Close

Search

Loading...

CULTURE, ARTS AND SOCIETY

Upcoming Program

Overview

As the world confronts the compounded impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, climate crisis, and structural injustices, societies are bracing for a protracted and complex period of reassessment, reimagination, and restructuring. The culture and arts sector must be at the table and included in decision-making processes as societies seek to eschew a return to “normal” and instead build back better.

With its broad program portfolio and its expansive arts and culture network, Salzburg Global is uniquely positioned as a strategic platform to support and advocate for these much-needed creative, cross-sectoral, and holistic approaches to systemic transformation. By strategically engaging pivotal international stakeholders across all sectors, this program will connect research, policy, and practice to advance the systemic relevance of culture and the arts for creative and innovative reforms across sectors.
 
By invitation only.


The power, influence, and creative imagination of the cultural sector needs to be inserted in upcoming worldwide efforts to build back better and to reframe systems that were already in need of complex reform before being further disrupted by COVID-19. The pandemic has brought into painfully sharp focus the inequalities and urgency of existing problems confronting our societies. It has also made the basic human need for artistic and creative expression more apparent and palpable than it has been in decades.

The humanizing, transformative and enabling power of the arts therefore represents a foundational principle for regeneration. Far from being the “non-essential” workers they have so misleadingly been classified as by many governments in their pandemic lockdown policies, artists, culture bearers, and culture workers will have essential contributions to make in coming years to new strategies for societal wellbeing and redefinitions of what it means to be human in our complex, interconnected world. Cultural considerations should not just be “add ons” or afterthoughts to policy development, rather they must be central to the formulation of imaginative, just, and sustainable approaches if they are to succeed.

The Humanizing Power of the Arts program will therefore focus on the systemic relevance of the arts and culture sector for creative reforms in the four target areas of climate, health, education, and justice. The program will promote and catalyze the intersections between the arts and culture sector and the following four interrelated strands of work: 

  • Building Back Greener: Mitigating climate change and designing a greener planet 
  • Building Back Healthier: Promoting community health and individual well-being through the arts
  • Building Back Smarter: Reimagining creativity in education and learning
  • Building Back Fairer: Advancing social justice and processes of decolonization

With its broad program portfolio as well as its expansive global change network, Salzburg Global is uniquely positioned as a strategic platform to support and advocate for these much-needed creative, cross-sectoral, and holistic approaches to systemic transformation. The Humanizing Power of the Arts program will embody a translational model that connects research, policy, and practice by strategically engaging pivotal international stakeholders across all sectors.

Program
Format

This three-day hybrid meeting (in Salzburg and online) program is the culmination of a succession of online focus group consultations beginning in the spring of 2021 and framed around the intersections between the arts and culture sector and the following four interrelated strands of work: 

  • Building Back Greener: Mitigating climate change and designing a greener planet
  • Building Back Healthier: Promoting community health and individual well-being through the arts
  • Building Back Smarter: Reimagining creativity in education and learning
  • Building Back Fairer: Advancing social justice and processes of decolonization  

Over the three days, participants will share insights and learning across the four strands of work. The highly interactive program will be structured around an inspiring mix of presentations, curated conversations, knowledge exchanges, and interdisciplinary work in small groups. The process seeks to develop a common strategy for inserting cultural knowledge into decision-making processes and to identify specific areas for highly focused work and global collaboration in each of the four strands going forward. A rapporteur will capture the main findings of the multi-faceted program, which will be presented to key stakeholders and policymakers in a public webinar and published as a session report.

Goals
  • Establish a louder and more persuasive voice for the culture and arts sector at the policy level and increase its impact on policy development and implementation through sustained cross-sectoral engagement with major institutions at local, regional, and global level and by facilitating effective connections between research, policy, and practice. 
  • Explore, analyze, and better understand the humanizing power of the arts and articulate its urgent relevance for helping societies to build back better by connecting research, policy, and practice. 
  • Create and curate an active and engaged global advocacy alliance for the cultural sector by facilitating cross-sectoral connections and inspiring unconventional partnerships for creative policy reform and change. 
  • Communicate and scale the systemic relevance of the arts and culture sector for achieving societal well-being, social justice, and sustainable development through public awareness-raising and influential strategic partnerships.
Key Questions
  • How can we advance cross-sectoral links between arts and green practice to mitigate climate change and design a more sustainable planet?
  • How do we build our understanding of how to harness the arts and creativity to drive better community health and individual well-being?
  • How can we better support the development of creativity in children, particularly through educational systems?
  • How can the culture and arts sector contribute most effectively and creatively to advancing social justice and supporting complex processes of decolonization?
Participant Profile

The hybrid program will convene an interdisciplinary and inter-generational group of approximately 60 creative practitioners, researchers, and policymakers from around the globe to forge a crucible for strategic dialogue.

Each of the four focus groups will include experts in research, policy, and practice from the four respective focus areas: climate, health, education, and justice. They will also be joined by technology innovators, anthropologists, cultural philanthropists, and media representatives.