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Daniela Rea – Telling the Personal Stories of Violence with Respect, Honesty and Empathy
Daniela Rea speaking at the 12th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change
Daniela Rea – Telling the Personal Stories of Violence with Respect, Honesty and Empathy
Stephanie Quon 
Kidnappings, disappearances, torture, murder. These are just some of the brutal fates suffered by many Mexicans; the consequences of which are long-borne by their families left behind. It is the personal stories of these violent experiences that Mexican journalist Daniela Rea wants to capture and share so that the world may see, understand, and not forget.  Recently awarded the inaugural Breach-Valdez Prize for Journalism and Human Rights (named for slain Mexican journalists Miroslava Breach and Javier Valdez), Rea has covered a diverse range of issues throughout her career. Enforced disappearances of innocent people, impunity, torture, and abuses of power in Mexico have all featured in her multimedia journalistic work.  Her mission is to tell the stories of the people she interviews honestly, affording those who have opened up and shared their feelings, thoughts, and experiences with her the utmost respect. To her, they are people, not just victims. Multimedia storytelling These personal stories have inspired many projects, using many different media – from paperbacks and graphic novels to documentaries, illustrations, and interactive multimedia experiences. Rea’s book Nadie les pidió perdón (No One Asked for Their Forgiveness) uncovers the countless disappearances and deaths of innocent people. Her documentary No sucumbió la eternidad (Eternity Never Surrendered) portrays the “intimate battles of two women awaiting their missing ones”; she directed it to “showcase the conflicts of memory and the daily struggle of both women [in] not disappearing from life.” Rea has also created various multimedia projects that give the audience an immersive experience through photos and videos along with captions that tell people’s stories of disappeared loved ones, uncovered mass graves and unidentified remains. As one of her projects, Buscadores (Searchers), states, the bodies that are found continue to add to “one of the largest clandestine graves in the continent.” Rea says she is proud of two projects in particular: Mujeres ante la guerra (Women Facing the War), and Cadena de Mando (Chain of command). Mujeres ante la guerra centers on the perspective of the women who have witnessed and survived violence. The accompanying illustrations represent how women can show resistance in times of violence. The online graphic novel, Cadena de Mando, tells the ongoing case of the Ojinaga death squad in Chihuahua, Mexico. Accused of crimes such as theft, torture, and murder, many of the death squad are now imprisoned in Mazatlan military prison.  Storytelling challenges Through her broad use of different storytelling tools, Rea seeks to honestly represent the traumatic and devastating violence countless people have experienced and addresses the difficulty of encapsulating the essence of the experience of that violence and its aftereffects. During the Ithiel de Sola Pool Lecture for the Salzburg Media Academy on Media and Global Change, Rea admitted it is challenging to “transmit to the public the understanding we reach with our work.” Journalists need to present complex and tragic events in terms that readers will understand while recognizing that words such as “justice,” “pain,” and “love,” oversimplify the gravity of the situation. She asked her audience of mostly journalism students to consider how can you call it “justice” when “your son, killed in a police operation, has been called to testify about his own death?” “Pain,” she says, is insufficient to describe how a mother feels when “the autopsy of the one your loved one reveals that they were buried alive, the trace of soil still remaining in his nails and lungs.” How can you say “love,” when you must decide between searching for “the love of your life who has disappeared or raising as a happy child, the son you had together?”  Journalists need “to assume the responsibility to work with people who suffer violence,” Rea told the Academy students. As the next generation of journalists and storytellers, they should strive to learn about people’s stories with respect and dignity, not just as victims of a tragic event. In the current state of newsgathering and storytelling, with its 24-hour news cycles, viral videos, and social media sharing, speed is often favored over nuance. But this is the wrong approach, says Rea: “We have to create the time to know the things and the feelings and the experience that people who suffer violence have,” she says. By taking the time to create a safe and secure environment people will have “confidence and the protection to say what they feel about the violence against them.”     Challenging truths Rea also understands the difficulty to discern an objective truth when finding a story. “In my years as a journalist I learned that I couldn’t pretend to talk about only [one] truth because I learned that it is very complicated,” she shares. Instead, she prefers “to talk about the experience of the people” because the truth for her is “more like varying experiences” than one singular narrative. Given this reflection, Rea ended her Salzburg lecture by proposing three shifts in perspective: First, to understand that to present the objective truth, you have to tell the story honestly. Second, to realize that to tell the truth of that story, you have to discover and understand the varying experiences from the people in that situation to know what “truth” is for them. Finally, to ensure your readers feel empathy, you need to tell the truth that resonates with them; this is helped by sharing a variety of stories and details. The topic of this year’s Salzburg Academy was Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust. Rea insists that to re-imagine journalism, we have to remember two things. The first is “to work with respect, with dignity, recognizing the dignity of the people [with] whom we work and with honesty.” “You could have a lot of tools, and a lot of possibilities, and a lot of media to write something, or to expose some story, but for me, something that is always necessary is the honesty and respect of the work.” Building a relationship to understand the experience of someone who has suffered is “very hard.” The second is to continue to learn. “Our social condition, our political contexts always are teaching us something, that maybe we don’t realize so I think it’s very important that we assume that in this profession we are always learning.” Otherwise, she cautions, journalism can become “an arrogant and very boring job.”   Daniela Rea was the speaker for the Ithiel de Sola Pool Lecture on the Impact of Communications Technology on Society and Politics at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change 2018.
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Salzburg Global Fellows Sign Former US National Security Officials’ Letter to President Trump
American flag
Salzburg Global Fellows Sign Former US National Security Officials’ Letter to President Trump
Salzburg Global Seminar 
More than 250 former US national security officials – including four members of the Salzburg Global community – have joined a rare public campaign to rebuke President Donald J. Trump for withdrawing the security clearance of former CIA director John Brennan, who has become a vocal critic of the president. On August 16, 15 American former senior intelligence officials from bipartisan presidential administrations signed an open letter condemning President Trump’s decision as “an attempt to stifle free speech.” William H. Webster – the first and only person to have served as director of both the CIA and the FBI and who at age 94 continues to serve on the advisory board of Salzburg Global’s Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law – was among the signatories.  Bipartisan outcry over President Trump's revocation of Brennan's security clearance continued to grow with the release of a statement of opposition signed on August 17 by 60 retired CIA officials and then on Monday by another 177 signatories spanning a wide range of national security jobs. Among them were Salzburg Global Fellows John B. Bellinger, III, former legal counsel, National Security Council; Antony Blinken, former deputy secretary of state and deputy national security advisor; and Eliot A. Cohen, former counselor of the US Department of State and former member of the Defense Policy Advisory Board.  The statements indicated that while the signatories do not necessarily agree with the opinions expressed by Brennan, their signatures represent a firm belief in Brennan’s right to express them, as protected by the First Amendment of the US Constitution.  See the full list of individuals who publicly opposed President Trump’s decision here. The changing political climate in the US has been a point of discussion at a number of other Salzburg Global Seminar programs in the last two years, building on long legacies of programs in American studies, the rule of law, and the role of media.  In September 2017, the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association (SSASA) held a symposium on Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration, the report from which was published in January 2018, marking the first anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration.  Letter signatories Webster and Bellinger (who delivered the 2016 Cutler Lecture shortly after Trump’s election and served as Webster’s special assistant at the CIA) voiced their support for the intelligence community during the Salzburg Cutler Fellows program in February 2018. Speaking to a group of students from 11 top US law schools, the two mentors defended the intelligence agencies under fire from President Trump and called on the aspiring lawyers to help rebuild public trust.  In July and August 2018, students from around the globe examined the implications for journalism in the “post-truth” world at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change.  Salzburg Global Seminar will continue to examine, debate, and dissect the political climate in the US when academics, Americanists, political scientists, cultural professionals, and public servants convene at Schloss Leopoldskron in September for the next SSASA symposium, Understanding America in the 21st Century: Culture and Politics.   Questions for discussion include “What explains the loss of trust that America is currently experiencing and what are the implications for the future?” and “In what way and manner has the expectation and conduct of political leadership changed in the 21st century?” It is exceedingly rare for intelligence professionals who spent most of their careers in the shadows and who tend to abstain from politically-charged public disputes to launch such a public campaign. However, in the initial statement issued on Thursday, the former intelligence leaders wrote that they felt “compelled to respond in the wake of the ill-considered and unprecedented remarks and actions taken by the White House.”  Such unprecedented remarks – and the responses they provoke – will provide much fodder for discussion at Salzburg Global programs for many more months to come.   
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Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Persist is a multimedia publication featuring 6 chapters exploring methods to educate, inspire and motivate approaches to journalism that combat a culture of distrust
Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Paul Mihailidis 
This article was first published on persist.community, a multimedia publication produced by 2018 participants of the Salzburg Academy of the Media and Global Change. The projects in this publication include new approaches and models for storytelling, conceptual platforms, games, prototypes, and creative materials. We persist towards. We resist against. In a ubiquitous media environment, where our technologies ask for more and more of our fleeting attention, it seems challenging to stay committed to an idea, an issue, a moment. Connective technologies have succeeded in disconnect us. They have splintered our communities, polarized our politics, and normalized spectacle in our information feeds. The same online networks that once touted their collaborative potential now provide sensational content to like-minded groups, perpetuate polarizing viewpoints, spread false information, and seed distrust in the very institutions we rely on for functioning civic societies. This distrust has pervaded our media institutions above all others. The core functions of information systems are now under attack, and the weaponization of fake news by political and public leaders has further eroded such trust. Journalists, meanwhile, are losing the trust of communities who find refuge and solace in the validation of information by peers online. It is within this context that over 75 aspiring journalists, media makers and activists gathered alongside over 35 faculty and visiting scholars to re-imagine journalism. The participants in the 12th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change convened for 30 master lectures, workshops, and seminars, 5 salons, a screening series, over 40 reading groups, 2 excursions, and over 20 hours of dedicated time to work in self-facilitated groups to build responses to the problem of distrust in our journalism and media institutions. What emerged from these three weeks is the commitment to a process where passionate people from around the world work intensely to experiment with media models and practices that seed interaction, care, imagination and dialog. In just over 20 hours of dedicated time to creating a digital publication, the 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change cohort created PERSIST: NEW IDEAS FOR JOURNALISM IN AN AGE OF DISTRUST. The publication features 6 chapters, which offer transmedia narratives that experiment with new approaches to storytelling and journalism that inspire care, community, and meaningful human engagement in an age of digital abundance. Each of the chapters features multimedia content, from platforms and apps to games, facilitations and prototypes, that collectively ask us to re-insert the “human” in our media systems. Students explored concepts of imagination, culture, and care in their work, and build models that work to bridge divides that exist across cultures, across borders, and across platforms. The term persist signifies both the effort of the group process that resulted in this publication, and the effort that it will take to combat the culture of distrust within and across our online networks. Persistence is understood in our work as striving to achieve a civic minded standpoint, where we recognize our shared social location, and exercise empathy for others through a collective struggle for meaningful dialog and engagement in the world. We apply persistence to our re-imagining of a journalism ecosystem that is guided by embrace a sincere commitment to bridging gaps between institutions and the communities in which they are embedded; and possess an overarching goal of contributing to the creation of emergent publics possessing the capacity and motivation to ably address the conditions of the day. In this way, we persist towards a better future, and not against intractable obstacles. Explore the collective work of our 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media & Global Change cohort.
Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long running multi-year program Salzburg Academy of Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here. You can also follow all the discussions on Twitter and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSmedia.
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Salzburg Academy Students Re-Imagine New Tools and Platforms for Better Journalism
Salzburg Academy Students Re-Imagine New Tools and Platforms for Better Journalism
Stephanie Quon 
In an age where advanced technology can manipulate or fabricate almost everything to produce false information and social media platforms’ algorithms create echo chambers that drown out more accurate information and moderate voices, the public appears to have lost trust in the media. How can this trend be reversed? For three weeks at a palace in Salzburg this summer, more than 75 participants from around the world came together to take on this challenge, producing interactive stories and creating new tools for engagement at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change.  Over the course of the three-week program – Re-Imaging Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust – university undergraduate and graduate students took part in plenary sessions, workshops, reading groups and hands-on exercises that challenged their perspectives, provided opportunities for thinking outside the box, and transformed their ideas into action. Topics covered included critical media making, the intersection of civic imagination and civic media, the bridging of cultural divides, journalism ethics, and media literacy.  The participants were led by an expert faculty of both academics and practitioners including award-winning journalist, Daniela Rea, Google tech lead, Dan Russell, and Global News Director for Buzzfeed News, Ryan Broderick. “We’re at the precipice of all of this new technology… I never fully understood the power that we have, the opportunity that we have, and the responsibility that we have until I came here and listened to all of these amazing scholars talk about the work that they’re doing,” says Academy student, Lynsey Jeffery, from University of Maryland, USA. The Salzburg Academy, now in its 12th year, served as an “inclusive and creative space,” where participants reaped the benefits of healthy debate and dialogue, challenging their existing views and sharing personal experiences through such exercises as the Human Library.  “Coming here has completely flipped my perspective and made me realize that I have such a Western-centric view on the media,” says Bournemouth student Maya Parchment. “It’s made me look at everything I consume in a different way.” Participants at this year’s Academy came from countries including Argentina, Austria, China, Colombia, Denmark, India, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, Palestine, Sudan, the UK, the US, Venezuela and Viet Nam.  Together, this global cohort produced the online publication Persist: New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust, to be published next week. Launched in 2007 by Salzburg Global Seminar and now counting nearly 1000 students and faculty in its alumni and with university partners on five continents, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change has taken a pioneering lead in media education with a focus on media literacy and civic engagement.  “What impressed me most [about this year’s program] was the engagement and sensitivity of such a diverse group of students to the cultural and social nuances that make the concept of trust so complex,” says Paul Mihailidis, program director of the Salzburg Academy and associate professor at Emerson College in Boston, USA.  “They found ways to educate and inspire each other, faculty, and the outside world through their own storytelling. The energy was palpable and the result is that not only are we forging new avenues for journalism, but also for those involved in the experience themselves.” “The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change continues to be a leader in creating active media networks and ideas that will positively benefit communities and societies around the world.” Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long running multi-year program Salzburg Academy of Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here. You can also follow all the discussions on Twitter and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSmedia.
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Re-Imagining Journalism - News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust
Photo by rawmaterial on Unsplash
Re-Imagining Journalism - News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust
Stephanie Quon 
One term that the world has been unable to escape over the past year and a half is “fake news”. The term has been used so often that in 2017, Collins’ Dictionary classified “fake news” as their Word of the Year. The lines between truth and fiction have become more difficult than ever for the public to distinguish, and for several media outlets and journalists, it has been an uphill battle to assure different parts of societies they are reporting accurately and fairly. We are at a point in time where many individuals receive a lot of their news on social media platforms where algorithms tailor both news sources and order of content based on user preference. While these platforms may present a pleasant user experience, their potential to exacerbate user bias and limit broader perspectives and differing viewpoints cannot go understated. This Sunday, more than 75 students from 17 countries, representing 16 different universities and institutions will arrive in Salzburg to participate in the annual three-week program of the Salzburg Academy for Media and Global Change - Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust. Through group discussions, reading groups, media workshops, and plenary sessions, participants will demystify and explore the crucial and irreplaceable roles of media, journalism, and storytelling by working together to understand the complex and interconnected levels of controversial topics and their impact on society. By the end of the program, participants will work together in groups and create their own multi-media series. Each series will showcase the participant’s unique approach and perspective to journalism which will not only be informative to the public about the current global events but will also contribute to a dialog that inspires intentional engagement to positive changes in communities around the world. Participants will be joined by 18 faculty members and 12 guest scholars. Their specialized areas of knowledge and broad perspectives will greatly contribute to the various lessons and presentations given throughout the program. Faculty and guest scholars will also be on hand to provide advice to participants as they create their final multimedia projects. Among others, guest scholars at this year’s program include Ryan Broderick, deputy global news director of BuzzFeed and Daniel Russell, senior research scientist at Google. In addition, Daniela Rea, a recent recipient of the Breach-Valdez journalism prize will give this year’s Ithiel de Sola Pool lecture. This lecture was created in honor of three-time Salzburg Global faculty member Ithiel de Sola Pool, a pioneer in the development of social science and network theory. Dr. Pool served as a faculty member during Session 45, American Society, in 1956; Session 77, American Foreign Policy, in 1962; and Session 203, Development, Communication and Social Change, in 1981. This year's program begins on Salzburg Global Day, the 71st anniversary of the first day of the organization's first program. Since 1947, more than 36,000 Fellows from more than 170 countries have come together to the Salzburg Global Seminar programs, and the fellowship continues to grow and thrive. Participants arriving on Sunday will follow in the footsteps of Salzburg Global’s founders and other Fellows, as they continue consider new ways to bridge divides, expand collaborations, and transform systems. Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long running multi-year program Salzburg Academy of Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here. You can also follow all the discussions on Twitter and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSmedia.       #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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A Positive Space in a Polarizing World
DEEPLY HUMAN: Salzburg Global Vice President Clare Shine embraces LGBT Forum Fellow Negede Gezahegn from Ethiopia following his successful asylum application in Austria.
A Positive Space in a Polarizing World
Louise Hallman 
When Schloss Leopoldskron hosted the first program of the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies in the summer of 1947, the 97 Fellows from 18 countries sought to heal the deep divisions left by two world wars in just three decades. Exactly 70 years later, as they gathered in the same place, the 82 students from five continents attending the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change did not have the same virulent rifts to overcome — but they too live in an increasingly polarized world. In the face of rising inequality, populism, anti-immigrant sentiments, religious divisions, ethnic conflicts, geopolitical rivalries and nuclear threats, finding the space and means to bridge divides has never been more important.  The annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change provides a safe space for healthy debate and dialogue. It also acts as a “brave space” where students can reap the benefits of challenging their perspectives and beliefs. “Seeing how people from different parts of the world can allow their perceptions to collide rather than clash has been the highlight of my time at the Academy,” says Connor Bean from Bournemouth University, UK. The intervening 70 years have seen unimagined expansion of global communications, but even in this age of social media and instant messaging, meeting “in real life” still holds great value. Over three weeks, Academy Fellows live, learn and create together, improving their academic understanding of media literacy and challenging their prejudices and stereotypes. Reflecting on his time at the Academy, Jack Lipei Tang from Chinese University of Hong Kong says, “Social contact with individuals is the only way we can resist vague, manipulating and stagnant macro-narratives full of hatred, misunderstanding and prejudice.” Diverse Voices It is not just young and rising leaders who need to bridge divides. Every Salzburg Global program is designed for impact, helping leaders at all levels understand and overcome barriers created by geographic, cultural, generational or ideological differences.  Our Health and Health Care Innovation program series engages not only clinicians, practitioners, policymakers and academics, but also patients and their advocates. The Young Cultural Innovators Forum includes artists and cultural entrepreneurs of every art form imaginable from classical music and digital design to contemporary dance and barbering — all with a shared desire to engage and improve their local communities. Truly diverse representation at the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum ensures open exchange between activists, artists and donors from Global South and North, helping avoid unintended negative consequences for communities and enabling all stakeholders take their rightful role as equal partners in the global push for LGBT human rights.  In the technology sector, middle-income countries, such as India, often lead the way as they “leapfrog” entire systems that richer countries are trying to reform incrementally, offering new, innovative solutions. Recognizing this, when members of Sciana — The Health Leaders Network wanted to learn more about patient-focused tech innovations, Salzburg Global chose Kanav Kahol, head of affordable health technologies at the Public Health Foundation in India, to present to the German, Swiss and British health care leaders.  Deeply Human All our programs actively welcome “non-standard” voices. Katrina Scotto di Carlo, who as a member of the City of Portland’s Socially Responsible Investments Committee helped lead the American city’s divestment from all corporate securities, considered herself somewhat of an outsider at the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum, where most of the participants are corporate board directors and lawyers. But after the three-day program she recognized the value of Salzburg Global’s approach: “There is a small population of people that are curious about ‘them’ in the us/them paradigm… [but] endeavoring to understand ‘them’ makes us, bit-by-bit, more isolated within our own group of ‘us’… The Schloss holds sacred space where the us/them paradigm is checked at the door in favor of open curiosity and the free exchange of ideas. It’s a place of refuge where the intellect can be in unfettered service to the greater good. My gratitude runs deep.” Salzburg Global Seminar is a “deeply human” organization that encourages all participants to shed their institutional personas at the Schloss gates and engage in personal dialogues. By bridging divides in this non-transactional setting, current and future leaders are better placed to break down silos in their own organizations and communities, respect other perspectives, find new partners for collaboration, adopt new ways of thinking and ultimately shape a better world.   
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