Close

Search

Loading...

Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Charlotte Kalanzi – Salzburg Global Puts You On a Different Level
Charlotte Kalanzi, founder of the H.E.A.R.T stars club, sitting in Max Reinhardt’s former study at Schloss Leopoldskron
Charlotte Kalanzi – Salzburg Global Puts You On a Different Level
Oscar Tollast 
After attending this year’s Salzburg Global Seminar program – Nature and Childhood: From Research and Activism to Policies for Global Change – Charlotte Kalanzi indicated her life would never be the same. The 33-year-old spoke candidly with Salzburg Global midway during the program. Kalanzi, an environmental education officer for C&L Fumigation and Cleaning Co., in Uganda, said, “I applied for some other [program], but then [Salzburg Global] recommended this [program], and I think it’s so applicable to what I’m doing because this is my passion.” The program, which took place as part of the Parks for the Planet Forum multi-year series, focused on four targeted interventions: using play as a lever for economic and social resilience; designing parks for community well-being; influencing the next generation of conservation leaders, and establishing cross-sectoral partnerships. The discussions which took place were relevant to a project Kalanzi had just launched off the ground – the Hygiene, Environment, Attitude, Relationship, Talent (HEART) stars club. The project aims to equip children with environmental knowledge, skills, and communication tools. Kalanzi said, “The members are the stars. They use their talents to pass on hygiene and environment messages. We emphasize a good relationship and a positive attitude for the environment.” The club has been able to grow through money raised by Kalanzi’s day-to-day job. Despite limited resources, Kalanzi’s efforts are already having an impact. She said, “We’ve been able to reach a number of schools in different places in Uganda, and the kids love the program. The fact that we publish their work, their original compositions - they are so passionate about it.” Kalanzi is equally passionate about entertainment and believes messages can be carried through mediums such as song and dance. Even fashion can play a role. She said, “In this era, everything has changed. You see children have everything… They spend most of their time using gadgets. So, I’m thinking entertainment is a key target… Different things are coming up so you can find a way of talking to these people… to see how to engage human beings, maybe produce something with environmental conservation. It’s not the first time Kalanzi took part in a program at Schloss Leopoldskron. She attended a Salzburg Global program in 2008 called Combating Climate Change at Local and Regional Levels: Sustainable Strategies and Renewable Energy. Reflecting on her participation, Kalanzi said, “It was my first international experience, and I was so impressed. The staff, the humility [the] people are humble – everything is down to earth. I found it so, so, so appealing and so good.” This program sought to develop processes for extending useful ideas and strategies to regions and localities around the world to encourage more sustainable practices. Kalanzi said, “After the [program], I think I became more resourceful to my boss then because she started referring me to different meetings… It was my first, but after that, I went to UN-funded programs in Kenya. I went to South Africa… It was really a good experience and, of course, having that certificate from Salzburg, showing it to people that I attended… it added something to my CV.” Kalanzi said she was grateful for the way participants like herself were made to feel valued in Salzburg. She said, “Salzburg has greatly inspired me. All the information they keep sharing with us, through newsletters, attending meetings… it truly promotes you, and it puts you [on] a different level because the knowledge you get from here… a lot of that can be applied everywhere around the world.”
READ MORE...
Sridhar Rangayan – My Film is Not Just a Coming Out Film, It’s a Film About the Subjugation Women Face in Patriarchal Societies
Sridhar Rangayan pictured at Salzburg Global Seminar in 2015 during the first-ever program of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum
Sridhar Rangayan – My Film is Not Just a Coming Out Film, It’s a Film About the Subjugation Women Face in Patriarchal Societies
Oscar Tollast 
Sridhar Rangayan has given a voice to social issues in India for more than two decades. The filmmaker, writer, activist, and festival director has won multiple awards all over the world and is someone at the forefront of the queer cinema movement. Earlier this year, he presented at TEDxNITKSurathkal, at his alumni college, discussing his journey to coming out proud and accepting his individuality. Rangayan, a participant at the first ever program of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, recently spoke with Salzburg Global to discuss his latest film. Salzburg Global spoke with Rangayan prior to India’s Supreme Court overturning a colonial-era law known as section 377 – a victory for India’s LGBT community. This decision has decriminalized same-sex sexual relations between consenting adults in private. Following this historic ruling, Rangayan got in touch with Salzburg Global again to add his thoughts. Rangayan said, “The Supreme Court verdict reading down the colonial law Sec 377, and thereby decriminalizing same-sex sexual relations between two consenting adults in private, is a historic decision by the highest court in India. The judgement far exceeded our expectations - the wordings in the judgement by all the judges, and also the firewalls they have built so no one can challenge the decision ever - these made the entire LGBTQ community very elated. It is still sinking in, that we are now living in a free India and not considered criminals because of our sexual orientation. It would impact the coming generations of LGBTQ youth and pave way for other rights - marriage rights, inheritance and adoption rights. “The change in law is just the first step, because in India we have to work towards changing social mindsets. We would have to put into motion numerous advocacy projects and my work is cut out to make more films like Evening Shadows and fight to have them seen by a large audience.” The Q&A with Rangayan below has been edited for length and clarity. Salzburg Global: Can you explain the thought process behind Evening Shadows and what inspired the story? Sridhar Rangayan: We always felt that there was no mainstream film that youngsters can show their parents as a means of helping them understand their true feelings and also for families to understand more about their LGBTQ children… Evening Shadows is a personal story of one family that is coming to terms with the challenges of acceptance, but the story is universal in its sensibility and emotional reach. The film is more than a coming out film. It is about a woman steeped in traditions and conservative social mores, standing up for her son against all the odds. Evening Shadows is a film of hope and courage. The film has been made with a simple, heartfelt narrative with no auteur flourishes so it can appeal to a large family audience in India and across the world.
SG: When did the thought emerge to push ahead with the project and how long did it take to film? SR: Fortuitously, our first film The Pink Mirror (Gulabi Aaina) made in 2002 got sold to Netflix, and we came into some money which we decided to invest in Evening Shadows… Then we started crowdfunding for the project. We received amazing support from 180-plus contributors across the world. This support gave us the necessary impetus to push forward with the production of the film. It took us about a year and a half to complete production and post-production. It was really amazing to get permission to shoot at the places we had visualized the film being set – the charming small town, the riverbank, the centuries-old temples… excavated from under the sand, the roads winding between paddy fields… some of them being archaeological monuments, which is a treat for the audiences… SG: Regarding the feedback you’ve received so far, has there been a particular review that’s stood out or a comment that’s been made which has been stuck in your mind? SR: The screening of Evening Shadows at KASHISH Mumbai International Queer Film Festival in May 2018 was one of the most amazing. It was the closing film, and it was a home audience, but the reaction far exceeded our expectations. There were some 1,100 people in the theater, and they clapped, cheered, cried, and emotionally reacted to almost every dialogue in the film. It was an uproar, a rollercoaster of emotions that crescendoed and filled the huge art deco theater. It gave us all goosebumps; it still does. Another very touching moment was - though sad - when a young Indian youth came up to me after the screening at Toronto and said, “I wish my mother was as understanding and accepting as the mother in your film. I have come out to her three years ago, and she hasn’t accepted me yet.” He hugged me and cried. I tried to assure him that Bollywood films have happy endings in a short span of time, but in life, happy endings may take a long time. I asked him to continue conversations with his mother gently and keep his hopes up. SG: What messages do you hope audience members will take away from Evening Shadows? SR: Evening Shadows is not just a coming out film of a gay youth, but also a film about the subjugation a woman faces within a patriarchal society… believe me, a dominant patriarchal mindset exists not only in Asian countries but also in many other cultures. The film is as much about women empowerment as it is about LGBTQ right to love. Most of the audience members are taking back this message, and we are glad. We would also like to underline the idea that the film is about the divide between two generations and their thoughts and ideas; how so many misunderstandings can arise from not accepting others’ points of view. SG: Congratulations on the awards you’ve won for the film. What does it mean to have the film recognized and celebrated in different parts of the world? SR: The awards are recognition of the narrative and technical excellence of our film Evening Shadows. They do mean a lot to the entire team as all of us have put in hard work and passion into this film. But the feedback and reactions by the audiences across the world have been the best awards we will always treasure. From an 80-year-old gay man in Kansas City, who has had an uphill struggle coming out in the ‘30s, to a young 18-year-old boy in Bengaluru who still faces similar challenges in India, the smiles, the tears and the hugs they have given are the best awards one can aspire for… the highest award is the thanks expressed by parents of LGBTQ children who watch the film and decide to embrace the child. SG: When creating the film, was facilitating Sweekar – The Rainbow Parents support group something you anticipated doing? SR: Evening Shadows, being a film about a son coming out and the challenges his mother faces in understanding him, the focus was always about the film being a support to parents and families. Facilitating a support group was a natural extension of this mission. Even when we began crowdfunding the film’s production, we had mentioned that we would earmark 10 percent of the money we raise to support the formation of a parents’ group… even as we progressed with the production of the film, we started the process of facilitating the group. The Sweekar – The Rainbow Parents’ group – started off with a first-of-its-kind closed door daylong structured workshop with parents to chalk out what they thought were the challenges faced by parents and how a support group can help address these. The aims and objectives of the group and its mission statement emerged from this workshop formulated by the parents themselves. SG: Please could you tell us about your experience at the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum. What can you remember from your program, and what impact did it have on you? SR: My participation at the first-ever Salzburg Global LGBT Forum program in 2013 couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time. It was a time when I had founded the KASHISH Mumbai International Queer Film Festival and was building a good foundation for the festival, which now over nine years has become not only South Asia’s biggest LGBTQ film festival but also an important mainstream event in Mumbai’s cultural calendar. Some of the ideas that all of us participants shared brought in a focus for the work I was doing. It also brought a lot of clarity to the two LGBTQ documentary films I was working on – Purple Skies and Breaking Free. Purple Skies about the Indian LBT community was completed in 2014 and went to play at many festivals and, more importantly, became the first-ever lesbian-themed film to be shown on Doordarshan, India’s national television network. My other film, Breaking Free, about the law section 377 and the Indian LGBT community was completed in 2015 and, among several awards, also won the National Award for Best Editing from the Government of India. These couldn’t have been possible but for the learnings at the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum about how important it is to work with the governments, policymakers, and stakeholders – instead of trying to work in opposition. The diversity of the participants and the spectrum of the experiences make the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum unique and very useful in formulating a broader view of LGBTQ movements across the world. The other learning was about the intersectionality of religion and sexuality, which many participants from different faiths expressed so clearly at the program – how it is important to synergize the two so as to lead a fulfilling and peaceful life. This learning will form the basis of my next feature film Songs of Eternal Love… of course, most importantly, the amazing location of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum offered a tranquil atmosphere to meditate upon one’s work and more crucially about one’s life.
READ MORE...
Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
Oscar Tollast 
A celebration of Afropunk featuring photographs, live music, discussion, and dancing will be held in Detroit, Michigan, later this week. “Here You Can Be Whatever You Want: A Celebration of Afropunk” is taking place at The Baltimore Gallery, Detroit, on September 14 between 6 pm and midnight. The free event has been organized by Salzburg Global Fellows Lauren Rossi and Karah Shaffer, in partnership with Facing Change: Documenting Detroit. Rossi, creative industries program manager at Creative Many, and Shaffer, co-founder and executive director of Facing Change: Documenting Detroit, both attended the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2017.   After taking part in this program, the duo received support and funding from Salzburg Global, the Kresge Foundation, and the Knight Foundation to inspire innovation and collaboration at a local level. On Friday, visitors will be able to view an exhibition of images made at Afropunk festivals around the world by photographers Kholood Eid and Bunni Elian. Music will be provided by internationally acclaimed DJ and vocalist Shaun J. Wright and DJ Holographic, a local emerging artist also known as Ariel Corley. For more information about the event, please click here.
READ MORE...
Daniela Rea – Telling the Personal Stories of Violence with Respect, Honesty and Empathy
Daniela Rea speaking at the 12th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change
Daniela Rea – Telling the Personal Stories of Violence with Respect, Honesty and Empathy
Stephanie Quon 
Kidnappings, disappearances, torture, murder. These are just some of the brutal fates suffered by many Mexicans; the consequences of which are long-borne by their families left behind. It is the personal stories of these violent experiences that Mexican journalist Daniela Rea wants to capture and share so that the world may see, understand, and not forget.  Recently awarded the inaugural Breach-Valdez Prize for Journalism and Human Rights (named for slain Mexican journalists Miroslava Breach and Javier Valdez), Rea has covered a diverse range of issues throughout her career. Enforced disappearances of innocent people, impunity, torture, and abuses of power in Mexico have all featured in her multimedia journalistic work.  Her mission is to tell the stories of the people she interviews honestly, affording those who have opened up and shared their feelings, thoughts, and experiences with her the utmost respect. To her, they are people, not just victims. Multimedia storytelling These personal stories have inspired many projects, using many different media – from paperbacks and graphic novels to documentaries, illustrations, and interactive multimedia experiences. Rea’s book Nadie les pidió perdón (No One Asked for Their Forgiveness) uncovers the countless disappearances and deaths of innocent people. Her documentary No sucumbió la eternidad (Eternity Never Surrendered) portrays the “intimate battles of two women awaiting their missing ones”; she directed it to “showcase the conflicts of memory and the daily struggle of both women [in] not disappearing from life.” Rea has also created various multimedia projects that give the audience an immersive experience through photos and videos along with captions that tell people’s stories of disappeared loved ones, uncovered mass graves and unidentified remains. As one of her projects, Buscadores (Searchers), states, the bodies that are found continue to add to “one of the largest clandestine graves in the continent.” Rea says she is proud of two projects in particular: Mujeres ante la guerra (Women Facing the War), and Cadena de Mando (Chain of command). Mujeres ante la guerra centers on the perspective of the women who have witnessed and survived violence. The accompanying illustrations represent how women can show resistance in times of violence. The online graphic novel, Cadena de Mando, tells the ongoing case of the Ojinaga death squad in Chihuahua, Mexico. Accused of crimes such as theft, torture, and murder, many of the death squad are now imprisoned in Mazatlan military prison.  Storytelling challenges Through her broad use of different storytelling tools, Rea seeks to honestly represent the traumatic and devastating violence countless people have experienced and addresses the difficulty of encapsulating the essence of the experience of that violence and its aftereffects. During the Ithiel de Sola Pool Lecture for the Salzburg Media Academy on Media and Global Change, Rea admitted it is challenging to “transmit to the public the understanding we reach with our work.” Journalists need to present complex and tragic events in terms that readers will understand while recognizing that words such as “justice,” “pain,” and “love,” oversimplify the gravity of the situation. She asked her audience of mostly journalism students to consider how can you call it “justice” when “your son, killed in a police operation, has been called to testify about his own death?” “Pain,” she says, is insufficient to describe how a mother feels when “the autopsy of the one your loved one reveals that they were buried alive, the trace of soil still remaining in his nails and lungs.” How can you say “love,” when you must decide between searching for “the love of your life who has disappeared or raising as a happy child, the son you had together?”  Journalists need “to assume the responsibility to work with people who suffer violence,” Rea told the Academy students. As the next generation of journalists and storytellers, they should strive to learn about people’s stories with respect and dignity, not just as victims of a tragic event. In the current state of newsgathering and storytelling, with its 24-hour news cycles, viral videos, and social media sharing, speed is often favored over nuance. But this is the wrong approach, says Rea: “We have to create the time to know the things and the feelings and the experience that people who suffer violence have,” she says. By taking the time to create a safe and secure environment people will have “confidence and the protection to say what they feel about the violence against them.”     Challenging truths Rea also understands the difficulty to discern an objective truth when finding a story. “In my years as a journalist I learned that I couldn’t pretend to talk about only [one] truth because I learned that it is very complicated,” she shares. Instead, she prefers “to talk about the experience of the people” because the truth for her is “more like varying experiences” than one singular narrative. Given this reflection, Rea ended her Salzburg lecture by proposing three shifts in perspective: First, to understand that to present the objective truth, you have to tell the story honestly. Second, to realize that to tell the truth of that story, you have to discover and understand the varying experiences from the people in that situation to know what “truth” is for them. Finally, to ensure your readers feel empathy, you need to tell the truth that resonates with them; this is helped by sharing a variety of stories and details. The topic of this year’s Salzburg Academy was Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust. Rea insists that to re-imagine journalism, we have to remember two things. The first is “to work with respect, with dignity, recognizing the dignity of the people [with] whom we work and with honesty.” “You could have a lot of tools, and a lot of possibilities, and a lot of media to write something, or to expose some story, but for me, something that is always necessary is the honesty and respect of the work.” Building a relationship to understand the experience of someone who has suffered is “very hard.” The second is to continue to learn. “Our social condition, our political contexts always are teaching us something, that maybe we don’t realize so I think it’s very important that we assume that in this profession we are always learning.” Otherwise, she cautions, journalism can become “an arrogant and very boring job.”   Daniela Rea was the speaker for the Ithiel de Sola Pool Lecture on the Impact of Communications Technology on Society and Politics at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change 2018.
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Fellows Sign Former US National Security Officials’ Letter to President Trump
American flag
Salzburg Global Fellows Sign Former US National Security Officials’ Letter to President Trump
Salzburg Global Seminar 
More than 250 former US national security officials – including four members of the Salzburg Global community – have joined a rare public campaign to rebuke President Donald J. Trump for withdrawing the security clearance of former CIA director John Brennan, who has become a vocal critic of the president. On August 16, 15 American former senior intelligence officials from bipartisan presidential administrations signed an open letter condemning President Trump’s decision as “an attempt to stifle free speech.” William H. Webster – the first and only person to have served as director of both the CIA and the FBI and who at age 94 continues to serve on the advisory board of Salzburg Global’s Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law – was among the signatories.  Bipartisan outcry over President Trump's revocation of Brennan's security clearance continued to grow with the release of a statement of opposition signed on August 17 by 60 retired CIA officials and then on Monday by another 177 signatories spanning a wide range of national security jobs. Among them were Salzburg Global Fellows John B. Bellinger, III, former legal counsel, National Security Council; Antony Blinken, former deputy secretary of state and deputy national security advisor; and Eliot A. Cohen, former counselor of the US Department of State and former member of the Defense Policy Advisory Board.  The statements indicated that while the signatories do not necessarily agree with the opinions expressed by Brennan, their signatures represent a firm belief in Brennan’s right to express them, as protected by the First Amendment of the US Constitution.  See the full list of individuals who publicly opposed President Trump’s decision here. The changing political climate in the US has been a point of discussion at a number of other Salzburg Global Seminar programs in the last two years, building on long legacies of programs in American studies, the rule of law, and the role of media.  In September 2017, the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association (SSASA) held a symposium on Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration, the report from which was published in January 2018, marking the first anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration.  Letter signatories Webster and Bellinger (who delivered the 2016 Cutler Lecture shortly after Trump’s election and served as Webster’s special assistant at the CIA) voiced their support for the intelligence community during the Salzburg Cutler Fellows program in February 2018. Speaking to a group of students from 11 top US law schools, the two mentors defended the intelligence agencies under fire from President Trump and called on the aspiring lawyers to help rebuild public trust.  In July and August 2018, students from around the globe examined the implications for journalism in the “post-truth” world at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change.  Salzburg Global Seminar will continue to examine, debate, and dissect the political climate in the US when academics, Americanists, political scientists, cultural professionals, and public servants convene at Schloss Leopoldskron in September for the next SSASA symposium, Understanding America in the 21st Century: Culture and Politics.   Questions for discussion include “What explains the loss of trust that America is currently experiencing and what are the implications for the future?” and “In what way and manner has the expectation and conduct of political leadership changed in the 21st century?” It is exceedingly rare for intelligence professionals who spent most of their careers in the shadows and who tend to abstain from politically-charged public disputes to launch such a public campaign. However, in the initial statement issued on Thursday, the former intelligence leaders wrote that they felt “compelled to respond in the wake of the ill-considered and unprecedented remarks and actions taken by the White House.”  Such unprecedented remarks – and the responses they provoke – will provide much fodder for discussion at Salzburg Global programs for many more months to come.   
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Fellow Cha Roque Wins Amnesty International Award
Cha Roque speaking at Salzburg Global Seminar
Salzburg Global Fellow Cha Roque Wins Amnesty International Award
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Cha Roque has spoken of her delight after winning one of Amnesty International Philippines’ first-ever human rights awards. Roque, a multi-time Fellow of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, was recently awarded an Ignite Award for Art that Matters for Film. She was one of four winners recognized as human rights defenders bringing about impact through their work by changing peoples’ lives. Other categories included Most Distinguished Human Rights Defender – Individual, Most Distinguished Human Rights Defender – Organization, and Outstanding Young Human Rights Defender. This is the first awarding season of the Ignite Awards for Human Rights. The awards aim to accord human rights defenders with the highest regard for the work they do and serve as a tool by showing ordinary people can do extraordinary work. Speaking with Salzburg Global, Roque said, “I was literally in disbelief when I found out about being nominated… I am more of an advocacy filmmaker, and my films haven’t been making the rounds in local, big festivals. I also know a lot of other advocacy filmmakers whom I look up to, and I believe that their years in making advocacy films makes them more deserving… nonetheless, I felt very honored to be nominated and to win the award.” Some of Roque’s notable films include Slay, What I Would’ve Told My Daughter if I Knew What to Say Back Then, and Hapag (Dining Table). Roque said, “In my LGBT-themed films, I wanted to tell the audience that LGBT people are the same as everyone else. My films are always focused on the exposition that as humans, we share the same sentiments, the same heartbreaks, the same joys, [and] the same hopes. “My LGBT-themed films have always been a reflection of my triumphs and struggles as a lesbian mom, and I wanted to use film to make people realize that we are not different from them and that we deserve the same rights that other people have. “For my other films, which are also mostly political and about my advocacies, I wanted to emphasize how art and film are powerful in advocacies and how they can make a difference in the way people see things.” Roque sat down with Sudeshan Reddy at the Salzburg Global program, The Many Faces of LGBT Inclusion, in October 2016, to discuss her experience as a filmmaker. She revealed the responsibility she felt she had telling the stories of fellow LGBT people.
Commenting on this program, Roque said, “It was during my first Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, in Chiang Rai, when I realized how much my films can make an impact. I have always believed that art and advocacy are very powerful when combined, but I’ve had doubts about my own films. Salzburg made me realize that my voice is as important as the voice of award-winning filmmakers. It was actually just months after that Forum when I made four films.” In addition to this program, Roque visited Salzburg Global last summer to take part in the Forum’s follow-on program, Home: Safety, Wellness, and Belonging. Roque said she had met very inspiring people who have influenced her as a person and filmmaker. Roque said, “Seeing people who share the same energy towards issues I strongly believe in motivated me to keep on making films - no matter how difficult. I did not only learn a lot from the Forum, [but] I also gained new friends who I still communicate and collaborate with until now. “Salzburg also opened doors to a lot of opportunities for me - from meeting like-minded people to having my film premiere in the session in Austria. It is just right that I share my award with my Salzburg Fellows because I wouldn't be the person and filmmaker I am now if I have not been exposed to them.” Reflecting on her latest award, Roque said, “As an advocate and as an artist, there are times when I question myself and get tired of what I do. This award is yet another reminder for me on why I make films, why I tell stories. This served as an inspiration and also a challenge to keep on making films that will tell about [the] triumphs and struggles of people.” Roque is now raising funds for her next LGBT-themed film entitled White TransLady. It is an experimental film about a transwoman who gets discriminated in the afterlife and finds a family in the most unexpected place. You can get in touch with her and learn more about her films through her website.
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Seminar Pays Tribute to Kofi Annan
Kofi Annan speaking at Salzburg Global Seminar in May 2008
Salzburg Global Seminar Pays Tribute to Kofi Annan
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Former United Nations (UN) secretary-general and Salzburg Global Fellow Kofi Annan has died at the age of 80. In a statement announcing his death, the Kofi Annan Foundation and his family said Mr. Annan died on Saturday, August 18 after a short illness. During his time as UN secretary-general, Mr. Annan sought to implement a comprehensive program of reform to revitalize the UN and make the international system more effective. He was the first secretary-general to have emerged from the UN staff, having first joined the system in 1962 as an administrative and budget officer with the World Health Organization. A staunch advocate for human rights, Mr. Annan and the UN were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2001 “for their work for a better organized and more peaceful world.” As part of a statement released by the Kofi Annan Foundation, his family said, “Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law.” In May 2008, Mr. Annan attended the Salzburg Global program, A “Green Revolution” in Africa: What Framework for Success? He visited in his role as chair of Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa. In an interview with Salzburg Global, Mr. Annan called for a “uniquely African green revolution” founded on “bold pro-poor policies” to address the food crisis facing Africa and the world.
Mr. Annan was also honorary president of Salzburg Global’s Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention series. In 2013, he wrote the foreword for a joint publication by Salzburg Global and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum - Global Perspectives on Holocaust Education: Trends, Patterns, and Practices. In this foreword, Mr. Annan said, “I am glad that the Seminar and the Museum together intend to continue their work, by helping to forge a worldwide community of Holocaust scholars and educators, and by conducting a series of case studies on international responses to recent genocides. This will help to shape more effective responses to such crises in future. I applaud their efforts, and hope that others will give them the support they need to carry out these tasks.” Edward Mortimer, former chief program officer of Salzburg Global Seminar, served as Mr. Annan’s chief speechwriter and director of communications between 1998 and 2006 prior to arriving at Salzburg. He said, “When I said goodbye to Kofi Annan in New York in December 2006, he thanked me for my work, and added, without prompting 'and I will come to Salzburg!' He was as good as his word - not only coming but bringing with him a major grant from the Gates Foundation, which enabled the Seminar to host the inaugural conference of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa in the spring of 2008. “Later, when I was struggling to get the Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention program at Salzburg off the ground, I turned again to him for help - knowing his longstanding interest in those topics - and he responded not only by giving us invaluable public support but also by providing crucial seed money out of his own pocket. "Both these actions were entirely characteristic of a man who cared profoundly about the future of humanity, was determined to help it in practical ways, and whose ideals corresponded closely with those of Salzburg Global Seminar." Stephen Salyer, president of Salzburg Global Seminar, added: “Arriving exhausted from efforts to head off a potential civil war in Kenya, Kofi Annan lost no time in challenging those gathered in Salzburg to take action to achieve self-sufficiency in food production. He focused particularly on the role of women and argued for a strategy that would take fullest advantage of their capabilities in farming and marketing.  "[While in Salzburg], he called the morning he was expected to depart and asked in his quiet, unassuming way if he and [his wife] Nane might stay on for a few more days. He explained that they had planned to relax at a nearby spa but they couldn’t imagine a more congenial and inspiring place to be than Schloss Leopoldskron. He became a beloved member of the Salzburg family who we will sorely miss."
READ MORE...
Displaying results 1 to 7 out of 556
<< First < Previous 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28 29-35 36-42 43-49 Next > Last >>