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Young Cultural Innovators

Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
The event will feature images made at Afropunk festivals all around the world plus performances from several artists
Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
By: Oscar Tollast 

Salzburg Global Fellows Lauren Rossi and Karah Shaffer collaborate to host event in Detroit, Michigan

A celebration of Afropunk featuring photographs, live music, discussion, and dancing will be held in Detroit, Michigan, later this week.

“Here You Can Be Whatever You Want: A Celebration of Afropunk” is taking place at The Baltimore Gallery, Detroit, on September 14 between 6 pm and midnight.

The free event has been organized by Salzburg Global Fellows Lauren Rossi and Karah Shaffer, in partnership with Facing Change: Documenting Detroit.

Rossi, creative industries program manager at Creative Many, and Shaffer, co-founder and executive director of Facing Change: Documenting Detroit, both attended the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2017.  

After taking part in this program, the duo received support and funding from Salzburg Global, the Kresge Foundation, and the Knight Foundation to inspire innovation and collaboration at a local level.

On Friday, visitors will be able to view an exhibition of images made at Afropunk festivals around the world by photographers Kholood Eid and Bunni Elian. Music will be provided by internationally acclaimed DJ and vocalist Shaun J. Wright and DJ Holographic, a local emerging artist also known as Ariel Corley.

For more information about the event, please click here.

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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
By: Louise Hallman 

The 2018 edition of the Salzburg Global President’s Report presents the renewed mission and strategic framework of the organization, announces an exciting new campaign, and reviews each of the last year’s programs

“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle

Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems. 

Features

This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects.

A Positive Space in a Polarizing World
From Students to Statesmen

Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect 
From Ideas to Impact

Radical Reinvention
From Local to Global

Campaign

The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come. 

“Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.” 

For the Love of Humankind
From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations

Yearbook

Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.”

Download the Yearbook (PDF)

You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 


 

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Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
Lala Pasquinelli (center) engaging in an activity at last year’s program of the Young Cultural Innovators ForumLala Pasquinelli (center) engaging in an activity at last year’s program of the Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
By: Oscar Tollast 

Young cultural innovator reveals how her time in Salzburg has helped develop her project

A visual artist based in Buenos Aires has spoken of her gratitude after attending the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.

Lala Pasquinelli, the founder of Mujeres que no fueron tapa (Women who were not on the cover), has revealed how her time at Schloss Leopoldskron has helped her project grow in size and stature.

Mujeres que no fueron tapa encourages people to use intuitive artistic experiences to express their diversity and potential. This expression is achieved by hacking magazines and stereotypes and transforming them through art actions and workshops.

Since leaving Salzburg, Pasquinelli has taken on board the advice of faculty and has collaborated with fellow YCIs to create a Festival of Hacking Magazines, which is taking in place in more than 150 schools across Argentina until September.

Pasquinelli said, “The project and the activities are about [having] a critical view of stereotypes in media, and [discovering] what [is] the thing we love in our lives, and the distance between that and the things the media are trying to impose [on] us. The idea of the Festival is to share with the teachers from private and public schools the tools that we developed the years before.”

Schools participate for free and receive guides and materials as to what activities to undertake and how. Once finished, teachers will send photographs and surveys back to Pasquinelli and her colleagues. The results from these surveys will be compiled into a book featuring testimonies and images of the Festival, plus results of the research carried out.

“At [the] moment, some of the schools are hacking magazines in different cities of Argentina, and I am watching photographs of blackboards from different schools with the phrase, ‘When do you love being yourself?’ …. It is amazing,” Pasquinelli said.

For this project, Pasquinelli received help from fellow YCIs Moira Rubio Brennan and Luciana Chait. Pasquinelli said, “It was very important to me to attend the [YCI Forum] last year, to make this idea grow and develop.”

Pasquinelli also highlighted the influence of YCI guest speaker Uffe Elbæk, a member of the Danish Parliament and leader of The Alternative political party, and YCI facilitator Adam Molyneux-Berry, managing director of iceHubs, on her work.

She said, “Adam talked a lot about to do things without money, or about money, was not a limit to [doing] the things you dream to change the world. The story Uffe told us about how he started his own party was very inspiring.”

Pasquinelli said she wanted to thank Salzburg Global, the sponsors, and organizations which make scholarships possible for the Forum. She said, “I think it is very important for artists to have the possibility of [experiencing] the seminar – to grow in our work and develop our tools.”

Pasquinelli's participation at the YCI Forum was supported by American Express. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please visit: https://yci.salzburgglobal.org/overview.html 

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YCI Project Helps Develop Historical Understanding of Memphis’ Past and Present
Fox was the commissioned poet for the I Am A Man Plaza (Picture: Cliff Garten Studio)
YCI Project Helps Develop Historical Understanding of Memphis’ Past and Present
By: Oscar Tollast 

YCI alumni Steven Fox’s Project Gratus responds to issues affecting Memphis and links up with MLK50 project

A creative-writing project initially designed to bridge divides and help Memphis’ underserved communities thrive will leave behind a lasting physical imprint.

Project Gratus, the brainchild of Steven Fox, highlighted the theme of gratitude to create workshops that kick-started intergenerational conversations between the youth and elderly generation.

In addition to project-based workshops, dialogue and reflection sessions also took place, which then evolved into financial literacy workshops for youth and an MLK50 project Fox was selected for.

Fox said, “The mission of these workshops was to develop [a] historical understanding of past and current events, invoke empathy and leverage self-confidence, self-worth, creative and critical thinking skills necessary to help citizens thrive artistically, socially, educationally and economically.

“The need for this innovative approach was and still is high due to the persistent issue of childhood poverty, high crime rates and failing students/schools in the Memphis community.”

Fox is a writer and spoken-word artist who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. After participating in the session, Fox received a follow-on grant to push ahead with Project Gratus.

In June 2017, Project Gratus hosted financial literacy workshops at Ed Rice Community Center in the Frayser Area of Memphis, Tennessee. Educator and volunteer Dione Smith used a financial literacy curriculum called JA Our City.

In five sessions, twelve students from a third-grade social studies class were introduced to subjects such as the importance of economic exchange and how money is managed by people and businesses in cities.

As a result of the program, students were able to examine the importance of money to a city, why people pay taxes and develop an understanding of how entrepreneurs promote a healthy economy within a city.

Between August and September 2017, Project Gratus worked alongside Cliff Garten Studio, the City of Memphis, and the Urban Art Commission.

Together they looked at community workshops focused on the I Am A Man Plaza, based next to Clayborn Temple, a gathering place for Martin Luther King Jr. and sanitation workers before they marched during the Sanitation Workers Strike in 1968.  

As part of the interactive plaza, which opened last month a day after the 50th anniversary of King’s death, a stone sculpture was built. Fox wrote the text that is etched in it. He was recommended for the role by Lauren Kennedy, a fellow member of the Memphis YCI Hub. The plaza gives visitors the opportunity to interact with art and inspire future generations to stand up for positive change.

Discussing the content of the workshops, Fox said, “Each workshop included project details and proposed design elements for the I Am A Man Plaza, as well as a review of quotes and text identified from prominent civil rights leaders that will be incorporated in the plaza design. As collaborator… I led a conversation with participants to derive contemporary text for the plaza design.”

Project Gratus hosted workshops at the New Chicago Community Development Corporation, Orange Mound Community Center, Clayborn Temple, and Whitehaven Community Center.

Fox asked visitors how to honor the sanitation workers and if there was something they could say to them now, what would that be? Citizens were encouraged to be present with one another, learn from one another, and recognize the impact of the Sanitation Workers Strike.

Commenting on this methodology, Fox said, “When we do this, we will fulfill the purpose of the I Am A Man Plaza with intention, and it will truly be a place of reflection, inspiration and hard work. Through these workshops, our hope is that the community will recognize opportunities and actions through our commemorating the strike in the history of Memphis.”

For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.

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Young Cultural Innovator Creates Online Poetry Archive
Visitors exploring the 2017 Detroit Art Book Fair (Picture: Maia Asshaq)Visitors exploring the 2017 Detroit Art Book Fair (Picture: Maia Asshaq)
Young Cultural Innovator Creates Online Poetry Archive
By: Helena Santos 

Maia Asshaq creates free audio archive to highlight the work of artists from all over the world

A young cultural innovator (YCI) has created a free poetry audio archive where artists from all over the world can share their work in their mother tongue.

Maia Asshaq, a member of the Detroit YCI Hub, is hoping the Recording Reading Archive will provide a connection between artists that goes beyond the poetry readings she hosts in Detroit.

Asshaq, co-founder of the Detroit Art Book Fair and founder of DittoDitto, said, “Since many of those performances occur undocumented, and many of the performers live elsewhere my focus has shifted slightly from events to figuring out a way to connect these artists and make their work more accessible.”

The archive, which is available to access online, came about after Asshaq’s experience at the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. During this session, Asshaq met a Japanese writer, Mariko Asabuki, with whom she connected through the power of poetry-reading.

Asshaq said, “Even though I can’t speak or understand Japanese, I was so curious as to how she may read her own work and what I could learn about it just by listening. I began work immediately on collecting recordings from friends and poets I was familiar with.”

After experimenting with playing pre-recorded poetry in both Paris and Berlin, Asshaq went back to Detroit where she designed a “sort of release party” with musician Matthew Conzett. Each month, Asshaq invites an experimental musician to incorporate recordings of their choice into a live performance. Musicians are then free to manipulate the recordings.

Asshaq timed the first official release party with the Detroit Art Book Fair, an annual event which draws thousands of people. This event featured performances from Detroit musicians Claire Cirocco and Matthew Conzett, which have since been added to the Recording Reading Archive.

The Recorded Reading Archive is available online, and even though the files cannot be downloaded, everyone can listen to the recordings for free. Asshaq said the archive gives “listeners a chance to not only listen to works by their friends and favorite writers but also to explore new work.” So far, the archive has more than 20 recordings.

This project was made possible after Asshaq received a follow-on grant after attending the YCI Forum at Salzburg Global Seminar. Discussing the next steps for the archive, she said, “In addition to building the archive and the monthly releases, my hope is that bookshops all over the world that I’ve built relationships with will feature the recordings as well. I am also trying to tap into existing archives and feature those sounds on my site as well.”

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Young Cultural Innovators “Move from Me to We” at Regional Meeting
Fellows and program staff who attended the second US regional meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsFellows and program staff who attended the second US regional meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Young Cultural Innovators “Move from Me to We” at Regional Meeting
By: Oscar Tollast 

Fellows from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans take part in two-day program

Young cultural innovators (YCIs) from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans have strengthened their network following the conclusion of the second US regional YCI meeting.

This year’s program, supported by the Kresge Foundation, took place at the Contemporary Arts Center of New Orleans with 27 YCIs from both the third and fourth sessions of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators participating.

The two-day program involved YCIs taking part in a series of discussions, workshops, site visits, and interactive exercises.

Fellows from the New Orleans YCI Hub led site visits. This included an exhibition opening and performance of The Rent is Too Damn High, an event curated by YCI Fari Nzinga; an exhibition tour and talk from the Curator of the Contemporary Arts Centre, exploring new models for interdisciplinary arts centers; a walk-through of Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard, a cultural corridor in New Orleans; and a tour of Studio BE showcasing work of Brandan 'Bmike' Odums.

The workshop’s theme was “Moving from Me to We,” exploring further what it means to be a YCI Hub and what YCIs want to accomplish as a community of Fellows in their cities and local communities.

Salzburg Global’s Young Cultural Innovators Forum has hubs in six regions around the globe. Hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo.

Chase Cantrell, the founder of Building Community Value, based in Detroit, said, “Every time I get together with other YCIs, I realize how universal problems are in each of our cities. It has gotten me to think more about how to leverage the network for learning and collaboration.”

Yasmine Omari, marketing and education outreach coordinator at Germantown Performing Arts Center, said “meeting the YCI Fellows from the year before was really wonderful. Reconnecting with the YCIs from my year was also really great. I learn so much from listening to their struggles and projects that they are working on and it really makes me feel less alone in the work that I am doing.”

Alphonse Smith, director of place and civic design at the Arts Council New Orleans, said the experience of being able to evaluate his work and potential collaboration opportunities was productive. He said, “It challenged me to take a step back and critically reflect on the work. It was also nice to hear constructive feedback from non-New Orleans Hub members.”

YCIs were joined in New Orleans by Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director for culture and the arts at Salzburg Global, and Faye Hobson, a program associate at Salzburg Global. Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer at Salzburg Global, and Andy Ho, US development Director at Salzburg Global, also attended the meeting to engage with Fellows. The program was led by YCI Forum facilitators Amina Dickerson, Peter Jenkinson, and Shelagh Wright.

Seidl-Fox said, “As creative change-makers, the YCIs confront similar challenges in their cities. Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans are all contending with social inequality, weak public education systems, high unemployment levels, economic disparities, and a general lack of public support for the cultural sector.   

“Working at the intersection of the arts and social change, all 27 YCIs are committed to addressing these challenges. This regional YCI meeting in New Orleans provided a rich opportunity for the YCIs to share experiences, coach each other, and strategize for the future. They represent and will shape the future of their cities.  

“Their energy, talent, and commitment are what Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans need to help them overcome the challenges of the 21st century.”

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is a ten-year project of Salzburg Global Seminar that champions young artists and cultural change-makers who are using innovative and creative practices to catalyze civic, social, and urban transformation in their communities around the globe. For more information on the Forum, please click here.


The Regional Fellows Event is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. More information on this event, which was supported by The Kresge Foundation, can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/594

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Detroit YCI Launches Project which Identifies Ways to Increase Creativity
Melvin Henley leads a discussion during Creativity in "Non-Creative" PlacesMelvin Henley leads a discussion during Creativity in "Non-Creative" Places
Detroit YCI Launches Project which Identifies Ways to Increase Creativity
By: Maryam Ghaddar 

Melvin Henley hosts discussion on Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places in Detroit

What does it mean to be creative in a work environment that often challenges the very definition of the word? How is creativity integrated into sectors and communities that are not considered creative per se?

Everyone has a creative streak, whether or not it’s immediately apparent. Melvin Henley, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, sought to explore this notion in a project titled Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places in Detroit, Michigan.

The event was hosted in October 2017 at Lawrence Tech University’s Center for Design and Technology, which welcomes people from various backgrounds, fosters design thinking, and serves students, professionals, architects, artists, designers, innovators, entrepreneurs, etc.

Henley received funding for the event through a follow-on grant from Salzburg Global after attending the forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Initially intended to convene industry experts from sectors not typically seen as “creative,” such as food, government, sports and education, Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places evolved into a series of group discussions, panel presentations, and an interactive activity between professionals from both “creative” and “non-creative” sectors. The aim was primarily to bounce ideas off each other, form networks, and engage in a friendly and open atmosphere for inspiration on creative brainstorming and idea generation. Shelly Danner, co-founder and program director of Challenge Detroit and another Detroit YCI from the 2016 Forum, led some of these idea generation exercises.

Reflecting on the event, Henley said: “Four core competencies were identified as being essential for creative expression: capturing, challenging, broadening and surrounding. All are measurable and trainable, which means that no matter what a person’s current creative output is, when you build on these competencies, your creative output is likely to increase.”

Conversations were prompted by a straightforward, yet thought-provoking inquiry: “Innovation and creativity are critical to our personal and professional growth as well as our economy. Do you agree or disagree?”

Four dynamic panelists were convened to speak at the event and were chosen based on their diverse work and experiences in the community. The speakers included Sandra Yu Stahl, lead evaluator at Citizen Detroit; Abir Ali, director of design and culture at The Platform; Delphia Simmons, chief strategy and learning officer at COTS, and Rachel Perschetz, director of community investment at Quicken Loans.

This particular project brought together 23 people from both “creative” and “non-creative” sectors, nurtured peer-learning opportunities for attendees, highlighted how creative thinking is used every day and offered ways to tap into that creativity in the workplace. In essence, it challenged participants to apply creative problem solving and encouraged individuals to acknowledge and embrace their creative confidence.

While Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places was geared towards peer-learning, coaching of young and green programs, and applying brain science and social intelligence in work settings, Henley explained that it was a “prototyping event” and that there is still much room for improvement. For instance, gathering more individuals from the community and focusing more on age diversity would emphasize the project’s central goal.

“Moving forward,” Henley noted, “the event has the potential to turn into a series of conversations that happen quarterly, but would like to start with one and see how it goes from there and/or if we can secure additional funding. One of the things that did emerge that I would like to build on is how creative can make room for “non-creative” in their creative output. Sometimes it feels like creatives produce work or spaces or experiences that can only be enjoyed by other creatives.”

Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places investigated creative leadership and the many methodologies that can emerge when a group of individuals endeavors to bring about positive change.

With this in mind, Henley said that “the THNK program in Amsterdam comes to mind as a great case study. One of the takeaways from the conversation is that people are unsure how to embrace creative ideas and use them to propel ideas and movements. The people in the room were unsure how to design programs for scalability, relevance, and impact outside of traditional business models. There appears to some [an] opportunity to further develop a framework or materials that could be helpful. If possible, I’d like to use more remaining funds to further investigate this subject and develop a Creative Leadership toolkit that is shared with others.”

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Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans (Photo: Flickr/Reading Tom)The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans (Photo: Flickr/Reading Tom)
Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
By: Oscar Tollast 

Fellows will explore what it means to be part of a creative hub in cities undergoing transformation

YCIs from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans have been reunited to take part in the second US regional meeting.

Thirty Salzburg Global Fellows, all of whom have attended the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in recent years, will convene at the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, on Saturday afternoon (April 7).

The two-day program will see YCIs reflect on what it means to be part of a creative hub in cities undergoing radical urban transformation and social renewal.

The opening conversation is titled “From Me to We.” Fellows will explore city-based change-making and civic innovation. They will go onto share city briefs and reflect on what’s currently happening in Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans.

Several YCIs have agreed to lead site visits in New Orleans on the first evening of the program, offering a range of options for participants to choose from. This includes a tour of Jockum Nordström’s “Why is Everything a Rag” exhibition and Sarah Morris’ “Sawdust and Tinsel” exhibition, both of which are at the Contemporary Arts Center.

Alternatively, participants have the chance to attend an exhibition opening and performance of The Rent is Too Damn High, which takes place at the Crescent City Boxing Club. This event, run by YCI Fari Nzinga, is described as a combination of visual art with performance and political satire, exploring themes of home, belonging, cultural transmission, gentrification, and displacement.

A third option is to walk to New Orleans’ French Quarter to visit the French 75 bar and the New Orleans Mardi Gras Museum. In this group, participants will discuss subjects involving private foundations and privately-funded cultural activities.

A “Cultural Corridor Tour” will also take place, including visits to the Ashe Cultural Arts Center, Tulane Small Center for Collaborate Design, and Roux Carre. All three of these organizations are engaged in community-based art, education, and design.

On top of this, participants could also take part in a tour of Studio BE, a 35,000 sq ft warehouse of art, currently housing Brandan Odums’ first solo show.

Regardless of which site participants visit, all will be asked how their learning from it could relate to their own work and home city. They will report back at the start of the second day of the program.

The rest of the day will be spent discussing modes of collaboration and developing impact plans for the hubs, before wrapping up and outlining the next steps forward.

The YCI Forum has hubs in six regions. Hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. The Forum also has a dedicated hub for Rhodes Scholars.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators engages the world’s most dynamic young creative change-makers. Launched in 2014 as a 10-year project, 50 innovators are invited each year to take part in a session held at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria.

Salzburg Global Seminar is committed to fostering creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide. The Forum aims to help build a more vibrant and resilient arts sector while advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide.


The Regional Fellows Event is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This session is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/594

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Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

New report from the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators chronicles how the annual convening in Austria is building a dynamic and impactful global network

“With more than 250 Young Cultural Innovators now connected in communities around the world, the YCI Forum is one of the most dynamic and impactful global cultural networks and a dynamic creative catalyst for innovation, civic transformation, and social change worldwide,” says Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Program Director for Culture & the Arts.

Now entering its fifth year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) held its fourth annual session at Schloss Leopoldskron in October 2017.

The global reach of Fellows now extends from Adelaide, Australia, to Valletta, Malta, and 21 cities – called “YCI Hubs” – in between. The 2017 Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) hailed from 13 countries, with each participant facing unique challenges, tied to their specific heritage and industry. They were met with 10 facilitators and five speakers, and the committed staff of Salzburg Global Seminar. 

Despite their geographical distances and differences in practice, the YCIs, the facilitators and speakers are intimately connected. A commitment to the arts and cultural sector, and shared ideals of community and justice make this a cohort of peers whose differences act not as barriers, but as bridges. The YCIs see themselves in a global context. They engage in international discourse without losing sight of their own communities.

The new report from the latest session, written by returning YCI Sanja Grozdanic, chronicles the week’s events including the plenary presentations, skills-building workshops, small group discussions and vibrant “Open Space” events, organized by the YCIs themselves.

“I have been in search of a world city that has intellectuals, artists and those trying to make the world better through their work, I have come to find that unlike the past there isn’t just one place for all these people they are spread out throughout the world and it really takes seminars like this to bring them together,” explains Yasmine Omari from the Memphis YCI Hub in Tennessee, USA. 

Linda Kaoma, from the Cape Town YCI Hub in South Africa adds: “I am walking away better equipped to continue to do my work as an artist, cultural practitioner and leader in my community and with a strong affirmation to always lead with the heart. Salzburg Global Seminar has introduced me to new friends, colleagues, accountability partners and future collaborators from all over the world.” 

The report includes many more testimonials from Fellows, as well as all their bios and those of the session facilitators and guest speakers.

Download the report as a PDF (low-res)

To receive a hi-res edition of the report, please email press[at]salzburgglobal.org


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development FoundationAmerican ExpressArts Council MaltaCambodian Living ArtsCanada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright GreeceJapan FoundationThe Kresge FoundationLloyd A. Fry FoundationThe McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here

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YCI Creates Intercultural Toolkit for Diverse Partners to Work Together
Participants take part in a group exercise at the Bottom Up Culture Project, an event organized by the Bulgaria YCI Hub
YCI Creates Intercultural Toolkit for Diverse Partners to Work Together
By: Oscar Tollast 

Memphis YCI Leni Stoeva collaborates with Bulgaria YCI Hub to produce new resource

An intercultural toolkit designed to bring partners together from diverse backgrounds has been created by a YCI Fellow.

Leni Stoeva, a member of the Memphis YCI Hub, has put forward a Cross-Partnership Development Toolkit, which will soon be available in multiple languages.

Stoeva views the toolkit as an “invitation to partnership and creativity,” which will allow individuals and organizations to gain more perspective, skills, and networks.

She said, “A significant takeaway from the [Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators] is new relationships formed. 21st century Europe is facing a growing complexity of societies and a standardization of lifestyles and cultures.

“Meanwhile, USA is facing a time of self-segregation based on class, race, and values at the root of the country’s pressing problems. The world’s future depends on inter-community connection and partnerships that foster understanding between people who may have little in common.”

Stoeva, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, created the resource after partnering with the Bulgaria YCI Hub.

Both worked together last year during the Bottom Up Culture Project, a project designed to highlight and discuss the current issues the creative community in Bulgaria is facing.

Stoeva helped to facilitate two consecutive sessions, the first of which was a university talk in Sofia and later a workshop in Plovdiv. Both events brought more than 60 people together.

Specific goals that were outlined ahead of the event to lead discussions included creating partnerships from a diverse set of interests, collaborating between major and smaller, local cultural institutions, establishing inter-sectoral partnerships, and introducing a specific cultural diversity strand to local partnerships.

This project held a forum that explored culture-led urban regeneration, cultural entrepreneurs, creative places, creative quarters, and neighborhood change and gentrification. After the event, Stoeva searched for the best practices of partnership development on national levels to present as a structured toolkit.

Stoeva said, “I believe that by participating in a cultural exchange seminar in Plovdiv provided me with compelling opportunities to continue conversations begun in Salzburg and foster learning across countries. With the project, we worked on identifying best practices for cross-partnership development.”

For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI), please click here.

Download an English version of the Cross-Partnership Development Toolkit 

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YCI Transforms Historic Phone Booth into Storytelling Kiosk
The Phone Booth installed outside the Lanesboro Museum in Lanesboro, Minnesota
YCI Transforms Historic Phone Booth into Storytelling Kiosk
By: Oscar Tollast 

Phone booth repurposed by Adam Wiltgen installed at Lanesboro Museum, Minnesota

A phone booth repurposed by a YCI has given residents in Lanesboro, Minnesota, the chance to have their story heard.

Adam Wiltgen, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, restored the beloved landmark and donated it to the Lanesboro Museum in December 2016.

The phone booth, which was decommissioned by Acentek, Inc., now acts as an interactive storytelling and story collecting exhibit.

Visitors can listen to local stories installed in the phone booth and contribute their own by leaving a voicemail message on a dedicated telephone number.

Wiltgen received funding for the hardware, equipment and interpretive signage for the project through a grant from Salzburg Global made possible by the Kresge Foundation. He received a follow-on grant after attending the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, one which was given for a new project that had a cross-sector approach and gave back to the community.

Adam Wiltgen, program director at Lanesboro Arts, said, “I immediately thought of the Lanesboro Phone Booth when this opportunity arose. It is such a charming historical asset and repurposing it as a storytelling exhibit is a great way to amplify the amazing work the museum has been doing preserving our history and collecting stories from all walks of life.”

Nine stories were collected for an open house and story celebration which took place in October last year. Stories included Glen Nyenhuis’s experience hunting and riding the caboose in Lanesboro, Bonita Underbakke’s memories fishing as a child at Watson Creek, Ann Madland’s reflections on living and working as an artist in Lanesboro, LaVonne Draper’s recollection of a trick played while tending bar, an e-mail message David Hennessey wrote in the aftermath of the 2002 Lanesboro fire, Blake Coleman’s memory of visiting Lanesboro for the first time, Betty Michaud’s tale of being surprised while swimming alone, Yvonne Nyenhuis’s anecdotes about the White Front Café, and Duane & Melissa Benson’s adventure swimming with horses.  

These stories were collected during storytelling projects organized by Lanesboro Museum. Story circles were conducted in partnership with the Minnesota Humanities Center for the Smithsonian Water/Ways exhibition in 2016. Story circles were also held in 2017 for the Be Here: Main Street initiative, a pilot project developed between the MuseWeb Foundation and the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum on Main Street program.

Since this event, the phone booth has continued to receive a positive reaction. Wiltgen said, “The Museum is changing out the stories regularly and adding new ones. Folks are using the voicemail box to leave messages and photos of the phone booth continue to pop up on social media. I'm looking forward to seeing how visitors interact with the phone booth this year during the high season. I love the cross-cultural and inter-generational appeal of the phone booth as well.”

For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.

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A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
Clare Shine looks back on the journey traveled, new projects and horizons.
A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
By: Clare Shine 

Clare Shine reflects on a landmark year celebrating Salzburg Global Seminar's 70th anniversary

As 2018 gets underway, I would like to express my sincere gratitude for your continued engagement with Salzburg Global Seminar. In reflection of a landmark year celebrating Salzburg Global Seminar’s 70th anniversary, I wanted to look back on the journey traveled, new projects and horizons.

Our 2017 theme of “Courage” resonated throughout this turbulent year. The 1947 vision of Salzburg Global’s founders – a “Marshall Plan of the Mind” to revive dialogue and heal rifts across Europe - felt fresh as ever. Cracks widened in societies and institutions across the world, compounded by a mix of insecurity, disillusionment, and isolationism.

Yet the world should be in a better position than ever to tackle common challenges. There is an open marketplace for ideas, innovation, and invention, and opportunities to engage and collaborate are growing fast.

In Salzburg, we are privileged to meet individuals from all walks of life who have the courage to tell truth to power, confront vested interests, express artistic voice and freedom, build coalitions for change, and see through tough choices. In divided societies, people need courage to stay true to their beliefs. Leaders need courage to curb their exercise of power. Together, we need courage to rekindle our collective imagination to rebuild society from the bottom up and the top down.

Three strategies guide our own work for this purpose.

1. Given Salzburg Global’s roots in conflict transformation, our programs seek to bridge divides:

  • Our American Studies series – a discipline born at Schloss Leopoldskron – focused on Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration, including the roots of economic and racial division;
  • The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change had its highest-ever participation on Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism and published an interactive playbook “Against Populism”;
  • Our Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention series is now applying tools developed in previous years to promote pluralism and tolerance and address issues of radicalization and violent extremism. Pilot projects to test these approaches are under way in five countries (Pakistan, Rwanda, South Africa, Morocco, and Egypt) with the potential to expand to other countries;
  • The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum marked its fifth anniversary with a major report assessing the influence and personal impact of a cross-sector network that now spans more than 70 countries and has inspired new partnerships and cultural initiatives.

2. Salzburg Global Seminar aims to inspire new thinking and action on critical issues to transform systems, connecting local innovators and global resources:

3. Salzburg Global seeks to expand collaboration by fostering lasting networks and partnerships:

After six years living in Schloss Leopoldskron and meeting the most diverse and talented people imaginable, I often hear myself describe Salzburg Global Seminar as “deeply human.” 2017 brought many reminders of the special bonds forged during our lifetime and the enduring need to advance trust and openness around the key issues facing today’s world. 

Thank you again for your commitment and recognition of Salzburg Global’s importance in your professional and personal development. We hope you will consider joining other Fellows who have already made a donation to Salzburg Global this year. Please click here to learn more.

With very best wishes from everyone at Salzburg Global Seminar, and we hope to welcome you back to Schloss Leopoldskron in the near future.

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Young Cultural Innovators Hub Project Explores How Art Can Be Used to Help Build Healthy Communities
From left to right - Photos from the Let's Play art installation, Shelley Danner and Dr. Asha Shajahan
Young Cultural Innovators Hub Project Explores How Art Can Be Used to Help Build Healthy Communities
By: Oscar Tollast 

YCI Shelley Danner explores how to create a culture of active living in Detroit

A YCI Hub project designed to highlight the importance of healthy, active living through art has reached more than 350 people.

The Challenge Detroit YCI Art and Community Health Project led to four different art installations being created and showcased in various parts of Detroit.

The project was co-designed and led by Shelley Danner, program director of Challenge Detroit. Danner attended the third meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016 and is a member of the Detroit YCI Hub.

Danner looked at the intersection of art and health, collaborating with Dr. Asha Shajahan from Beaumont Family Medicine, Challenge Detroit Fellows, and other community partners.

Challenge Detroit’s mission is “to challenge leaders to learn by doing through a year of meaningful employment and intellectual work with area nonprofits designed to positively impact” a “diverse” and “culturally vibrant” Detroit. It invites 30 of tomorrow’s leaders to live, work, play, give, and lead.

The art installations, built by four teams of Challenge Detroit Fellows, included “Let’s Play,” “Elevated Cardio,” “Step into Something,” and “Limitless.”

These four pieces of art were showcased at Central City Integrated Health and its Clubhouse, as well as the Butzel Recreation Center and Chandler Park.

While on display at the Central City Clubhouse, “Elevated Cardio” allowed members with disabilities to use a set of decorated stairs as part of their physical therapy program.

“Step into Something New” highlighted the physical activities that can be undertaken every day, from jumping to dancing. Silhouetted motions on 4 by 8 foot banners, paired with oversized shoes and motivational phrases were created for this installation.

“Let’s Play” involved Challenge Detroit Fellows taking photos of themselves in parks based throughout Detroit to show how physical activity can be fun. The Fellows behind this project used refurbished windows from the Architectural Salvage Warehouse in Detroit to frame the photos.

“Limitless” saw Challenge Detroit Fellows co-create art using bikes with children from Detroit’s eastside with neighborhood nonprofit Mack Avenue Community Church (MACC) Development.

The project featured at the Detroit Institute of Arts’ National Arts and Health Symposium in September and was also included in Detroit’s Open Streets community festival in October. 

The design question for the project was: How might we use art as a medium to build healthy communities and create a culture of active living in Detroit?

In a report about the project, Danner said, “Through the various presentations and site showcases thus far, we have interacted and raised awareness with over 350 community members and residents, and counting, of the importance of healthy, active living with low-barriers-to-access through these creative art installations.”

This project was made possible thanks to YCI project funds provided to Salzburg Global by the Kresge Foundation for follow-on work after last year’s YCI Forum. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.

 

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Gerhard Feldbacher Returns to Salzburg Global with Mobile Tea House
Feldbacher (right) taking part in a tea ceremony with the fellows of the fourth YCI forum in the flying tea house. Photo by Heinz HolzmannFeldbacher (right) taking part in a tea ceremony with the fellows of the fourth YCI forum in the flying tea house. Photo by Heinz Holzmann
Gerhard Feldbacher Returns to Salzburg Global with Mobile Tea House
By: Mirva Villa 

Salzburg Global Fellow explains inspiration behind new project and his future plans for it

For three years, Gerhard Feldbacher had been playing with the idea of a mobile tea house. The simple, geometric shapes and lightness of traditional Japanese houses had fascinated the Austrian designer and architect for a long time.

The final push to make the project a reality came after Feldbacher offered to finish the tea house to be used at the fourth session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.
Feldbacher attended the YCI Forum the previous year and had an “intense” experience.

“I thought [the mobile tea house] would be nice as a communication place,” Feldbacher says. “By offering it to Salzburg Global, I wanted also to oblige myself to finally do it.”

The tea house consists of white paper walls, woven tatami mats and a fireplace. The sunken hearth is the focal point of the house. Above the fire, the teapot is hung from a jizaikagi - a small hook adorned with a fish sculpture.

Feldbacher ordered the jizaikagi from an antique shop in Tokyo. It’s thought to be more than a century old. The fish and blue fireplace tiles symbolize water and are meant to protect the paper house from catching fire.

The flying tea house can be put together in a matter of hours, and it is light for a house, weighing less than 300 kilograms. The lightness was another aspect that interested the architect. “I made another mobile house some years ago which is 10,000 kilograms,” Feldbacher says. “Three hundred kilograms is nothing compared to that.”
Once Feldbacher had his mind set on making the tea house, it took three months to complete. The architect had expected the delicate paper walls to require the most work, but the roof ended up being the most difficult part to build. He says, “It had to be stable, but also very light because the whole thing sits on a trailer.”

During the fourth session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, several participants used the tea house as a meeting place to work on their projects. One group stayed so long, Feldbacher had to politely ask them to leave at the end of the day.

“I had to actually kick them out of the tea house because I had to cover it for the night, so that was a nice compliment,” Feldbacher laughs.

One of the participants from Japan held a traditional tea ceremony in the tea house, which other YCI participants attended.

In addition to Schloss Leopoldskron, the flying tea house has also appeared at the Hallein-based arts festival Schmiede.

Feldbacher is looking forward to seeing what else the tea house will be used for in the future, whether that’s as a stage for performances or a place to stay for travelers.

In the immediate future, the tea house will travel the Salzkammergut region in the spring and feature at street art festivals in the summer.

To improve the tea ceremony experience, Feldbacher plans to make binchō-tan, a type of hardwood charcoal. He says, “It’s visually very nice and difficult to get here in Europe. I want to do that coal by myself as a part of the ceremony.”


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Minneapolis YCIs Organize a Skills Sharing Workshop to Address Housing Issues in Low-Income Neighborhoods
Nia Umoja speaking at the Development Without Displacement: Skill Building & Knowledge Share workshop
Minneapolis YCIs Organize a Skills Sharing Workshop to Address Housing Issues in Low-Income Neighborhoods
By: Mirva Villa 

YCIs Carla Schleicher and Chaun Webster organize event to bring local communities closer

Passionate to bring about discussion on the issues related to land use in the city of Minneapolis, Salzburg Global Fellows Chaun Webster and Carla Schleicher set about creating a workshop bringing together local communities.

A group of 30 participants from multi-racial and indigenous working class communities came together to develop skills, share knowledge, and produce creative strategies to address the local challenges in housing by creating alternative economic models.

North Minneapolis, Webster and Schleicher explain, is a densely-populated historically black neighborhood that has faced decades of divestment. More recently, however, there have been sharp increases in housing costs while wages remain stagnant. This has led to an “extreme number” of evictions.

Notably, the
rising number of evictions is hitting the low-income neighborhoods in Minneapolis the hardest, with many families either being displaced from their homes or having to spend too much of their income on housing expenses, by the federal standard.

Both Webster and Schleicher attended the third meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, where Webster together with New Orleans YCI Imani Jacqueline Brown facilitated a breakout session to encourage the YCI fellows to think about development in the context of their own backgrounds.

Titled “Development Without Displacement,” the breakout session encouraged discussion around how working class communities could be empowered creatively to engage with land use issues affecting them. The discussion was framed by the work of American Studies scholar, Bench Ansfield, on development as an extension of colonial logic.

Building on the themes of the breakout session, Webster and Schleicher created a day-long workshop titled ‘Development Without Displacement: Skill Building & Knowledge Share,” held in May 2017. The project was made possible thanks to YCI project funds provided to Salzburg Global Seminar by the McKnight Foundation.

Nia Umoja, from a grassroots neighborhood collective called Cooperative Community of New West Jackson, came to lead the session, which saw the participants develop their views on cooperation through discussion and group exercises.

A report about this project, authored by Webster and Schleicher said, “These exercises were points of tension and conversation as we thought through the rapid growth Minneapolis is facing and the extreme number of evictions that North Minneapolis has undergone that coincides with the lack of affordability and stagnant wages.”

The intense five-hour workshop allowed the group to think about next steps for Minneapolis, with the discussion ranging from just causes for eviction laws to banking accountability and electoral strategy for the municipal elections in November 2017.

The report continued: “The feedback that we got was that the space was rich with vision and was an important connecting point. The convening also functioned to do some important work in deepening the relationship between West Jackson and North Minneapolis and we are in the process of envisioning a Mississippi River Connection Network that would enable continued knowledge and skills sharing to take place.”

For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.

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Young Cultural Innovator Includes Max Reinhardt Mirror in Art Installation
The Coming to See exhibition is taking place at the Salzburger Kunstverein until November 26 (Picture: Annelies Senfter)The Coming to See exhibition is taking place at the Salzburger Kunstverein until November 26 (Picture: Annelies Senfter)
Young Cultural Innovator Includes Max Reinhardt Mirror in Art Installation
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

Annelies Senfter loans antique from Schloss Leopoldskron for Coming to See exhibition

Salzburg Global Fellow Annelies Senfter included a mirror that once belonged to Max Reinhardt in her first art installation.

The antique, recently acquired by Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron and Salzburg Global Seminar, was loaned to Senfter to be used in her Coming to See exhibition, which took place at the Salzburger Kunstverein between October 13 and November 26.

The installation included a collection of acorns from Schloss Leopoldskron, which were spread out in the Kabinett space. Completing the display was a photo of another antique mirror once owned by Reinhardt.

Senfter, a visual artist who lives and works in Salzburg, attended the third meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators last year.

Describing Senfter’s work, the Salzburger Kunstverein said, “Annelies Senfter’s work is situated between photography, research, and poetic investigation, and investigating notions of memory and trauma. Her work resonates with an urge to uncover repressed subjects without stirring up negative sentiments.

“Thus this exhibition brings together these few elements, including the artist’s photographic work, to take a glance back 100 years and weigh upon not only the time caught between that moment and ours but also to weigh upon the immediacy of our collective present. Surviving through all that time is art, the great and pure mirror upon which we as a people may gaze. And if we choose not to gaze at this reflection, the reflection is still produced for others to see, nonetheless.”

Speaking to Salzburg Global, Senfter said, “This project belongs to another bigger project I started in 2014. I did a lot of research on sites in Salzburg the Nazis took away during World War Two, such as parks and gardens. I started with Schloss Leopoldskron.

“I started collecting leaves from elder trees, trees which were planted before World War Two happened – like all the trees here at Schloss Leopoldskron. I collected the leaves and then made a botanical collection…. I combined it with the story of the building.”

These stories and leaves appeared in Senfter’s Asking the Trees project, which also included leaves collected from Villa Zweig and Villa Trapp.

While continuing with this project, Senfter received an invitation from the Salzburger Kunstverein to put on an exhibition. She said, “I thought, ‘Okay, if the name of this exhibition (room) is Kabinett, maybe I should do something with a mirror. I did photographs of mirrors here because to Max Reinhardt, of course, mirrors were important. He was a theater man. Mirrors are important to create certain atmospheres.”

Ahead of the exhibition, Senfter returned to Schloss Leopoldskron to view Reinhardt’s mirrors in the Venetian Room and his former office. It was during this visit she was offered the chance to use one of Reinhardt’s former mirrors that had been recently acquired from the hotel.

The mirror is an original piece, crafted by a Berlin carpenter around the beginning of the 20th century. It previously hung at the palace nearly one hundred years ago. Carved out of coniferous, the mirror is silver- and gold-plated.

Senfter said, “I’m really thankful that the Schloss was so supportive with the mirror because I know that they just bought it this summer, and I’m taking it away for six weeks. I really appreciate that, and I’m thankful for it.”

Fellows from the fourth meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators surprised Senfter by coming to the exhibition’s opening.

Having attended the Forum in 2016, Senfter described the experience as “breathtaking” and something which had helped her with her projects.

She said, “Very often I’ve heard of things we were talking about, like being brave, going forward, going to places you’ve never been before, doing something new – something you don’t know if it will out or not.

“Take the risk that if something is not working out, you will survive. If you never try, you will never know. This was very, very helpful if you’re working in the arts because it’s always something new. You never know what’s going to happen or you never know if it will work out. You can just say, ‘Okay, if I’m lucky, it will work out. If not, okay. This is what it is. I will do the next thing.’” 

WATCH: Annelies Senfter speaking in 2016 on developing projects in an intuitive way


Annelies Senfter took part in The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016. The list of our partners for this session and further information can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/569

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Kristina Borg – “I’m Always Interested in Encouraging the People I Work with to Become Co-Creators, Not Just Participants”
Kristina Borg at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsKristina Borg at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Kristina Borg – “I’m Always Interested in Encouraging the People I Work with to Become Co-Creators, Not Just Participants”
By: Mirva Villa 

Visual artist discusses You Are What You Buy project and what inspired her career path

People and community are at the very center of Kristina Borg’s work. Through her career as an independent visual artist and arts educator, she has supported people in creating their own art and has invited others to take part in her art projects.

“I’m interested in working with specific groups of people, different communities… People brought together either because of a particular place they come from, like their town or city, or particular working place,” Borg tells Salzburg Global, speaking at the
fourth meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.

“I’m always interested in encouraging the people I work with to become co-creators, not just participants,” Borg says. Her deep interest in bringing art to ordinary people’s reach and creating a dialogue is evident in one of her latest projects, You Are What You Buy,  an interactive performance set in a supermarket that she shared with other participants of this year's Forum during the open space showcase.

During the playful performance, performers would move around the store like robots, piling their carts full of items. Sometimes the group could be seen using the ordinary items in unexpected ways such as musical instruments or makeshift shelters.The confused and curious ordinary shoppers who watched these exploits as they unfolded became part of the audience.

The thought-provoking act aimed to highlight issues of sustainability and ethical consumption. The interdisciplinary project also contained an element of research on consumption habits with the main collaborators being social anthropologist Virginia Monteforte and academic Silvia Simoncelli. The year-long project culminated with a live performance.

“To a certain point it was an intrusion in this private, semi-public space, with an element of shock, maybe,” says Borg. “It was participatory at times, depending on how the clients reacted to it. Hopefully, it allowed us shoppers to reflect on what we buy and how we buy.”

Simple moments of connection

When asked what inspired her to take up her career path, Borg stops to think.

“This is a very interesting question because I’m in a transition phase. Three months ago I had a teaching post at a secondary school – so that’s one side of my career. But parallel to that, I always, as long as my memory takes me back, I remember being involved in the visual arts,” says Borg, adding that she had always been passionate about socio-community projects.

These parallel versions of Kristina co-existed, but for some reason, she never thought she would be able to merge the roles.

“But two or three years ago I started realizing that all this could merge. After all, it’s just me and part of my personality.”

Borg also felt the need to move away from “rigid” world of art schools for a while and focus on her own projects and freelancing.

Borg has recently combined her love for arts and people by coordinating a community project, entitled Naqsam il-MUZA (Sharing the muse), as part of the Valletta 2018 European Capital of Culture program. The project aims to bridge a connection between the national fine art collection of Malta and the local community, finding ways for art to become a tool in everyday life and conversations.

In the project, Borg meets locals and discusses art with them. Meeting new people and being introduced to their lives is one of the most rewarding aspects of her artistic practice, she says.

“I always start off by having one to one meetings with the participants… I find it so fascinating that I meet this person. I have no idea who he or she is; they have no idea who I am… There would have only been some communication via email or the phone… and I find it so beautiful how they open up.”

Borg fondly remembers a time when a participant felt the need to share something very personal with her to set the ground for their conversation. She often finds herself being invited to people’s homes and being offered food they have prepared. “I find these simple moments beautiful,” says Borg.

Citizen of the world

The chance to attend the fourth meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators came at the right time in Borg’s life.

“It’s an awesome experience on so many levels. It’s a learning experience and a self-reflective experience which I think I needed at this phase in my life,” Borg says. “I always had this dream in my life to be able to answer the question, ‘Where do you come from?’ and say, ‘I’m a citizen of the world.’ And for the first time in my life - in these few days here at the seminar - I’ve felt the possibility to say that.”

The Forum has also given Borg the willpower to realize her ideas. Before, she had a lot of ideas, but she never thought it was quite the right moment to put her them into action.

“What I’ll take away from here is, ‘Just do it.’ It’s either now or never,” Borg laughs.

“It makes you realize that what your worries are, and what you might perceive as a weakness are just common things with other participants, and just form part of the process,” Borg says.

“Without support, we can’t get anywhere. It’s important to exchange ideas, to exchange fears and experiences, and offer solutions.”


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Jung-Suk Ryu – The Desire to Create Better Societies and Communities Transcends Across Different Sectors
Jung-Suk (JS) Ryu, executive director of the Indefinite Arts Centre, is also a classicallyJung-Suk (JS) Ryu, executive director of the Indefinite Arts Centre, is also a classically trained pianist and founding artistic director of the Ottawa Symphonic Ensemble
Jung-Suk Ryu – The Desire to Create Better Societies and Communities Transcends Across Different Sectors
By: Oscar Tollast 

Executive director of Indefinite Arts Centre reflects on his new position and multi-sector career

Jung-Suk Ryu can’t think of a better job right now that taps into his passions. The 32-year-old is four months into his new role as the executive director of the Indefinite Arts Centre – Canada’s oldest
disability arts organization.

Ryu, who also goes by “JS,” took on the role having previously worked as director of external and community relations for the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, and director of public affairs for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB). Ryu says, “Where I am now is [at] that perfect blend of both of those worlds that absolutely excites me.”

The Indefinite Arts Centre provides training, creation and exhibition opportunities for artists who live with developmental disabilities. Just over 200 artists visit the Centre’s studio space each week to take part in self-directed artistic programs where are they given the freedom to create whatever they wish.

Ryu, speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, says, “Our organization helps them through that creation process all the way up to the exhibition where we exhibit their works both in our own gallery space within our facility but also within the city of Calgary, within the country, and also internationally.”

A whole new world opened up for Ryu during his time at CNIB, an experience he found extremely humbling.

“It certainly was extraordinary to realize the potential that is within countless Canadians across the country who happen to live with disabilities but are making tremendous contributions
in their own communities in their own ways.”

After two years with CNIB, Ryu moved across to the arts sector to work for the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity. Here he oversaw the growth of the Centre’s public sector funding at a time of economic uncertainty. In his words, he was “the first sort of in-house lobbyist for this organization.”

Ryu focused on strategizing and developing ways to increase the organization’s awareness within the public sector, strengthen relationships, and present a stronger case. He says, “I just helped capture what I was seeing into something that did indeed resonate with both levels of government that would
fund us. That was really exciting to see.”

The experience Ryu has accumulated in his career spans across multiple sectors including health care, politics, and communications. When asked if transitioning between these fields can be challenging, Ryu replies, “Absolutely not.”

Expanding on this point further, Ryu says, “Everybody, in all sectors, we’re innovating. We’re trying to create a better community and a better society. We’re trying to address different gaps and means. What I’ve realized – especially with my career starting off in politics – I’ve realized that desire transcends sectors.” For Ryu, each sector is driven by the same thing. “Your staff is still tapping into that desire for all individuals to aspire to create stronger more resilient communities – whatever the audience may be, whatever that particular client group you’re working with. I haven’t really found it that much of a
challenge. I think it’s tapping into that desire for change.”

Ryu was one of five Canadians to attend this year’s Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, whose presence was made possible thanks to the Canada Council for the Arts.

He was made aware of the opportunity thanks to a connection at the Council he made at a summit in Montreal last year. “If I had not gone to that event in Montreal, I would not have known about it whatsoever. It’s the same thing today. If I’m not here interacting with 49 other peers, who knows what kind of other opportunities I might not be able to experience?”

Ryu described his first few days at Salzburg Global as “overwhelming,” highlighting, in particular, the opportunity to hear about a wide range of different initiatives and take part in informative skill-building workshops with different facilitators. “It is an incredible, unparalleled learning and networking experience and something that is so relevant to me because of the stage that I am in my career….”

“These types of opportunities that help ground us in realizing that there’s tremendous potential to take pause and learn but to also take pause and make more and make friends and make networks, I think is so valuable.”


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Facilitators Guide YCIs in Lessons on Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Design and Sharing Their Vision
Participants at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsParticipants at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Facilitators Guide YCIs in Lessons on Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Design and Sharing Their Vision
By: Oscar Tollast 

Participants at this year’s YCI Forum received guidance to develop their dynamic visions, entrepreneurial skills, and global networks which are needed to help their causes to grow

A series of skills workshops represented a unique opportunity for participants to address how to use arts and culture to make sense of the world and themselves and make a difference in their communities.

Facilitators included Adam Molyneux-Berry (managing director of iceHubs Global), Amina Dickerson (president of Dickerson Global Advisors), Arundhati Ghosh (executive director of the India Foundation for the Arts), and Matt Connolly (chief executive officer of Tällt Ventures).

Design with and for your user

Financial resources are not as important as human resources. Participants were recommended to build movements around the work they’re doing and use human-centered design to create programs, projects, and businesses that are focused on the needs of the user rather than the perceived needs of the user. A project should be designed in such a way that it addresses the needs of the people
being served. To do this, participants were encouraged to design projects with communities, not just for them.

Explore different ideas of leadership

We are the CEOs of our own lives, in addition to being a part of an organization. Participants reflected on how they showed up as leaders and what they wanted to achieve through demonstrating leadership.
The workshop featured a strategy which referenced The Bigger Game, created by Rick Tamlyn. Participants were challenged to think about the compelling purpose of their work, their hunger for advancing a certain discipline, what vision to bring on board, the investments which need to
be made, and the bold actions required to escape comfort zones.

Understand your entrepreneurial self

Participants examined a list of attitudes and behaviors which had been created with both successful and unsuccessful entrepreneurs. Together they thought about where they stood against these attitudes.
They then went through the transtheoretical model, which involved moving them to a level of awareness around where they stood presently compared to thoughts of where they want to be tomorrow, and the
actions and habits needed to achieve that.

Help others understand what you do

The cultural sector can build its own stories in a way that are compelling, evocative, and more efficient than the stories which presently make up the dominant narrative. Participants went through a process of finding their story, exploring who they were, what they did and why, why having a story mattered, and who it mattered to. Participants explored the structure of their stories and the best way in which to tell them to audiences, be it with passion, rationale, or emotion.


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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YCI Forum Highlights Benefits of Collaboration and Exchange
Participants of the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators reflecting on their experience at the final plenary discussionParticipants of the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators reflecting on their experience at the final plenary discussion
YCI Forum Highlights Benefits of Collaboration and Exchange
By: Tomás De la Rosa 

Young cultural Innovators reflect on their takeaways from the Session

The fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators has reached a resounding conclusion with a message of unity and cooperation.

After six days at Schloss Leopoldskron, 50 of the brightest and creative minds influencing urban and social transformation in their communities have left Salzburg with ideas on how to develop their causes.
This year’s Forum involved young artists and cultural leaders representing more than 30 cities and regions.

Participants exchanged their cultures, passions, opinions, and individual talents and explored how diversity in art is perceived and how it impacts communities.

In the program’s final plenary session, facilitators Peter Jenkinson and Shelagh Wright suggested the session marked the beginning of some of the most thought-provoking conversations of the participants’ lives, something they hoped would influence participants throughout their careers.

Referring to Muhammad Ali’s poem, “Me. We,” Jenkinson and Wright explained that by raising complex issues and dilemmas, participants were pressured to think outside of their safe spaces and develop a greater sense of intimacy with those they would not normally relate with, thus improving their understanding of group dynamics.

The skills workshops and small work groups created to incentivize discussion and facilitate exchange throughout the session received high praise from participants during the closing plenary.

The exchanges throughout the final few days of the program helped refresh the participants’ vision and entrepreneurial skills. A number of participants said the experience had allowed them to enrich each other through different beliefs and approaches.

One participant said that by asking them to face challenges that could only be solved through collaboration, the session had made them more committed to working with people from different backgrounds as the variety of inputs helped them complement each other and make the challenges “not feel like such.”

Several of the facilitators described the Forum as a safe space for courage and peace where Fellows act as a bridge to the future.

Looking ahead, participants discussed potential projects to implement in their communities going forward, as well as how to strengthen the existing YCI network.

The YCI network has now grown to more than 200 creative change-makers across all continents.


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Luciana Chait - We’re Losing Great Art by Turning Our Backs on People Who Lack Access to Opportunities
Luciana Chait participated in the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsLuciana Chait participated in the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Luciana Chait - We’re Losing Great Art by Turning Our Backs on People Who Lack Access to Opportunities
By: Mirva Villa 

AulaVereda project coordinator calls for better access to arts and education for children

For the past four years, Luciana Chait and her colleagues at AulaVereda have visited a slum in Buenos Aires twice a week. With their help, more than 30 children and teenagers have been able to develop their view of culture, art, education, and values without imposition. “We think that children are agents of change,” says Chait, speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. “They’re change-drivers, not just receivers of what adults can give them. We live in a world centered around adults, but we think children can give a lot themselves.”

Chait, a coordinator for AulaVereda,says the project aims to empower children living in vulnerable parts of the city and the surrounding area. Chait’s work primarily involves people living in a slum called Villa 31. A problematic housing situation, unemployment, and a lack of access to schools and hospitals are just some of the challenges being faced by residents. Nestled right next to the wealthiest part of Buenos Aires, the contrast is stark.

AulaVereda (Classroom-in-the-Streets) looks to provide children with the same education and cultural skills that other children have. Chait believes culture is created from the bottom-up and ordinary people have great artistic skills and ideas to encourage cultural development that needs to be brought to society.

“Usually we think of “Culture” with a capital letter, that people who have the money can pay for it and have access to it. The “culture” of the peoples – lowercase - is forgotten, and so we try to reinforce the culture and artistic skills of children and teenagers in vulnerable areas.” Chait’s passion for supporting the education of these children and youth comes from her background as a teacher.

But she also feels passionate about ensuring that great talents are not lost due to lack of opportunity.
“The world is unfair, and it needs to change; that’s for sure. We’re losing a lot of great art by turning our back on people who don’t have the time or the tools to produce, so we’re losing a lot of great artists, great painters, great singers and other skilled people because they are either too busy working or dealing with a harsh everyday life. We have to look for a way to stop losing a lot of great things in the world.”

Chait hopes that her experience at Salzburg Global will provide her with ideas on how to make the project more professional and to help it grow – not only in size but also in quality. “I’m hoping to go home with more tools to make the project grow. I’m really convinced that this project needs to be everywhere, not just in a few places… I also think that there are experiences around the world from other people that will help me enrich the project.”

Finding links and creating new connections is also valuable for Chait as she seeks to advance the growing movement concerning children’s rights. Chait says, “There is a cultural movement, and there is a child movement around the world, so children are getting organized in different ways. I think we need networking for that.”

Another aspect of education Chait is working hard to revolutionize is electronic learning, which she has been working on for a decade. Several years ago, Chait worked with the government in South Africa, helping to tackle illiteracy. Now, she is involved in a project to train community health workers in the United States to fight against issues such as diabetes in vulnerable areas.

She recently co-founded Dijon - Media and Learning Experience, a body which helps organizations and people develop electronic learning materials.

In Chait’s mind, “Technology and education could bond together to help solve the world’s problems.”


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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YCIs Reflect on the Best Practices for Anchor Institutions
Participants at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.Participants at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.
YCIs Reflect on the Best Practices for Anchor Institutions
By: Mirva Villa 

Panelists discuss the global challenges faced by cultural practitioners and the key strategies for anchor institutions to best serve their communities

The issues faced by cultural practitioners and the best practices for anchor cultural institutions in
communities were among the topics discussed on the third day of the
fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.

Alberta Arthurs, a multi-time Salzburg Global Fellow, and member of Salzburg Global’s Advisory Council on Culture and Arts kick-started the discussion by reflecting on today’s global challenges.

Arthurs suggested the world had recently experienced significant geopolitical and geoeconomic changes alongside the rise of new leaders. With that in mind, culture and the arts could act as unifying forces.

How to harness that power to build connections on a global scale is – in Arthurs’ view – one of the biggest challenges for today’s cultural practitioners. She said, “We need proximity, the sense of
likeness and kinship that artists and activists create across countries and borders.”

Arthurs said the cultural sector also required more research to support and advance the work people do on a practical level. Sat next to Arthurs were Karen Brooks Hopkins, president emerita at the
Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Steven A. Wolff, principal at the AMS Planning & Research Corp.

Discussing research conducted by the Anchor Cultural Institutions Project, both Hopkins and Wolff focused on the question: How can anchor cultural institutions in low-income areas and communities in transition make maximum social, economic and artistic impact?

Several conclusions were drawn from studying three U.S.-based anchor institutions: The New Jersey Performing Arts Center, AS220 on Rhode Island, and MASS MoCA in Massachusetts. Key strategies included building meaningful partnerships in the community and “speaking in one voice.” This strategy
meant having a consistent and clear message reflected in all aspects of the institution. It was also essential to remove obstacles and make room for everyone in the community.

An ideal vision of a 21st-century cultural district is one where different institutions can co-exist side by side, creating a hub consisting of all levels of arts and culture. Hopkins cited the Jewellery Quarter in Birmingham, England, as a successful example of cultural collaboration. The historic area consists of hundreds of jewelry stores, but also has a mix of other businesses and a vibrant community event scene, attracting visitors with tours, performances, and creative activities.

Wolff discussed further the role anchor cultural institutions play in their community. The three case studies highlighted in the research thought the most impact they had was on the city identity, diverse programming, and youth education. Wolff suggested the institutions can continue to enable cultural awareness and understanding – “things that we desperately need today.”

The presentation raised a lot of thoughts among participants on the role large anchor institutions should hold in their communities and the relationship and exchange between smaller community initiatives and more prominent organizations.


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Heinrich Schellhorn Welcomes YCIs to Province of Salzburg
Heinrich Schellhorn, Minister for Social and Cultural Affairs in the Province of Salzburg, speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum.Heinrich Schellhorn, Minister for Social and Cultural Affairs in the Province of Salzburg, speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum.
Heinrich Schellhorn Welcomes YCIs to Province of Salzburg
By: Oscar Tollast 

Minister for Social and Cultural Affairs visits as YCIs reflect on resilience in the face of adversity

At different stages in our career, and in life, we can feel as if we’re running on empty – operating on little energy or with scarce resources.

During this time, the need to remain resilient takes on an even greater significance when a big decision goes against us.

Participants of the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators reflected on this thought and how to respond to setbacks during an official welcome by Heinrich Schellhorn, Minister for Social and Cultural Affairs in the Province of Salzburg.

Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine asked Schellhorn where he found strength and resilience in light of the Green party’s performance in Austria’s general election this past Sunday.

While Schellhorn described the result as a “bleak day,” he felt the Greens would rise again, reflecting on the “ups and downs” he had experienced in his career.

At this week’s election, the Greens gained just over three percent of the vote. Schellhorn said the party had failed to provide the right answers to the questions voters were asking.

He indicated society was changing very fast, coming to terms with globalization, immigration, and digitalization.

Schellhorn suggested “simple answers” would not solve any of the concerns but that these types of messages appealed to voters. He told participants there was a need to remain optimistic and support the values of international cooperation and an open society.

One participant asked Schellhorn for his thoughts on where progressive change would come from, suggesting the message needed to come from the bottom up.

Schellhorn agreed and said the first thing required was for politicians to listen to the people. He then told participants that a “leadership of ideas” was needed. According to Schellhorn, democracy does not always mean the voters are right; it also means leaders being able to convince voters of their ideas.

The People’s Party, headed by Austria’s Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, won enough seats in the election to give the party control of parliament in a coalition.

To what extent did the election result reflect a generational way of thinking?

Schellhorn said the young generation was “very divided.” In light of a declining birth rate in Austria and an aging society, Schellhorn predicted voters aged 50 and above, however, would play the most active part in civic society in the future.

Speaking after Schellhorn, Peter Jenkinson, YCI Forum facilitator, said this year’s cohort represented a “creative army that’s deeply human” that will be part of the growth going forward. Jenkinson said, “We have to believe there is a better way and there are no barriers that can’t be overcome.”


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Julius Owino - "Who's Going to Change Things If It's Not Us?"
Julius “Juliani” Owino is one of 50 participants taking part in the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsJulius “Juliani” Owino is one of 50 participants taking part in the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Julius Owino - "Who's Going to Change Things If It's Not Us?"
By: Mirva Villa 

Celebrated Kenyan rapper speaks about building confidence and supporting others

“Being confident in yourself and having the courage to try – we didn’t have that,” says Julius Owino, speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. “Over time,” he adds, “I built that confidence for myself... For me, it takes small actions and being deliberate… And what I learned [at the session] is having courage, too. Having [the] courage to try. So over time, you try, and you try, and it starts making sense.”

Owino (also known by his rapper name Juliani) grew up in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya. It was a harsh upbringing: he would see his parents and the parents of his friends work hard every day to try and make sure there was food on the table. He was 16-years-old when he got his first good pair of shoes. He lost friends who were killed as a result of crime.

For Owino, who started creating music as a teenager, it felt at the time like there was nothing to encourage him to strive for success.

“It’s really difficult to get somebody to tell you failure is not one of the things that is celebrated. You only celebrate when you’re successful.

“When you have hope, you can take anything that day. When you get people telling you that they see something in you, even when you’re not seeing it – that’s really inspiring and gets you [going].”

For the most part, Owino had to build that self-confidence on his own. Now, having become a well-known hip-hop artist, Owino wants to support people from his childhood community.

He has already founded several initiatives, including Dandora Hip Hop City, Mymsanii, Customer Bora, and Taslim. The projects all have the same goal: to give hope to young people.

“To just tell these guys that actually, I see something in you that your reality is not showing you now, and here’s an environment for you to try to bring it out of yourself.”

Owino is one of 50 participants taking part in the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.

Among other creators and innovators from the arts and culture sector, Owino is taking part in seminars and break-out groups discussing entrepreneurship, storytelling and leadership.

By the end of the session, participants like Owino will able to develop their ideas, skills, and global networks that will help them and their causes to grow in stature.

First started in 2014 to empower and advance young change-makers, Salzburg Global’s Young Cultural Innovators network now includes more than 200 creatives all over the world.

Uniting and empowering young people is something Owino feels strongly about. He raps in Sheng – a Kenyan language mixing English, Swahili, “and any other thing that can make sense” because in
a country divided by tribes and class lines Owino says that’s one of the things that unifies people, particularly young Kenyans.

“It’s a language that keeps changing… It was created by Kenyans to break barriers when it comes to tribal issues, class issues… Sheng is one of the main things that has been able to do that,” Owino says.

Speaking to Salzburg Global on the second day of the session, Owino says he has “already gained a lot” from the experience.

“For me, even to be here with all these 50 amazing people that I’m amongst, who are doing things all over the world… and I’m just a guy from Nairobi. It has increased my confidence and my validation,” says Owino. “If I can get to do a YCI [event] in Nairobi, that would be amazing.”

“Kutabadilishwa na nani Kama si sisi” is the name of one of the songs on Owino’s first album, which translates in English as “Who will change things if it’s not us?”

The song reflects on his experiences growing up in the slums. Its message is to empower young people to take up the responsibility to improve their own lives.

“It’s easy to become the victim, and it’s easy to have that perception about yourself, that you just have to survive and die… Through faith in [myself ], I actually realized that I have a lot to offer. So that’s why I’m saying, who’s going to change things if it’s not us?” 


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Developing Models for Projects, Movements and Causes to Thrive
Uffe Elbæk speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsUffe Elbæk speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Developing Models for Projects, Movements and Causes to Thrive
By: Oscar Tollast 

Danish politician Uffe Elbæk reveals how he established a new political movement and cultural voice

The question of whether to follow your head or heart is often a difficult one to answer. Of the options in front of you, one is usually safe, the other risky. When this situation arises in your career, it can feel as if the stakes become even higher.

When Uffe Elbæk stood down as Denmark’s minister of culture in 2012, he had faced a similar dilemma. Before his resignation, he received criticism for holding official gatherings at an organization he had previous ties to and where his husband worked at the time. 

Speaking at the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, Elbæk said reports in the media felt like the “bad side” of House of Cards. His peers told him the period would pass, but Elbæk felt he had to make a decision. He said, “I’m happy to say I chose my love.”

Elbæk stood down from his position and the Danish Social Liberal Party, continuing in his seat as an independent. He was later cleared of any misconduct. While this was a difficult time, he made the decision that gave him the most positive energy. He said, “In the end, I asked my heart. My best guiding tool in my life has always been my heart.”

This decision would have a significant impact on Elbæk’s career. In the spring of 2013, while standing on a street corner with two of his advisors, Elbæk expressed his disappointment with Danish politics. It led to one advisor suggesting the formation of a new political party.

This led to a more detailed discussion about how this party should look and what it should be doing.

Elbæk and his colleagues followed a specific model to move from idea to realization: an idea needs purpose, values, a concept, theme, structure, and action. This process provided a way to turn the idea for a new way of politics into a reality.

The game plan, concept, and structure of the party would stand on a platform of six values: courage, humbleness, transparency, generosity, empathy, and humor. The three big challenges the movement aimed to face included the climate crisis, lack of empathy, and the systemic challenges.

In November 2013, Elbæk announced his new political party - The Alternative - to the world. Today, it has 10 MPs in the Danish Parliament and prides itself as a political movement and cultural voice.

Elbæk said the project design could be applied to small or large projects and encouraged the YCIs to reflect deeply on their own processes and values and to lead boldly from the edge.

To learn more about how The Alternative came to fruition, please click here.


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators VI is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Young Cultural Innovators to Convene in Salzburg for Fourth YCI Forum
Fifty of the world's most talented young innovators will take part in a six-day program at Salzburg Global (Picture: Michal Jarmoluk)Participants at the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Young Cultural Innovators to Convene in Salzburg for Fourth YCI Forum
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

YCI network expands to more than 200 creative change-makers across the world

More than 50 of the brightest creative minds catalyzing urban and social transformation in their communities will convene at Salzburg Global this weekend.

Young artists and cultural leaders representing more than 30 cities and regions will take part in the fourth session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI).

The six-day program, which begins on Saturday, will take place at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria.

Participants will develop their vision, entrepreneurial skills, and global networks which will allow them, their organizations, and their causes to thrive in new ways.

They will do this through a series of capacity building sessions focusing on storytelling, entrepreneurial thinking, human-centered design, and comparative styles of leadership.

YCI alumni will return as facilitators and resource specialists to assist this year’s participants, providing continuity and exchange of best practice.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is a 10-year project which aims to build collaborative networks for human capital and leadership development within the cultural sector.

Most participants come from YCI hubs that Salzburg Global has developed with partners in cities all around the world. These hubs form the core of the YCI multi-year program.

YCI hubs convene mini-sessions, workshops and public events and act as a local resource for emerging innovators.

In previous years, the disciplines represented by participants at these sessions have ranged from the visual and performing arts, literature, and cultural heritage, to foods, fashion, architecture, and design.

This year’s participants are arriving from Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Bangalore, Buenos Aires, Bristol, Cairo, Canmore, Chicago, Copenhagen, Detroit, Hanoi, Cape Town, London, Manila, Memphis, Montreal, Nairobi, New Orleans, New York, New Delhi, Ontario, Siem Riep, Salzburg, Seoul, Skidegate, Tirana, Tokyo, Toronto, Valetta, and Vientiane.

Salzburg Global Program Director Susanna Seidl-Fox said, “With the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators coming up soon, membership in our YCI network will grow to more than 200 creative change-makers across all continents. We are particularly excited to be welcoming new Forum partners from Canada, Malta, and Kenya this year.  

“The YCI Forum connects and supports cultural leaders working at the intersection of the arts, civic innovation, and social transformation. Our world needs the creativity, energy, vision, and passion that these young leaders bring to their communities now more than ever. And they, in turn, can benefit greatly from the ongoing support, encouragement, and network that the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators provides.”


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Minneapolis Communities Given a "Warm Welcome" by YCI Hub Project
Guests contributed to a tapestry combining maps of Somalia and Minnesota - an interwoven representation of the shared community
Minneapolis Communities Given a "Warm Welcome" by YCI Hub Project
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

YCI alumna brings together different Minnesota communities at pop-up cafe event

A YCI Hub project designed to give residents in Minneapolis an authentic cross cultural experience has been hailed a success.

Warm Welcome, a one-night pop-up cafe in a Minneapolis park ice skating warming house, recently brought together new and established Minnesota cultures in a friendly exchange.

The project was co-directed by YCI alumna Amanda Lovelee, a member of the Minnesota YCI Hub. She worked alongside Emily Stover as part of their collaborative group Plus/And. 

The group worked with the Somali Museum of Minnesota and the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board to host the event.

Visitors were given a cup of Somali milky tea after they contributed to a tapestry combining maps of Somalia and Minnesota - an interwoven representation of the shared community.

Outside the warming house, four Somali grandmothers sang, laughed, and shared stories around a campfire much like the nomadic traditions of their childhood. 

The grant for the project was administered by Salzburg Global Seminar as part of funding received from The McKnight Foundation. Lovelee was one of several beneficiaries to receive a regional grant to undertake follow-on activities after attending Session 569 - Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III.

Discussing the project, Lovelee said, "As artists, we hoped that Warm Welcome would be an experience where new and old Minnesota communities could meet, listen, learn, and recognize how much we all have to offer if we can all be open to receiving.

"Our intention was to deepen a sense of empathy for our immigrant neighbors through their food and their stories, while assuring those who might feel afraid that their presence is not merely tolerated, but desired. This traditional Minnesotan space, the ice skating warming house, was temporarily transformed into a place for mutual welcoming to the community we share."

Lovelee admitted organizers were unsure how many people would turn up for the event, which took place in February, but developments in the news cycle helped generate further interest.

She said, "Our invitation was released on social media the day of the travel ban, affecting Somali nationals and even Americans of Somali descent, was first instated, and the overwhelming response indicated many people felt the need to show up.

"We were offering an opportunity to neither hide nor protest, but to gather and celebrate the diverse culture that we’ve built together. Overall our team hosted around 150 people of different ages and ethnicities, including many passers-by who happened upon Warm Welcome as they enjoyed the unseasonably warm night.

"We had tea and mulawah left at the end of the night, and felt like our first Warm Welcome event accomplished what we’d set out to do, and was a small moment of hopeful exchange for many who attended."

The tapestry weaved throughout the evening by visitors represented a symbolic map of Minnesota and Somalia. At the end of the event, guests could see the blended borders of two distant and distinct places, so far apart in distance and in culture, becoming one. The final map was framed and given for display at the Somali Museum of Minnesota.

Moving forward, Plus/And is approaching Minneapolis Parks to consider alternative ways of making use of their warming houses. They also hope to design a series of mobile structures which can serve different functions all year round.

Lovelee said, "We hope that Warm Welcome can be an example of how these structures could be used to further the board’s mission. We are pursuing an opportunity to create a similar space for two weeks in January 2018, and intend to work with other immigrant community partners to share their cultural hot drinks, stories, and understanding.

"Overall we believe that Warm Welcome is an inviting space, bringing people together to share what makes us each unique in our state’s coldest season, and to bring some warmth to a cold time in our country’s history."

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Lauren Kennedy and Rachel Knox Highlighted in List of Memphis’ Most Interesting and Influential People
Lauren Kennedy and Rachel Knox at the third Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) in 2016
Lauren Kennedy and Rachel Knox Highlighted in List of Memphis’ Most Interesting and Influential People
By: Oscar Tollast 

Young Cultural Innovators feature in the inaugural issue of digital publication The ii 100

Salzburg Global Fellows Lauren Kennedy and Rachel Knox have been included in a new publication showcasing Memphis’ most interesting and influential people.

The ii 100 features Kennedy and Knox in its inaugural 2017 issue with 98 other people from the Memphis area.

Both Kennedy and Knox attended the third Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) in 2016. 

Kennedy is the executive director for the Urban Art Commission, having previously worked for Ballet Memphis, and the Dallas Art Fair. Knox, meanwhile, is a program officer for Hyde Family Foundations and sits on the boards of: The Urban Arts Commission, Voices of the South Theatre Company, and Our Fallen Heroes Foundation

Every year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) brings 50 of the world’s most talented young innovators from the culture and arts sector together at Schloss Leopoldskron. Salzburg Global supports participants to develop their vision, entrepreneurial skills, and networks, to enable them and their causes to continue to thrive.

Most participants are drawn from several YCI Hubs in various cities around the world. As members of the Memphis Hub, Knox and Kennedy attended the first major offsite meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in Detroit, MI earlier this year. They were joined by participants from hubs in Detroit, MI and New Orleans, LA. Participants worked on collaborative micro-innovation projects tied to the creative economy and social innovation.

Speaking ahead of this year’s Salzburg Global Day, Knox heaped praise on the YCI Forum. In a Facebook post she said, “My attendance to the Young Cultural Innovators Forum came at a time of transition in my career, so I felt a bit lost when I arrived. However, I quickly learned that although I was surrounded by creatives, my interest and passions about politics and policy were met with equal measure and enthusiasm from some of the most brilliant minds I've encountered. 

“As a textbook know-it-all, I learned that you don’t have to know all of the answers and that “I don’t know” isn’t a cop-out but an extraordinary opportunity to explore the possibilities ahead of you. It renewed my love of learning and not just knowing.

“I got the chance to travel out of the country for the first time in my life and explore one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been with the sweetest air I’ve ever smelled. I won’t ever forget the experience or take it for granted. And I’m so excited and thankful for the new group of fellows attending the YCI forum in the Fall. I can’t wait for them to join our incredible and scrappy American team from Memphis, and Detroit, and New Orleans and see what new energy they bring.”

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Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators: Regional Fellow Event
Report from Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators: Regional Fellow Event now available
Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators: Regional Fellow Event
By: Aceel Kibbi 

Report from YCI Forum event now available

The report of the Salzburg Global session Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators: Regional Fellow Eventis now available online to read, download and share.

In its first major regional meeting, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) that was held on April 27 to 29 in Detroit, Michigan brought together 16 fellows from the YCI city hubs in Memphis, Detroit and New Orleans. For two days, fellows explored urban transformation, creative placemaking and storytelling in intensive discussions, workshops and peer-to-peer learning.

The YCI forum is a ten-year project that aims to foster creative innovation and entrepreneurship with the intention of advancing economic and urban development worldwide, while supporting innovators in gaining leverage on important social issues within their local communities.

Generously supported by the Kresge Foundation, the session recognized the importance of language and emphasis in communicating multi-faceted projects, defining challenges addressed by one’s work, and articulating what one hopes to gain for an exchange with a funder or policymaker.

Download as a PDF (lo-res)


The Salzburg Global session Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators: Regional Fellows Event is part of Salzburg Global’s long-running Culture and the Arts series. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/577 
 

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First Bulgarian YCI Hub Project Highlights Issues Faced by Creative Community
The Bottom Up Culture Project was organized by the Bulgarian Hub of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI)
First Bulgarian YCI Hub Project Highlights Issues Faced by Creative Community
By: Oscar Tollast 

Bottom Up Culture Project reviews culture-led urban regeneration practices, developing creative places, and cultural entrepreneurship 

Participants of a YCI Hub project in Bulgaria have been urged to act more courageously in their work by taking risks and implementing experimental approaches.

Cultural change-makers and innovators received this advice last month while participating in the Bottom Up Culture Project, an event organized by the Bulgarian Hub of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI).

The project's main aim was to highlight and discuss the current issues the creative community in Bulgaria is facing in the context of developing a cultural capital on the continent. The grant for the project was administered by Salzburg Global Seminar as part of funding received from the America for Bulgaria Foundation. It was one of a series of regional grants offered to YCIs from Session 569 - Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III – to undertake follow-on activities.

This project, which took place on the 11th and 15th of May, featured as part of the educational platform of the Plovdiv 2019 Foundation. Events were held in Sofia and Plovdiv. Topics discussed within the framework of the forum included culture-led urban regeneration practices, cultural entrepreneurship, and the question of developing creative quarters.

The participants’ disciplines included art management, contemporary art and socially engaged art, festivals, publishing, regional development, consultancy, academic research, illustration, tourism, theater, music, and architecture. Salzburg Global Fellows and YCI faculty members Peter Jenkinson and Shelagh Wright were on hand to guide the discussions and support participants' ideas of using their work as a catalyst for cultural, economic and social change.

In Sofia, Jenkinson and Wright participated in an open talk which was moderated by YCI Victor Yankov, from the Plovdiv 2019 Foundation. Jenkinson and Wright were able to share their international experience with cultural and socially-engaging projects to Bulgarian cultural organizations and artists. In Plovdiv, meanwhile, cultural practitioners took part in a skills-building workshop. Lyubov Kostova, director of the British Council Bulgaria, joined Jenkinson and Wright to discuss cultural events organizers' issues from the Bulgarian perspective. 

Participants received practical advice on how to meet their challenges and took part in activities to help them learn how to communicate a message easier. They also considered the positioning of arts and culture in relation to activism and social engagement, the role of government in relation to artistic and cultural activities, and the effects of economics in creating a long-term presence in communities. A popular point of discussion revolved around the development of a creative district in Plovdiv - the Kapana - which was built to create an arts and culture community.

To meet some of the challenges faced by participants, an economy of exchange was suggested, starting from within the artistic community. People can form meaningful partnerships through identifying what their assets are and what the possibilities within the community are. This idea is essential for creating a type of ecology rather than a system of competition. There is a lot more output from the ground which needs to be acknowledged, and the idea only artists can be creative is one which needs to be challenged.

Jenkinson and Wright shared several examples of the intersection of arts and cultural development. This list of examples included the Open School Project, which brings together education and art practice in the UK. Participants also learned about the work conducted by Turquoise Mountain. This organization has helped restore Murad Khane, one of the poorest areas in Kabul, Afghanistan, which has been included on the World Monuments Fund's Watch List of the world's most endangered sites. From having no running water, electricity, and buildings in ruin, the area has since transformed into a flourishing cultural and economic hub after investment in schools and the younger generation.

Participants were advised to look at examples from other countries and explore existing working systems. Essential practical tools include taking action, allowing culture to happen as a natural organic process, and identifying and sharing assets. Crowdsourcing is a viable way of building resources, finance, and energy to support bottom-up projects. Communication remains key in the creation of a sharing economy. A belief in sustainable change can occur from the bottom up where individual stories become integral to the story of the future. Jenkinson and Wright left their audiences in Sofia and Plovdiv with a key piece of advice: "Do what you can with what you have where you are."

YCIs from the Bulgarian Hub will continue to create and lead projects to expand the vision created through organizing the Bottom Up Culture event. Developing international projects across the global YCI 2016 network also remains an ambition. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI), please click here.

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Salzburg Global Fellow to Take Part in Dara Film Screening and Panel Discussion
Akhtar at Session 564 Promoting Pluralism and Countering Extremism
Salzburg Global Fellow to Take Part in Dara Film Screening and Panel Discussion
By: Oscar Tollast 

Critically acclaimed play Dara to be screened for free in Oxford at All Souls College, The Old Library

Salzburg Global Fellow Anwar Akhtar will take part in a panel discussion and Q&A following a screening of the highly applauded Dara later this week.

The play, adapted from work by Ajoka Theatre, is a portrayal of the seventeenth century Moghul Royals the Shah Jahan family and addresses debates surrounding religious freedom and practice.

Dara was the first Pakistani play to be chosen and adapted by the UK's National Theatre in London. This came to fruition after Akhtar brought a CD of Dara to the theater's attention.

On Friday, May 5, a free film screening of the play will take place in Oxford at All Souls College, The Old Library, starting at 6 pm. 

Akhtar, having played a key role in Dara's creative team, will take part in a panel discussion and audience Q&A after the screening.

Akhtar, director of The Samosa and production consultant to the National Theatre and Ajoka Theatre, is a multi-time Salzburg Global Fellow, and most recently a participant at the December 2016 session, Promoting Pluralism and Countering Extremism.

Prior to this, Akhtar also helped facilitate working groups at the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators both in 2014 and 2015, where he premiered the filmed recording of the critically acclaimed play. 

The play was praised for its ability to "reach people that political debate cannot" with the central trial scene especially applauded. It created much public debate on culture, history and religious tolerance. 

This Friday, in addition to the screening of the play, Akhtar will take part in a discussion with Polly O’Hanlon, Professor of Indian History and Culture at the Oriental Institute, Oxford University.

This discussion will be moderated by Salzburg Global senior advisor Edward Mortimer, author of Faith and Power: the Politics of Islam, and former Director of Communications for UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

To book a ticket for this event, please visit http://form.jotformeu.com/Events_All_Souls/DaraScreeningOxford5May

Entrance is on a first come first serve basis. You must register for the event and arrive at 5.40pm to be seated. The screening will begin at 6 pm. Latecomers may not be able to enter if capacity is reached.

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Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators Hosts First US Offsite Event
Picture credit: Thomas Hawk
Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators Hosts First US Offsite Event
By: Oscar Tollast 

Session to explore new ways of facilitating more engagement activities in other YCI city hubs

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators will host its first American offsite meeting later this week.

More than 20 YCI Fellows will convene at the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators - Regional Fellows Event: Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans.

The event, which takes place between April 27 and 29, will bring together several YCI Fellows from an expanding network of US city hubs. This network includes Memphis, TN, Detroit, MI, and New Orleans, LA. Those in attendance will include authors, cultural organizers, creative directors, strategists, and artists.

These participants, among others in the culture and arts sector, are a source of inspiration for new ideas to tackle social improvement and sustainable development around the planet. This event will be building on the participants’ creativity, talent, and energy to drive forward positive action.

The three-day event, supported by The Kresge Foundation, will challenge participants to think of ways to accelerate change in cities. They will work on micro-innovation projects linked to the creative economy and social innovation. Facilitators for the upcoming session include Amina Dickerson, president of Dickerson Global Advisors, Peter Jenkinson, an independent cultural broker, and Shelagh Wright, director of ThreeJohnsandShelagh and Mission Models Money. Dickerson has been a skills workshop leader at the YCI Forum in Salzburg for two years, with Jenkinson and Wright co-facilitating the YCI Forum sessions in Salzburg and Fellowship event in Athens since the Forum launched in 2013. 

During the program, participants will take part in panel discussions, small workshop exercises, and will undertake several site visits. One of the first activities participants have already been tasked with is producing an overview of critical data and examples of good practice in the creative sector in Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans. These briefs are set to be shared in advance of the session and will serve as a basis for discussion.

A key outcome expected from the event is a practical toolkit to facilitate more regular convening and engagement activities by Young Cultural Innovators in other city hubs in the Salzburg Global YCI network around the world.

The YCI Forum has city hubs in six regions across the planet. City hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Cape Town, Detroit, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, New Orleans, Phnom Penh/Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. The Forum also has a dedicated hub for Rhodes Scholars.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) launched in 2014 as a ten-year project designed to engage fifty of the world’s most dynamic young creative change-makers every year. The Forum is a significant commitment by Salzburg Global Seminar to foster creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide. The hope is to build a more vibrant and resilient arts sector while advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide.


The Regional Fellows Event: Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This session is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/577.

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Salzburg Global Fellow Deana Haggag Highlighted as Woman Leading the Fight to Protect the Arts in America
Deana Haggag speaking at Salzburg Global Seminar in 2015
Salzburg Global Fellow Deana Haggag Highlighted as Woman Leading the Fight to Protect the Arts in America
By: Oscar Tollast 

President and CEO of United States Artists, and YCI Forum alumna, features in Vogue

Salzburg Global Fellow Deana Haggag has reaffirmed the importance of the arts in America and the impact it can have on others.

Haggag, who was recently appointed President and CEO of the non-profit United States Artists, made the argument while speaking to Vogueas part of a Q&A.

The article, published online earlier this month, discusses the nature of arts in the United States following a proposed budget by U.S. President Donald Trump.

If approved, the budget is set to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Haggag attended The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2015. At the time, she was director of The Contemporary Museum of Baltimore.

Following the session, she continued to work with her fellow alumni. Haggag helped support the Citizen Artist Baltimore project, led by Rebecca Chan, along with Priya Bhayana. The project's aim was to mobilize the Baltimore arts and culture sector to make their interests a critical issue in the city's 2016 mayoral election. It led to the first-ever Mayoral Forum on Arts and Culture in Baltimore's history.

Speaking to Vogue, Haggag discusses her new role with United States Artists, the need to protect the existence of art, and the greatest challenges she faces. She also discusses her belief how art is for everyone and its ability to do everything.

Toward the end of the Q&A, she says, "I think about people who didn't grow up with art or don't have art in their lives, who are perhaps missing that thing that art can help bridge, which is having empathy for another person and another experience.

"If you can't meet someone day to day who different from you, if you don't have that in your life, then you can find that through music and the arts and books. That's why we exist."


Deana Haggag took part in The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2015. The list of our partners for this session and further information can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/554

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Young Cultural Innovators Share Their Passions in Video Series
Young Cultural Innovators present their passions at the Third Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsYoung Cultural Innovators present their passions at the third Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Young Cultural Innovators Share Their Passions in Video Series
By: Chris Hamill-Stewart 

Third year cohort of YCIs share their passions in video series at the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators

Who are you and what are you passionate about? This was the question put to the Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) of the third annual Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators.

The video responses to this question were produced as part of a communication workshop hosted by Natasha Cica, Director of Kapacity.org. In the dialogue-based workshop, YCIs worked in larger and break out groups to co-create the conversation, share perspectives and ultimately built capacity to “own their own voices.” The workshop challenged and supported the group to experiment with different communication styles and methods, with the ultimate goal of delivering a powerful presentation in their videos.

You can watch the videos of the YCIs who have chosen to make their video public in the list below, on both Facebook and YouTube.

Dong-Hee Cho, founder of the Well Done Project and creator of an inexpensive educational math book for children in Africa, on her own work, how education can bring us closer together and the Salzburg Global Seminar.

Natasha Cica, director of Kapacity.org, talks about her experience of facilitating a communications work shop at Salzburg Global Seminar, and what she's most enjoyed about meeting this group of young innovators.

Sebastian Chuffer, filmmaker, director and CEO of Cineastas del Futuro (Future Filmmakers), discusses the importance of storytelling and its role in our personal and civil lives.

Yuki Uchida, co-representative of Re:public Inc, on why it's important for citizens to be involved with the design of their own spaces.

Shelley Danner, co-founder and program director of Challenge Detroit, discusses what she's enjoyed about attending a Salzburg Global Seminar session.

Netta Avineri, assistant professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and co-founder of the MIIS Intercultural Digital Storytelling Project, discusses her interests in storytelling, creative hubs, and moving forwards from the session.

Anouza Phothisane, co-founder of Loabangfai, the first Laos-based break dancing crew, discusses what he enjoyed about attending the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators and how he presents his work and country to many other creators.

Meryam Bouadjemi, filmmaker and storyteller, describes how her experience at Salzburg global Forum for Young Cultural innovators has helped her in an important time of her life.

Taulant Dibra, architect and founder of TD architecture Studio, on why he became an architect and his projects that he considers successful.

Joo Im Moon, senior researcher at the World Culture Open Arts & Culture Lab, shares her dream through quotes that inspire her.

Steven McMahon, choreographic and associate artistic director with Ballet Memphis, discusses how his experience at The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators has affected his personal growth.

Cadeatra Harvey, or C. Harvey, owner of Generation of Dreamers and Baltimore's Gifted, on empowering the youth in Baltimore through their own art and creativity.

Samuel Oliver, manager of executive affairs and capital projects for Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, on making his voice heard and his message understood.

Edwin Kemp Attrill, founder and artistic director of ActNow Theatre, discusses how artists, creatives and citizens are becoming a force for global change, and how cultural innovation is an integral part of the shift from hierarchies into networks.

Maria José Greloni, regional director of communication and online campaigns at Wingu, explains how her time at Salzburg Global Seminar has influenced her ideas for future projects, and made her realize the value of humor in creativity.

Chryssa Vlachopoulou, communication, press officer and events manager for BIOS, on her experience attending a Salzburg Global Seminar session and what she'll take away from it.

Rachel Knox, program associate for Innovate Memphis, discusses how Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural innovators has helped her realise she's not alone in her struggles and how she's enjoyed meeting such a diverse goroup of people through the program.

Carla Schleicher, artistic programs and project coordinator for West Broadway Business and Area Coalition, reads a message addressed to her from one of the people she has helped through her work.

Melvin Henley, creative industries strategist, implementer and advocate, discusses his own work in Detroit, and how things are looking up for the city.

Arlette Quynh-Anh Tran, writer and curator of Post Vidai, on her own work and how art can be used to build bridges between fractured parts of society.

Despina Gerasimidou, creator of Future Libraries, on how the traditional idea of libraries is fading out and being replaced by modern and exciting new centers of experience and learning.

Annelies Senfter, visual artist and photographer, on developing her projects in an abstract way and trusting in herself.

Alphonse Smith, talks about his own path to where he is now, and how he is working in New Orleans to build on the rich culture that already exists there, and making it more accessible to all residents.

Yuki Oka, explains his motivations for doing the work he does, and how this has driven him to try to help others.

Joana Stefanova, cultural manager and part of the One Foundation for Culture and Arts, on love.

Maia Asshaq, author, publisher and co-founder of the Detroit Art Book fair and DittoDitto Books, on creating an online companion piece to her already existing work.

Aaron Davis, Ph.D candidate and expert on cities and their changing role in the 21st centuries, discusses involving citizens in design processes and why this is important in the first place.

Amanda Lovelee, visual artist and city artist for City of St Paul, on how important art can be for cities.

Kreshnik Merxhani, freelance architect known for his writings and artistic restoration projects, on why he has always wanted to be an artist and the work he does to restore more than just physical objects, but memories, relations and knowledge

Brian Gerardo, entrepreneur, dancer and co-founder of the Baltimore Dance Crews Project, discusses how his personal experiences have influenced him to set up his own after-school dance activities.

Nicolas Aziz, project coordinator for Converge, on the importance of new cultural experiences, bringing them to youth for their benefit and helping them to exceed what is expected of them.

Imani Jacqueline Brown, co-founder of Blights Out and director of programs at Antenna, discusses the crisis of capitalism we're experiencing right now, and especially its effects on arts and culture.

Lomorpich Rithy, independent filmmaker and founder of Plerng Kob (meaning campfire), on coming together to share stories, hear other peoples' stories and exercize the right to have your voice heard.

Mark Salvatus, contemporary artist exhibited in multiple exhibitions, on defining his life and creating meaning through art.

Victor Yankov, festival director of the Open Arts Foundation, on the role of culture in cities and societies.

Lauren Kennedy, executive director of the Urban Art Commission, on how her early exposure to art was influenced by her interactions with her father, and how her understanding of public art continues to grow and evolve.

Miku Kano, member of ISHINOMAKI 2.0, discusses her work in the post-tsunami town of Ishinomaki, and how they're creating the "most interesting town in the world" by fostering creativity.

Nafsika Papadopoulou, External Collaborator and Project Coordinator for Neon Organization, on the transitional stage Athens is going through, and how urban art and creativity may aid in this transition.

Wandisile Nqekotho, founder of 18 Gangster Museum, on how he's helping young people to stay away from gangsterism in South Africa.

Rebecca 'Bucky' Willis, project manager for Detroit Collaborative Design Center, discusses the concept of Design Superheroes and why they're important.

Sacramento Knoxx, multi-discipline performance artist, on the city that he's from.

Andrei Nikolai Pamintuan, producer and creative director of Pineapple Lab, on empowering creators and artists by providing them with a platform to share their experiences and stories.

Chheangly Yeng, co-founder of the Magic Library and Slap Paka Khmer (Khmer Collaborative Writers), discusses Cambodia's troubled past and how his work in telling stories to children can benefit those children and their futures.

Yu Nakamura, who runs 40creations, a group which preserves the recipes of octogenarians, on why she likes wrinkles, meeting a grandma and finding the right way to solve problems or change your situation.

Seda Röder, "the piano hacker," on the value of creativity, the 21st century as the century of creative thinking, and concentrating on the core of what makes us humans - creativity.

Adam Wiltgen, arts administrator, presenter and technical communicator, on using creativity to overcome community challenges.

Cameron Shaw, writer, editor and executive director of Pelican Bomb, discusses her work in empowering artists and providing a platform through which creators can critically examine issues in everyday life.

Siviwe Mbinda, founder of the Happy Feet Youth Project, on using dance to attract children to his project, and then positively influencing them through education.

Shawn Burnett, co-founder and executive director of Walks of Art, has a message for anyone who doesn't wake up with hope in their hearts.

Mirela Kocollari, director of Cultural Heritage and Tourism for the Municipality of Tirana, on being cautious of our limits, knowledge, and abilities in order to bring out the best in ourselves.

Michele Anderson, rural program director for Springboard for the Arts, on the importance of rural communities and making sure they are a part of the conversation in the future of our societies and creative thinking.

Bora Baboci, architect and visual artist, presents an image introduced to her during her time at Salzburg Global Seminar.

Steven Fox, writer, poet and actor from Memphis, Tennessee, discusses being accepted as a creative.

 


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III is part of a ten-year multi-year series, which is generously supported by: Albanian-American Development Foundation; America For Bulgaria Foundation; American Express; Arts South Australia; Asia-Europe Foundation; Cambodian Living Arts; Edward T. Cone Foundation; Lloyd A. Fry Foundation; Korea Foundation; the McKnight Foundation; Red Bull Amaphiko; The Kresge Foundation; Japan Foundation; Stavros Niarchos Foundation; Adena and David Testa; and the Yeltsin Center.

More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/569

More information on the series can be found here: yci.salzburgglobal.org

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Young Cultural Innovators Forum III
Young Cultural Innovators Forum III
By: Denise Macalino 

Report from the third annual Young Cultural Innovators Forum now available

The report from the third annual Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is now available online to read, download and share.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators(YCI Forum), is an annual series that supports emerging young artists and cultural actors who are using innovative practices to catalyze urban transformation in their communities. 

Our biggest and most diverse cohort of sixty-four young cultural leaders from sixteen different cities, including six new hubs, gathered in the Schloss Leopoldskron in mid-October. Salzburg Global was fortunate enough to host future innovators this past Fall from Albania, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Greece, Japan, the Mekong Delta Region, the Philippines, South Africa, South Korea, Russia, and the United States. 

This group of young leaders spent a week in each other’s company, exploring concepts on how to foster strong culture in order to transform communities. The YCI Fellows, passionate about the growth in their local hubs, connected with like-minded individuals to spread their innovative thinking with a global network. With a revitalized energy towards their work, the YCI Fellows returned to their communities with new perspectives and ideas on their role as leading innovators. 

Download the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators II report (PDF) (low-res)  


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III is part of a ten-year multi-year series, which is generously supported by: Albanian-American Development Foundation; America For Bulgaria Foundation; American Express; Arts South Australia; Asia-Europe Foundation; Cambodian Living Arts; Edward T. Cone Foundation; Lloyd A. Fry Foundation; Korea Foundation; the McKnight Foundation; Red Bull Amaphiko; The Kresge Foundation; Japan Foundation; Stavros Niarchos Foundation; Adena and David Testa; and the Yeltsin Center. 

More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/569

More information on the series can be found here: yci.salzburgglobal.org 

You can follow all the discussions and interactions on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Baltimore Rise Up
Lead photography: Vandalog
Baltimore Rise Up
By: Tony Abraham 
Several YCI-Fellows involved as social entrepreneurs in the Charm City One hundred men and women are gathered inside a lecture hall at Baltimore’s esteemed Johns Hopkins’ University early on a Saturday morning, and though they range in age, race, class and gender, they all have one thing in common. They’re all here to learn how to be social entrepreneurs. From wannabes to seasoned vets, the room is filled with social entrepreneurs like Steven Nutt, a cyber security professional who just received funding from the Warnock Foundation for his food donation app, Are You Going to Eat That, and Andrew Foster, who received funding from the same foundation last spring to develop Baltimore Pooch Camp, a program he launched to help both at-risk youth and shelter dogs. A woman named Gladys wants to start a program for disadvantaged youth. The woman next to her, Kimberly, hopes to do the same. 

Darius Graham, the director of Hopkins’ Social Innovation Lab, is hosting the bootcamp, a taste of the Lab’s social enterprise incubator, in hopes of drumming up interest and fostering talent while keeping a community of innovators connected.

“This is an opportunity for you to share with us, with each other and with the speakers what your experience has been so far as an entrepreneur or changemaker in this city,” he said.

Social entrepreneurs, community organizers and artists in Baltimore have been galvanized by the uprising that ignited three miles Southwest of this lecture hall in the spring of 2015, sparked by the murder of Freddie Gray by six police officers in the spring of 2015.

Poet and entrepreneur Brion Gill remembers her reaction to the live news coverage that day.

“Baltimore’s about to explode.”

In a way, the city did. But the brutal injustice that was Freddie Gray’s murder did not happen in a vacuum. Gill herself has seen how systemic injustice impacts low-income people of color – especially youth. The poet used to be a teacher at Eager Street Academy, a school for teens who have been charged as adults and are subsequently housed in the city’s detention center.

 

Now, Gill runs Free Verse, a poetry workshop for Baltimore youth that bolsters creative expression and initiates dialogue about race.

Zeke Cohen, an entrepreneur and candidate for Baltimore City Council, used to be a teacher, too, at a school in the neighborhood where Freddie Gray grew up. Students at the school, which he likened to a prison without heat or air conditioning, were unable to drink water from the lead pipes. They had to walk past “liquor stores and heroin dealers” to get to class – if they could even make it to class.

That’s why Cohen and a handful of his fellow educators collectively launched a nonprofit called The Intersection, to teach high school students civic leadership and community organizing. The nine students in the pilot program went on to register 100 people to vote, build a community garden to address fresh food crises, lobby for inclusive immigration legislation, document neighborhood blight and host a mayoral forum.

“I have come to truly believe that if we’re going to change our city, state and country, it will have to come from young people,” said Cohen. “If you think about movements that have happened in our country, it’s often the youth, young people, who start the movement.”

Cohen, is now running for City Council as the candidate who will work across sectors, silos, districts – just about any boundary – to create real equity in Baltimore. That will mean working closely with the city’s social entrepreneurs. For example, Cohen vowed to hire an ambassador from Baltimore Corps, a fellowship for social changemakers in the city.

Brian Gerardo, founder of Baltimore Dance Crew Project, was one of the first Baltimore Corps fellows. Like Cohen and Gill, Gerardo was a teacher before becoming a social entrepreneur.

“There are so many entrepreneurs here in the city who have found needs, and I think a lot of us are from education backgrounds. People see education as being a very big need,” he said. “The work we’re doing is never easy, especially for people of color.”

Baltimore Dance Crew Project takes a multi-pronged approach to youth development by using hip hop dance to strengthen the relationships across generations. Students are not only engaging in dance, they’re forging relationships with older dancers who maintain careers outside of dance. Plus, the crew itself is a very necessary support network.

“The average mentorship relationship only lasts five months. That’s not a long time to build a lasting relationship,” said Gerardo. “When I was a teacher here in the city, I myself was having a hard time building relationships with my students beyond my classroom. Having that positive relationship changes the school environment.”

Gerardo said the uprising has magnified the social impact work being done in Baltimore. The urgency has always been there, he said, but there has been an uptick in donations and volunteer power.

Sammy Hoi, the impact-impassioned president of Maryland Institute College of Art, said he feels there’s been a heightened sense of urgency since the uprising – a sense that the city has to create equity “as soon as possible.”

But the galvanization of the social impact community is undeniable, said Hoi.

“Baltimore has a culture of fragmentation, meaning we can be a lot better at coming together for a common agenda. Post-Freddie Gray, there’s a great sense of awareness that we need to come together,” he said. “There’s no lack of good will but the actual synergy is very much a work in progress.”

Hoi is trying to expedite that progress by reframing MICA’s activities and programming, making them mission-based and inclusive while “translating Baltimore’s rich creative capital into a vibrant and equitable creative economy.” In other words, MICA’s students and program staff are partnering with grassroots organizations to bring arts education to underserved neighborhoods like Freddie Gray’s West Baltimore community.

There, a conscious collective of grassroots organizations, anchor institutions, social entrepreneurs, investors and artists called Innovation Village have banded together to invest in their own community, which has largely been subjected to generational marginalization.

“We’re hyper-focused on making sure there’s access to food, health, housing and education, and using technology as an enabler to be created in how those services are delivered,” said chairman Richard May. Earlier this summer, Innovation Village announced a free public wifi initiative in partnership with public-private collaborative OneBaltimore and an upcoming incubator for social entrepreneurs.

You cannot pelt a pebble in Charm City without hitting someone working on, around or within close proximity to a social project or social entrepreneur. And, odds are, they’ll be working with youth.

Back at Johns Hopkins, Graham is instructing the room of nascent social entrepreneurs to communicate with one another.

“Always know who else is doing the kind of work you’re doing. You’re going to want to talk to them and learn what is and isn’t working,” he said. “View them as competition or collaborators – either way, find people doing similar work and ask them questions.”

Gill, Gerardo, Hoi and fellow Baltimore changemakers Meryam Bouadjemi, Shawn Burnett and Cadeatra Harvey just had a chance to do exactly that this month. All six are Fellows of the 2016 Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. In Salzburg, the Fellows shared best practices with international leaders in the space and brought back lessons on how to improve the city’s cultural ecosystem.

If the uprising was the explosion Gill initially perceived it to be, the city’s social entrepreneurs, artists and community organizers are ready to raise a phoenix from the ashes.


Meet the entire YCI-Baltimore-Hub online and find general information on the Young Cultural Innovators Forum. The original of this article was produced by Red Bull Amaphiko and it can be found here: https://amaphiko.redbull.com/en/magazine/baltimore-rise-up
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YCI Develops Tech Solutions for Social Change
YCI Develops Tech Solutions for Social Change
By: Tony Abraham 

With her NGO Wingu Maria Jose Greloni empowers other organizations across Latin America through technology

María José Greloni might have over a decade of experience working with NGOs under her belt, but it didn’t take a decade for the communications pro to understand the financial limitations NGOs face. That’s why the native Argentinian has made a career out of helping nonprofits get their hands on innovative technologies that give them a leg up in the marketplace.

Those technologies, which range from customer relationship management software to virtual reality, allow NGOs to compete with the private sector and offer high quality social services that governments aren’t usually built to provide.

Ironically enough, Greloni does that work through a NGO calledWingu, a spinoff of U.S.-based nonprofit Idealist that works with tech developers and communications experts to empower organizations through technology.

“One of the things that I believe is that NGOs and social projects should have a profitable or sustainable way to get money,” said Greloni. “Many times, the people who work at NGOs are not professional enough because NGOs don’t have the money to pay as well as the market does.”

That’s where Wingu steps in. While Greloni herself hones in on communications and data, she’s seen her organization develop some seriously game-changing technologies for NGOs across Latin America.

1. Digital donation platformsDonar Online is really big. What we have built is a platform where NGOs from all of Latin America can receive donations. Right now, we have more than 1,000 NGOs from the region that have received more than $300 million and we don’t charge anything. Our model in this case is sponsorships. Big companies are sponsoring this tool.”

2. Bringing transparency to underserved neighborhoods “Before we did Caminos de la Villa, the slums you see in Google Maps were just a grey hole. We have walked all the slums in Buenos Aires and have mapped them in alliance with another NGO that works in human rights. The citizens who live in slums can report the state of the slum. For example, if the government has promised to build something or do something with water and hasn’t provided a solution, citizens can report it. One of the challenges we have with this mapping is that once the platforms are built, it’s not that easy to get the citizens to make reports. If we wish for them to participate, we have to invest our resources in communication.”

3. Virtual reality for cancer patients “This is a different case because what we did was create an alliance with a virtual reality company. When a patient goes to take their long term chemo treatment, we give them virtual reality lens and they can choose where they want to be when they get their medicine. It was an experiment that got huge. One of the things virtual reality does for patients is relax them so they are not so focused on the treatment. In a way, that anxiety gets lowered. We want to get this treatment to other private and public hospitals. That’s the dream.”

4. Crowdsourcing citizen data “We have a project that is related to crowdsourcing of citizen data called DataShift in four countries. What we’re doing, in alliance with CIVICUS, we’re trying to create solutions so that the citizens come report on the platform and make the invisible visible. In many cases, the data governments have show one side of reality. What we’re trying to do is show the other. Many countries in Latin America are part of Open Government Partnership, and in Argentina right now we just got access to this information. Just two weeks ago, we had the first Open Government Forum. I think Argentina is walking the good path."

5. Data-driven communication campaigns “There’s a need to communicate. We are doing Camp-Camp right now to help NGOs think their campaigns. We’re collecting data and helping a few organizations do that. For example, our project with health centers right now is in a testing phase. What they do is ask citizens to answer a very brief questionnaire about their socioeconomic conditions and how they are received by services. Usually, the service is terrible. We will be able to have that data and go to the government with that. It’s super, super new.”


Maria Jose Greloni was attending the 2016 Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsThe original of this article was produced by Red Bull Amaphiko and it can be found here: https://amaphiko.redbull.com/en/magazine/the-tech-solutions-revolutionalising-social-change

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The National Shelf Service
Photography: Future Library
The National Shelf Service
By: Phil Hoad 
YCI-Fellow Despina Gerasimidou aims at a revolution of library systems in Greece and the Balkans “From collection to connection, and from connection to creation.” That’s the mantra of Despina Gerasimidou, who is convinced that Greece’s libraries can become beacons of social change. The country, with its chronic public-funding shortage, doesn’t from the outside seem like a promising candidate. But the Future Library initiative, where Gerasimidou is director, has high ambitions. “We are talking about a revolution here, about the renaissance of the physical library as space,” she says, “More and more libraries are transforming themselves into local hubs, community centers and offering solutions to people’s problems, and services we could not have imagined before: maker spaces, media labs, music studios and business centres.” 

Established in 2011 in Veria, Macedonia, to spread the model of the city’s pioneering central library, Future Library now operates across 140 libraries in Greece and the Balkans. Among many things, it has transformed nine into state-of-the-art media labs, and organises librarian training and summer-reading campaigns.

They’re backed by the philanthropic Stavros Niarchos Foundation, which this summer opened a €600m Athens cultural centre; FL also plans to extend the network out into 11 other countries in the region, including Turkey, in partnership with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Promoting traditional literacy as well as digital-era skills obviously ticks the kind of egalitarian nurturing role that is the purpose of all libraries, and which can be a starting point for greater social mobility. But Future Library’s support programme could benefit one group in particularly dire need: the estimated 60,000 refugees in limbo in Greece.

“Libraries demonstrate a long tradition of attracting and embracing people regardless of their countries of origin,” says Gerasimidou, “They have the power to advocate for the refugees’ rights of access to education and information, but even more than that: free access to education and information is a fundamental right of all people.”

Future Library has mapped the availability of such services in Greece to refugees, and last year organised a multi-disciplinary training workshop in which librarians, municipal staff, social and NGO workers could learn how to help.

It has been a turbulent time for all public services in Greece – part of the reason why a private philanthropic organisation like the Stavros Niarchos Foundation has decided to step in to stimulate an already-outdated library network. Navigating this partnership hasn’t been plain sailing. The National Library will move to new premises in the Athens cultural centre, while the Foundation will only hand over the Cultural Center, the building and the park to the Greek state. In parallel, the achievements across the wider library networks are already significant – the second time a great library-builder has come out of Macedonia.


Future Library director Despina Gerasimidou was attending the 2016 Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural InnovatorsThe original of this article was produced by Red Bull Amaphiko and it can be found here: https://amaphiko.redbull.com/en/magazine/the-national-shelf-service

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South Africa's Pop Up Gangster Museum founded by YCI Fellow
Photography: Imraan Christian/Mobile Media Mob
South Africa's Pop Up Gangster Museum founded by YCI Fellow
By: Rofhiwa Maneta 
Wandisile Nqeketho is attending the 2016 Young Cultural Innovators Forum The first thing you notice about the 18 Gangster Museum founder, Wandisile Nqeketho is his larger-than-life character. The Khayelitsha-based entrepreneur has a disarming wit about him, routinely interjecting parts of his speech with a joke, anecdotes about the ways of the world and a trademark “it’s too easy” quip when responding to a compliment about his achievements. But underneath his comedic exterior lies a man who’s well aware of the workings of the world and it’s violence – and he’s made it his life’s mission to do something about it. “I can’t live in a society that is governed by fear,” says the 26 year old. “Khayelitsha [where he lives] has a huge gang problem and gangsterism’s become normalized. I don’t think curbing gangsterism should just be left to the police. I wanted to do something about it myself.” His Cape Town-based social enterprise does exactly that, by collaborating with gangsters and ex-offenders to educate people about the dangers of gangsterism.

Nqeketho’s 18 Gangster Museum is a museum dedicated to showing the material consequences of gangsterism. The museum is hosted inside a shipping container and is a replica of a prison cell and the idea is that ex-offenders go ‘back to prison’ while those visiting the prison are immersed into its realities. The ex-offenders also give first hand accounts about the hazards of gangsterism and prison life from inside the prison cell museum. “The response was amazing,” he recalls. “There was an ex-offender who shared his story at the museum. He’d been in prison for four years for armed robbery, car theft and attempted murder. And he’s only 26, mind you. But he’s turning his life around. He’s in varsity right now and even though his is a cautionary tale, there’s a bit of hope at the end of it. He managed to turn his life around.”

To live in a township in any part of Cape Town – or any part of South Africa for that matter – is, to quote American author Ta Nehisi Coates, “be naked to the guns, violence and trauma”. Nqeketho believes in writing a new narrative, not just for Khayelitsha, but for every township dotted across South Africa. “I want to live in a gang-free society,” he says, before pausing, almost as if to keep his loftiness in check. “I just can’t live in a society where gangsterism or crime are presented as a way of to the kids growing up in townships. If anything, the recent response to the exhibition has shown me just how much work still needs to be done. The museum is still in its infancy but it would be great to have it up and running outside of Cape Town.”


Wandisile did attend the 2016 Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. His attendance was generously supported by Red Bull Amaphiko. The original of the article can be found here: https://amaphiko.redbull.com/en/magazine/south-africa-s-pop-up-gangster-museum
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Young Cultural Innovators Travel to Salzburg for Third YCI Forum
Young Cultural Innovators Travel to Salzburg for Third YCI Forum
By: Chris Hamill-Stewart 

Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators brings together cultural entrepreneurs, artists and more from across sectors to develop their vision, skills and networks.

Cultural innovation and creative entrepreneurship have become key to sustainable development, economic progress, and social development in the 21st Century. The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III, taking place October 11 to 16 at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, will bring together over 50 of the brightest minds from across varying industrial, geographic and cultural backgrounds with the goal of developing their skills, enhancing their connections on a global scale, and sharing their own expertise and experiences. The experience will help these innovators prepare for the challenges and opportunities of the 21st Century. 

The Forum brings groups of people from selected cities to develop “culture hubs” – these hubs form the core of the Young Cultural Innovators program; they give participants areas where they can focus their ideas, develop them collaboratively and explore and develop upon what they’ve learned during the Forum. They also provide a platform for public events and workshops. There are currently hubs in cities across the world, including Tokyo, Athens, Buenos Aries, Salzburg, Baltimore and Seoul.

As the third instalment of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in the ten-year series, the Forum will build on previous years’ experiences to provide an even more in-depth and fulfilling experience. This year there are six new cultural hubs: with Adelaide, Detroit, Memphis, New Orleans, Minnesota and Plovdiv being represented. There are also eight new partners including the Albanian-American Development Foundation, the America for Bulgaria Foundation, Arts South Australia, the Asia-Europe Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, the Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, the McKnight Foundation, and the Yeltsin Center. The host of new partners have helped to being in participants from new hub cities to an already hugely diverse program.

Across the packed five-day program, participants can expect a wide variety of experiences: collaborative sessions; multimedia training and practice; highly interactive talks; smaller and larger discussion and workshop groups. All this aims to develop skills and foster creativity and collaboration.

“We have gathered an amazing group of inspiring young leaders who are using their imaginations and creative energy to improve their communities and bring about transformative change in their cities,” said Program Director Susanna Seidl-Fox, “They are in for a week of intensive discussion, skill building, peer mentoring, exchange, inspiration, and fun.”

Experts and facilitators with their own eclectic backgrounds come from all over the world to share their expertise and experience, guaranteeing that the experience is enriching for all participants. 


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III is part of a ten-year multi-year series, which is generously supported by: Albanian-American Development Foundation; America For Bulgaria Foundation; American Express; Arts South Australia; Asia-Europe Foundation; Cambodian Living Arts; Edward T. Cone Foundation; Lloyd A. Fry Foundation; Korea Foundation; the McKnight Foundation; Red Bull Amaphiko; The Kresge Foundation; Japan Foundation; Stavros Niarchos Foundation; Adena and David Testa; and the Yeltsin Center. 

More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/569

More information on the series can be found here: yci.salzburgglobal.org 

You can follow all the discussions and interactions on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Beyond the Schloss Gates
Clare Shine at the Sunshine Cinema in South Africa with the Red Bull Amaphiko Academy
Beyond the Schloss Gates
By: Patrick Wilson 
Salzburg Global Seminar's staff head out of the Schloss to take Salzburg Global programs out on the road. Salzburg Global Seminar challenges current and future leaders to solve problems of global concern. Our dedicated team at Salzburg Global share in this mission, not only by leading programs in Salzburg, but also by partnering with other globally-conscious organizations and facilitating events across the world. Singapore Founded by three young Harvard men as place for fresh intellectual exchange, Salzburg Global Seminar has long been engaged in issues surrounding the future of education. In this vein, President Stephen L. Salyer visited Singapore for the first International Liberal Education Symposium, hosted by Yale-NUS College at its new permanent campus in the city-state. The event brought together more than 30 global education leaders to discuss the future of international higher education and dialogue on obstacles and trends in education in an increasingly interconnected world. Hong Kong Salzburg Global’s long-running program Philanthropy and Social Investment entered a new phase in 2015 in anticipation of the adoption of new climate change goals, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the funding needed to support these new initiatives. Marking the start of this new phase, Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine together with US Development Director Andrew Ho travelled to Hong Kong for the session Philanthropy in the Global Age.  The session was co-convened with The Global Friends, a consortium of global philanthropists leading values-driven social innovation, and focused on the philanthropic innovation needed to support transition to a climate-balanced economy and foster US-China collaboration to this end. Gwangju and Seoul, Korea Building on our work with the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum), Program Director for Culture and the Arts Susanna Seidl-Fox travelled to Gwangju, Korea for the Asia-Europe Foundation’s conference Cities: Labs for Culture? Seidl-Fox, who has been leading programs on culture and the arts at Salzburg Global for almost 20 years, moderated a panel focusing on leadership in the cultural sector. She also met with creatives and cultural leaders in Seoul at the World Culture Open, a network which invites people to engage in intercultural exchange and collaboration. While in the capital, Seidl-Fox was also able to attend a gathering of local YCI Fellows from the Seoul hub. Florence, Italy Intercultural exchange and conflict transformation were also key themes for Susanna Seidl-Fox when she traveled to Florence, Italy, to discuss the pressing need for Western societies and global Muslim communities to build comprehension and communication. New York University’s John Brademas Center for the Study of Congress brought together 20 artists, conveners, practitioners, and funders to identify opportunities for positive action and collaboration. Seidl-Fox brought insights from the 2014 session Conflict Transformation Through Culture: Peace-Building and the Arts and discussed the need to promote capacity-building in the Middle East-North Africa region. Minsk, Belarus Program Director Charles E. Ehrlich furthered Salzburg Global’s conflict transformation work when he traveled to Belarus to speak at the International University on Conflict Transformation in Minsk – an apt location, as the city had recently hosted the OSCE-led Russian-Ukrainian peace talks. Ehrlich presented two topics drawn from his own professional experiences in Kosovo and Catalonia, examining the causes of disputes, reconciliation, and lessons learned for peaceful transformation. The program brought together young professionals from Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, and Georgia, including Russian-occupied territories (Abkhazia and South Ossetia), to look beyond regional conflicts and frame constructive dialogue for exchanging new ideas.

Berlin, Germany

Drawing on her own professional background in biodiversity and climate and water issues, as well as Salzburg Global’s own extensive work in the fields of international trade, governance, transboundary cooperation, and conflict prevention, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine moderated a discussion entitled (Mis)understanding of Climate – China, India, and the EU at the Public Diplomacy Forum in Berlin, Germany. The event was hosted by the Charhar Institute, Clingendael Institute, and ifa, and supported by Robert Bosch Stiftung.  Cape Town, South Africa Red Bull’s Amaphiko project is a founding partner of the YCI Forum. Through this partnership, Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine was invited to Cape Town, South Africa to speak at the Red Bull Amaphiko Academy, a launch-pad event for grassroots social innovators and entrepreneurs who are making a positive difference in their community. As well as strengthening the Red Bull Amaphiko partnership, Shine also acted as a talent scout, meeting STEM education innovator Varaidzo Mureriwa and inviting her to participate in Untapped Talent: Can Better Testing and Data Accelerate Creativity in Learning and Societies?
WANT TO HOST A SALZBURG GLOBAL FELLOWSHIP EVENT IN YOUR CITY? To find out when Salzburg Global Seminar staff might be in your city and to inquire about hosting a local Salzburg Global Fellowship event, contact Salzburg Global Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke: fellowship@SalzburgGlobal.org 
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Architects of the Future
Salzburg Global President STEPHEN L. SALYER (right) meets with AHMAD ALHENDAWI, the first-ever United Nations Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth.
Architects of the Future
By: Louise Hallman 

Since its founding by three Harvard graduates in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has demonstrated a unique commitment to investing in next-generation talent from all walks of life. Combining dedicated accelerator programs for young Fellows with topical sessions on key issues for youth around the world, we help rising professionals meet today’s global leaders on equal terms. We believe in engaging and empowering future leaders today to be the architects of more sustainable and just global systems tomorrow.

When Clemens Heller, Richard Campbell, and Scott Elledge convened the first “Salzburg Seminar in American Studies” in 1947, they were reacting to a continent ravaged by two World Wars in just three decades. Inspired by the Marshall Plan for Economics, they sought to launch a “Marshall Plan for the Mind” to reinvigorate European and American intellectual capacity, strengthen connections across the Atlantic, and heal deep post-war rifts. 

Fast forward nearly 70 years and Salzburg Global Seminar continues to forge breakthrough ideas and collaborations that bridge global and local divides. Our mission to challenge current and future leaders to solve issues of global concern calls for courage and creativity across generations and sectors.  

Most of Europe may no longer be ravaged by war, unlike some regions, but it faces spiraling tensions that can only be resolved through youth engagement and long-term vision. The recent financial and Euro crises, as well as attempts to accommodate desperate waves of refugees crossing the Mediterranean in search of safety in the European Union, have pushed European institutions, governments, and communities to the brink. New solutions and new energy are sorely needed.  

“As a trusted neutral organization that has witnessed conflict on its doorstep for decades, Salzburg Global has the responsibility to think and act long-term beyond narrow interests,” explains Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine. Our multi-year programs not only seek to address immediate problems facing individuals and institutions, but also systemic challenges, identifying levers for sustainable and socially just change at all levels. 

Many of Salzburg Global’s 2015 programs addressed critical issues faced by young people around the world. These included Youth, Economics, and Violence: Implications for Future Conflict, held in partnership with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which tackled the interconnected problems and opportunities of burgeoning youth populations and marginalized youth in key cities and regions. Early Childhood Development & Education and Untapped Talent: Can Better Testing and Data Accelerate Creativity in Learning and Societies – both in partnership with ETS – examined ways to improve education and social care systems from early years to university to ensure that all young people have the opportunity to fully develop and realize their potential. Two off-site panel discussions in Vienna on Educating Young People for the Jobs of the Future and Washington, DC on The Immigration Crisis: A Preview of Things to Come? explored the need for labor markets and societies to accommodate technological disruption, changing demographics, and human mobility.  

In addition to youth futures in the areas of education, employment, and civic engagement, Salzburg Global’s 2015 programs also concentrated on finance and corporate governance systems that shape the prospects of – and will be shaped by – upcoming generations. It is vital to include rising and non-standard perspectives in these high-level dialogues, explains Salzburg Global Program Director Charles E. Ehrlich: “They question conventional thinking, enabling established participants to reassess today’s systems in the light of global challenges.”  

Younger professionals need to be at the table not only because they broaden perspectives, but also because they will be the architects of transnational systems on which future prosperity, environmental protection, and the achievement of global agendas such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals will depend. Engaging fresh talent on equal terms is the way Salzburg Global leverages new voices, new brains, and new geographies. 

“By bringing smart young voices to the center of interdisciplinary discussions, Salzburg Global empowers next generation leaders to influence current policymakers and affect positive change into the future,” adds Ehrlich. 

To equip youth from all backgrounds to become effective leaders, it is critical to invest in their human capital development. Salzburg Global not only opens up opportunities for informal mentoring and network growth through attending sessions on topics from health care innovation to the future of financial regulation, but also runs dedicated capacity-building programs, such as the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum), the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change, and the now-independent Global Citizenship Alliance

Participating in the annual YCI Forum in Salzburg helps teams of innovators from city hubs around the world develop new skills focused on intra- and entrepreneurship, the latest digital resources, new business models, risk-taking and innovation, the psychology of leadership and emotional intelligence, and cross-cultural communication and negotiating skills. They leave “turbo-charged” to expand their work in their communities. This motivation and upskilling is all the more valuable, as many of these city hubs face significant economic, political, cultural, and/or racial stress.  

Reflecting on his participation in the YCI Forum, David Olawuyi Fakunle from Baltimore, MD, USA, said: “I will look back on Salzburg as the five days that changed my life. It gave me a glimpse into what the world can be when everyone is driven by understanding, cooperation, and social good. It is comforting and personally it has strengthened my purpose. Just as importantly, I left with a plan for action. That is what I needed, and the fact that I received it will take my efforts to provide healing in Baltimore to the next level.” 

Dafni Kalafati from Athens, Greece added: “What I took back home was a heart full of joy and a mind full of inspiration. Bringing together so many innovative minds can only create a better world to live in.”  

Heller, Campbell, and Elledge would likely agree.

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Young, Innovative, and Widespread
Fellows of the 2015 session of the YCI Forum
Young, Innovative, and Widespread
By: Patrick Wilson 
The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) is a ten-year project launched by Salzburg Global Seminar to engage 50 of the world's most dynamic young cultural innovators every year - in Salzburg and across the world The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) brings together talented individuals from the culture and arts sectors in several key cities. The Forum helps them develop the dynamic vision, entrepreneurial skills, and global networks needed to allow them, their organizations, their causes, and their communities to thrive in new ways. In their “hubs” across the world, our YCIs are putting these newfound tools to work. With the annual program in Salzburg as its cornerstone, the YCI Forum is structured around a network of hubs, currently including Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Phnom Penh, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, and Tokyo. Salzburg Global is actively working to expand its network of hubs in more cities and countries across the world. Baltimore, MD, USA  Citizen Artist Baltimore, a project led by 2015 YCI Rebecca Chan with support from Priya Bhayana (YCI 2014) and Deana Haggag (YCI 2015), is mobilizing the Baltimore arts and culture sector to make their interests a critical issue in the city’s 2016 mayoral election. Their activities led to the first-ever Mayoral Forum on Arts & Culture in Baltimore’s history. The project also aims to create connections between organizations and communities that have not customarily engaged with one another and mobilize diverse constituencies around a common goal. Buenos Aires, Argentina In Buenos Aires, Fellows greeted 2015 with a new project to help facilitate high-level artistic production within disadvantaged social contexts. The project, entitled Hangar, aims to create events that will allow artists in poor social and economic situations to participate in creative and cultural activities and showcase their work in venues where they are not traditionally visible. Athens, Greece  Our first Greek YCI Fellows created a new independent cultural network, cultureFWD, and in June they hosted an interactive, educational workshop for young artists, creators, and cultural entrepreneurs in Athens, Greece. Dedicated to giving back to their own cultural community, cultureFWD partnered with Salzburg Global to create the day-long event, which brought together 48 participants from around the world and focused on ways in which the Greek cultural and creative sectors may respond to the country’s ongoing social and economic challenges. Phnom Penh, Cambodia Supported by Cambodia Living Arts and the US Embassy in Cambodia, the Mekong Delta hub, based in Cambodian capital Phnom Penh, worked with young students to explore the possibilities of arts and culture as agents of change. The event was held at Sa Sa Bassac, where Meta Moeng (YCI 2015) is the community projects manager. The event used materials such as the Salzburg Global Faces of Leadership video series to inspire students to engage in arts and culture and learn from the achievements and personal stories of Young Cultural Innovators from around the world. Tokyo, Japan With Mitch Yoshimoto, faculty member of the 2014 YCI session, leading the cultural program for the 2020 Olympics, the YCIs of the Tokyo hub are in the early stages of planning a YCI-led event to coincide with the Tokyo 2020 summer games. They hope to bring together YCIs from multiple years and hubs for the event.  Rotterdam, the Netherlands Rotterdam YCIs and Forum sponsor, the Stichting De Verre Bergen, have partnered to support “creative business plans” for public arts projects in the city. Five proposals were selected by the YCIs at an event by Stichting De Verre Bergen in January; the projects are currently in development stages. One project will win €15,000 to invest in its own continued activity and growth. Salzburg, Austria The Salzburg Hub has seen many collaboration projects among YCIs and other Salzburg Global Fellows. Martin Murer (YCI 2015) organized a symposium with Shinji Sudo, a faculty member of the second YCI session from Japan, at Salzburg University’s Center for Human-Computer Interaction in June 2015. After attending Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability in February 2016, Robert Praxmarer (YCI 2014) is collaborating with Romanian Fellow Anamaria Vrabie on an eco-game app for schools, which will explore how computer games can change our behavior and society.
FIND OUT MORE The report from the 2015 session Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) is available online to read, download, and share. SEE ONLINE:  www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/554  yci.SalzburgGlobal.org
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AADF launches Culture Corps for Young Cultural Innovators
Claire Shine at the launch of Culture Corps
AADF launches Culture Corps for Young Cultural Innovators
By: Patrick Wilson 
Albanian-American Development Foundation Launch New Program for Young Cultural Innovators The Albanian-American Development Foundation (AADF) has launched its new project, Culture Corps | Young Cultural Innovators Driving Change on 2 June.  The new initiative aims to strengthen the cultural sector and expand the possibilities for innovation and change through the power of creativity.  AADF implemented the project in collaboration with Salzburg Global Seminar and fulfill the training program through our Young Cultural Innovators Forum.  The goal of the project is to create the mindset and give the tools to local cultural innovators to drive the change in their communities and provide opportunities for the next-generation of cultural leaders to learn new skills, knowledge and build networks that they need to jump start entrepreneurship. Hosted by the Center for Openness and Dialogue, the inaugural event included a panel discussion composed by: AADF Chairman of the Board Michal Granoff, Vice President and Chief Program Officer of Salzburg Global Seminar Claire Shine, Minister of Culture Mirela Kumbaro and Mayor of Tirana Erion Veliaj. The speakers shared with the audience their approach and commitment, in support of the project, underling the need for creative initiatives in help promote and implement sustainable development. The continuing project will improve the capacity of 15 emerging young creative promoters in Albania to use the arts and creativity as means to catalyze the urban regeneration of cultural hubs both through their participation in Salzburg Global Seminar’s Young Cultural Innovators Forum and through the development of cross-country Innovation Hubs. AADF has opened applications for Albanian participants at YCI forum 2016. Applications will open until June 25 here.  
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Salzburg Global Fellow Updates - April 2016
Our featured April FellowsOur featured April Fellows
Salzburg Global Fellow Updates - April 2016
By: Patrick Wilson and Rand El Zein 

Compilation of our Fellows' recent achievements and landmarks

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Email Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke.


Anwar Akhtar is a Fellow who participated in various Sessions including as a faculty member of the 2014 Salzburg Global Media Academy and as a facilitator of both sessions of the Young Cultural Innovators Forum - Session 538 and Session 554. Akhtar’s latest project is a film entitled ‘Karachi – A City of Children’. The film depicts Karachi, a city that holds 20 million people with thousands of children living on its streets. It explores how child exploitation is part of metropolis’s economic sector from refuse collection to industry. The film interviews the people of Azad Foundation, whom have been working since 1998 to provide welfare for the street children in Karachi. 

The film was made by Karachi University School of Visual Arts as part of the Pakistan Calling film project from The Samosa in partnership with the RSA.

For more information about the issues of child welfare work in Karachi, please visit: Azad Foundation and KVTC 

You can watch the full film below.

Bharat Doshi is a Fellow of Session 550 | Corporate Governance in the Global Economy: The Changing Role of Directors and Session 384 | Asian Economies: Regional and Global Relationships. He also hosted the Fellowship event India’s Role in a Globalized World: New Priorities and Expanded Horizons. Doshi has been appointed as Director at the Reserve Bank of India. Mahindra Group chairman, Anand Mahindra said: “Bharat has been an integral part of the Mahindra growth story and a solid pillar of the Group for over 40 years."

You can read the full article here.

Another Fellow from Session 550, Christian Mikosch, together with colleagues at international law firm Wolf Theiss commented on the consequences of the Panama Papers, while also stressing the importance to not forget about the "forgotten" tax havens within the United States and the related implications for trans-atlantic trade relations.

You can read the full article (in German) here.

Khaled El Hagar, Fellow of Session 403 | From Page to Screen: Adapting Literature to Film, has released his new film Sins of the Flesh.

The film examines revenge, passion and the misuse of power and concerns five people who live on a desert farm during the Egyptian revolution.

A French review of the movie by Le Monde can be read here

Eun-Kyoung Kwon is a Fellow from Session 556 | International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity: The Challenge of North Korea and the manager of the International team at the International Coalition to Stop Crime against Humanity in North Korea (ICNK). ICNK has produced a motion graphics video that provides an easy summary of the Commission of Inquiry report. It shows the fundamental human rights violations the North Korean regime (DPRK) has committed, according to the UN General Assembly and the UN Human Right Council. The video specifically tackles the issue of freedom of thought and expression. Kwon claims that the next motion graphics ICNK plans on producing confronts the matter of Freedom of Religion in North Korea. 

You can watch the first CIO Report video about freedom of thought and expression below.

Pam Veinotte and Daniel Raven-Ellison, Fellows of Session 557 | Parks for the Planet Forum: Nature, Health and a New Urban Generation, are to be featured as guest speakers at the Urban Biosphere Initiative webinar (URBIS Dialogue) on May 12th from 16:00 to 17:15 CEST.

URBIS Dialouge 12 is produced by IUCN and ICLEI and will be on the topic of connecting cities and their natural area regional networks of green spaces. Lead speaker, Chantal van Ham, EU Programme Manager Nature Based Solutions in the IUCN EU Representative Office in Brussels, will guide the discussion on investing in nature within and beyond urban boundaries that can offer a valuable economic return for cities as well as looking into the potential of unconventional partnerships and innovative ways to connect cities and urban dwellers to natural landscapes that can provide significant benefits in their day to day lives.

You can register for the webinar at the link here.

Sara Watson, a Fellow from Session 542 Early Childhood Development and Education, is the Global director of ReadyNation, a business membership organization that advocates for investments in children and youth in order to improve the economy and workforce. ReadyNation is co-sponsoring the First Early Education Action Congress, hosted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on June 6 and 7, in Paris. Watson is also moderating a panel at the congress on the topic ‘Building Unexpected Advocates for Early Childhood.’ Watson claims that “This is an exciting opportunity to explore not just what early childhood services should be, but how to build the public and political will to give all children access.” 

For more information about the congress visit the Ensemble for Education Program website here

As well as this, ReadyNation’s first international newsletter on global business actions on early childhood is now available. To subscribe, please click this link

 
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Young Cultural Innovators - “Who Are You and What Are You Passionate About?”
The Young Cultural Innovators talk about their purposes and organizations in the video project.The Young Cultural Innovators talk about their purposes and organizations in the video project.
Young Cultural Innovators - “Who Are You and What Are You Passionate About?”
By: Patrick Wilson 

The video project Faces of Leadership focuses on the passions and purposes of Young Cultural Innovators

Who are you and what are you passionate about? This was the questioned answered by the Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) of the second annual Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators for a video series entitled ‘Faces of Leadership’.

The videos were produced as part of a workshop led by Jo Hunter, co-founder of 64 Million Artists and an associate at the New Citizenship Project. The goal of the workshop was to enable the YCIs to talk about themselves and their work in a compelling and dynamic way, and at the end of the session, the participants each made a three-minute video doing exactly that.

You can watch the videos of the YCIs who have chosen to make their video public in the playlist below and on YouTube.

Me-Ryong Choi is a museum instructor at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul, Korea. She discussed her work educating the public and encouraging them to enjoy art. Choi expressed that appreciating and loving art must be an inclusive experience for all backgrounds by saying: “I really want to make sure that not just the privileged or those who know about art come to the museum so that those less privileged or have less opportunities to enter the art world can appreciate it. I would love to make sure this happens during my career.”

Nicolas García Mayor is an industrial engineer from Argentina and founder and director of ar estudio. Mayor talked about the refugee crisis currently facing us as a global nation. “There more than 85 million refugees around the world,” he said. “Half of these refugees are children. This crisis is due to political decisions, natural disasters and war. This is a big problem.” Mayor stressed the importance of pooling resources and innovation to help tackle humanitarian issues like the refugee crisis.

Josefina Bacigalupi Goni, director and founding member of DIBAGO from Argentina, used the story of a mother and her orphaned child to demonstrate the power of working together and sharing skills to create change. “I think that if we can work together as one anything can be done,” she says in her video.

Sam Galler is a Rhodes Scholar D.Phil student from the United States studying international development at Oxford University. He is building an online platform that informs political decisions and cooperation. It aims to help coordinate political decisions and inform them when they are making sub-optimal outcomes so that they can correct them and collaborate. “This online platform would be a way of building social trust and helping build a sense of community of those online but would otherwise disagree about several issues.” Galler said. “I think we have a lot of tools that still need to be developed to promote more social cultures.”

Rowan Pybus is a co-founder of Sunshine Cinema and Greenpop and a founder and director of Makhulu Media from South Africa. He talked about his work with Sunshine Cinema, a sustainable business model that turns solar energy into social impact. “We started with the idea that media that mattered wasn’t being seen where it was needed,” he said. “We decided to develop a business model that would enable us to share films in areas that were requesting content that could impact them in interesting ways.”

Sara Kim, founder of Diagonal Thoughts from Korea, talked about how her architectural office's mission is to create surroundings that can awaken a person to who they truly are and inspire them to achieve their goals. Her organization is specifically working on adaptive reuse which works with existing structures such as abandoned buildings which need to be adapted due to new city programs. “I think the human being is an environmental animal and everyone needs a space to grow and live,” Kim said.

Akio Hayashi, a founder of NPO InVisible from Japan, aims to reconnect and remake communities following natural disasters. He talked about the impact of the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami as well as his feelings of a general lack of community within Tokyo. NPO InVisible has used artists to create community engagement projects including an app to collate people’s feelings and emotional responses following the 3/11 disaster.

Paz Beguè, director of VERDEVER from Argentina, talked about her seizing an opportunity to be a producer for a company going to China’s Shanghai Arts festival. She realized from this that there was a need to produce Argentinian art abroad which inspired her to start her own project to promote art and wisdom. “The thing is to not only promote [art] as a product - which they are - but to also promote workshops and other things that have to do with the values of art, creativity and what’s behind it.” 

Ian Hilzerman is an entrepreneur and designer from Argentina and CEO at #MakePogo. He believes the world has a design problem. “We have unlimited needs but we have limited resources,” he said. To try and change this he has created a network that connects creatives with creators to stop ideas getting lost in the crowd and allow them to be worked on collaboratively.

Jiwon Park, a graphic designer, visual communicator, entrepreneur, social catalyst, and educator from Korea, talked about using design for social facilitation and cross-pollination. Her organization Design Can Do aims to inspire one another and promote social cross-pollination. Park said: “I want to make the use of my skills to facilitate positive design processes that can be applied to pressing social issues.”

Marcos Amadeo, a public affairs and creative industries developer from Argentina, who is helping to lead the Buenos Aires YCI hub, uses a story about him getting his first car to illustrate the importance of taking opportunities to expand your world view. He makes a point of when he traveled to Morocco where he was alone and had nothing to his name and the kindness of a family that took care of him. 

Sanne Donders is a freelance photographer from the Netherlands. She speaks about her interest in the personal stories of people in her city and people in the world. She talked about a family in her neighborhood who have ten children and three adopted children who work several jobs to provide for their children. Due to it being far too expensive for them to go out, they learned Zumba dancing from the internet and every Friday invite people to dance Zumba with them. Donders finished by saying: “I try to remind people that there is no group of people, they’re all individuals with individual stories.” 

David Fakunle is a third-year doctoral student in the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA. He told a tale about a young child who receives gems that give him powers every year of his birthday and also a rock that grants him awareness. Through this he encouraged others to share their gems and using the power of storytelling to pass resources and share knowledge.

Christiana Damanaki is a content creator at Clio Muse in Greece. She talked about heritage having a meaning and its relevance today. It was something Damanaki was incredibly passionate about. “I truly, truly believe in my heart and brain that with culture and history we can become better humans,” she said. 

Kiron Neale is a Rhodes Scholar D.Phil. student from Trinidad and Tobago studying renewable energy at the University of Oxford. He used a conversation with himself with both Trinidadian dialect and Standard English to show his different forms of interaction in different regions. The conversation also involved his work on using cultural innovation to find sustainable energy solutions.

Siphiwe Ngwenya, director of the Maboneng Township Arts Experience and founding director of Arts Township International from South Africa talked about his project to bring art exhibits to the less privileged and non-elite by encouraging people to host art exhibits in their own homes.

Dafni Kalafati, an art therapist, documentary filmmaker, and founder of Amaka from Greece, used a form of therapy with the audience to bring a smile to the viewers’ faces. She did this to show the benefits of using art as a tool for self-expression. Kalafati showed her passion to spread happiness, saying: “I believe that everybody around the world has the right to joy and happiness.”

Kenneth Asporaat is a theater producer and founder of his own non-profit organization. He talked about investing in your own talent and pushing your creativity to the limit. Asporaat believes creativity is not exclusive to artists alone. “I believe there hides an artist in every one of us,” he said. “It is my force and my strength to see talent in people.”

Phina So, leader of Women Writers Cambodia, talked about empowering and connecting writers and readers through storytelling, writing, and dialogue. She encouraged everyone to spread their stories and messages of positive change with each other, and offered her writing skills as a way of facilitating this. 

Nicolàs Alvarado is a Mexican writer, cultural promoter, theater and television producer and presenter. He talked about a notebook he was given by his niece that features Jeff Koons’s inflatable lobster on the cover. He used this as a way of promoting the importance of fostering critical thought through the use of humor, wit, and the media.

Rachel Woodlee, a Rhodes Scholar D.Phil student from the United States studying social policy at Oxford University talked about her visit to a Tibetan family in a traditional Tibetan home. When asked if she wanted to hear some music she assumed some traditional Tibetan music but instead they played her a techno song on a modern sound system. The experience encouraged her to take a step back from our pre-conceptions and engage with other cultures on a personal level.

Akinobu Yoshikawa is a senior design fellow at MakBiz in Sendai, Japan. He talked about trying to make the world better with design and how the use of design and building can support recovery after disasters. He referenced how collaboration can create a better sense of ownership and pride within a community.

Sophie Bargmann, a curator, journalist, and conceptor from the Netherlands, talked about her purpose of wanting to "turn Artists into Rockstars." She talked about how boring she would find art galleries as a child and cared more about the gift shop; this directed her focus towards the branding of art. She stated the importance of this branding on a local artist level as well as the wider known artists.

Konstantinos Matsourdelis, founder and CEO of the Museum of Greek Gastronomy, encouraged people to think about where their food comes from and to look at the way different cultures use food and how their culinary arts have developed. “We research, we document and we present aspects of our culture through exhibitions,” he said. “Obviously we try a lot of great recipes as well!”

Immanuel Spoor is a founder of On Track Agency and Stichting De Nieuwe Lichting from the Netherlands talked about how he unwittingly became a music manager for a friend’s band and how it prompted him to create his own agency. He stated how vital it is utilize the talent of creative people and providing them with a platform and how he wishes to branch out from the Netherlands with this idea.

Rebecca Cordes Chan, a program officer at the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation from Baltimore, MD, USA, talked about holistic grant-making as a path to social equity with a short Haiku about the work she does that encourages people to be bold and take risks.

Sotirios Stampoulis is a member of the steering committee of the Cultural Innovators Network (CIN) from Greece. He wanted to give narratives to the packaging of basic food products to connect the consumer with the story of its production. In this way he hoped consumers to understand the process of their food production and to become better informed.

Lucy Wilhelm, a textile designer and trend predictor from Austria, talked about working together with clients to help realize a shared vision. She discussed her process of alleviating the confusion some of her clients face with bringing their products to the next level.

Rasheida Adrianus, founder of Girls 'N Cocktails in the Netherlands, used a poem to discuss why she founded her organization. The poem goes into detail about the disparity she and other women face when they feel unrepresented by the media and her attempts to try and create better representation and reflections of the self in the media

Meta Moeng, an arts manager in Cambodia, talked about how she believed art could bring people together. She talked about working with a Cambodian art network to help make connections between the art community and people in Cambodia that can inspire a younger generation.

Devin Allen, a self-taught photographer from Baltimore, MD, USA, talked about his experiences of becoming an activist through his photography. He talked about his own upbringing and his issues with racial barriers that informed his career trajectory and the work he does. He talked about the biggest issue he faced saying: “The biggest struggle is being an entrepreneur, being new and being black at that. It was hard to even get sponsorship and funding initially, I was turned down multiple times.”

Misaki Iwai, event and collaboration manager at Impact HUB Tokyo, talked about the importance of collaboration in the creation of great ideas. She talked about how these ideas don’t just come from one genius; they can come from all sorts of different backgrounds and experiences. She referenced how the HUB can be used to network and collaborate on ideas.

Thomas Layer-Wagner, co-founder of Polycular from Austria, talked about the game his company is making called "EcoGotchi” that aims to promote sustainable solutions for climate change. He hoped the game would help focus efforts of those who want to make a different but don’t know the best way to motivate change with sustainable choices.


The YCI Forum is held by Salzburg Global Seminar and was supported this year by The Edward T. Cone Foundation, the Fondation Adelman pour l’Education, the American Express Foundation, the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Fulbright Greece, the Japan Foundation, the Korea Foundation, Elizabeth S. MacMillan Fellowship, the Mexican Business Council Fellowship Program, the Nippon Foundation, Red Bull Amaphiko, the Stichting De Verre Bergen, Adena and David Testa, the US Embassy in Bratislava, Slovakia and the HDH Wills (1965) Charitable Trust. More information on the session can be found here: yci.SalzburgGlobal.org

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Nicolas Garcia Mayor - Innovative Ways to Help Refugees
Nicholas Garcia Mayor talks innovative approaches to the Refugee Crisis at our Young Cultural Innovators Forum IINicholas Garcia Mayor talks innovative approaches to the Refugee Crisis at our Young Cultural Innovators Forum II
Nicolas Garcia Mayor - Innovative Ways to Help Refugees
By: Patrick Wilson 
Industrial Designer talks about the huge refugee crisis and what his organizations are doing to provide aid and support Nicolas Garcia Mayor has spoken to Salzburg Global Seminar in our Faces of Leadership video project filmed during our Young Cultural Innovators Forum II. Mayor is an industrial designer from Argentina and founder and director of ar estudio, a design and new product development company, and president of Fundación ar, dedicated to promote and support innovative ideas that will help improve the quality of life of people. He also created the Cmax System, an innovative disaster relief shelter for humanitarian aid. During the YCI Forum in 2015, Fellows were asked to offer some thoughts on their own personal ideas and projects. The following is a list of some of their submissions to the question: Who are you and what are you passionate about? In the video Mayor talks about Fundación ar's work in creating innovation for humanity and what the Cmax System can do to to aid the refugee crisis around the world. You can see more of our Young Cultural Innovators here.
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Doreen Toutikian - Showing the Public What Design Can Do
Doreen Toutikian talked about giving young designers a platform in Lebanon at our Young Cultural Innovators Program IIDoreen Toutikian talked about giving young designers a platform in Lebanon at our Young Cultural Innovators Program II
Doreen Toutikian - Showing the Public What Design Can Do
By: Patrick Wilson 

Director of MENA Design Research Center on providing platforms for young designers in Lebanon and what design can do for social impact.

Doreen Toutikian spoke to Salzburg Global Seminar for our Faces of Leadership video project filmed during our Young Cultural Innovators Forum II.

Toutikian is a interdisciplinary designer, researcher, and a social entrepreneur. She is the co-founder and director of the MENA Design Research Center and of Beirut Design Week.

During the YCI Forum in 2015, Fellows were asked to offer some thoughts on their own personal ideas and projects. The following is a list of some of their submissions to the question: Who are you and what are you passionate about?

In the video she talks about wanting to use her design abilities to do more to help Lebanon and show others what design can do for social impact. She also highlights the importance of giving young designers a platform to impact society.

You can see more of our Young Cultural Innovators here.

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Shinji Sudo on Combating Stigmas by Leveraging Creativity
Shinji Sudo spoke about combating the stigmas of mental health at our Young Cultural Innovators Program IIShinji Sudo spoke about combating the stigmas of mental health at our Young Cultural Innovators Program II
Shinji Sudo on Combating Stigmas by Leveraging Creativity
By: Patrick Wilson 

Founder of NEXTIDEVOLUTION on combating stigmas by leveraging the creativity of the mind.

Shinji Sudo spoke to Salzburg Global Seminar for our Faces of Leadership video project filmed during our Young Cultural Innovators Forum II.

Sudo is the founder of People Design institute NEXTIDEVOLUTION and the marketing consulting firm Fujiyama Store. In addition, he launched a collaborative project with Keio Gijuku University, called “People Design Lab”.

During the YCI Forum in 2015, Fellows were asked to offer some thoughts on their own personal ideas and projects. The following is a list of some of their submissions to the question: Who are you and what are you passionate about?

In the video Sudo talks about his experience with his second son’s cerebral palsy and the stigmas this brought. This inspired him to work on making a more diverse culture and using the tools of fashion, the arts and sports to combat stigmas by leveraging the creativity.

You can more of our Young Cultural Innovators here

 
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Salzburg Around the World - Cambodia
Susanna Seidl-Fox, Program Director of Culture and the Arts in a session at ANCER 2016Susanna Seidl-Fox, Program Director of Culture and the Arts in a session at ANCER 2016
Salzburg Around the World - Cambodia
By: Patrick Wilson 
Salzburg Global Program Director travels to Cambodia as part of Salzburg Global's growing outreach in the Mekong region Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Program Director of Culture and the Arts traveled to Cambodia in January to attend the third conference of the Asia-Pacific Network for Cultural Education & Research (ANCER). ANCER was originally conceived as an organization dedicated to preserving Cambodia’s traditional art forms but has now evolved into creating a vibrant, dynamic and sustainable art sectors throughout the country. The three-day event featured keynotes and sessions related to networking and on the tools and platforms that can support the research and practice in arts and cultural management and cultural policy fields in the Asia-Pacific region. Workshops were also included to stimulate career choices and networking such as careers in arts management. The theme of this year’s conference was “Vitality & Viability: Arts Ecosystems in Asia”  The event was organized by one of the partners of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, Cambodia Living Arts. The organization aims to facilitate the transformation of Cambodia through the arts and work in collaboration with others to create an environment where Cambodian arts empower and transform individuals and communities. ANCER 2016 marked the formal launch of the Greater Mekong Subregion Hub for Cultural Changemakers, an initiative in partnership with Salzburg Global Seminar based in Phnom Penh that seeks to connect young cultural leaders from around the region. This partnership is part of Salzburg Global’s continued transboundary collaboration with organizations and events on a global scale. In 2014, Salzburg Global Seminar launched a 10-year program to make a global network of 500 Young Cultural Innovators. These would be people using arts, culture and creativity for social improvement and sustainable economic development. This network will be built up via 10 regional hubs and connected through an annual Forum in Salzburg, Austria. There are existing hubs in Athens, Baltimore, Seoul, South Africa and Tokyo. Cambodian Living Arts is leading the development of a hub from Phnom Penh. Seidl-Fox praised the event and discussed what she and Salzburg Global have taken back from the experience. “It was inspiring to participate in the ANCER conference on Arts Ecosystems in Asia and connect with a dynamic network of cultural researchers and practitioners focusing on the Asia Pacific Region.” She said. “We received some extremely helpful feedback and advice on the Greater Mekong Delta Young Cultural Innovators Hub that we are developing in partnership with Cambodia Living Arts.”

To find out when Salzburg Global's staff might be in your city and to host a Fellowship gathering, please contact Salzburg Global Fellowship Manager, Jan Heinecke.
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