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Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans (Photo: Flickr/Reading Tom)
Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
Oscar Tollast 
YCIs from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans have been reunited to take part in the second US regional meeting. Thirty Salzburg Global Fellows, all of whom have attended the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in recent years, will convene at the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, on Saturday afternoon (April 7). The two-day program will see YCIs reflect on what it means to be part of a creative hub in cities undergoing radical urban transformation and social renewal. The opening conversation is titled “From Me to We.” Fellows will explore city-based change-making and civic innovation. They will go onto share city briefs and reflect on what’s currently happening in Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans. Several YCIs have agreed to lead site visits in New Orleans on the first evening of the program, offering a range of options for participants to choose from. This includes a tour of Jockum Nordström’s “Why is Everything a Rag” exhibition and Sarah Morris’ “Sawdust and Tinsel” exhibition, both of which are at the Contemporary Arts Center. Alternatively, participants have the chance to attend an exhibition opening and performance of The Rent is Too Damn High, which takes place at the Crescent City Boxing Club. This event, run by YCI Fari Nzinga, is described as a combination of visual art with performance and political satire, exploring themes of home, belonging, cultural transmission, gentrification, and displacement. A third option is to walk to New Orleans’ French Quarter to visit the French 75 bar and the New Orleans Mardi Gras Museum. In this group, participants will discuss subjects involving private foundations and privately-funded cultural activities. A “Cultural Corridor Tour” will also take place, including visits to the Ashe Cultural Arts Center, Tulane Small Center for Collaborate Design, and Roux Carre. All three of these organizations are engaged in community-based art, education, and design. On top of this, participants could also take part in a tour of Studio BE, a 35,000 sq ft warehouse of art, currently housing Brandan Odums’ first solo show. Regardless of which site participants visit, all will be asked how their learning from it could relate to their own work and home city. They will report back at the start of the second day of the program. The rest of the day will be spent discussing modes of collaboration and developing impact plans for the hubs, before wrapping up and outlining the next steps forward. The YCI Forum has hubs in six regions. Hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. The Forum also has a dedicated hub for Rhodes Scholars. The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators engages the world’s most dynamic young creative change-makers. Launched in 2014 as a 10-year project, 50 innovators are invited each year to take part in a session held at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria. Salzburg Global Seminar is committed to fostering creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide. The Forum aims to help build a more vibrant and resilient arts sector while advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide. The Regional Fellows Event is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This session is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/594
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Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Salzburg Global Seminar 
“With more than 250 Young Cultural Innovators now connected in communities around the world, the YCI Forum is one of the most dynamic and impactful global cultural networks and a dynamic creative catalyst for innovation, civic transformation, and social change worldwide,” says Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Program Director for Culture & the Arts. Now entering its fifth year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) held its fourth annual session at Schloss Leopoldskron in October 2017. The global reach of Fellows now extends from Adelaide, Australia, to Valletta, Malta, and 21 cities – called “YCI Hubs” – in between. The 2017 Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) hailed from 13 countries, with each participant facing unique challenges, tied to their specific heritage and industry. They were met with 10 facilitators and five speakers, and the committed staff of Salzburg Global Seminar.  Despite their geographical distances and differences in practice, the YCIs, the facilitators and speakers are intimately connected. A commitment to the arts and cultural sector, and shared ideals of community and justice make this a cohort of peers whose differences act not as barriers, but as bridges. The YCIs see themselves in a global context. They engage in international discourse without losing sight of their own communities. The new report from the latest session, written by returning YCI Sanja Grozdanic, chronicles the week’s events including the plenary presentations, skills-building workshops, small group discussions and vibrant “Open Space” events, organized by the YCIs themselves. “I have been in search of a world city that has intellectuals, artists and those trying to make the world better through their work, I have come to find that unlike the past there isn’t just one place for all these people they are spread out throughout the world and it really takes seminars like this to bring them together,” explains Yasmine Omari from the Memphis YCI Hub in Tennessee, USA.  Linda Kaoma, from the Cape Town YCI Hub in South Africa adds: “I am walking away better equipped to continue to do my work as an artist, cultural practitioner and leader in my community and with a strong affirmation to always lead with the heart. Salzburg Global Seminar has introduced me to new friends, colleagues, accountability partners and future collaborators from all over the world.”  The report includes many more testimonials from Fellows, as well as all their bios and those of the session facilitators and guest speakers. Download the report as a PDF (low-res)
To receive a hi-res edition of the report, please email press[at]salzburgglobal.org The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. 
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YCI Creates Intercultural Toolkit for Diverse Partners to Work Together
YCI Creates Intercultural Toolkit for Diverse Partners to Work Together
Oscar Tollast 
An intercultural toolkit designed to bring partners together from diverse backgrounds has been created by a YCI Fellow. Leni Stoeva, a member of the Memphis YCI Hub, has put forward a Cross-Partnership Development Toolkit, which will soon be available in multiple languages. Stoeva views the toolkit as an “invitation to partnership and creativity,” which will allow individuals and organizations to gain more perspective, skills, and networks. She said, “A significant takeaway from the [Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators] is new relationships formed. 21st century Europe is facing a growing complexity of societies and a standardization of lifestyles and cultures. “Meanwhile, USA is facing a time of self-segregation based on class, race, and values at the root of the country’s pressing problems. The world’s future depends on inter-community connection and partnerships that foster understanding between people who may have little in common.” Stoeva, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, created the resource after partnering with the Bulgaria YCI Hub. Both worked together last year during the Bottom Up Culture Project, a project designed to highlight and discuss the current issues the creative community in Bulgaria is facing. Stoeva helped to facilitate two consecutive sessions, the first of which was a university talk in Sofia and later a workshop in Plovdiv. Both events brought more than 60 people together. Specific goals that were outlined ahead of the event to lead discussions included creating partnerships from a diverse set of interests, collaborating between major and smaller, local cultural institutions, establishing inter-sectoral partnerships, and introducing a specific cultural diversity strand to local partnerships. This project held a forum that explored culture-led urban regeneration, cultural entrepreneurs, creative places, creative quarters, and neighborhood change and gentrification. After the event, Stoeva searched for the best practices of partnership development on national levels to present as a structured toolkit. Stoeva said, “I believe that by participating in a cultural exchange seminar in Plovdiv provided me with compelling opportunities to continue conversations begun in Salzburg and foster learning across countries. With the project, we worked on identifying best practices for cross-partnership development.” For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI), please click here. Download an English version of the Cross-Partnership Development Toolkit 
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YCI Transforms Historic Phone Booth into Storytelling Kiosk
YCI Transforms Historic Phone Booth into Storytelling Kiosk
Oscar Tollast 
A phone booth repurposed by a YCI has given residents in Lanesboro, Minnesota, the chance to have their story heard. Adam Wiltgen, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, restored the beloved landmark and donated it to the Lanesboro Museum in December 2016. The phone booth, which was decommissioned by Acentek, Inc., now acts as an interactive storytelling and story collecting exhibit. Visitors can listen to local stories installed in the phone booth and contribute their own by leaving a voicemail message on a dedicated telephone number. Wiltgen received funding for the hardware, equipment and interpretive signage for the project through a grant from Salzburg Global made possible by the Kresge Foundation. He received a follow-on grant after attending the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, one which was given for a new project that had a cross-sector approach and gave back to the community. Adam Wiltgen, program director at Lanesboro Arts, said, “I immediately thought of the Lanesboro Phone Booth when this opportunity arose. It is such a charming historical asset and repurposing it as a storytelling exhibit is a great way to amplify the amazing work the museum has been doing preserving our history and collecting stories from all walks of life.” Nine stories were collected for an open house and story celebration which took place in October last year. Stories included Glen Nyenhuis’s experience hunting and riding the caboose in Lanesboro, Bonita Underbakke’s memories fishing as a child at Watson Creek, Ann Madland’s reflections on living and working as an artist in Lanesboro, LaVonne Draper’s recollection of a trick played while tending bar, an e-mail message David Hennessey wrote in the aftermath of the 2002 Lanesboro fire, Blake Coleman’s memory of visiting Lanesboro for the first time, Betty Michaud’s tale of being surprised while swimming alone, Yvonne Nyenhuis’s anecdotes about the White Front Café, and Duane & Melissa Benson’s adventure swimming with horses.   These stories were collected during storytelling projects organized by Lanesboro Museum. Story circles were conducted in partnership with the Minnesota Humanities Center for the Smithsonian Water/Ways exhibition in 2016. Story circles were also held in 2017 for the Be Here: Main Street initiative, a pilot project developed between the MuseWeb Foundation and the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum on Main Street program. Since this event, the phone booth has continued to receive a positive reaction. Wiltgen said, “The Museum is changing out the stories regularly and adding new ones. Folks are using the voicemail box to leave messages and photos of the phone booth continue to pop up on social media. I'm looking forward to seeing how visitors interact with the phone booth this year during the high season. I love the cross-cultural and inter-generational appeal of the phone booth as well.” For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
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A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
Clare Shine 
As 2018 gets underway, I would like to express my sincere gratitude for your continued engagement with Salzburg Global Seminar. In reflection of a landmark year celebrating Salzburg Global Seminar’s 70th anniversary, I wanted to look back on the journey traveled, new projects and horizons. Our 2017 theme of “Courage” resonated throughout this turbulent year. The 1947 vision of Salzburg Global’s founders – a “Marshall Plan of the Mind” to revive dialogue and heal rifts across Europe - felt fresh as ever. Cracks widened in societies and institutions across the world, compounded by a mix of insecurity, disillusionment, and isolationism. Yet the world should be in a better position than ever to tackle common challenges. There is an open marketplace for ideas, innovation, and invention, and opportunities to engage and collaborate are growing fast. In Salzburg, we are privileged to meet individuals from all walks of life who have the courage to tell truth to power, confront vested interests, express artistic voice and freedom, build coalitions for change, and see through tough choices. In divided societies, people need courage to stay true to their beliefs. Leaders need courage to curb their exercise of power. Together, we need courage to rekindle our collective imagination to rebuild society from the bottom up and the top down.Three strategies guide our own work for this purpose.1. Given Salzburg Global’s roots in conflict transformation, our programs seek to bridge divides: Our American Studies series – a discipline born at Schloss Leopoldskron – focused on Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration, including the roots of economic and racial division;The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change had its highest-ever participation on Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism and published an interactive playbook “Against Populism”;Our Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention series is now applying tools developed in previous years to promote pluralism and tolerance and address issues of radicalization and violent extremism. Pilot projects to test these approaches are under way in five countries (Pakistan, Rwanda, South Africa, Morocco, and Egypt) with the potential to expand to other countries;The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum marked its fifth anniversary with a major report assessing the influence and personal impact of a cross-sector network that now spans more than 70 countries and has inspired new partnerships and cultural initiatives. 2. Salzburg Global Seminar aims to inspire new thinking and action on critical issues to transform systems, connecting local innovators and global resources: Our high-level leadership programs address fundamental components of dynamic and inclusive societies. We now have three annual series - Forum on Finance in a Changing World, Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum, and the Public Sector Strategy Network – and have begun a new collaboration with major foundations on Talent Management for Effective Global Philanthropy. We have expanded our work on Health and Health Care Innovation with ambitious initiatives, including the five-year Sciana Health Leaders Network which marks a groundbreaking crossborder partnership with The Health Foundation (UK), Bosch Stiftung (Germany) and Careum Stiftung (Switzerland), and a major partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation aimed at building a shared culture of health.Education for Tomorrow’s World is going global! As an outcome of our 2015 and 2016 work on innovation for social and emotional learning, we are convening meetings over 15 months in Latin America, the Middle East and Gulf, and North America. These will inform a synthesis session in Salzburg in December 2018 to frame lessons learned for decision-makers in the education sector and other key stakeholders. 3. Salzburg Global seeks to expand collaboration by fostering lasting networks and partnerships: The Young Cultural Innovators Forum, created in 2014, now has 18 city/country hubs across the world, and held its first US inter-city meeting in Detroit;We’re expanding alliances in Asia with long-standing and new partners. The Asia We Want: Building Community through Regional Cooperation is laying foundations for a bottom-up innovation network for A Clean and Green Asia. November saw our first-ever program with the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups and the Hong Kong Jockey Club on Leadership for Inclusive Futures in Hong Kong, focused on 30 rising leaders across the public, private and civil society sectors.The Salzburg Statement on The Child in the City: Health Parks and Play (Parks for the Planet Forum) was showcased at the World Congress on Public Health in Australia and will feature in webinars for US city leaders, working with the National League of Cities and the Children in Nature Network. After six years living in Schloss Leopoldskron and meeting the most diverse and talented people imaginable, I often hear myself describe Salzburg Global Seminar as “deeply human.” 2017 brought many reminders of the special bonds forged during our lifetime and the enduring need to advance trust and openness around the key issues facing today’s world.  Thank you again for your commitment and recognition of Salzburg Global’s importance in your professional and personal development. We hope you will consider joining other Fellows who have already made a donation to Salzburg Global this year. Please click here to learn more. With very best wishes from everyone at Salzburg Global Seminar, and we hope to welcome you back to Schloss Leopoldskron in the near future.
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Young Cultural Innovators Hub Project Explores How Art Can Be Used to Help Build Healthy Communities
Young Cultural Innovators Hub Project Explores How Art Can Be Used to Help Build Healthy Communities
Oscar Tollast 
A YCI Hub project designed to highlight the importance of healthy, active living through art has reached more than 350 people. The Challenge Detroit YCI Art and Community Health Project led to four different art installations being created and showcased in various parts of Detroit. The project was co-designed and led by Shelley Danner, program director of Challenge Detroit. Danner attended the third meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016 and is a member of the Detroit YCI Hub. Danner looked at the intersection of art and health, collaborating with Dr. Asha Shajahan from Beaumont Family Medicine, Challenge Detroit Fellows, and other community partners. Challenge Detroit’s mission is “to challenge leaders to learn by doing through a year of meaningful employment and intellectual work with area nonprofits designed to positively impact” a “diverse” and “culturally vibrant” Detroit. It invites 30 of tomorrow’s leaders to live, work, play, give, and lead. The art installations, built by four teams of Challenge Detroit Fellows, included “Let’s Play,” “Elevated Cardio,” “Step into Something,” and “Limitless.” These four pieces of art were showcased at Central City Integrated Health and its Clubhouse, as well as the Butzel Recreation Center and Chandler Park. While on display at the Central City Clubhouse, “Elevated Cardio” allowed members with disabilities to use a set of decorated stairs as part of their physical therapy program. “Step into Something New” highlighted the physical activities that can be undertaken every day, from jumping to dancing. Silhouetted motions on 4 by 8 foot banners, paired with oversized shoes and motivational phrases were created for this installation. “Let’s Play” involved Challenge Detroit Fellows taking photos of themselves in parks based throughout Detroit to show how physical activity can be fun. The Fellows behind this project used refurbished windows from the Architectural Salvage Warehouse in Detroit to frame the photos. “Limitless” saw Challenge Detroit Fellows co-create art using bikes with children from Detroit’s eastside with neighborhood nonprofit Mack Avenue Community Church (MACC) Development. The project featured at the Detroit Institute of Arts’ National Arts and Health Symposium in September and was also included in Detroit’s Open Streets community festival in October.  The design question for the project was: How might we use art as a medium to build healthy communities and create a culture of active living in Detroit? In a report about the project, Danner said, “Through the various presentations and site showcases thus far, we have interacted and raised awareness with over 350 community members and residents, and counting, of the importance of healthy, active living with low-barriers-to-access through these creative art installations.” This project was made possible thanks to YCI project funds provided to Salzburg Global by the Kresge Foundation for follow-on work after last year’s YCI Forum. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
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Gerhard Feldbacher Returns to Salzburg Global with Mobile Tea House
Feldbacher (right) taking part in a tea ceremony with the fellows of the fourth YCI forum in the flying tea house. Photo by Heinz Holzmann
Gerhard Feldbacher Returns to Salzburg Global with Mobile Tea House
Mirva Villa 
For three years, Gerhard Feldbacher had been playing with the idea of a mobile tea house. The simple, geometric shapes and lightness of traditional Japanese houses had fascinated the Austrian designer and architect for a long time. The final push to make the project a reality came after Feldbacher offered to finish the tea house to be used at the fourth session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Feldbacher attended the YCI Forum the previous year and had an “intense” experience. “I thought [the mobile tea house] would be nice as a communication place,” Feldbacher says. “By offering it to Salzburg Global, I wanted also to oblige myself to finally do it.” The tea house consists of white paper walls, woven tatami mats and a fireplace. The sunken hearth is the focal point of the house. Above the fire, the teapot is hung from a jizaikagi - a small hook adorned with a fish sculpture. Feldbacher ordered the jizaikagi from an antique shop in Tokyo. It’s thought to be more than a century old. The fish and blue fireplace tiles symbolize water and are meant to protect the paper house from catching fire. The flying tea house can be put together in a matter of hours, and it is light for a house, weighing less than 300 kilograms. The lightness was another aspect that interested the architect. “I made another mobile house some years ago which is 10,000 kilograms,” Feldbacher says. “Three hundred kilograms is nothing compared to that.”Once Feldbacher had his mind set on making the tea house, it took three months to complete. The architect had expected the delicate paper walls to require the most work, but the roof ended up being the most difficult part to build. He says, “It had to be stable, but also very light because the whole thing sits on a trailer.” During the fourth session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, several participants used the tea house as a meeting place to work on their projects. One group stayed so long, Feldbacher had to politely ask them to leave at the end of the day. “I had to actually kick them out of the tea house because I had to cover it for the night, so that was a nice compliment,” Feldbacher laughs. One of the participants from Japan held a traditional tea ceremony in the tea house, which other YCI participants attended. In addition to Schloss Leopoldskron, the flying tea house has also appeared at the Hallein-based arts festival Schmiede. Feldbacher is looking forward to seeing what else the tea house will be used for in the future, whether that’s as a stage for performances or a place to stay for travelers. In the immediate future, the tea house will travel the Salzkammergut region in the spring and feature at street art festivals in the summer. To improve the tea ceremony experience, Feldbacher plans to make binchō-tan, a type of hardwood charcoal. He says, “It’s visually very nice and difficult to get here in Europe. I want to do that coal by myself as a part of the ceremony.” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.
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