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Young Cultural Innovators

Hot Topic - How do Young Cultural Innovators help bridge divides in their communities?
Salzburg Global Fellows reveal what divides exist in their cities and regions and how their work helps bridge them
Hot Topic - How do Young Cultural Innovators help bridge divides in their communities?
Anna Rawe 
A select number of Fellows at the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators were asked: What divides exist in your city/region and how does your work help bridge divides? We have published their answers below. “In my region there are divides… that are geographic in terms of the divides between the downtown core and the suburbs in Toronto, which is where I live. Those geographic divides are also representative of other divides like income, racial, cultural… so the city, although it is diverse, it’s also divided up so that that diversity often seems quite segmented. I think my work is about looking at those divides and that segmentation and seeing the innovation that happens in areas that are not part of the downtown core. A lot of resources and attention tend to go in the core of the city but not that much to the outer areas, and I grew out in a community that’s in one of those outer areas, so I really believe in cultivating the work that’s being done out there...” Alyssa Fearon, Canada Curator at the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba, Brandon, Manitoba “There’s a lot of things going on right now back home about fake news and the government, so I think there’s a clear divide between those who support the government and those who actually oppose them. That’s one of the biggest problems we’re facing right now because there’s a lot of propaganda and political manipulation when it comes to information and communication of things. I think for us at the Design Studio we try to have different government agencies and NGOs to try to communicate their messages properly and to try to help them build a better strategy when it comes to saying things more clearly. It’s because these are the times that we actually need to properly address our causes, what we fight for, and the truth, more than anything else… so that’s what we try to help with...” Reymart Cerin, Manila Creative director at The Public School Manila Branding & Design Studio “We have no places for gatherings, we have art centers, museums, exhibitions but for just a small gathering we don’t have a lot of spaces, so we tried to [renovate] abandon places like a senior citizen center, or a community hall or a public office, it’s really hard to find a good place to gather. Another challenge… because it’s the countryside everybody is too busy to have an arts education… To bridge the divide we [also] have to think about the poor people or disabled people, connecting to them to have them enjoy the arts, [so they aren’t] alienated from the arts. Our foundation has moving trucks which go to the mountainous areas or to the fishing villages. We go there and have performances and a moving exhibition system, so they can enjoy the arts for free... Another system is art vouchers, which is when poor people have to buy a book or go to a performance or an exhibition, the cost is really high so we have a discount, like 50%, which is 70 euros for one year, which is not that much but it helps them to have an opportunity to enjoy the arts.” Namhee Joo, Seoul Program manager at Chungnam Arts & Culture Foundation “In my country there is not a different way of thinking - these kinds of things. They are very interesting people that are always searching for something new or something that can make diversity... We are one of the most peaceful countries because we live happily in what we trust and what religion we are.” Anisa Papajani, Tirana Senior sales account executive at Vodafone “We have performances against bullying, on recycling, on emotions and how your reaction to things can affect other people, so I think that is one way that we are trying to bridge this idea of performance being only for the national theatre, the baroque stage kind of thing, to bring arts to everyone...” Dorian Mallia, Malta Artistic director at Moveo Dance Company The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.
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YCI Forum - Knowing What You Do, Designing For Your User, and Being a Leader
Participants are taking part in workshops led by Arundhati Ghosh, Adam Molyneux-Berry, and Amina Dickerson
YCI Forum - Knowing What You Do, Designing For Your User, and Being a Leader
Oscar Tollat 
A fixture of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators over recent years has been a series of capacity-building workshops designed to help participants take their next steps forward in their lives. This year’s program is no exception. Participants will receive advice from three experienced facilitators on different aspects of their work, all three of them having attended programs at Schloss Leopoldskron previously. Adam Molyneux-Berry, an award-winning social entrepreneur and ecosystem builder, is returning to Salzburg for the third time. He is leading a workshop titled “Principles of Self-Organization.” He said, “What we have noticed over the last few years at the YCI [Forum] is that one of the highest requirements [participants] will have when they come into the program is funding. They all say that they are looking for funding. I kind of don’t agree with that... What they actually need is people power. “What this session is about is how they can leverage the strengths that they each have to solve their problems before the money stage, and then get to a point where when they do receive money, they are actually ready to take that money and do something useful with it.” Amina Dickerson, president of Dickerson Global Advisors, meanwhile, will explore the culturally diverse concepts of leadership with participants. She said, “My workshop is about leadership values and vision. It’s really to help the Fellows focus on what their own style of leadership is, what values undergird that, and how they can best prepare themselves for the long arc of their careers with thoughtfulness and intention about how they lead, what it is that is their compelling purpose in leading and then what resources and skills they need to do that in the best way they can. “I think particularly in this time, it is very, very important for leaders to understand what motivates people, what are the tools that they need to really have impact in the world and to be, as many of them have said, authentic leaders.” Arundhati Ghosh, executive director at the India Foundation for the Arts, will be guiding participants on how to communicate the value of their work. She said, “The first part of the session is going to be an understanding of communicating stories and how stories are built around why you do what you do and the people they serve. “But the second part of the session will be more focused on, ‘How do you then take the story and make it work for those that you are seeking resources from?’ It could be funding, it could be partnerships, it could be collaborations...” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.
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Rocio Rapoport - I Help Empower Women With Music
Rocio Rapoport at Salzburg Global Seminar - Rapoport started her career as a singer and main composer in rock and fusion bands, among other styles
Rocio Rapoport - I Help Empower Women With Music
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
“I was a feminist even before I knew I was a feminist… [because as a child] I didn’t know the word existed,” says Rocio Rapoport, an Argentinian musician specializing in experimental pop. Women are undervalued in the music industry, says Rapoport, speaking as a participant of the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. She puts this down to the “sustained power of men” in the industry with women enjoying very little or no visibility. “Women in history have done a lot of things, but they have not had the same level of visibility [as men],” Rapoport says forthrightly. To tackle this issue, Rapoport cofounded Blazar in 2014. Taking its name inspiration from an astronomical phenomenon that produces a high energy force, she describes Blazar as “a communion of women artists with the goal of creating better opportunities for women in the music industry.” The collective is now made up of 12 musicians of diverse genres including rock, jazz, electronic music, experimental music, and Argentina’s folklore genre. To ensure women gain more acknowledgment for their work, Blazar aims to get more women on and off the stage at music festivals. Although many festivals are attended by roughly an equal percentage of women and men or sometimes more women than men, the stage has eluded many female acts thus far. A BBC analysis of posters of the UK’s nine biggest music festivals found that 77% of the 756 acts advertised were male in 2018. Rapoport reckons the situation is no different in Argentina and the wider region of Latin America and Spain. Offstage, Blazar also hopes to help groom a cadre of women technicians, producers and festival organizers to ensure that there is gender equality in all aspects of the music business. Another objective of Blazar is to help establish creative collaborations between and among female musicians. For many years, female musicians have been portrayed as rivals, forced into competition with each other for the limited space the music industry has carved out for them. Instead of pitching their music and personalities against each other, Rapoport and her commune of artists work on collaborations among themselves and with those outside the group. “We need to break that idea [that women cannot work together] … so that we can be more strong together, to achieve together...” While many Latin American countries including, until recently Argentina, have had women at the apex of political leadership, a culture of “machismo” persists. “I love Cristina [Fernández de Kirchner],” Rapoport proclaims, “but so many people hate her for being a woman. They criticize how she dresses; they say ‘she talks too much.’ If it was a man that will not be important.” She also talks about the glass ceiling and the gender pay gap in the music industry. The 33-year-old hopes that with her work with Blazar, she can help remove stereotypical notions of women and achieve greater rights for women. She has been prominent in the fight to legalize abortion in Argentina. So many women have died because they resorted to backstreet clinics and unsafe methods to terminate pregnancies, she says. As such, Rapoport uses her music to speak out about women’s rights and advocate for social justice issues such as racism and LGBT rights. Where does Rapoport hope to be in five years? She says, “I hope that Blazar will not really need to exist and thatthere will be no reason for me to make music to empower women." The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.  
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YCI Forum - Bridging Divides on a Global Scale
Participants in discussion in the Robison Gallery at Schloss Leopoldskron
YCI Forum - Bridging Divides on a Global Scale
Oscar Tollast 
In her maiden speech to the British Parliament, the late Jo Cox said, “We are far more united and have far more in common with each other than things that divide us.” Participants of the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators were reminded of this quote as they met to discuss the communities and contexts within which they worked. On Wednesday afternoon, participants took part in an interactive, online exercise which involved realtime voting. Initially, they were asked to consider how they felt now and how they hoped to feel at the end of the program. Several people still felt tired, but there was an overwhelming response that the group felt happy, excited, and inspired. Building on this platform, participants hoped to leave Salzburg connected, motivated, hopeful, and empowered. The majority of participants in this year’s program are working within communities that have more than one million people. Each participant was asked to submit three words to define their community/city. Words such as diverse, busy, resilient, and conservative were popular choices. Divides highlighted in these communities included class, race, gender, economic, and political. In addition to this, participants were asked to identify some of the greatest challenges their communities were facing. From all corners of the world, participants identified education, housing, and poverty as key issues. Looking toward the future, participants were asked to think about words they hoped would describe 2050. A range of words were put forward, but it appeared there was an overarching hope that the world in 2050 would be vibrant, healthy, progressive and safe. Participants explored this topic further in table discussions within their hubs. They were asked to consider whether the divides in their communities were getting worse or better and who or what was the cause. Were they working to bridge these divides? If yes, were they doing it alone? If no, what was stopping them? There are tools, tactics and strategies which can be implemented to bridge divides. Participants were asked to think about where they could look for inspiration and hope in their communities, their countries, and around the world to do so. With this in mind, is there a particular divide they themselves within their YCI Hubs could help to bridge? This topic will be discussed further over the next few days. The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.   #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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Change-Makers Meet in Salzburg for Fifth Program of Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Participants taking part in the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Change-Makers Meet in Salzburg for Fifth Program of Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
Emerging cultural leaders from around the world will meet in Salzburg, Austria, this week as they become the latest Fellows of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Fifty-five professionals are taking part in the fifth program of the YCI Forum at Schloss Leopoldskron, which takes place between October 16-21. Now in its fifth year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is a 10-year project which aims to build collaborative networks for human capital and leadership development within the cultural sector globally. The YCI network now has more than 250 members across all continents. The one-week program in Salzburg will comprise a series of workshops, discussions and practical capacity-building exercises centered on leadership and values, communicating the value of one's work and principles of self-organization. Aged between 25 and 35, the participants represent diverse creative disciplines, gender and geographic contexts. Participants are working across a broad range of cultural professions including architecture, urban planning, creative placemaking, design, performing and visual arts. This year’s program will be attended by participants from YCI Hubs in Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Detroit, Japan, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Nairobi, New Orleans, Salzburg, Seoul, Tirana, and the Upper Midwest United States. Several participants from previous YCI programs will return to act as resource specialists and facilitators. Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director for culture and the arts at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, “The main goals of this week’s Forum in Salzburg are to welcome fifty-five new members from around the world into the YCI network, connect them with each other, and provide opportunities for them to reflect on their own practices as well as their roles in their communities, cities, and as part of the YCI network worldwide. “Their participation is the beginning of what we hope will be a long term engagement with an active community of creative people around the globe, who are striving to make this world a better place for all.” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.  
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Young Cultural Innovators Present at Better Together Challenge 2018
Rebecca Chan speaking at Better Together Challenge 2018 in Daejeon, the Republic of Korea
Young Cultural Innovators Present at Better Together Challenge 2018
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows Rebecca Chan and Yu Nakamura have expressed their delight after appearing at an international conference in the Republic of Korea. Chan, a program officer at LISC National Creative Placemaking Program, delivered a <C!talk Global> presentation on arts, culture, and equitable development at Better Together Challenge 2018. Yu Nakamura also delivered a <C!talk Global> talk about her current project, Grandma’s Happy Recipes Storybook, a book in which Nakamura gathers recipes from octogenarians who lived through the Second World War and other significant events. This event was organized by World Culture Open and the Presidential Committee on National Balanced Development of Korea. It took place in Daejeon at the beginning of September. Nakamura has recently published a Korean edition of her book and produced a 10-part YouTube series featuring some of the grandmas she spoke to. She was invited to talk about her project and how her experiences in an earthquake in 2011 led to its creation. She said, "I was in Tokyo [during the earthquake] and of course I was scared but what made me more scared was the fact that we cannot eat anything if logistics didn’t work… If we consider innovation as evolution, then people who [have relied] on systems, have they really evolved since [our] grandmas’ era?" She concluded her talk by challenging the audience to think about how “our world now is so convenient thanks to technology but our lives [are] relying on a visible system too much, and we are not good at dealing with contingence." Speaking about the conference, Nakamura said, “It was [such a] fruitful event where I [got] to know [what] Korean young people were passionate about, and talking to other global speakers, includ[ing] Rebecca was super inspiring.” Rebecca Chan, who lives in Baltimore, Maryland, said, “My work at LISC is usually hyper-local, yet there are so many parallels between US community development and what I heard and saw presented in Daejeon; challenges of gentrification, urban/rural divides, waning civic engagement, and how to leverage cross-sector partnerships. “I am so thankful for the opportunity to share and learn, and to witness the dynamism and rigor with which these challenges are being tackled in Korea. I am ever more inspired by and grateful for all the intrepid local leaders I encounter in this work. [They] are the real deal. “Thank you to World Culture Open, in particular, Joo Im Moon, [and] Salzburg Global Seminar for building an international network of cultural innovators, and of course, my Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) colleagues for constant inspiration. Finally, [I would like to give a] shout out to my fellow <C!talk Global> presenters, Ivan Mitin, Yu Nakamura, & Thomas Cavanagh.” Chan attended the second program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2015. At the time, she was a program officer at the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, a Baltimore-based philanthropic organization which promotes innovation in science and technology, arts, education, and social justice. Chan has also served as the program director of Station North Arts & Entertainment Inc. Nakamura attended the third program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016. She is the co-founder of 40creations, which amongst other things sells local hand-made wine, and she currently working on a project that introduces European wine and Japanese sake to Thailand. To learn more about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
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Salzburg Global Fellow Animates Campaign Against New Hydropower Development in Albania
Kleidi Eski, a design professional and multimedia artist, at Salzburg Global Seminar in October 2017
Salzburg Global Fellow Animates Campaign Against New Hydropower Development in Albania
Oscar Tollast 
The Valbona River flows through northern Albanian Alps and this beautiful, wild river forms part of what local activists like to call the “blue heart of Europe.” But, they warn, “the Blue Heart of Europe is at risk of a heart attack” thanks to the proposed development of hydropower plants along this biologically diverse artery. Enter the eco-cardiologists determined to save the Balkans’ rivers from such destructive development. One such activist is multimedia artist and Salzburg Global Fellow Kleidi Eski, who was inspired to take action, in part, thanks to his participation at the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2017. Eski currently runs Light and Moving, a multidisciplinary design and animation studio in Tirana, Albania, and attended the fourth program of the YCI Forum alongside four other “YCIs” from his country thanks to support from the Albanian-American Development Foundation. Since leaving Salzburg, Eski has collaborated with others to campaign against the development of hydropower plants along the Valbona River. Campaigners believe the development could cause much of the river to dry up, which would have a knock-on effect on the ecosystem and local communities who use water for drinking and irrigation purposes. Construction has been ongoing inside Valbona Valley National Park since 2016. Earlier this year, Eski was asked to conceptualize a protest billboard campaign to be utilized in Tirana. He created “Po Flet Valbona” (“Valbona Speaks Out”) as a slogan and logo. Working alongside Collective68, an open source web agency, Eski also helped set up a website providing information around the campaign and details on how people can join. Eski says the streets of central Tirana were filled with “Po Flet Valbona” adverts for 10 days earlier this spring, while campaign brochures and stickers still continue to decorate many popular bars. Eski and his peers are continuing their efforts to stop construction of the plants. He worked alongside a group of musicians, including singers Elina Duni and Eda Zari, to produce a song and animated music video in support of the campaign. The video has already received thousands of views on YouTube and Facebook and has been shared across social media, attracting the attention of mainstream media outlets. Eski told Salzburg Global his time at Schloss Leopoldskron had a significant effect on his way of thinking. He said, “The YCI Forum [at] the Salzburg Global Seminar has profoundly influenced me in believing that culture, art, and design can affect the world around us. “More importantly, this experience proved [to] me that in order to create impact, it is important to join forces with everyone who shares the same ideals. Of course, I have done a little part of it, but this is already a [motivator] to do more in the future.” You can learn more about the campaign here. #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
Oscar Tollast 
A celebration of Afropunk featuring photographs, live music, discussion, and dancing will be held in Detroit, Michigan, later this week. “Here You Can Be Whatever You Want: A Celebration of Afropunk” is taking place at The Baltimore Gallery, Detroit, on September 14 between 6 pm and midnight. The free event has been organized by Salzburg Global Fellows Lauren Rossi and Karah Shaffer, in partnership with Facing Change: Documenting Detroit. Rossi, creative industries program manager at Creative Many, and Shaffer, co-founder and executive director of Facing Change: Documenting Detroit, both attended the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2017.   After taking part in this program, the duo received support and funding from Salzburg Global, the Kresge Foundation, and the Knight Foundation to inspire innovation and collaboration at a local level. On Friday, visitors will be able to view an exhibition of images made at Afropunk festivals around the world by photographers Kholood Eid and Bunni Elian. Music will be provided by internationally acclaimed DJ and vocalist Shaun J. Wright and DJ Holographic, a local emerging artist also known as Ariel Corley. For more information about the event, please click here.
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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