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Salzburg Updates

Making the World Better and Beautiful Through Collaboration
Jaimie (Joo Im) Moon
Making the World Better and Beautiful Through Collaboration
Oscar Tollast 
For Jaimie (Joo Im) Moon, her experience in Salzburg was “inspiring” for many reasons – none more so than her realizing “how so many great and creative people are out there making our world better and beautiful…” Her participation in the Young Cultural Innovators Forum (YCI) also helped her make connections that would have otherwise been difficult to make. “It was also very meaningful for me to get to talk with global fellows from the regions that are comparatively rare to meet in East Asia, such as those from Eastern Europe and South America. The thoughtfully curated programs of YCI led us to become friends and to exchange thoughts and experiences in fun and mindful way[s].” Moon, from the Republic of Korea, arrived in Salzburg in October 2016 as a senior researcher and cultural designer for the Bureau of Strategic Planning of the World Culture Open, a non-profit organization that promotes cultural diversity and unprejudiced cultural exchange around the globe. Now, she is the executive director of the Bureau that stands in its place: The Bureau of Research & Plan. Moon has since grown more confident about her life goal. She said, “I think I was able to be clearer about my goal through YCI and recent years of work because I feel that there are more allies, the comrades, and friends to learn from and to exchange knowledge and experiences with for the common goal. Such [a] feeling of solidarity brings up confidence and willpower in me.” Better Together At World Culture Open, Moon is working on the organization’s Better Together Initiative, which tries to bring together social entrepreneurs from around the world who are working for the greater good. Moon said, “World Culture Open shares a very similar goal of what Salzburg Global Seminar has been achieving over 70 years - convening creative minds across sectors, fostering networks and partnership for social change, [and] connecting local innovators across the globe.” One of the two pillars of this initiative is the Better Together Festival (Challenge), an annual three-day global gathering of change-makers where participants can share stories of their projects and win prizes through a contest-format program. They can also exchange knowledge, attend talks and concerts, have in-depth group discussions on social issues, and discuss potential partnerships. Last year’s festival was held in Pyeongchang and featured hundreds of practitioners from around the world, including several YCI Fellows. Susanna Seidl-Fox, a program director at Salzburg Global responsible for culture and the arts, was also in attendance. Moon said, “Along with the Challenge, we were happy to be able to invite some YCI Fellows as advisory members to the Better Together initiative this year. Advisory members… are those recognized as proactive agents of change in their own communities who actively engage in shaping and implementing Better Together initiative with a collaborative network of practitioners and change-makers.” Collaborative Partnerships Moon said she had benefited personally and professionally from knowing Seidl-Fox. “She has been a great mentor for me in the aspect of leadership, management, and communication… I believe such professionalism that Susi shows throughout the process of work is also a very important learning element for young cultural innovators.” The YCI Forum is building a global network of 500 change-makers in hub communities to design collaborative projects, build skills, provide mentorship, and connector innovators in different cities and countries. Moon has collaborated with Salzburg Global Fellows, including Phloen Prim, Siphiwe Mbinda, Rebecca Chan, Yu Nakamura, Sebastian Chuffer, Chunnoon Song-e Song, and more. Moon said, “The YCI network, a pool of hundreds of creative minds is an incredible source of greater-good practitioners [whom] I can invite, connect [with] and introduce [to] the field of work that I am involved in. “For the projects that I curated in Korea, I could invite YCI Fellows as global speakers, facilitators and expert/advisory members, or connect the Fellows to other cultural projects and collaborative opportunities in Korea.” Arts and Culture in the Republic of Korea In the Republic of Korea, Moon said there are a “good amount” of grants and government-backed cultural foundations that support the arts. World Culture Open, for example, works closely with the public sector at various levels. Moon said, “We partner with the Presidential Committee for the National Balanced Development for a project to find and support the cultural innovators in local areas… They are the core element in terms of [the] sustainable development of the region. Such collaborative effort[s] [are] important, especially when the disparity between cosmopolitan urban [cities] like Seoul and the other regions is generating many social problems. “The Better Together Global Festival has [also] been hosted and funded by the city-level regional governments each year. And we often get invited by the government bureaus for consultancy to various arts and culture-related matters in the regions.” Despite this financial support, Moon believes the arts and culture sector in Korea is still considered a secondary subject when compared with technology, the economy, or politics. “We need to acknowledge cultural innovators – those who practice and promote arts and culture – are also the social innovators. Cultural innovators approach social issue[s] with [flexibility] and creative perspective[s] and find breakthroughs from unconventional approaches. Arts and culture brings advancement to technology, [the] economy, and even politics with creativity.” If Moon could change one thing about the arts and culture sector in her country, it would be the arts education system. She believes arts and culture need to be taught as a natural means of expression and creativity. “Arts and culture should be appreciated and valued more importantly in terms of class time and resource allocation at schools, and it should be applied cross-sectoral throughout various subjects. Teachers need more learning resources and practical training. It is never enough. Governments and corporations need to invest more in arts education.”
The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators empowers rising talents in the creative sector to drive social, economic and urban change. Launched in 2014, it is building a global network of 500 competitively-selected changemakers in “hub” communities who design collaborative projects, build skills, gain mentors, and connect to upcoming innovators in their cities and countries.
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Salzburg Global Fellows Discuss Artificial Intelligence and More at Pune International Literary Festival
From left to right - Parag Mankeekar, Stacy Baird, Seda Röder, and Charles Ehrlich at the Pune International Literary Festival
Salzburg Global Fellows Discuss Artificial Intelligence and More at Pune International Literary Festival
Claire Kidwell and Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Seminar cast an eye on the future at this year’s Pune International Literary Festival (PILF) as it partnered with the festival for the fourth consecutive year. Each year, as part of the partnership, a Salzburg Global Seminar staff member convenes a select group of Fellows in Pune, for a main-stage panel discussion on a topic of global concern, as well as to participate in discussions on other issues within their expertise, and to provide mentoring and guidance to young authors participating in the festival.  From 20-22 September, Charles Ehrlich, a program director at Salzburg Global, joined Fellows Stacy Baird, Seda Röder, and Parag Mankeekar in Pune, India. They took part in Salzburg Global’s main panel discussion on artificial intelligence (AI) and societal innovation.  During this period, they also engaged in discussions on issues ranging from climate change to creativity in a digital age. The quartet have all participated in multiple programs at Schloss Leopoldskron spanning many of Salzburg Global Seminar’s key program areas across governance, justice, culture, health, and education, and could bring this diversity of knowledge and experience to Pune. The Pune International Literary Festival is Pune’s first-ever English literary festival and provides a space for young authors to gain insight into the writing process, listen to personal stories from acclaimed authors, and attend panels on international topics to add relevance to their work. The festival was established by author and Salzburg Global Fellow Manjiri Prabhu, who first came to Schloss Leopoldskron in 2002 for the program From Page to Screen: Adapting Literature to Film. Inspired by her time in Salzburg, Prabhu wanted to create a forum where people who would not otherwise meet come and collaborate on international issues. Prabhu said the festival was “extremely privileged” to have Salzburg Global return as an international partner. She said, “With every passing year, the bond has strengthened to serve a common objective, that of spreading knowledge to attain global peace. I hope that together we will bridge the gap between thoughts and action and bring about a change in the world through literature, arts, and culture.” Seda Röder, a classical pianist and co-founder of Sonophilia, a global thinktank for creative leadership and cross-industry collaboration, was visiting India for the first time. In her work, she wants to help empower humans to become creative problem-solvers to tackle global challenges. Reflecting on the panel discussion she took part in, Röder said, “I had a feeling that some people were really afraid of how much technology should be actually accepted, how much AI should be in the room, [and] how much of the decision making it should take over. It’s an essential question to so many people.” In the panel discussion, Fellows also discussed the visibility of data, the ethics surrounding it, and what checks could be put in place to protect people. Röder said there was agreement among panelists that societies have reached a point where there is no going back. “I can’t imagine a future where all this improvement and innovation, and all the good and bad technology that goes with that - we won’t be able to take anything back,” Röder said. “You can’t tell people not to use social media or anything like that, I think that makes no sense. So we’ll have to figure out a way of steering the ship hopefully without making it sink.” Parag Mankeekar, a health professional and anthropologist turned social-tech entrepreneur, found the experience of talking about AI at a literary festival a novel experience. He said, “The world constantly changes, and writers have a great role to play to bring this changing world reality to the thought process of the common man in a language that's easy to understand.” During the panel discussion, Mankeekar sought to demonstrate how AI can help solve the world’s most challenging problems. He said, “The challenge is how common man can deal with the issues of data privacy and ‘illusions’ AI sets through its anti-social algorithms can be brought to the knowledge of common man… This is where I must appreciate the efforts of Salzburg [Global] Seminar and PILF to bring such an important topic as one of the main themes of the festival and sensitizing the society to be ready for the better future.” Taking part in his first literary festival, law and technology expert Stacy Baird, consulting director at TRPC, said it was an honor to be involved and experience the festival’s creative energy.  “It was a delight to be able to share insights on our topics, climate, and the environment and artificial intelligence, with an interesting and interested cross-cultural group of creative writers,” said Baird. “It was also wonderful to have the opportunity to meet a number of people from outside my usual sphere of association. I expect I have made several life-long friends.” Additional Salzburg Global Fellows speaking at the festival included former UN undersecretary-general and acclaimed author Shashi Tharoor, who discussed his own life journey as well as his most recent book Why I am a Hindu.  Salzburg Global program director Charles Ehrlich said he admired the “relaxed intergenerational atmosphere” created at the festival, which enabled participants and speakers to mix and talk freely, creating a synergy with Salzburg Global’s ethos.  Ehrlich added, “It was also terrific to engage across multiple sectors in India’s second-largest literary festival – and we are very pleased Salzburg Global Seminar was able to bring Fellows to the Festival who themselves crossed so many disciplines. The Festival itself sought out this diversity, and it is precisely these interconnections that underline why Salzburg Global Seminar and the Pune International Literary Festival make good partners.”
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Salzburg Global Seminar and Ending Pandemics Create One Health Timeliness Metrics
Participants of Finding Outbreaks Faster: Metrics for One Health Surveillance
Salzburg Global Seminar and Ending Pandemics Create One Health Timeliness Metrics
Salzburg Global Seminar and Ending Pandemics 
Coinciding with the fourth annual One Health Day, participants of Salzburg Global Seminar and Ending Pandemics’ latest program have designed the first-ever set of One Health timeliness metrics and prototyped a framework for implementation. Specialists in environmental, livestock, wildlife, and human health from across the globe spent the past few days at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria as active participants in the program Finding Outbreaks Faster: Metrics for One Health Surveillance. In November 2018, Salzburg Global Seminar and Ending Pandemics ran a program that produced a set of metrics for measuring progress in finding and responding to human health outbreaks faster. These metrics have now been adopted by the World Health Organization and other agencies. The participants in this year’s program broke new ground in expanding the application of this approach to One Health. One Health is a collaborative, multisectoral, and transdisciplinary approach that recognizes the health of people, animals, and the environment are connected. The timeliness metrics will enable One Health stakeholders to measure their performance in finding outbreaks faster to save lives and protect livelihoods. On November 3 each year, One Health Day is marked across the world. It is a campaign that brings attention to the need for a One Health approach to address shared health threats at the human-animal-environment interface. During this year’s program, participants engaged with panel discussions, presentations, and group work to design One Health metrics. Initial discussions centered on operationalizing One Health surveillance and identifying metrics for human, animal, and environmental health. A few examples of timeliness metrics developed through a highly interactive, iterative process include time to detect an unusual or adverse health event, time to initiation of a multisectoral investigation, and time to implementation of control measures.  Moving forward, Ending Pandemics will process the many ideas generated at the program and produce a One Health framework to be openly shared and promoted globally. Participants mapped out an action plan through 2021 and offered commitments to push this plan forward. For more information about One Health Day, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/onehealth/one-health-day.html
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Preserving Our Past with a Look to the Future
Salzburg Global Seminar and Harvard University Library Logos
Preserving Our Past with a Look to the Future
Salzburg Global Seminar 
We are delighted to announce Salzburg Global Seminar has partnered with Harvard University Archives to permanently house and make available for research our historical records, fulfilling a wish by Salzburg Global's "fourth founder" Herbert P. Gleason. Our hope is this collection will engage researchers and  students interested in global intellectual and cultural history. We encourage you to learn more about Salzburg Global's connection with Harvard University below. In 2009, Salzburg Global Seminar’s “fourth founder” Herbert P. Gleason put forward a proposal. He advocated for the organization to share its history with the Harvard University Archives, the oldest and largest academic archives in the United States, and thus the wider world. It was a chance for Salzburg Global to reconnect with the establishment its three founders hailed from and an opportunity to reaffirm the extraordinary relationship between both organizations. Salzburg Global makes no secret of its connection with the Ivy League university. As mentioned, the organization was the brainchild of three Harvard men – graduate student Clemens Heller, college senior Richard “Dick” Campbell and English instructor Scott Elledge. In the summer of 1947, the trio had the vision to rebuild Europe by pursuing a “Marshall Plan for the Mind.” The first program, known as the Salzburg Seminar in American Civilization, was a triumphant success. Faculty mostly came from Harvard University, including literary historian F.O. Matthiessen, Nobel Prize-winning economist Wassily Leontief, government professor Benjamin F. Wright and acclaimed historian Gaetano Salvemini. While the Harvard administration was less enthusiastic about the initiative, the Harvard Student Council provided part of the funding. Gleason, also a Harvard alumnus, was selected alongside five other Harvard students through a university-wide competition to administer the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies summer program of 1949. He became the clerk of the Seminar after his graduation in 1950. He was a signatory of the original incorporation papers and remained a member of the board of directors until 2010. It’s perhaps no surprise to learn a young Gleason put forward another proposal at the time to expand the organization’s program of studies and think more globally. Salzburg Global Seminar hasn’t looked back since and continues to flourish. Since 1947, the organization has welcomed more than 37,000 Fellows from more than 170 countries. Today, Salzburg Global challenges current and future leaders to shape a better world. Its multi-year series of programs aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems. Following Gleason’s call for action, which gained the enthusiastic support of Salzburg Global Seminar’s President and Board leadership, work began on cataloging and archiving past program materials including reports, lecture outlines, directories, and schedules. It was the start of a lengthy procedure, which was undertaken by various members of staff and interns. What followed was a significant learning process for the organization. Sadly, Gleason was unable to see his initiative reach a successful conclusion. He passed away on December 9, 2013, at the age of 85 following treatment for cancer. Staff at Salzburg Global continued, however, to push ahead with Gleason’s wish and ensure another part of his legacy lived on. By December 2017, an estimated 350 linear feet of textual records was ready to be shipped to the Harvard University Archives. After traveling by boat, the boxes arrived at the Archives the following month. Since being delivered, the records have been accessioned. The records will be shortly made available for researchers and the wider public, which will bring Salzburg Global further into the world. Since its establishment in 1947, Salzburg Global has welcomed hundreds of participants who have held a connection with Harvard University. In recent years, Harvard Law School has been one of 11 schools to partner with the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program. Now in its seventh year, the program convenes up to 55 students nominated by their law schools along with faculty and noted practitioners of international public and private law. Together they take part in a highly interactive exploration of leading-edge issues in international law, national security, international courts, the rule of law, and international finance, monetary and trade law. In addition, some of Salzburg Global’s current staff and former interns have studied at the illustrious university. Stephen Salyer, president, and chief executive officer at Salzburg Global, has a Master’s in public administration from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Meanwhile, Charles E. Ehrlich, a program director at Salzburg Global, holds an A.B. in history and classics (Latin). His father also studied at Harvard at the same time as Heller, Campbell Jnr., and Elledge. Julia Bunte-Mein served as a program intern in the summer of 2018. Bunte-Mein, who is pursuing a Bachelor’s degree at Harvard studying social anthropology and environmental studies said, “On the recommendation from an advisor from Harvard’s German Department, I looked into Salzburg Global and was very inspired by its programs bringing together diverse opinions to discuss today’s most pressing global policy issues. Now knowing the history of Salzburg Global’s founding by three Harvard students, who sought to overcome political divides through discussions of literature and humanities, it is not surprising to me that they came from Harvard… “I find one of the principal benefits from my experience [at Harvard] has been engaging in complex, often controversial topics with students coming from vastly different geographic, religious, and political backgrounds around the world… The open-mindedness and emphasis on creating spaces to broach sensitive or multifaceted subjects pervade the campus culture. This prepared me well for working at the Salzburg Global Seminar.” Fiona Davis graduated from Harvard with a Bachelor’s degree in government, a minor in history, and a language citation in French. She interned at Salzburg Global the quarter after Bunte-Mein. She worked primarily as a development intern but also assisted on programs. She said, “It is a testament to the perennial legacy of Harvard's history of service, the ingenuity of Salzburg Global's founders, and the stewardship of Salzburg Global's leaders over time that the organization has retained its character and staying power as a now globally focused organization for cross border cooperation. “Moving Salzburg Global's archives to Harvard essentially brings this process full circle. What began at Harvard became a global service organization, and now Salzburg Global's legacy will be permanently remembered and made a part of Harvard's own physical records again. Salzburg Global can become a part of the fabric of Harvard's legacy of service that will influence the next generation's leaders and thinkers to embrace and practice the same values.” Reflecting on this feat and fulfilling Gleason’s wish, Stephen Salyer, president, and chief executive officer of Salzburg Global said: “Our cooperation with the Harvard University Archives makes permanent a connection between Harvard students with a dream and leading scholars who helped make that dream reality.  The early years left an indelible mark on all we do, and the Seminar’s spirit of public service now extends to fellows, scholars and partner institutions in every corner of the world. We are deeply thankful for the University’s shared vision, and tangible support.” Access to the collection will be limited in some cases until it is processed and there are restrictions in place, yet the Harvard University Archives and Salzburg Global are both eager to invite researchers into these records and anticipate that permission for research will be granted in many cases. During this initial phase, if you are interested in learning more about the collection or requesting permission to access, you can contact Virginia Hunt, Associate University Archivist for Collection Development and Records Management Services, at virginia_hunt@harvard.edu or 617-495-3240.
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Moving Patient Safety Measurement into Action
Susan Edgman-Levitan speaking during the Salzburg Global program on Moving Measurement into Action: Designing Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety
Moving Patient Safety Measurement into Action
Mirabelle Morah 
“We are absolutely committed to making the work that comes out of this seminar actionable and real,” said Susan Edgman-Levitan, the executive director of John D. Stoeckle Center for Primary Care Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital, USA. Earlier this month, Edgman-Levitan and other experts from across the globe gathered at Schloss Leopoldskron, the historic home of Salzburg Global Seminar, to take part in Moving Measurement into Action: Designing Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety. The program happened in cooperation with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), a body which Edgman-Levitan belongs to as a senior fellow. After five days of discussion, presentations, and group work, participants helped shape new global principles for measuring patient safety. Edgman-Levitan says every participant is “absolutely committed” to making the work that comes out of the program actionable and real. “We never came into this thinking we were just going to sit around for five days and talk and have a good time and play foosball,” Edgman-Levitan said. “We really came into this to make a difference and to have an impact, and I think the hard work is before us. But I think we've built a very, very strong foundation here and I'm very excited about seeing how this all plays out in different settings, in different countries, and with different international organizations.” During last month’s program, participants considered what the role of the patient would be when designing global principles for measuring patient safety. As an advocate for understanding the perspective of patients in patients’ health care, Edgman-Levitan had a lot to share on the matter. “Patients have a view of safety that no one else has. I think patients are the most astute observers of what our health care system is really like…” said Edgman-Levitan. “I think without getting their opinions and evaluations of how we're delivering care that we just engage in magical thinking about what a good job we're doing… I think that when managers and clinicians start partnering actively with patients to redesign or improve care, they very quickly realize that patients know a lot more about their operation than they do... “If you put managers and clinicians in a room to redesign something, they will often come up with the most expensive, complicated, and wrong solution possible that costs a lot of money. And when you talk to patients and get their input, they typically come up with very elegant easy-to-implement, and most importantly, effective solutions to the problems that they're having because they know what is going to work for them… We can sometimes figure out the technical sides of that, but we would have never understood that if it weren't for their role in the design process.” Edgman-Levitan is no stranger to Schloss Leopoldskron and Salzburg Global Seminar. The latest program marked her third visit. She previously attended health programs in 1998 and 2010. So, how does this program compare? “I think this has been an amazing seminar...” said Edgman-Levitan. “[Participants are] very engaged in the discussions and very respectful of one another, willing to raise challenging issues in a way that I think really is illustrative of the heart of what the Salzburg Seminar mission is, where we can have healthy and incisive debate in a respectful way… I know I personally have met many people here that I have either read their work, I've looked at their websites, I've heard of them, and now I will have no hesitation to pick up the phone and call them and say, 'Hey, can we do something together?' And I think that's the power of the seminar.” The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Moving Measurement into Action: Designing Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety, is part of the Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series. The program is being held in partnership with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. This program has been supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.
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Salzburg Global Helps Launch London as the World’s First National Park City
At the National Park City Summit – from left to right – Paul de Zylva, Clare Shine, Peter Massini, Kevin Halpenny, Kobie Brand, Alison Barnes, Dan Raven-Ellison, Russell Galt
Salzburg Global Helps Launch London as the World’s First National Park City
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Dan Raven-Ellison saw his dream become a reality last month as London declared itself as the world’s first National Park City. In a special ceremony at City Hall on July 22, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan co-signed the London National Park City Charter, which outlines ways to increase London’s green credentials. During the ceremony, Raven-Ellison said, “The London National Park City is our habitat, it’s our city. We all have a voice to shape it. We need more bold visions of a positive future—a better life.” Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer of Salzburg Global Seminar, was invited to speak on the global potential of urban partnerships and nature-based solutions for equity, health, and economies. During her talk, Shine said, “It’s not a zero-sum game. If you plant trees and make safe green space accessible for everyone, you are dealing not only with biodiversity and climate change but also violence, loneliness, and other urban problems… There are so many win-wins.” Other Salzburg Global Fellows at the celebration included Kobie Brand, director of ICLEI’s Cities Biodiversity Centre; Jonny Hughes, chair of the IUCN Urban Alliance, Russell Galt, director of the IUCN Urban Alliance; and Alison Barnes, a trustee of the National Park Foundation. The previous day, Salzburg Global joined forces with the National Park City Foundation and World Urban Parks to launch the Universal Charter for National Park Cities—a unique new movement to affirm and celebrate the power of cities as habitats shaping life on earth. The Charter defines a National Park City as “a place, a vision and a city-wide community that is acting together to make life better for people, wildlife and nature” and explains that “a defining feature is the widespread commitment to act so people, culture and nature work together to provide a better foundation for life”. The Charter specifies that a National Park City is “a shared vision and journey for a better life” and that everyone in a National Park City can benefit and contribute every day. Raven-Ellison, Brand, Hughes, Galt, and Barnes have all attended programs of Salzburg Global’s Parks for the Planet Forum, a platform for transformative leadership and action to reconnect people and nature in an urbanized world. Launched in 2015, the Forum aims to improve human and societal wellbeing by expanding access to nature-rich urban spaces, increasing investments in urban conservation, and creating dynamic partnerships between people, cities, and protected area systems. For more information about the Forum, please contact Salzburg Global program director Dominic Regester at dregester@salzburgglobal.org.
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Charter for National Park Cities Gathers International Support
Charter for National Park Cities Gathers International Support
Daniel Raven-Ellison 
A Universal Charter for National Park Cities, the first of its kind to address the growing role of cities as habitats shaping life on earth, is launched on Sunday 21 July 2019, by the National Park City Foundation, World Urban Parks and Salzburg Global Seminar.  Download the Charter as a PDF Organisations and individuals are invited to sign and support the first Universal Charter for National Park Cities which is already supported by experts and change-makers from over 20 countries, including the UK, Australia, India, Uganda, Honduras, Canada, South Africa, Albania and the USA.  Supporters include scientists, artists, medical doctors, parents, social innovators, environmentalists, investors, authors, climate change activists and educators.  The historic document sets out a common vision for this new kind of national park, reflecting the importance of how cities develop and operate. The Charter defines a National Park City as “a place, a vision and a city-wide community that is acting together to make life better for people, wildlife and nature” and explains that “a defining feature is the widespread commitment to act so people, culture and nature work together to provide a better foundation for life”. The Charter specifies that a National Park City is “a shared vision and journey for a better life” and that “everyone in a National Park City is able to benefit and contribute everyday”. With ceremonies taking place in Australasia, Europe and North America, the Universal Charter for National Park Cities is being launched the day before London becomes the world’s first National Park City.  Adelaide (Australia), Glasgow (Scotland), Galway (Ireland) and Newcastle upon Tyne (England) are all in the running to be the world’s second National Park City, with influencers in other cities around the world inspired to follow suit. Alison Barnes, Trustee of the National Park City Foundation said: “It has been a privilege to work with colleagues from across the world on the Universal Charter. The vision for National Park Cities pioneered in London has proven resonant and inspirational. Today is an important moment of hope that we can act together to make life better for people, wildlife and nature in our cities at a global scale.”  Neil McCarthy, CEO of World Urban Parks, said: “This is the most significant development regarding people and nature since John Muir and the creation of the national park concept. World Urban Parks has been inspired by the London NPC journey and has established an aspirational target of 25 National Park Cities worldwide by 2025 – 25 for 2025.” Daniel Raven-Ellison, founder of the London National Park City campaign, said: “When you look around the world there are national parks that represent every major kind of internationally recognised landscape and habitat apart from one - the world’s fastest growing habitats - cities. Inspired by rural national parks, the National Park City idea challenges us to think differently about cities and to make life better in them for people and wildlife. Crucially, everybody in a National Park City is able to both enjoy and contribute to it.” Clare Shine, Vice President of Salzburg Global Seminar said: “Across the world, ever more people are living and working in cities, and billions are spent on urban development and infrastructure. Yet nature is being squeezed out – despite overwhelming evidence that connecting with nature can boost the physical, mental and spiritual health and wellbeing of people and their communities. Greener, healthier cities make good economic sense for a sustainable planet. The National Parks City concept is a radical, timely and locally-driven solution to this shared global challenge. Salzburg Global Seminar has backed Dan Raven-Ellison’s vision from the start. Through our Parks for the Planet Forum, we are excited to lead international collaboration to build a transformative movement for living and liveable cities now and for generations to come.””.  Kobie Brand, Global Director of Biodiversity at ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability said:   "Our future is urban. Embracing nature and inviting it into every aspect of city life, is essential for humanity's health and well-being. Our commitment matters - from our own streets and neighbourhoods to city-level planning and design. We can achieve this vision of cities with nature through true partnering and collective action. Every voice matters, every action counts and every city can make a difference. Congratulations to the people of London for leading the way!"  
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Stephanie Bertels: Why Is It Increasingly Important for Boards to Clearly Signal Their Position on ESG Issues?
Stephanie Bertels: Why Is It Increasingly Important for Boards to Clearly Signal Their Position on ESG Issues?
Stephanie Bertels 
This article is part of the series, the Salzburg Questions for Corporate Governance by the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum As an academic working at the intersection of corporate governance and sustainability, I end up chatting with executives and directors in global companies quite regularly. Lately, directors are asking whether their company should be taking a public position on one or more environmental, social, or governance (ESG) issues. “It used to be just the NGOs or the SRIs (socially responsible investors) asking for this, but now even mainstream investors are asking,” they will say. Even the central banks have started to get in on the action, viewing climate change as a threat to financial stability.  It started decades ago with the pressure to issue a sustainability report, but a string of incidents ranging from the Rana Plaza building collapse and the Volkswagen emissions scandal to PG&E’s “climate-driven bankruptcy” have raised questions about what other environmental, social, and governance risks may lurk within.  And yet despite these issues, or perhaps because of them, the world is looking to the biggest companies to clearly articulate what role they will play in solving some of our most intractable problems and to clarify how they will contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  Boards need to respond As demands for corporate social and environmental responsibility expand and intensify, investors are demanding a clear position from management and the board, one that includes specifically addressing the company’s understanding of the context in which it operates and clarifying its role and commitments to address key environmental and social challenges. But our research is showing that this isn’t just a paper exercise. By developing position statements, boards and executive teams deepen their understanding of these issues in the context of their business, clarify the link to the company’s overall strategy, clarify their position for other key stakeholders, and provide the direction and confidence for management and employees to act.  What does “good” look like when it comes to a position statement? That’s a question that keeps surfacing in my conversations with directors. To provide an answer, we analyzed over 3,000 board position statements, finding that too often, they were lengthy documents that failed to make a clear strategic connection between the issue and the implications for business decision making.  Our guide on Next Generation Governance, provides a framework to help companies produce more credible and concise position statements.  A good position statement will do three key things:  Explain your company’s understanding of the issue including what you see as relevant limits;  Clearly link the issue to your business strategy; and Make a credible commitment to take appropriate actions. It’s that credible commitment piece that many companies are struggling with. It means that for each relevant issue, your company needs to talk with stakeholders to understand the key system limits and what it would take for your company to operate within them.  Companies are increasingly expected to take a position on carbon One issue that is taking front and center is the climate crisis. Of the statements we reviewed, over 2,000 of them related to climate change and momentum continues to grow fueled by two key trends.  First, the Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) released guidelines asking companies to engage in scenario-planning and to disclose their climate-related risks. While currently voluntary, it is expected that regulation on mandatory climate risk disclosure is sure to follow. Second, there are a multitude of initiatives pressing companies to set a science-based target in alignment with a 1.5°C reduction pathway. Despite this, a recent study of 274 of the largest publicly traded, high-emitting companies found that almost half do not adequately consider climate risks in their operational decision-making and only an eighth are reducing carbon emissions at the rate required to keep global warming below 2°C, let alone 1.5°C.  To be viewed as credibly engaging on climate, investors and other stakeholders will want you to articulate a clear position. For those ready to do so, this guide can help.  Have an opinion?  We encourage our readers to share your comments by joining in the discussion on LinkedIn. Stephanie Bertels is the director of the Centre for Corporate Governance and Sustainability at Simon Fraser University's (SFU) Beedie School of Business in Vancouver, Canada. She founded and leads the Embedding Project, where she works with dozens of global companies to help them embed sustainability into their operations and decision-making. Stephanie developed an online knowledge portal (www.embeddingproject.org) featuring a curated selection of the most relevant corporate sustainability resources - including practical guides and tools developed through her own research. Her most recent work draws upon a review of over 3200 board position statements and interviews with over 200 global CEOs and board chairs to explore how corporate governance and corporate strategy processes are shifting to account for environmental and social constraints. She has previously worked as an environmental engineer and is a trustee and chair of SFU's Academic Pension Plan. She has a Ph.D. in strategy and global management and sustainable development from the University of Calgary, an M.Sc. in petroleum engineering from Stanford University, USA, and a B.Sc. in geological environmental engineering from Queen's University. Stephanie is a Fellow of Salzburg Global Seminar. The Salzburg Questions for Corporate Governance is an online discussion series introduced and led by Fellows of the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum. The articles and comments represent opinions of the authors and commenters, and do not necessarily represent the views of their corporations or institutions, nor of Salzburg Global Seminar. Readers are welcome to address any questions about this series to Forum Director, Charles E. Ehrlich: cehrlich@salzburgglobal.org To receive a notification of when the next article is published, follow Salzburg Global Seminar on LinkedIn or sign up for email notifications here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/corpgov/newsletter 
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Aiming for Exceptional Care, Accountability, and Results
Astrid S. Tuminez, president of Utah Valley University (Photo: UVU Marketing Communication)
Aiming for Exceptional Care, Accountability, and Results
Oscar Tollast 
In 2018, Astrid S. Tuminez was appointed the seventh president of Utah Valley University, becoming the institution's first female president. Before joining UVU, she served as an executive at Microsoft and, before then, as the former vice dean of research and assistant dean of executive education at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, the National University of Singapore. Tuminez is a Salzburg Global Fellow and former advisor to the organization. We recently spoke with Tuminez to learn more about her work and her memories of Salzburg Global. You've been appointed the seventh president of Utah Valley University. Congratulations! How does it feel, and what do you want to achieve in this role? It feels amazing to be the seventh and first female president of Utah Valley University (UVU), the largest university in the state of Utah. UVU has a long history - founded in 1941 - of being scrappy, gritty and relevant. In the current age of digital transformation, massive technology-driven change, and continuing - and, in some cases, rising - inequality, I feel that an institution like UVU is so promising. We have open admissions, and we believe in capitalizing human capital, wherever it comes from. Seventy percent of our students work, 18 percent are people of color, and 29 percent are 25 years or older. We offer vocational, career and technical education through the community college model, while also offering over 90 bachelor’s degrees and 11 master’s degrees. I am sometimes daunted by the responsibilities of being UVU president, but, every day, I am renewed and energized because the work is so meaningful. I work with a wonderful team of administrators, faculty, and staff. Together we can enhance thousands of students’ chances to get the education that will help them live productive, dignified and meaningful lives. That is what “student success” means to me, and that’s what I want to achieve in this role.   You have a vast amount of experience in academia, philanthropy, technology, and business. How will these experiences help you in your new role? I am a rather untraditional university president, having worked in so many other fields - academic being only one of them - before coming to UVU. When I first applied for this job and did the interviews, I had the epiphany that everything I knew how to do and all the skills and experiences I had acquired could actually be put to good use at a university. I had done research, administration, sales and marketing, legal and compliance, fundraising, investing, peacemaking, etc.—and a university is the perfect place for applying all the lessons I’ve learned in these other fields. Although my Ph.D. is in political science and my undergraduate degree was in Russian literature and international relations, I have always wanted to be more broad than narrow. Today, when knowledge is no longer siloed, I think my experiences can be relevant to students who will likely have non-linear lives and many different careers in their lifetime.   Your profile on Chartwell describes you as an expert in leadership, state-building, nationalism, entrepreneurship, and negotiation. You have spoken on a range of subjects with different audiences. However, is there one learning or piece of wisdom which you always try to convey to others? At UVU, I have articulated our foundational values as “Exceptional Care, Exceptional Accountability and Exceptional Results.” If there is one piece of wisdom that I have frequently shared, that is the importance of caring. We have to see people as they are, care about them, and be curious about their identities and life experience. If we build from a foundation of care, we can then follow with tough conversations. We can lead in ways that build people, not break them down. If we focus on leadership, Salzburg Global challenges current and future leaders to shape a better world. In your opinion, what are some of the qualities you would recommend leaders across sectors to work on? I would go back again to “Exceptional Care” as a foundation. I believe that leaders who are in the game only for power or their own egos will not necessarily shape a better world. Leaders should not believe their own propaganda. That is so unhealthy. The second value I have articulated at UVU is “Exceptional Accountability.” Do leaders walk their talk? Do they act as ethical and responsible stewards of the resources they do control? Are they honest? Do they have integrity?  Finally, at UVU, I have highlighted “Exceptional Results” as our third foundational value. Leaders who want to shape a better world should know how to execute, how to get things done, how to have impact.   I notice you've attended a Salzburg Global Seminar program on Asian economics, alumni events in New York and Singapore, and a Freeman Foundation Symposium. What can you remember about these experiences? Did they have an impact on your career or inspire new ways of thinking? I have also visited Middlebury when the Seminar still had staff there, and I was an advisor to the Seminar for a few months, out of New York City. My first visit to Schloss Leopoldskron was magical. I made friends with whom I am still in touch today. I remember dancing to Abba’s “Dancing Queen” in the Schloss’ basement. It was such an amazing time of intellectual, social and even emotional renewal. I was thrilled to return a second time. And then I returned for a third time with my family to do one of Schloss Leopoldskorn’s Christmas specials. We had sleigh rides, and my kids roamed around the Schloss looking for hidden doors and passageways. We loved it. The impact on my career has included a deeper appreciation of cross-cultural and interdisciplinary dialogue and a keener understanding of the importance of networks - people and ideas. Amb. Frank Wisner, my mentor who first introduced me to Salzburg Global Seminar, remains my friend and mentor to this day.   In 2014, I understand you were a senior advisor on global strategy and programs for Salzburg Global, too. What motivated you to take on that role, and what was that experience like? What motivated me to take on that role was the very positive experience and interaction I had had with Salzburg Global, with its Board of Trustees (I attended one meeting in Dallas, TX), with the new leadership under Stephen L. Salyer, and all the colleagues and friends I had met as a Salzburg Global Fellow. If I recall correctly, I was charged to think about new strategies to strengthen Salzburg Global’s programs, reputation, and fundraising. It was a very enjoyable assignment. Alas, it was short-lived!   In a documentary for UVU, we heard how you had a deep commitment to education and liked the idea of educational opportunities across a broad range. Education is the big break in life and frees the human spirit, as the narrator says. What can we do more to highlight the importance of education in the public and private sector and ensure more resources are invested in this area? Access and affordability are two big buzzwords in the world of education. I believe both are important. I was very lucky as a child, growing up in the slums of the Philippines, to have been given access by Catholic nuns to a high-quality education. They exempted me from tuition, so it was affordable! That opportunity changed the whole trajectory of my life and paved the way to where I am today. I think governments around the world should do more to fund education and to ensure that education is delivered in both traditional and new modalities, meeting people/students where they are - face-to-face, online, hybrid, older students, off-ramp and on-ramp students and so on.   I am concerned, in the U.S. in particular, that many bash higher education and denigrate its value. The fact of the matter is, without higher education, the United States will not be able to maintain its competitiveness; neither will it live up fully to its values as a democratic and equitable society.  In Asia, where I lived for 13 years, I was very impressed that the public sector in ambitious countries and territories was investing heavily in education, including K-12, university, and adult continuing education. We are facing a lot of disruption today, and human welfare will depend very much on giving more people access to a quality, affordable education. As for the private sector, I believe in partnerships between industry and higher education institutions. There can be collaborations involving work experience for students [such as] internships [and] apprenticeships; curriculum design from non-academic certification to associate’s/bachelor’s/master’s degrees, and continuing education for those already employed. Nobody can afford to stand still today. We must be learn-it-alls, and the work of education needs support from universities, governments, and industry.   We like to ask Salzburg Global Fellows what inspires them to do their day-to-day work. With that in mind, what motivates you?   UVU students motivate me more than anything. Behind every number in the 40,000 students we have is a person, a story that is unfolding.  My interactions with UVU students replenish my energy. I work for them. When they succeed, I succeed. Nothing is more motivating than that.
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