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Salzburg Updates

Thank You for Helping to Make the World a Better Place
Photo by Courtney Hedger on Unsplash
Thank You for Helping to Make the World a Better Place
Salzburg Global Seminar 
As we say goodbye to 2018 and hello to 2019, we want to thank all of you, our supporters. Your commitment has ensured the successful launch of the Inspiring Leadership Campaign - the most ambitious fundraiser in Salzburg Global's history designed to expand programs, support scholarships and Fellow collaboration, and preserve and enhance our unique home in Salzburg. Your gift creates positive, lasting change in communities around the world and extends the opportunity to become a Salzburg Global Fellow to future generations. Thank you for making this possible. Stephen Salyer, President and CEO of Salzburg Global Seminar, said, "Salzburg Global Seminar connects amazing people from diverse cultures, inspires new thinking and strategy, and builds collaborations that transform communities. This is made possible by our generous donors and through the engagement of active global networks. Thank you for supporting our work worldwide." This is just the start! It’s never too early or late to make a gift. Help us offer the Salzburg experience to others who are striving to make the world a better place. Join us. Learn more at: campaign.salzburgglobal.org
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Michael Chang – “Every Little Action from Everyone Counts”
Michael Chang in conversation at Salzburg Global Seminar
Michael Chang – “Every Little Action from Everyone Counts”
Oscar Tollast 
In October 2018, health and urban planning professionals from more than 15 countries convened in Salzburg to explore how urban environments can affect health and the public good. The group came together for Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment. Among the participants was Michael Chang, a project and policy manager at the Town and Country Planning Association. Chang, a chartered town planner, and an honorary member of the UK Faculty of Public Health, leads the Reuniting Health with Planning initiative of stakeholder engagement and policy research across the UK. We spoke with Michael after the program to discuss what he had learned and his decision to create the Health and Wellbeing in Planning Network. Read our interview below. SG: Building Healthy, Equitable Communities was your first experience of taking part in a Salzburg Global program. What were your expectations heading into the event? MC: I had high expectations and was highly excited heading into the event, after doing a bit of research into the organization, about its work and the impacts it has had over the years. I knew there would be a presence from colleagues across the globe so there would be an exciting melting pot of ideas, experiences, and cultures. I was looking forward to harnessing that energy and the opportunity the experience would bring to enhance my own work back in the UK. SG: How would you describe your experience in Salzburg? MC: I am not usually an expressive type of person, but I would describe the experience in Salzburg as phenomenal, a once in a lifetime opportunity and such a privilege. The setting gave me a safe thinking space which I don't usually have. The connections allowed me to share my thoughts openly with others. The [program] provided a structure for me to reflect on my own circumstances.    SG: What impact did the conversations and ideas generated at Schloss Leopoldskron have on your work? Was there an idea or perspective you heard which you hadn't considered before? MC: Everyone was open and honest with their conversations and professional views. I was grateful to everyone for this level of transparency. It did raise a couple of challenging conversations especially when it came to issues around racially-related inequalities in the American and South African contexts, and the nuance between ‘gentrification’ and “regeneration.” I learned that while as professionals, we may use these terms interchangeably to suit, it doesn't alter the level of impact our actions can have on local communities. Fortunately, as the experience of attending a planning conference in New Orleans earlier in 2018 was still fresh where such issues are very much at the fore, I was able to relate and have a broader mind-set during discussions. The ideas discussed and presented show that every little action from everyone counts, and sometimes the big idea may not be the answer. We don't tend to learn and acknowledge the lessons of the past and from others, so having that critical mass of thinkers and doers was really beneficial. SG: What's inspired you to move forward with the Health and Wellbeing in Planning Network? MC: I wanted to move forward with the idea of identifying [and] then bringing together that critical mass, at least initially in the UK context which doesn't currently exist in a structured way. The ability to exchange and share experiences, potential transferable solutions or even to have those challenging conversations at the Session demonstrated that perhaps if only initially replicated in a virtual forum, it would be worthwhile. The thinking space provided during smaller group discussions with colleagues such as Gemma McKinnon towards the end of the [program], and with external colleagues such as Rachel Flowers gave me the conviction to press the “go” button for the Health and Wellbeing in Planning Network. This meant activating a series of communication platforms via a LinkedIn group, a Twitter account, and a simple website. SG: What response have you had to the Network so far? MC: In the first weekend of the Network being set up on Twitter right after #SGSHealth, it had close to a couple of hundred followers already. By 2019 new year’s day the number of followers is at 350. On LinkedIn, the Network has 48 members, and on the website, there is a list of 17 members who sent in a short biography to be included. SG: In the long-term, what are your hopes for the Network? MC: It is still early days for the Network to be fully activated across its different communication platforms. I am hoping that the Network members will increase to build a critical mass of “public health planners,” its presence enhanced through its website and its value widely recognized, which means ultimately more virtual peer to peer exchanges taking place in 2019. The Network can function in a number of different ways that is focused on its members acting as ‘peers’ to help each other signpost requests for further support and technical expertise. I hope it can be self-sustaining and become the go-to one-stop-shop for information on all things about planning for health and wellbeing. SG: What do you think practitioners working to improve health and wellbeing need to know more about when it comes to planning? MC: The first step is to understand the parameters of what you mean by “planning.” Certainly, I learned that planning in the UK is very different from planning in the USA, South Africa or New Zealand. By understanding the parameters, you can begin to think about the possibilities including the limitations of what legislation and policy allow you to do. Most importantly this allows you to know who else you have to work with, engage and involve in the process, and appreciate that working together is always better than working alone. SG: The Network is in its early days, but what is one thing you have learned already? MC: It is important to articulate a need for an idea and whether such a need is sustained and regular or just a one-off. This can really be done by having lots of conversations with others so as well as understanding more about the target audience, you are also making links and thereby helping to create the need. Come back to me in a year or so to see whether I am on the right track or not! 
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Identifying the Next Steps Forward to Find Outbreaks Faster
Participants place their commitments on the board for others to see
Identifying the Next Steps Forward to Find Outbreaks Faster
Oscar Tollast 
The theme for the final day of the Finding Outbreaks Faster: How Do We Measure Progress? program was “Implementation at Scale.” Participants were asked to create an action plan together, which involved creating a timeline as a group and outlining their commitments to advance the outbreak timeliness metrics. In the first exercise, participants were asked to consider progress markers which could be pinpointed on an action plan for the year ahead and beyond. Suggested activities included creating a public website featuring data from past projects and case studies. In the immediate future, meanwhile, the metrics refined in Salzburg could be finalized and published. The metrics could also be tested in new pilot studies. An ongoing communications strategy and training plan for non-technical stakeholders could also be developed. Looking ahead one year from now, the metrics could be extended to the concept of “One Health,” a strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals and the environment. In total, participants put forward more than 35 actionable steps. As one participant remarked, “This was the work of a collective saying we are going to make the world better.” As the program came to an end, each participant was asked to make a personal commitment, which they would speak and tape to a wall for all to see. One participant committed to working with all his heart to change mindsets of public health specialists towards outbreak timeliness metrics. Another, meanwhile, said they would continue to use timeliness metrics and promote their use in IHR evaluations and assessments as important indicators. In a bid to build excitement around the metrics, one participant said they would advocate for a strategic and comprehensive communication approach and urged Ending Pandemics to invest in resources in this area. Mark Smolinski, president of Ending Pandemics, revealed his organization was committed to providing up to $50,000 of matching funds to country partners in up to 10 countries in 2019 to test and implement prospective measurement of timeliness metrics. Salzburg Global Seminar has committed to sharing the outcomes from this program to its network. It will also bring this topic to the attention of a couple of its high-level annual multiyear series, including Philanthropy and Social Investment, and the Public Sector Strategy Network. Salzburg Global has also committed to working with Ending Pandemics and other interested partners to advance this program further in the years ahead. The program Finding Outbreaks Faster: How Do We Measure Progress? is being held in partnership with Ending Pandemics and the University of Minnesota. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program, please follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Finding Outbreaks Faster - Refining Metrics for Implementation
Participants pose for a group photo at Salzburg Global Seminar
Finding Outbreaks Faster - Refining Metrics for Implementation
Oscar Tollast 
Following four days of lively discussion and brainstorming, participants of Finding Outbreaks Faster: How Do We Measure Progress? have helped refine outbreak timeliness metrics that can help guide progress toward meeting the goals of the Global Health Security Agenda and ensure compliance with the International Health Regulations. Field epidemiologists, government and intergovernmental officials, NGO leaders, academics, and others working in 16 countries and territories convened at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, for the program held by Salzburg Global Seminar and Ending Pandemics. Through group work and plenary discussions, participants helped identify key barriers to implementation of the proposed metrics at the national and transboundary levels. They also provided guidance as to how the metrics could be refined to address these challenges. During initial discussions as a group, the majority of participants felt Ending Pandemics should keep the six timeliness metrics initially proposed. These metrics include outbreak start, outbreak detection, outbreak reporting, outbreak verification, outbreak intervention, and public communication. As these metrics were discussed further, several participants stressed the need to identify how the outbreak was verified. This brainstorm led to a new metric being added, “laboratory confirmation.” Further, the group also added a final metric, “outbreak end,” bringing the final set of metrics to a total of eight. On the final day of the program, participants discussed how the metrics could be implemented at a country-level. Participants suggested a level of consideration was required, as synergistic work is taking place within existing systems. The need for countries to have a sense of empowerment was noted as critical to enabling their engagement with the new metrics. One participant indicated to help move things on the ground quicker, there needed to be a demonstrable impact which could be used to encourage the adoption of the metrics. This impact could be identified through follow-up research where the metrics have been tested and through visibility studies. As the program came to an end participants concluded there is a need to develop similar animal timeliness metrics as well as forecasting metrics, the latter of which could focus on aspects such as the environment, political instability, and disaster events. Moving forward, Ending Pandemics will continue to work on these timeliness metrics and build on the ideas which emerged at Schloss Leopoldskron. The program Finding Outbreaks Faster: How Do We Measure Progress? is being held in partnership with Ending Pandemics and the University of Minnesota. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program, please follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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What Next for Corporate Governance?
What Next for Corporate Governance?
Charles E. Ehrlich 
At the fourth annual program of the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum, Brave New World: How Can Corporate Governance Adapt? 40 Fellows spent three days at Schloss Leopoldskron exploring how even experienced board directors need to understand and rise to meet new challenges to traditional principles of corporate governance.  A new initiative of the Forum now seeks to expand these discussions beyond the confines of the program by launching a new monthly online discussion series – the Salzburg Questions for Corporate Governance. Each month’s discussion will be led by a thought-piece from a Corporate Governance Forum Fellow, starting with international technology strategist, advisor, and entrepreneur, Anastassia Lauterbach on Tuesday, November 20, who will publish an opinion article to lead an online discussion of:  “What questions should boards be asking about the potentially unintended ethical considerations of Artificial Intelligence?” Lauterbach is also a director of Dun & Bradstreet and the chief executive officer of 1AU-Ventures. A new question will follow each month, from looking at the use of blockchain as a tool for boards, and the changing relationship of corporations to society, to how important “doing the right thing” is in delivering long-term shareholder value.  The Fellows’ thought-pieces will be published both on SalzburgGlobal.org and on the professional networking site LinkedIn, where we encourage Fellows and their networks to post responses and join in the discussion. The Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum was launched in 2015 to enable critical thinking on the changing roles and responsibilities of directors across jurisdictions and cultures. At its annual three-day program each October, the Forum convenes a select and intergenerational group of no more than 40 participants representing a range of expertise and geographic specialization, including board directors; senior managers; judges, regulators, and policymakers; lawyers; academics; fund managers; and representatives of key civil society interest groups to explore how corporations can pursue both profit and public good in a fast-moving global environment, taking account of growing risks, disruptions, regulation, public scrutiny and consumer pressure. The highly interactive program takes place in plenary and breakout sessions without any speakers, panels, or formal presentations. Small group conversations allow for intense exploration of specific aspects of the general themes, returning to the plenary to refine conclusions. Adherence to the Chatham House Rule ensures an open and free exchange among peers. This new online discussion series builds on those candid but closed discussions in a public space, drawing in new voices and expanding the conversations beyond Salzburg and the Forum.  You will find our first article by Anastassia Lauterbach online on Tuesday, November 20.  To receive notifications of when each month’s article is published, please follow Salzburg Global Seminar on LinkedIn and sign up to our dedicated mailing list: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/corpgov/newsletter  In the meantime, for background, I invite you to read an interview we recently did with Anastassia: https://www.salzburgglobal.org/news/latest-news/article/anastassia-lauterbach-artificial-intelligence-is-a-huge-growth-driver.html   The Salzburg Questions for Corporate Governance is an online discussion series introduced and led by Fellows of the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum. The articles and comments represent opinions of the authors and commenters, and do not necessarily represent the views of their corporations or institutions, nor of Salzburg Global Seminar. Readers are welcome to address any questions about this series to Forum Director, Charles E. Ehrlich.To receive a notification of when the next article is published, follow Salzburg Global Seminar on LinkedIn or sign up for email notifications here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/corpgov/newsletter 
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Duy-Loan Le - Boards Have a Responsibility to Ask the Right Questions
Duy-Loan Le at Salzburg Global Seminar
Duy-Loan Le - Boards Have a Responsibility to Ask the Right Questions
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
Duy-Loan Le’s life story is fit for the silver screen. Before retiring, Le worked at Texas Instruments (TI), one of the three oldest technology hardware companies in the United States, along with Intel and IBM. She rose through the ranks to become a senior fellow at TI, the highest position attained through a rigorous election process by peers. When Le clinched this position, she also made history as the first woman and first Asian to get to the top at the company. Rising to the top, however, was not new to her. She graduated from high school as valedictorian and went on to graduate magna cum laude at the University of Texas - Austin with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering aged just 19. While working full time at TI and traveling internationally for her job, she attended night school at the University of Houston where she graduated with an MBA aged 27. What’s even more impressive about Le’s achievement is that she did not speak a word of English when she and her family fled war in Vietnam for the United States aged 12.   At TI, she helped grow the company’s key products, generating over $5 billion in revenue and oversaw the development of the world’s fastest digital signal processor, a feat that was recognized in 2004 by the Guinness Book of Records. She also holds 24 patents.   Le now serves on the boards of public and private companies, the universities she attended and has founded a range of non-profit organizations focusing on children’s education worldwide. Le was one of about 40 business executives and corporate leaders who participated in the latest program of the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum. During her time at Brave New World: How Can Corporate Governance Adapt?, Salzburg Global spoke to Le about her experience as a “glass ceiling breaker” and how directors like herself can improve gender and ethnic diversity in companies.   This Q&A with Le has been edited for length and clarity.   Salzburg Global: You are the only woman to be elected as a senior fellow at TI. How does it feel to be in that position?   Duy-Loan Le: Well, it is always an honor to be the first. Breaking the glass ceiling in a technology company is always very, very challenging for women. At TI, there are two paths to advance in your career. There is the management path, and there is the technology track. At TI, the technology track is an election process, not a promotion. You are elected by your peers, and all your peers at a certain level are males - all white males as a matter of fact. And so to be the only woman in history is a source of pride, but it is also a responsibility. I don’t want to, and it is definitely not cool, to be the only woman to hold that title.   SG: How can corporate governance improve so that more women have access and opportunities in senior positions like the one you held?   DL: As far as the board is concerned, we have a responsibility to ask the right questions when it comes to promotion, when it comes to recruiting of talent, and when it comes to having a portfolio of diverse candidates for any critical positions. We have to ask that question, and we have to make sure that we continue to give women and minority groups opportunities to enhance their leadership skills and become more visible in companies.   For example, when I was elected TI senior fellow, I established programs within TI to build a pipeline not only for women but also minorities. And building that pipeline required me to understand what stops them and required me to go outside my comfort zone to seek answers and talk about the issues with my colleagues and ask for their support to provide opportunities so that they can develop the necessary skills in order to be promoted. At a broader view, making sure that kids from diverse backgrounds are exposed to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields is also a critical aspect of building this pipeline from a very young age. STEM provides a great platform to inspire a sense of confidence in girls. A sense of “can do,” a sense of “without fear” are among the best gifts we can give our girls.  One last thing, I think that a lot of times when tech companies talk about long-term sustainability, it should not be only about the financial metrics, it also should be about talent. And talent takes a long time to develop.  As leaders, we must have the courage, and the vision to think about it today and not measure sustainability only in terms of dollars and cents. By the way, although no woman has followed me yet to the top at TI thanks to the pipeline it shouldn’t take much longer for that to happen.  SG: What particular set of skills does one need to rise through this pipeline? DL: Academic degrees are important, technical knowledge is necessary but not sufficient. Soft skills, people skills, the ability to understand business, the ability to understand the interdependence of science and business is actually what differentiated me. All I have is a bachelor's and master's degree. But at the end of the day, the ability to influence - to articulate an idea so that people will believe in it, to get people to march on the same path so that together you can execute a vision that is hard to understand at the time - is absolutely critical. Technical leadership and technical competency are not the same: the latter is about technical knowledge while the former combines technical knowledge and people leadership. SG: What tips would you like to share with someone who wants to also sit on boards? DL: The odd thing is that I first became a member of a public company board of directors when I was quite young. Today we continue to talk about how hard it is for women to get on boards. So you can imagine how difficult it was 16 years ago and on top of that, I was barely 40. I think the skill set that I had back then that allowed me to be invited is the people skills, my reputation in the industry as an influencer, and visibility that often minorities don’t have. There is an old saying: “it is not what you know, it is about who you know.” And I agree with that, but I will add that what is even more important is “who knows you?” This is essential, and one of the best ways to build that visibility is to have the confidence to speak in public, let your voice be heard and to do something for the good of society such as non-profits. I co-founded several non-profits, I serve on university boards, and I give keynote speeches not because I am using it for something or I was seeking something in return. I did all of that simply because giving back is the right thing to do, and somehow that helps with visibility. I guess doing the right thing can never be wrong! The Salzburg Global program Brave New World: How Can Corporate Governance Adapt? is part of the multi-year series, the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum. The session is being held in partnership with Shearman & Sterling LLP and CLP Group. It is being sponsored by Bank of America, Barclays, BNY Mellon, Elliott, Goldman Sachs, and Microsoft. More information on the program can be found here.
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Young Cultural Innovators Depart Salzburg With a Smile
Participants and faculty of the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Young Cultural Innovators Depart Salzburg With a Smile
Oscar Tollast 
Fifty cultural practitioners have left Salzburg emboldened, hopeful, and optimistic following the conclusion of the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. The five-day program came to an end on Sunday morning, as participants from 14 regions and cities departed for their next destination. Participants spent the previous five days taking part in capacity building sessions focusing on human-centered design processes, communication, and leadership. They also took part in peer mentoring sessions and explored the local art scene in Salzburg. On Friday evening, participants came together to perform in Schloss Leopoldskron’s Great Hall for the second incarnation of The Schloss is Alive. Audience members were treated to poetry, dance, live music, and improv. The following day, participants took part in two final plenary sessions. Before discussions started, however, artist and muralist Phillip Simpson presented a canvas he had painted the previous evening. The “Smile" received a positive reaction from the group. Simpson invited his peers to add their signatures and messages to the painting, which he decided to gift to Salzburg Global.   The first session of the day involved participants reflecting on the capacity building workshops they had taken part in and discussing the need for self-care. Part of self-care is being able to ask for help, participants heard. Much of the damage we can inflict on ourselves is because of the expectations we set. One participant discussed how he felt like a “living contradiction.” He discussed doing 100 things at once in a space by himself with no staff. When others ask if there is anything they can do, he would reply, “I got it.” The reality was he didn’t. He said he needed to open up more upon returning home and learn it was not weak to ask for help. Another participant reminded the group that self-care was a privilege and participants had to be conscious about the position they were in. Burnout is not a badge of honor, one participant argued. It may feel as if you should change everything at once, but she suggested tackling one thing at a time to reduce the risk of being overwhelmed. On Saturday afternoon, participants gave brief reports of their experiences in the peer mentoring groups and discussed what they had learned from one another. This year’s groups were facilitated by Marcos Amadeo, Toni Attard, Christine Gitau, and Hiroko Kikuchi. Each of the facilitators enabled participants to feel vulnerable and connected. The peer mentoring groups acted as a safe space for participants to learn from one another and learn about themselves. For one participant, the peer mentoring exercise was the favorite part of their experience. Following the group reports, the discussion focus turned to systems transformation. Participants were asked to consider the systems they were trying to change in each of their contexts. Participants were told systems don’t transform overnight, and change is often incremental. One of the facilitators suggested transformation needed to be value-based and reminded participants of the values discussed at the beginning of the program: humor, empathy, transparency, generosity, courage, and humility. At times, participants may feel frustrated about the systems they are fighting against. However, it is important to remember that there are people within these systems who also seek to make positive steps within communities. When possible, participants should look for connections which can be made where change can be achieved together. Change is a learning process, but as Fellows of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, participants have incredible potential to transform communities, cities, and regions across the world. As discussions came to a close, participants were asked to make a commitment to themselves. As a symbolic gesture, they were each given an acorn to take away once that commitment was made. Mighty oaks from little acorns grow, after all. Reflecting on the program, Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director for arts and culture at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, “Fifty creative changemakers – from Tirana to Tokyo, from Buenos Aires to Baltimore, from New Orleans to Nairobi, and from Salzburg to Seoul and beyond –  left this week’s YCI Forum inspired, energized, and eager to engage with their 200 YCI colleagues around the world. Together they form the YCI Forum network, with its incredible potential for using creativity as an opportunity for societal transformation. Salzburg Global looks forward to supporting, expanding, and empowering this dynamic network over the next five years.” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.
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Czyka Tumaliuan - I Help Preserve Filipino Literature
WORD UP: In addition to her work as a writer, self-publisher, comics creator, poet, and archivist Czyka Tumaliuan is also working on the first VR-made art exhibit with Filipina artist Issay Rodriguez.
Czyka Tumaliuan - I Help Preserve Filipino Literature
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
“There [are] a lot of things that I do in the Philippines...” says Cyzka Tumaliuan, before listing the different areas her work takes her. She is a writer, self-publisher, comics creator, experimental poet, archivist, and open-source advocate.  She is also the founder and lead organizer of an independent, experience-driven book fair in Manila, the Philippines, called Komura. However, she is perhaps more well known as the owner of Kwago, a bookstore in Manila that sells books and magazines. More appropriately, she describes Kwago - the Filipino word for “owl” - as a “book bar.” Tumaliuan says, “It has fiction-inspired coffee and cocktails. It allows me to make people drunk and force them to read,” she jokes. Tumaliuan was among 50 participants who convened at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, for the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. “For the digital natives right now, they are not interested in reading. [But I am going to] name this drink after a local writer, and I will tell you about this writer. It allows me to share [Filipino culture] through taste,” Tumaliuan says. There is a “Hemingway” drink, inspired by the American writer Ernest Hemingway and the “Dark Hours” drink inspired by a book of the same name by Filipino writer Conchitina Cruz, whom Tumaliuan describes as a massive influence for her taking up experimental poetry. In college, Tumaliuan says she was depressed and “didn’t know what to do” but Cruz’s works, written in her native Filipino language, saved her. This unique business model keeps Kwago financially afloat. The shop deals in books considered commercially inviable or politically controversial by much larger outlets. Tumaliuan says, “In bigger bookstores, they can’t make money out of it, so they don’t support it, but for [Kwago], we support each other in the community, so it is a reader-based model.” In a recent interview with CNN Philippines Life, Tumaliuan said, “I also read [the books] and actually, I am their first customer.” Kwago has attracted attention all over the world. In a profile piece by Rappler.com, Tumaliuan said the project was about human connections. She said, “The physical space allows you to connect, and that’s more important, khait hindi ka bumili ng book (even if you don’t buy a book).” The books are mostly self-published by little known and experimental writers in the Philippines who without Kwago would have no opportunity to share their work with the wider populace. Since opening in 2017, Kwago has transformed from a simple bookstore into a safe space for up and coming spoken word artists, musicians, and independent zine makers to display their craft in a welcoming atmosphere. In recent times, however, Kwago is not the only thing occupying Tumaliuan’s already busy mind. She is involved in the arduous task of digitizing to preserve classic Filipino language literature. “Print is dying,” she says and “we have a lot of literature written in dialects in the Philippines.” Without scanning these books page after page with her friends, she fears some of these books and the languages they are written in will simply go out of existence. “Kopya means copy in Filipino, and basically we are creating a digital library of Filipino literature by manually scanning them and putting it in a [computer program].” These books are inaccessible to a lot of people but with a small team Tumaliuan is scanning to preserve them for future generations and for free. She says, “I really believe that knowledge should be free...” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.
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Inspiring Leadership - The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar
Inspiring Leadership - The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Today, we proudly launch Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar.  With the goal of raising $18 million by 2021, Inspiring Leadership is our largest-ever fundraising campaign.  This ambitious effort will enable Salzburg Global Seminar to expand our scholarships, invest in innovative new programs and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for future generations.  “Our programs have for 70 years changed lives, influenced policy and provoked innovation… Inspiring Leadership — with the goal of raising $18 million over three years — will propel Salzburg Global to increase its impact across the world,” said Salzburg Global President and CEO, Stephen Salyer. “Salzburg Global Fellows and partner institutions have the power to transform systems and shape a better world. Our work includes reimagining education for a next generation of workers, catalyzing equitable development in rapidly urbanizing societies, ensuring equal protection for LGBT people and communities facing marginalization, and much more.  “We invite all those who share our vision to join in Inspiring Leadership. Ask how you can become involved, and help us ensure Salzburg Global Seminar sustains courageous, ethical action to shape a better world.” Chairman of the Salzburg Global Seminar Board and early supporter of the Campaign, Victoria Mars added: “This Campaign marks an inflection point in Salzburg Global’s extraordinary history, and I hope you will join me in helping to propel this bold and important organization toward its next 70 years of outsized impact.” Our Campaign priorities – People, Passion and Place – reflect our both our long history in challenging current and future leaders to shape a better world, but also our long-term commitment to build upon this momentum of innovation and partnership to develop and motivate the next generation of problem-solvers our world requires. By investing in people and increasing scholarships, we will ensure diverse voices and rising stars, regardless of financial means, can participate in our programs. By investing in passion and developing new programs, we will empower our Fellows to find bold and collaborative solutions to the world’s most pressing issues. By investing in place and preserving our historic home, Schloss Leopoldskron, we will sustain its spirit of openness, trust, and inspiration for those who will gather here to shape a better world. In today’s turbulent times, the world needs the kind of leadership we inspire – now more than ever. Inspiring Leadership is a call to action. This Campaign is an invitation to help take this bold organization to new heights. Together, we will expand our impact and inspire the thinkers, doers and leaders who will shape creative, sustainable and just change for generations to come.  Join us. Learn more at: campaign.salzburgglobal.org  
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