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Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Persist is a multimedia publication featuring 6 chapters exploring methods to educate, inspire and motivate approaches to journalism that combat a culture of distrust
Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Paul Mihailidis 
This article was first published on persist.community, a multimedia publication produced by 2018 participants of the Salzburg Academy of the Media and Global Change. The projects in this publication include new approaches and models for storytelling, conceptual platforms, games, prototypes, and creative materials. We persist towards. We resist against. In a ubiquitous media environment, where our technologies ask for more and more of our fleeting attention, it seems challenging to stay committed to an idea, an issue, a moment. Connective technologies have succeeded in disconnect us. They have splintered our communities, polarized our politics, and normalized spectacle in our information feeds. The same online networks that once touted their collaborative potential now provide sensational content to like-minded groups, perpetuate polarizing viewpoints, spread false information, and seed distrust in the very institutions we rely on for functioning civic societies. This distrust has pervaded our media institutions above all others. The core functions of information systems are now under attack, and the weaponization of fake news by political and public leaders has further eroded such trust. Journalists, meanwhile, are losing the trust of communities who find refuge and solace in the validation of information by peers online. It is within this context that over 75 aspiring journalists, media makers and activists gathered alongside over 35 faculty and visiting scholars to re-imagine journalism. The participants in the 12th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change convened for 30 master lectures, workshops, and seminars, 5 salons, a screening series, over 40 reading groups, 2 excursions, and over 20 hours of dedicated time to work in self-facilitated groups to build responses to the problem of distrust in our journalism and media institutions. What emerged from these three weeks is the commitment to a process where passionate people from around the world work intensely to experiment with media models and practices that seed interaction, care, imagination and dialog. In just over 20 hours of dedicated time to creating a digital publication, the 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change cohort created PERSIST: NEW IDEAS FOR JOURNALISM IN AN AGE OF DISTRUST. The publication features 6 chapters, which offer transmedia narratives that experiment with new approaches to storytelling and journalism that inspire care, community, and meaningful human engagement in an age of digital abundance. Each of the chapters features multimedia content, from platforms and apps to games, facilitations and prototypes, that collectively ask us to re-insert the “human” in our media systems. Students explored concepts of imagination, culture, and care in their work, and build models that work to bridge divides that exist across cultures, across borders, and across platforms. The term persist signifies both the effort of the group process that resulted in this publication, and the effort that it will take to combat the culture of distrust within and across our online networks. Persistence is understood in our work as striving to achieve a civic minded standpoint, where we recognize our shared social location, and exercise empathy for others through a collective struggle for meaningful dialog and engagement in the world. We apply persistence to our re-imagining of a journalism ecosystem that is guided by embrace a sincere commitment to bridging gaps between institutions and the communities in which they are embedded; and possess an overarching goal of contributing to the creation of emergent publics possessing the capacity and motivation to ably address the conditions of the day. In this way, we persist towards a better future, and not against intractable obstacles. Explore the collective work of our 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media & Global Change cohort.
Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long running multi-year program Salzburg Academy of Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here. You can also follow all the discussions on Twitter and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSmedia.
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Salzburg Academy Students Re-Imagine New Tools and Platforms for Better Journalism
Salzburg Academy Students Re-Imagine New Tools and Platforms for Better Journalism
Stephanie Quon 
In an age where advanced technology can manipulate or fabricate almost everything to produce false information and social media platforms’ algorithms create echo chambers that drown out more accurate information and moderate voices, the public appears to have lost trust in the media. How can this trend be reversed? For three weeks at a palace in Salzburg this summer, more than 75 participants from around the world came together to take on this challenge, producing interactive stories and creating new tools for engagement at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change.  Over the course of the three-week program – Re-Imaging Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust – university undergraduate and graduate students took part in plenary sessions, workshops, reading groups and hands-on exercises that challenged their perspectives, provided opportunities for thinking outside the box, and transformed their ideas into action. Topics covered included critical media making, the intersection of civic imagination and civic media, the bridging of cultural divides, journalism ethics, and media literacy.  The participants were led by an expert faculty of both academics and practitioners including award-winning journalist, Daniela Rea, Google tech lead, Dan Russell, and Global News Director for Buzzfeed News, Ryan Broderick. “We’re at the precipice of all of this new technology… I never fully understood the power that we have, the opportunity that we have, and the responsibility that we have until I came here and listened to all of these amazing scholars talk about the work that they’re doing,” says Academy student, Lynsey Jeffery, from University of Maryland, USA. The Salzburg Academy, now in its 12th year, served as an “inclusive and creative space,” where participants reaped the benefits of healthy debate and dialogue, challenging their existing views and sharing personal experiences through such exercises as the Human Library.  “Coming here has completely flipped my perspective and made me realize that I have such a Western-centric view on the media,” says Bournemouth student Maya Parchment. “It’s made me look at everything I consume in a different way.” Participants at this year’s Academy came from countries including Argentina, Austria, China, Colombia, Denmark, India, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, Palestine, Sudan, the UK, the US, Venezuela and Viet Nam.  Together, this global cohort produced the online publication Persist: New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust, to be published next week. Launched in 2007 by Salzburg Global Seminar and now counting nearly 1000 students and faculty in its alumni and with university partners on five continents, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change has taken a pioneering lead in media education with a focus on media literacy and civic engagement.  “What impressed me most [about this year’s program] was the engagement and sensitivity of such a diverse group of students to the cultural and social nuances that make the concept of trust so complex,” says Paul Mihailidis, program director of the Salzburg Academy and associate professor at Emerson College in Boston, USA.  “They found ways to educate and inspire each other, faculty, and the outside world through their own storytelling. The energy was palpable and the result is that not only are we forging new avenues for journalism, but also for those involved in the experience themselves.” “The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change continues to be a leader in creating active media networks and ideas that will positively benefit communities and societies around the world.” Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long running multi-year program Salzburg Academy of Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here. You can also follow all the discussions on Twitter and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSmedia.
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Salzburg Global Mourns the Death of Ernest Mokganedi
Salzburg Global Mourns the Death of Ernest Mokganedi
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar would like to pay tribute to Ernest Mokganedi, a transboundary conservation champion and Salzburg Global Fellow, who has passed away at the age of 48. Mokganedi was killed after being involved in a motorbike collision on Saturday, July 28. Two other bikers were also injured in the incident, whom we both wish a strong recovery. Salzburg Global was first introduced to Mokganedi when he attended one of our programs, The Next Frontier: Transboundary Cooperation for Biodiversity and Peace, in November 2016. Mokganedi was one of a diverse group of participants who helped identify the most promising approaches with regards to inclusive and sustainable development, regional economic growth, cohesion, and peace-building. The program was the second in the series of the Parks for the Planet Forum. Since 2002, Mokganedi had been director of the Transfrontier Conservation Areas in South Africa, a position which allowed him to utilize his extensive knowledge and experience in the fields of public policy development, public policy implementation, labor relations, and dispute resolution. In a statement, Edna Molewa, minister of environmental affairs for South Africa, said, “Mr. Mokganedi was instrumental in establishing, managing and extending the Transfrontier Conservation Areas (TFCA) in Southern Africa having grown this network of conservation areas from a concept to the successful reality it is today. “His role and commitment to ensuring that all the countries linked through the TFCAs in Southern Africa benefited from these areas will always be recognized.” Mokganedi also served as a board member for the Southern African Wildlife College. As part of a tribute, the College said Mokganedi “loved life and lived true to the five mottos of the Tshwane Legends Bikers Club; Family-hood, Brother-hood, Respect, Love and Discipline … He often lent his support when working through strategic issues and was incredibly supportive of the College’s work." Our thoughts remain with Ernest Mokganedi’s family and friends.
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Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Fellows are pressing for the committed support of dementia inclusive and friendly communities across the world. This call to action features as part of a Salzburg Statement published as a result of discussions at the Salzburg Global program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities. The program was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic in December 2017. Around 50 participants from all regions of the world, including health and social care leaders, patient representatives, and policymakers, took part in a highly participatory program focusing on building new insights and aggregating perspectives from different sectors. Alzheimer’s and related neurodegenerative diseases have a profound impact on the person with dementia, their carers and families, the local community, and the broader society. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects the number of people living with dementia to triple from 50 million in 2017 to 152 million by 2050. A dementia-friendly community, as defined by Alzheimer’s Disease International, is a place or culture in which people with dementia and their carers are empowered, supported and included in society, understand their rights and recognize their potential. This Salzburg Statement calls on community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, researchers and advocates to: Work collaboratively and alongside people impacted by dementia to design and implement innovative community-based solutions to improve the wellbeing of persons living with dementia and their care partners. Initiate and support the transformation toward “Dementia-Inclusive and -Friendly Communities.” Promote community-based solutions that can be translated across the boundaries of households, health and social service systems, municipalities, and nations. Health professionals are called to: Ensure increased access to a timely and honest dementia diagnosis using words and language that enable and empower individuals. Place a high value on community-based programs and social services by being informed about what is available and sharing this information with those living with the disease and their families. Researchers and policymakers to: Invest in rigorous qualitative research to define quality of life and wellbeing from the perspective of people with dementia. Develop more accurate measures of quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and their care partners, as well as measures that demonstrate the role of community in supporting people with dementia and their care partners Implement rigorous evaluations of Dementia Friendly Communities, including structural readiness, person-centered outcomes, and community-level impact in order to ensure better transparency, dissemination, and transfer of best practices and collaborative tools from community to community. Support policies that utilize the resources and capacity of the community to the greatest extent possible. View the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on Issuu
Download the Salzburg Statement in full by clicking here The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of “Generous Supporter” Vi Lort
Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of “Generous Supporter” Vi Lort
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar would like to pay tribute to Vi Lort, a long-time friend and supporter of Salzburg Global Seminar who passed away on July 8, 2018. Vi was the widow of Roger Lort, who served as vice-president, resident director, and treasurer at the Seminar between 1965 and 1991. Vi, along with Roger, was a recipient of the Salzburg Cup, an honor bestowed upon individuals whose service to Salzburg Global merit special recognition. She was a crucial part of the Lort team when the organization first visited the Middle East to recruit Fellows. Efforts in this direction were so successful because she was along to share the challenge of making contacts and conducting interviews. She was also one of the most active and supportive volunteers in memory, continually helping in the office with any task that needed doing, and was also a superb hostess, caring tirelessly for the needs of Fellows and Faculty.   Vi played a pivotal role in the Seminar’s life for many decades. She contributed to the organization’s general operating budget and the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association. Marty Gecek, chair of the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association and director of American studies symposia at Salzburg Global, said, “All who had the privilege of knowing and working with Vi Lort, can attest to her love and affection for the Salzburg Seminar, which was demonstrated in countless ways throughout the many decades she was at the side of her husband Roger Lort, vice president, and treasurer. “Vi was not only gracious, poised and welcoming to all who came to Schloss Leopoldskron, her wonderful humor and enthusiasm endeared her to all. For many years, she was a generous supporter of the Seminar, in particular, the American Studies program. Vi was one of the most positive individuals I have ever met, always seeing the bright side of things, despite her many medical challenges. With her passing, an important era of the Salzburg Global Seminar’s history has come to a close." Tim Ryback, former director of Salzburg Global Seminar, said, “Roger and Vi were a model of dignity, honesty, kindness, and generosity of spirit, indeed the very embodiment of the Seminar spirit.  Roger could have been a high-flying New York investment banker, which indeed he was for a time, and Vi an even higher flying (in the literal sense of the word) airline hostess, but both decided to devote their lives to the Seminar, and saw the institution through complex times with a firm but gentle hand.   “There is much talk about the spirit that continues to inhabit the walls of Schloss Leopoldskron. I believe the spirit of Roger and Vi remains in the very spirit of the Seminar.”
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Salzburg Global Fellow Danny Ramadan Wins Canadian Authors Book Award
Salzburg Global Fellow Danny Ramadan Wins Canadian Authors Book Award
 
Salzburg Global Fellow Danny Ramadan has received another accolade for his latest book, The Clothesline Swing. Ramadan, who has previously attended two programs of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, recently won the 2018 Fred Kerner Book Award, which is given each year by the Canadian Authors Association. This tale takes place during the aftermath of the Arab Spring and tells the story of two lovers anchored to the memory of a dying Syria. The book has already been widely acclaimed and was named among the Best Books of 2017 by the Globe and Mail and the Toronto Star. It also received an Independent Publisher Gold Medal in the category of LGBT Fiction. Ramadan is a a Syrian-Canadian author, storyteller and LGBTQ refugees activist. Born in Syria, Ramadan moved to Vancouver, Canada in September 2014. During the Salzburg Global program, The Many Faces of LGBT Inclusion, Ramadan discussed his experiences as a gay refugee and his search to find a place to belong. After winning his latest award, Salzburg Global caught up with Danny to discuss his reaction, the messages he wants his readers to take away, and his experience as a Fellow of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum. Read our Q&A below. SG: Congratulations on winning the Fred Kerner Book Award. What were your first thoughts when you found out you had won? DR: I was completely floored when I found out I won that award. Being recognized for my art is the highest form of recognition I can think of. It says that my art, despite it being about characters on the margins, and being an unconventional form of storytelling, can still hold value in my new community here in Canada. SG: Was it a surprise to be featured on the shortlist? Did you have any expectations when you first published the book? DR: When I published the book, I wished the best for it but knew that my expectations might be too high. I'm thankful the book won this award, and one more award, as well as was featured in multiple shortlists and best books of 2017 lists. It honestly came as both a confirmation that I'm on the right track and a surprise that my work as an author can hold value for others who don't necessarily share the same lived experiences with me.   SG: What was the drive behind writing a book and how did you find that process? Is it a skill that came naturally to you? DR: I have always thought of myself as an author. If we queer people are superheroes, my superpower was my ability to write. It always felt natural and comfortable for me to write. If anything, my storytelling skills are the reason I managed to leave a mark in all aspects of my life as an activist or a journalist. I was driven to write this book because there were stories that I found unique to the experiences of queer Syrian refugees that I believed should be told, and I didn't even know if those stories will be read by anyone else other than me, so having this opportunity for those stories to be shared means the world to me. SG: What message(s) do you want readers to take away from The Clothesline Swing? DR: I think the main message behind the story of The Clothesline Swing is that there is a lot of resilience in the spirits of queer refugees everywhere. Their stories are not that of hardship, but also of survival and finding love and being true to who they are; as well as finding paths to accomplish their dreams both as humans but also as humans who are marginalized and second-rate in many communities around the world. SG: You’ve received excellent feedback so far, but has there been a particular piece of feedback or a review you’ve received that sticks in your mind? DR: Being shortlisted for the Lambda awards was a highlight in my life and the best accomplishment I've ever managed to achieve. I've known about the awards since I was a unique fella back in Syria, and I dreamed one day of winning one. I can now say I was shortlisted for that prestigious award and who knows, maybe I win it with my next book. SG: How would you describe your experience as a participant of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum? What impact has it had on you? DR: How to describe a life-changing event that truly affected me positively throughout the years it followed? This is too difficult. I have met folks that I learned so much from, and people that I connected with on spiritual and meaningful ways. I've seen stories unfold in front of my eyes on the panels that means so much to me. I'm a witness for this Forum, and it made me a better person for sure. Danny Ramadan has attended two Salzburg Global programs. This includes The Many Faces of LGBT Inclusion (2016) and Home: Safety, Wellness, and Belonging (2017).
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Mechanics for the Future – How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Mechanics for the Future – How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Governments worldwide are under pressure to meet complex needs as populations age, countries urbanize, and technology transforms lives and work. They have a lead responsibility to prepare their societies for a radically changing world, yet face shrinking budgets and declining trust in the public sector. The Public Sector Strategy Network, launched in partnership between the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, Salzburg Global Seminar and Apolitical, helps governments tackle complex challenges through better foresight, innovation, and implementation. Co-created with senior leaders around the world, the Network is building a mutually-supportive coalition of engaged individuals and institutions on the frontline of digital, financial and societal disruption, promoting effective public leadership and strategic communication. The 2018 program - Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? - brought together 27 participants from 16 countries – mostly senior officials from governments and multilateral institutions – to engage informally, away from media and gatekeepers, and to test out ideas for immediate follow-up at the technical level. The subsequent report focuses on two significant areas for public sector innovation: creating a new social contract and responding to external forces. This report also features specific publicly-available examples by the Apolitical team which help illustrate some of the talking points which emerged. Download the report (as a hi-res PDF to read more)
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Salzburg Global to Help Design First Universal Charter of National Park Cities
Salzburg Global to Help Design First Universal Charter of National Park Cities
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Seminar is delighted to play a part in a new initiative to launch the world’s first Universal Charter of National Park Cities. Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer of Salzburg Global, will be a facilitator at a two-day event in London organized by the National Park City Foundation, ahead of the first-ever London National Park City Week. Shine is one of 18 people attending the event, which starts on Thursday, July 19. She is joined by Salzburg Global Fellows Dan Raven-Ellison (National Park City Foundation), Kathy MacKinnon (IUCN), Pamela Veinotte (Parks Canada), and Andrew Simms (New Weather Institute). Raven-Ellison, MacKinnon, and Veinotte have each played an active role in Salzburg Global’s Parks for the Planet Forum multi-year series and ongoing activities around the world.   The Parks for the Planet Forum is a ten-year collaboration to reconnect people and nature in an urbanized world. Launched in 2015 with IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), this series catalyzes innovative alliances to conserve and expand access to nature for human health and wellbeing, communities and economies in the cities of the future. Simms, meanwhile, attended Philanthropy in the Golden Age in December 2015, the inaugural convening of The Global Friends, a consortium of global philanthropists leading value-driven social innovation. This meeting has been convened by London National Park City and the National Park City Foundation, which is promoting a "greener, healthier, wilder" way of life. The discussions are being held in partnership with World Urban Parks, the City of London, the Mayor of London, Farrells, Therme Group and Salzburg Global Seminar. Attendees will spend the first day of the meeting visiting a range of nature rich spaces in London that engage and open up opportunities for community engagement and demonstrate the National Park City ideals. They will take these examples on board as they consider how to develop the Universal Charter on the second day of the program. Shine will facilitate this program and provide opening remarks to kick-start discussions. During the day, table groups will focus on different parts of the charter. One group will review the case, ambitions, and values of the charter. Another will focus on the suggested framework for engagement, and the third group will explore methods of delivery and calls to action. Attendees will then review the milestones and timeline toward launching a year-long collaboration to agree the Universal Charter. London will become the world’s first National Park City in 2019. The aim of the Universal Charter of National Park Cities is to provide inspiration, vision, leadership and a framework for the creation, delivery, and monitoring of National Park Cities around the world. This meeting will lead straight into the first London National Park City Week, which takes place from July 21-29. Events are taking place across the capital, including talks, walks and an experience fair. For more information about London National Park City Week, please click here.
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Fellows Around the World Meet to Celebrate Salzburg Global Day
Participants from this year’s Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change join in the fun on their first day in Salzburg
Fellows Around the World Meet to Celebrate Salzburg Global Day
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows from all over the world came together on Sunday to celebrate Salzburg Global Day. Building on last year's inaugural celebration, Fellows from different programs stretching across many years met up at organized events in Europe, South America, Asia, and Africa. This took place as other Fellows joined in the fun online, sharing photos and memories of their experiences using Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Salzburg Global Day takes place on July 15 each year, the anniversary of the beginning of the Salzburg Seminar in American Civilization in 1947. At this program, scholars and advanced students convened at Schloss Leopoldskron for six weeks of study. The Seminar – what would later become Salzburg Global Seminar - made it possible for present and future leaders of European thought and education to study with Americans a well-defined subject of common interest. The Seminar offered a program of learning and reflection for young leaders who sought to build a united Europe. On Sunday, events took place in Abuja, Nigeria; Athens, Greece; Bengaluru, India; Berlin, Germany; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Cairo, Egypt; Cape Town, South Africa; Chiang Mai, Thailand; Mumbai, India; Nairobi, Kenya; and Paris, France. Informal gatherings are also due to take place this evening (Monday, July 16) in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, and in Washington, D.C., the United States. Before all of these events, organizers were given e-kits which included posters, photo props, a link to Salzburg Global's 70th-anniversary video, and a flyer. Sakuntala Narasimhan, a Fellow of Sustainable Rural Community Development and Who Will Control the Food System?, helped organize the event in Bengaluru, India. It was hosted by the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS) and featured a talk by Nirupama Menon Rao, who served as India’s foreign secretary between 2009 and 2011 and was a former ambassador for India to the US. Rao spoke about sensitizing youth to the needs and priorities of the country to ensure progress and development in real terms. In Chiang Mai, Thailand, Trinnawat Suwanprik, a Fellow of The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia and Nature and Childhood: From Research and Activism to Policies for Global Change, hosted a meeting featuring representatives from Chiang Mai University and Chiang Mai's Chamber of Commerce to enhance co-creation, the sharing of best practices and new ideas. Attendees discussed how to increase awareness to change the culture of the people with regards to waste utilization and urban transportation. On Sunday morning, Mark Sparvell, from Microsoft Education, hosted a TweetMeet which prompted other Salzburg Global Fellows to think about the programs they attended, the importance of expanding collaboration, their memories of Salzburg Global, and how their experience changed their lives. This year's Salzburg Global Day also coincided with the start of the 12th program of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. In his welcoming remarks, Stephen L. Salyer, president and chief executive officer of Salzburg Global Seminar, told participants it was a "special day" for the organization and hoped participants would join in future celebrations and add to the memories. While this year's Salzburg Global Day may be over, Fellows are encouraged to continue sharing their memories on social media using the hashtags #ShareWithSGS and #SalzburgGlobalDay. Posts are being amalgamated into one social media feed, which can be seen here. To make your post visible to other Salzburg Global Fellows, please make your posts public rather than sharing only with your friends. Listed below are some of the events which have taken place so far: Salzburg Reunion Berlin! Treasuring the Salzburg - Berlin connection. Klaus Mueller, Founder & Chair Global LGBT Forum; Ivan Capriles, Rapporteur LGBT Forum; Marc Pachter, SGS Advisory Council Culture & Arts; filmmaker Benjamin Cantu, LGBT Forum #ShareWithSGS #SalzburgGlobalDay pic.twitter.com/5UyhqEhqXp — Klaus Mueller (@KlausMuellerkm) July 14, 2018 #SalzburgGlobalDay Nairobi, Kenya. We are so honoured to be part of a Global Team making an impact and driving change in our Society cc. #ShareWithSGS pic.twitter.com/vI1KTD0eQ2 — Moses Osani (@osanimose) July 15, 2018 #SalzburgGlobalDay Cape Town under way. #ShareWithSGS cc. @TanjaHichert pic.twitter.com/xKJ6WwUfnN — Heinrich Dirk (@Hein404) July 15, 2018 Relevance of @SalzburgGlobal in today's world - panel discussion in Mumbai.#salzburgglobalday pic.twitter.com/6hygqBkcq1 — PuneLitFest (@PuneIntLitFest) July 15, 2018 Hoy compartiendo el #SalzburgGlobalDay #SharewithSGS en Buenos Aires con compañeros queridos en vivo y a través de las redes. pic.twitter.com/mD9MqpZNYo — Lala (@Lalapasq) July 15, 2018
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