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Salzburg in the World

How Can European Values Be Protected in a Multipolar World?
The Rt Hon. the Lord Patten of Barnes CH, the last Governor of Hong Kong and former European Commissioner (Photo: Wikimedia Commons/James Yuanxin Li)
How Can European Values Be Protected in a Multipolar World?
Martin Silva Rey 
International relations theorist G. John Ikenberry said, "The rise of China will undoubtedly be one of the great dramas of the twenty-first century. China's extraordinary economic growth and active diplomacy are already transforming East Asia, and future decades will see even greater increases in Chinese power and influence. But exactly how this drama will play out is an open question. Will China overthrow the existing order or become a part of it?" The world's most populous country and the fourth largest is gaining influence much beyond its continent. The Belt and Road Initiative (OBOR) entails a massive flow of foreign direct investment of Chinese capital in 152 countries, where that country is sponsoring infrastructure development to set up the "Silk Road Economic Belt." Since 2012, the 16+1 mechanism has brought together 16 Central and East European states and China for annual meetings between the heads of state and cooperation. Earlier this year, a joint communication by the European Commission was published on "EU-China – A strategic outlook," where China was labeled a "systemic rival." In response to China's growing economic power and political influence, the report indicated the European Union should "deepen its engagement with China to promote common interests at global level… seek more balanced and reciprocal conditions governing the economic relationship… [and] adapt to changing economic realities and strengthen its own domestic policies and industrial base." The communication states the EU and China are "linked by an enduring relationship," but questions remain open for debate. How should Europe position itself in a multipolar world where the support of historic allies can no longer be taken for granted? Can a Britain in the throes of Brexit still contribute to a European response to China's rise? Must it or can it carve out an independent role for itself? These are some of the questions to be debated during this year's Palliser Lecture, organized by Salzburg Global Seminar in partnership with 21st Century Trust. The event will convene two major experts in Europe-China relations: The Rt Hon. the Lord Chris Patten of Barnes CH, the last Governor of Hong Kong and former European Commissioner Rana Mitter FBA, historian and political scientist, and Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China at Oxford University The Aga Khan Foundation UK will kindly host the fourth edition of The Palliser Lecture. The event will take place on May 21, 2019, at 10 Handyside Street, London N1C 4DN. The reception will begin at 17:30, and the discussion between Patten and Mitter will take place from 18:30. John Lotherington, director of 21st Century Trust, said, "This event couldn’t be more timely with developments in the trade war between the United States and China, the controversy around Huawei, and political strife in Hong Kong. But it is also about the slower underlying changes as Europe reacts to the expansion of Chinese power and reach." The Palliser Lecture honors the Rt Hon. Sir Michael Palliser GCMG PC, who served as a senior British diplomat and was the vice chairman of the Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors. It is part of the Salzburg Global Lecture Series.
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Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia
Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia
Salzburg Global Seminar 
“Look for the rainbow in every crowd,” former Chief Justice Dipak Misra declared following India’s Supreme Court ruling to decriminalize homosexuality in September 2018. “Equality and liberty and this freedom can only be fulfilled when each one of us realizes the LGBT community has the same rights as other citizens.” The Indian court’s decision to strike down Section 377, a colonial-era law criminalizing same-sex relationships, is just one example of the momentous advocacy work being done by LGBT communities in South Asia; a region where many of these human rights issues are at tipping point. While a region of diverse cultural and religious communities and differing levels of economic development, the progress of legal and social rights for LGBT people in South Asia will have a profound impact on the region at large and globally.  During the sixth gathering of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum – Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia – more than 40 advocates from 17 countries met in Kathmandu, Nepal, to discuss how to enhance Asia’s underrepresented role in global LGBT dialogues, and engage individuals and institutions to create significant shifts in social attitudes and policy landscapes across the region. Appropriately, Nepal is a nation widely seen as a regional leader in progressive attitudes on sexual orientation and gender identity in South Asia. The significance of this was not lost on Forum participants, whose calls for wider social acceptance and rights were amplified by a united energy of strength and leadership. As with all Salzburg Global LGBT Forum meetings, the gathering brought together a widely diverse group of human rights leaders spanning government, law, diplomacy, religion, media and culture, and built on the explicit goal of the Forum to further develop a network of trust, where both Fellows’ professional expertise and their life experiences are highly valued. Underlining that fundamental human rights concern us all, the Forum meeting connects queer and straight leaders who represent gender and sexual orientation in different expressions, united by their passion to advance LGBT equality globally.  Despite – or rather thanks to – the intricate mix of nationalities, cultures and faiths represented at the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, boundaries of separation were broken as participants vowed to learn from this collective strength and resilience. “We have much in common; but we also face different challenges, and live in different contexts,” participants – now known as Fellows – were told. “Everyone has something valuable to share.” In South Asia, several LGBT human rights issues are at a “tipping point” at which legal and/or social change could soon be possible. Gender recognition and decriminalization are two such legal tipping point issues for several countries. However even in places where legal progress on these fronts has been made (for example in Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka), social discrimination and violence often persist and serve to exclude LGBT individuals and their families from access to employment, health care, education and other services. Because of this, additional action is needed across South Asia to ensure full legal and social inclusion and recognition for gender and sexual minorities, with special attention to transgender and intersex communities. The 2019 program contributed to national and regional discussions on LGBT inclusion across the South Asian region by providing a platform for open policy dialogue and debate; creating an opportunity to highlight South Asia’s unique legal, religious, and cultural history of LGBT family and community inclusion with policymakers and international organizations active in the region; and by producing multimedia products that can help illustrate the critical importance of inclusive policies. Download, read and share the Executive Summary Report from the program to find out more. Download as a PDF
* LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is widely recognized in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as in any way exclusive of other cultures, groups or terms, either historical or contemporary. The 2019 program of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was held in partnership with the UNDP’s Being LGBTI in Asia and the Pacific program, and was also supported by the German Federal Foreign Ministry and the Archangel Michael Foundation, with additional support from EQUAL GROUND, The Nippon Foundation, the Korea Foundation and the Ann M. Hoefle Memorial Fellowship.  
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Moving from Me to We in Memphis, Tennessee
Beale Street, Memphis (Photo by Heidi Kaden Lopyreva on Unsplash)
Moving from Me to We in Memphis, Tennessee
Oscar Tollast 
The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators will go stateside this week for a Regional Fellows Event in Memphis, Tennessee. The three-day program, Moving from Me to We: US Regional Young Cultural Innovators Event, will convene 30 Salzburg Global Fellows from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans from May 9 to May 12. Fellows will be encouraged to “move from me to we” while reflecting on their roles within their respective hubs and cities and exploring what they want to achieve together in their local communities. This is the third time the YCI Forum has held a regional meeting in the United States, having previously convened programs in New Orleans (2018) and Detroit (2017). This meeting is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. Memphis, Detroit, and New Orleans are cities undergoing radical urban transformation and social renewal. During the program, Fellows are encouraged to share their experiences, coach each other, and strategize for the future. There will also be panel discussions on creating safe spaces, shifting work, community building, and partnerships. YCI faculty members Amina J. Dickerson, Peter Jenkinson, and Shelagh Wright will return to facilitate the event. Salzburg Global Seminar will be represented by Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director, culture and the arts; Benjamin Glahn, vice president, development and operations; Andy Ho, US development director; Faye Hobson, program manager, culture, arts, and education; and Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer. Activities will be hosted at the Memphis Music Initiative, the National Civil Rights Museum, and CMPLX. Fellows will have the opportunity to hear from the people behind these organizations and learn how their work is shifting the narrative in Memphis’ cultural sector and amplifying voices often overlooked. Guest speakers at this year’s event include Amber Hamilton, chief operations and strategy officer at Memphis Music Initiative, Britney Thornton, executive director of Juice Orange Mound, and Noel Trent, director of interpretation, collections, and education at the National Civil Rights Museum. The meeting will conclude with a closing night concert featuring performances from YCI artist IMAKEMADBEATS and other artists from Memphis label Unapologetic. Moving from Me to We: US Regional Young Cultural Innovators Event is the third US regional meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This event is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. For more information on this program, please click here.
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Salzburg Global Reaches New Agreement with the Korea Foundation
Logos of Salzburg Global Seminar and the Korea Foundation
Salzburg Global Reaches New Agreement with the Korea Foundation
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar is delighted to announce a new agreement with the Korea Foundation which will help expand its fellowship. The Korea Foundation has agreed to support Salzburg Global by providing financial assistance for seven participants from the Republic of Korea to attend and take part in its programs up until April, 2020. The mission of the Korea Foundation is to promote better understanding of Korea within the international community and to increase friendship and goodwill between Korea and the rest of the world through various exchange programs. Since 2012, the Korea Foundation has sponsored many next-generation global leaders to attend Salzburg Global’s programs, and in 2014, both organizations established an international intern program, which continues to flourish. Salzburg Global is deeply grateful for the Korea Foundation’s dedicated ongoing support and looks forward to welcoming new participants from the Republic of Korea in the near future.
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Building Bridges - Outlining the Next Steps Forward
Fellows of the Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?
Building Bridges - Outlining the Next Steps Forward
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows have been encouraged to “keep connected and keep the momentum going” after a fruitful program on inclusive economies and better health. Policymakers, business representatives, academics, and representatives from civil society were among those who took part in Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health? The program is part of Salzburg Global’s Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series and was held in partnership with the Health Foundation. From April 29 to May 2, participants tackled complex challenges and attempted to bridge the worlds of business, health, and economic development. Toward the end of the program, participants worked in smaller groups to come up with solutions. On the final day, participants presented their ideas. The first group to present focused on developing a conceptual model of the relationship between inclusive economies and health in places. Participants came up with two tools. The first tool was a list of simple conversation starters designed to encourage dialogue between the health and economic sector. The second tool – named the Reinhardt Model – puts well-being economy at the center of discussions. This model has been designed for economic leaders to speak with health practitioners. It features a set of dynamics such as esteem, place, and well-being that feed into economies. The next group sought to establish “new normals” for business and the public sector in a sustainable way when it comes to scaling. Participants came up with a short playbook with chapters exploring how we design for scale, understanding the market, finance, and what models people might choose. This group also looked at partnership models and structures, how to work with different sectors, and putting in place the right governance. Evaluation is key. Has the scaling produced the expected results? Has the scaling led to diminishing returns? This group is keen to bring the playbook alive using case studies from around the world. Several participants pushed for the creation of a new Salzburg Statement for Cities to Lead Change at the Local and National Level. They argued successful cities create environments which are inclusive of all people and abilities. Participants encouraged city administrators to work with businesses to identify which groups are most marginalized and under-utilized, co-produce solutions with these communities, and address system-based barriers of unemployment for these groups. Cities can measure their performance through a clearly defined governance framework, by working with multiple organizations to establish a shared dataset, and by contributing to global knowledge and lessons for other cities through networks and sectors. Cities can build on the positive contributions they are already making by promoting an inclusive economic agenda in their strategies and actions. Participants working in the McGowan Room considered how to engage citizens and stakeholders through new narratives. They concluded narratives could be used to create bridges between different sectors. A good narrative is a shared story which incorporates many voices and can be retold. It captures a vision of the future and complements data, evidence, and the application for resources. A story, however, does not have to be a written statement. There are other ways to be creative and to empower people during the process. Narratives can act as a framework for actions, participants heard, as well as bring forward a cast of new characters. Participants working within this group indicated they would like to develop a Salzburg Statement and take their work back to their employers and refine their ideas. The final group to present emphasized the need to act now for the future, managing transition and inter-generational justice. Participants discussed creating a language around “whole life thinking” and facilitating conversations between different generations. On a practical level, this work could be embedded within existing projects, participants heard. The methodology behind the project is crowd contribution. Participants are looking for input from as many places as possible. Participants heard the group had the seed of an idea, but the backers who become involved in the project will help this seed grow. John Lotherington, the program director at Salzburg Global for health and health care, urged participants to stay in touch, noting, “There is so much possibility in what you have been talking about.” Lotherington proposed a three-month check-in to see where participants were with their projects. Salzburg Global Seminar will be on hand to provide logistical and catalytic support where possible. The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?, is part of the Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series. More information on this multi-year series is available here.
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Designing Better Systems for People to Live In
Ted Howard, left, in conversation with a fellow participant during the Salzburg Global program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?
Designing Better Systems for People to Live In
Martin Silva Rey 
Co-founder and president of the Democracy Collaborative Ted Howard works toward creating stronger democracies.   A social justice advocate and activist, his entire career has been spent in the NGO world, as well as the United Nations. Almost 20 years ago, he co-founded an action-oriented think tank "at the grassroots, at the community level," that goes beyond producing papers. What interests him? "How do we redesign the system that we live in - that we call capitalism at this point - toward a system that can produce better environmental outcomes, better health for people, have people more at the center rather than objects of a system, and greater equity and equality in terms of economics?" He aims at strengthening democratic practice. "So many of our national democracies are really threatened now. I think we see that in Europe, we certainly see it in my home country of the United States. And our belief is if you want a thriving national democracy—a 'big D' democracy—where it really is built is in community and in people's experiences." Howard is behind a worker-owned cooperatives program in Cleveland, Ohio, partly based in Mondragon, Spain. Using the purchasing power of the city's anchor institutions, such as hospitals and universities, the model creates green jobs and builds wealth. This initiative blossomed in a hostile context. "Twenty years ago, if I were to talk about worker ownership and cooperatives, and these kinds of different forms of enterprise, those were seen as 'Those aren't American. Maybe the Europeans will talk about that, but not here. Not Americans.' But now there is a very robust conversation in America about alternative forms of business and enterprise, and how you put more control in people's hands at the workplace."    Concerned about health inequalities in the United States, he attended the Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health? In the United States, Howard explains, "18 percent of our Gross Domestic Product is spent on our health care. And the truth is there are just many, many people in the United States that simply can't afford the kind of basic health care that they need. And in the United States, health care isn't seen as a right. We have civil rights, freedom of expression, right to have the religion you want. But health care is not seen as a right. It's something that you purchase in the market… "In one sense, we have an extraordinary system if you have the money to pay for it… You can live in a neighborhood as I have for the last five or six years which is populated by African-American black population 98 percent, and there your health care winds up that you have the life expectancy as a man of 64 years. And eight miles away, in a white suburb, your life expectancy is 88 years. And so health systems now, and we work with lots of these health systems, are saying, 'We can't just passively sit back and allow people to be sick and come to us and try to treat them.'" That shift in health systems makes him believe a European-style health care system is viable in the United States, as the issue has become part of the political agenda. "We have a system for senior citizens like myself called Medicare when you hit the age of 65. And Bernie Sanders, the senator who ran for president and is running again back in the States, talked about 'Medicare for all,' which was sort of the way in America you could talk about some sort of national system… But when he said it, he was a complete outlier. People just thought he was kind of crazy… This time, there are 20 people running for president as a Democrat in the United States for the 2020 [presidential election], and most of them are talking about some sort of national health service or quasi-national health service. So the dialogue has changed very, very much."    Not only for health but for all social outcomes to improve, he argues, the new system should lead to a "democratic economy." That is the subject of his last book, The Making of a Democratic Economy, to be published in summer 2019.    "In my view, well, if you're really looking at population health, and the health of millions and millions of people, you really have to look at big order economic changes. Or you're simply not gonna get to where you need to get, given the impact of the social determinants of health on our communities, our lives, and our families." The book features a critique of neoliberalism, which, he claims has produced a fundamental disruption in the United States. "The statistics are extraordinary… of the income gains of the last 30 years. Ninety-some percent of them have gone to less than 1 percent. It was always thought that every generation of Americans would be better off economically through social mobility than their parents were. That's just how it worked at least for the majority, for the white population. That's no longer the case. According to Howard, the model that can replace today's capitalism would not be either state socialism or hyper-capitalism, but much more community based and from the ground up. "It would emphasize broadening ownership over business and capital so that more people have a stake in their communities. It would emphasize leveraging the kinds of assets that we have in our communities to benefit our communities rather than always looking for some new giant corporation (‘Can we get Google to come in here?'). It would look at not just the number of jobs being created, but the quality of those jobs…" The ultimate question for all of us, according to Howard, is: "Are we really trying to bring about really decisive change?" The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?, is part of the Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series. More information on this multi-year series is available here.
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Building Bridges - Knowledge Cafe
Photo of levitating book in library Photo by Jaredd Craig on Unsplash
Building Bridges - Knowledge Cafe
Yasmina Ghandour 
During Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?, participants took part in a knowledge cafe with several stations discussing topics linked to creating better health. Participants moved every 30 minutes among stations. Each table had a facilitator who gave a brief impulse talk on the topic and then led the discussion. We spoke with each facilitator to garner what their take-aways were. "The main takeaway, I think, was the variety of different ways of applying investment tools and innovative finance tools to different health and social challenges at the global level, and then at the national level and local level, and how we need different approaches for those different scales of challenge that we’re dealing with. The message that I was trying to get across was what the range of options are for using investments to make a difference in social challenges such as health, and also the importance of engaging investors because they are asset owners who have power, and so, therefore, engaging them in using that power as part of our process of change.” Stephen Muers, trustee of the Friends Provident Foundation, and head of strategy and market development at Big Society Capital Key points from “What can be achieved by innovative finance and activist investors to align better business strategies with population health?” "We were looking at co-production and grassroots initiatives and looking at their contribution to the health and economic development agenda... we had a really interesting discussion between the dynamics of the merits of a big local versus the merits of scaling. And I guess at the end of the day we agreed there’s a place for both. There’s so much potential around a local initiative but actually replicating it and growing it is not always the best solution. You might lose so much in that process. There again we do need to get scale in certain circumstances and when you do scale it’s important to do so under a framework that provides an enabling framework.” Sarah Deas, director of Co-operative Development Scotland Key points from “What are the challenges to incorporating co-productive/grassroots initiatives into wider local/national/international health and economic initiatives?” "My main takeaway from the knowledge cafe discussion was that the idea by the organizers who formulated the question whether data was the new oil was a very important question... there are some very intriguing parallels between data now and oil in the history of the 19th century, in particular, and of certain power structures and other historical developments that were very important... I realized that looking into those parallels and seeing also where the differences are and the parallels are is absolutely vital when dealing with the questions of data... my message was to consider data rather as a currency rather than as oil... this would allow us to distinguish between the public value of data and the private value which have to be distinguished... my practical message was to really push for the idea of attaching a monetary value to data and actually let people be paid for giving their data.” Franz von Roenne, senior GIZ manager Key points from “Data is the new oil: what are the main opportunities and threats regarding inclusive economies and health arising from this disruption, and how can or should they be managed?” "Overall, evidence from around the world suggests that greater gender equality has a positive effect on the health of males and females and gender equality tends to be associated with a convergence in the health outcomes of men and women. Pressures on boys and girls to conform to gender norms is huge... Women in the workforce face different stresses than men because of expectations gender norms place on women as caregivers... economic development policies need to be gender aware – consider how policies impact men and women and what is happening to gender equality as economic development strategies are deployed. But beyond being gender aware, we must look for opportunities to transform gender norms. Unless there is encouragement and support for men to assume more non-traditional roles, further health gains that comes from gender equality will be stymied. And as a result, further economic development may itself also be affected.” Tessie San Martin*, president and chief executive officer of Plan International USA Key points from “The significance of gender in economic development strategies to support better health” *Extract is taken from a summary email sent by Martin The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?, is part of the Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series. More information on this multi-year series is available here.
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Governance and Technology: How to Achieve Better Results?
Source Code for a WordPress Website Photo by Ilya Pavlov on Unsplash
Governance and Technology: How to Achieve Better Results?
Martin Silva Rey 
In a fast-moving world, governments need to become more agile to rethink public service and envision institutions fit for new challenges and disruptions. How will innovations in technology affect governance? What are the opportunities presented, or challenges anticipated – are they fundamentally different from those in the past? Can they be dealt with through the same governance mechanisms or do we need to construct different mechanisms? What tools do public servants need to master to be fully equipped? Those are some of the questions that participants will discuss during the Salzburg Global Seminar program Agility for an Accelerating World: Can Governments Keep Up? From May 05-07, senior public sector leaders from 19 countries will gather at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria. They will be able to speak openly among peers about major disruptive forces confronting governments over the next 10-20 years. The program will also examine effective planning strategies to face those disruptive forces. Together, participants will devise year-round opportunities for practical exchange and follow-up among involved countries and institutions. This program takes place under the auspices of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a platform that equips governments to tackle complex challenges through improved foresight, innovation, and implementation. Co-created with senior leaders from around the world, it is building a mutually-supportive coalition of individuals and institutions on the frontline of digital, financial and societal disruption, promoting effective public leadership and strategic communication. The annual invitation-only retreat is supported by the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, in partnership with Apolitical. Additional country and institutional partners include the Australian Government, the Government of Ireland, the Government of Canada's Impact and Innovation Unit, Civil Service College Singapore, and Nesta. The program director is Charles Ehrlich. Looking ahead of the program, Ehrlich said, "Governance is a process, but too often gets driven by its own process. The world is moving so rapidly, that governments need to think less about the process and more about the ends: what results their citizens expect. This requires agility to respond to - and often to anticipate - trends, events, and even unforeseeable developments, and to adjust the process on the fly. Some roles traditionally carried out by the public sector will no longer be – but this does not mean that governments abdicate their responsibility to their citizens. "At this year's Annual Foresight Retreat of the Public Sector Strategy Network, we have a diverse group of 32 public leaders from 19 countries exploring precisely these challenges, exchanging their own experiences with each other, and enhancing international relationships across the strategic policy community." The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Agility for an Accelerating World: Can Governments Keep Up?, is part of the Public Sector Strategy Network. This program is supported by the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, in partnership with Apolitical. Additional country and institutional partners include the Australian Government, the Government of Ireland, the Government of Canada's Impact and Innovation Unit, Civil Service College Singapore, and Nesta. More information on this network is available at the following link: https://bit.ly/2PMCt5m
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Bridging Worlds - Making the Most of the Systemic Interconnected Approach
Salzburg Global Fellows in discussion in Schloss Leopoldskron's Max Reinhardt Library
Bridging Worlds - Making the Most of the Systemic Interconnected Approach
Oscar Tollast 
There is a famous quote from Walter Payton: “We are stronger together than we are alone.” It’s a well-known quote but perhaps one we are all guilty of failing to take into consideration from time to time. Aptly, ahead of moving into working groups on Monday afternoon, participants of the Salzburg Global program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health? were asked to consider: how is alignment best achieved across sectors connecting inclusive economies with health? In addition, what capabilities do we need to build to make the most of the systemic, interconnected approach that the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) encourage? One participant discussed how they became frustrated when others treated health as “health care.” They said their aim now was to get businesses to work toward health resilience, focusing on improving the future of health in the workplace, societal settings, and supply chain. The speaker said this work could be accomplished through partnerships. Fellows heard companies should understand what their impact is on their employees, consumers,  stakeholders, and surrounding communities. Businesses can take a systemic approach to health and  connect it to their processes. Hearing what other people think is important, and this requires active listening. One speaker suggested this skill could be adopted more by professionals working within health. There needs to be a recognition health is not going to be prioritized in the same way by other stakeholders. Adding to this notion of active listening was the importance of having “authentic conversations.” The speaker indicated distrust existed within health circles in the UK because promises are made which can’t be kept. This has damaged health’s kudos at a national and local level. To some, health is seen as a “cash cow or begging bowl.” It has to overcome this legacy and have an authentic conversation with potential partners on the reality of the systems and services. It’s not just about talking either, Fellows heard. It’s about the language used in real life, social media, and the media. Fellows were urged to listen to the nuance of what people are saying. A third speaker said the issues had been identified but what lacked was the implementation. The important thing now is to consider steps people can take to advance agendas. They suggested one or two issues needed to be identified which could act as an entry point. From here, costs could be identified, and a case could be made demonstrating the gains of cross-sectoral initiatives. Initiatives can be built upon and scaled up. The speaker warned that unless  action is taken now, Fellows will continue to have these conversations 10 years from now. Fellows heard more institutions are beginning to reposition themselves in terms of how they view health and are beginning to look at the broader agenda and strategic points of entry. The New Zealand Government, for example, has ensured its 2019 Budget has a focus on well-being. The Government has expressed its commitment “to putting people’s well-being and the environment at the heart of its policies, including  reporting against a wider set of well- being indicators in future Budgets.” “The Wellbeing Budget” will broaden the Budget’s focus by using the Treasury’s Living Standards Framework to inform the Government’s funding decisions. Fellows recognized the importance of adopting cross-sector approaches and finding new ways of breaking out of silos. Examples were shared as to how engagement and interaction had been used effectively to break them down. One speaker posited whether silos were a manifestation of human beings’ dislike of complexity and longterm planning.  One Fellow, summarizing what they had heard, indicated there was a need for disruptors, a need to know how to work within multidisciplinary teams, and an acceptance others might have the solutions to the problem being tackled. A solution is needed to find out how work can more frequently be assessed in terms of its health, social, and environmental impact. The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?, is part of the Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series. More information on this multi-year series is available here.
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