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Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
By: Salzburg Global Staff 

Report from the second annual YCI Forum now online

The report from the second annual Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is now available online to read, download and share.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) is an annual series that supports emerging young artists and cultural actors who are using innovative practices to catalyze urban transformation in their communities. 

Growing out of the early Young Cultural Leaders Forum, this was the second year of the YCI Forum, bringing 61 participants to Salzburg from 18 countries. These Young Cultural Innovators represented a broad spectrum of the arts and culture scenes in their cities from photography to food, heritage to design.

This year's cohort came from nine YCI Hubs in cities around the world, including Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Cape Town, Phnom Penh, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, and Tokyo. Following the program in Salzburg, which incorporated plenary keynote sessions as well as the skills-building and problem-solving working groups, the YCI Fellows are now encouraged to return to their "hubs" to connect with their 2014 peers and remain engaged with this year's cohort in a growing local and global network.

Download the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators II report (PDF) (low-res)


More information on the 2015 program can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/554

More information on the ten-year YCI Forum can be found here: yci.salzburgglobal.org

Salzburg Global Seminar is grateful to the following organizations and individuals for their generous support of this session: Fondation Adelman pour l’Education, American Express, the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Buenos Aires Ciudad, Cambodian Living Arts, the Edward T. Cone Foundation, the Japan Foundation, the Korea Foundation, the Elizabeth S. MacMillan Fellowship, the Mexican Business Council Fellowship Program, The Nippon Foundation, Red Bull Amaphiko, the Stichting De Verre Bergen, Adena and David Testa, the US Embassy in Bratislava, Slovakia, and the HDH Wills (1965) Charitable Trust.

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Corporate Governance in the Global Economy - The Changing Role of Directors
Corporate Governance in the Global Economy - The Changing Role of Directors
By: Louise Hallman 

Report from inaugural Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance now available online

The report from the inaugural session of the new multi-year series, the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance is now available online to read, download and share.

The October 2015 session Corporate Governance in the Global Economy: The Changing Role of Directors brought together 50 directors, senior managers, lawyers, judges, regulators, policy-makers, and academics from 16 different countries.

While participants were able to discuss their own professional experiences under Chatham House Rules, which provided a comfortable and open setting to share diverse and diverging opinions. Key conclusions in the report include:

  • Enhancing corporate profit and shareholder gain remain the foremost purpose of corporations worldwide, and investor expectations generally constrain the pursuit of other objectives;
  • The role and structure of the board will continue to evolve in response to further developments in the regulatory landscape, social values, and cultural norms;
  • The skills and leadership styles of directors are at the very core of corporate effectiveness, accountability to shareholders, and responsiveness to social pressures;
  • Businesses around the world fail or suffer systemic losses because they fail to anticipate risk; and
  • Shareholder activist investing is a much more prevalent phenomenon in the US than in other countries, but is becoming more significant in some other jurisdictions as well.

The session was hosted in partnership with BNY Mellon, Goldman Sachs, and Shearman & Sterling LLP, and was sponsored by Barclays, LIXIL, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, Mars, Potter Anderson & Corroon LLP, the state of Delaware, and Warburg Pincus, with additional support from the University of Pennsylvania. 

Download the report as a PDF

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The Promise of Data - Will This Bring a Revolution in Health Care?
The Promise of Data - Will This Bring a Revolution in Health Care?
By: Louise Hallman 

Report from latest session in the long-running Health and Health Care Innovation series now available online

The report from the latest session in the long-running Health and Health Care Innovation series - The Promise of Data: Will this Bring a Revolution in Health Care? - is now available is now available online to read, download and share.

Recognizing that health care is facing transformative opportunities through the use of data and analytics, Salzburg Global and session partners the Mayo Clinic, Dartmouth College, Arizona State University, and the Karolinska Institute, brought a diverse group of health care policymakers, providers and patients, together with with data and information technology experts, ethicists, legal experts and representatives from business and media for the session, The Promise of Data: Will it Bring A Revolution in Health Care?, held at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria from March 22 to 27, 2015.

The report, written by Dartmouth College's Merritt Patridge - a three-time Fellow of Salzburg Global Seminar - covers major themes from the session including the urgency and opportunity of data for value, and barriers, risks and ethics concerning Big Data for health, as well as use cases and interviews with Fellows from the session, and key lessons for going forward.

Download the report as a PDF


The session The Promise of Data: Will This Bring a Revolution in Health Care? is part of the Salzburg Global series “Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century” and was held in collaboration with the Mayo ClinicArizona State UniversityThe Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science, and in association with the Karolinska Insititutet.

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International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity - The Challenge of North Korea
International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity - The Challenge of North Korea
By: Salzburg Global Seminar staff 

Report from session on how to deal with North Korea now published

The report from the Salzburg Global symposium International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity: The Challenge of North Korea, part of the Salzburg Initiative on Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention is now available is now available online to read, download and share.

In June 2015, Salzburg Global Seminar, with support from the National Endowment for Democracy and the Open Society Foundation, convened the symposium in Salzburg to address how the international community should respond to the crimes against humanity perpetrated in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, or North Korea).

As this newly published report shows, there is no consensus on what should be done – neither about what is most likely to bring about positive change for the people of North Korea “today”, nor about how to provide a modicum of justice for the millions of victims, whether living or already perished. These goals, while intertwined, often lead to rather different opinions on what is most likely to be effective. Among the diverse experts that convened for the Salzburg symposium, there was a broad range of opinion spread across a continuum of possible actions from a very strong accountability stance to one that gives priority to engagement and cooperation.

The report seeks to provide a summary of many of the key points raised, highlight the diverse perspectives expressed, and reflect the range of strategies discussed, without suggesting there was unanimity around any of the recommendations or cataloging a complete record of the very deep and complex discussions that were held. This is a glimpse, at best, into the range of issues and opinions that were examined and shared over a very intense five day gathering – but one that can help elucidate core challenges related to the case of the DPRK and highlight various concrete strategies that are being, or could be, adopted in an effort to improve the lives of people living in North Korea.

Download the report as a PDF


Salzburg Global Seminar is grateful to our program partners, the National Endowment for Democracy and the Open Society Foundation, and our other partners for their generous support of Session 556 and to the Citizens Alliance for North Korean Human Rights for their programmatic co-operation.

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Strengthening Communities - LGBT Rights and Social Cohesion
Strengthening Communities - LGBT Rights and Social Cohesion
By: Salzburg Global Seminar staff 

Report of the third Salzburg Global LGBT Forum now online

The report from the Salzburg Global program Strengthening Communities: LGBT Rights and Social Cohesion, the third annual Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is now available is now available online to read, download and share.

In June 2015, Salzburg Global Seminar, brought together 57 participants from 34 countries from all professional sectors, ages and expertise. They reflected upon LGBT inclusion and social cohesion in relation to democratic institutions, families, communities, social justice, activism, education, employment, hate crimes and bullying. Three general themes were proposed for conversations:

  1. The Cost of Social Exclusion: What are the economic effects of social exclusion? How does LGBT exclusion affect national economies or international corporations? What are the implications of LGBT issues on the refugee crisis, migration, and those left behind?
  2. The Power of Storytelling: How are we portrayed in media? As monsters or ordinary citizens? As individuals or as a community? How do we tell our own stories?
  3. Transformation: How far can we advance LGBT human right issues before the global attention wanes?

As session rapporteur Ivan Capriles writes: "It has been at times difficult to select, condense or leave out so much material to provide the reader with a concise and enriching insight into this wonderful experience. Hopefully, these pages will allow the reader to grasp as much as possible the spirit of our growing Global LGBT Forum."

Download the report as a PDF


The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum 2015 was held with the generous support of the Austrian Development Cooperation, the German Federal Foreign Office, Hivos, Michael Huffington, and the Open Society Foundations. Additional support was provided by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth, the HDH Wills (1965) Charitable Trust, the Korea Foundation and the Nippon Foundation.

Salzburg Global Seminar would like to thank all the participants for donating their time and expertise to this session.


*LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is currently widely used in human rights conversations on sexual orientation and gender identity in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as exclusive of other cultural concepts, contemporary or historical, to express sexuality and gender, intersex and gender-nonconforming identities.

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New Paradigms for Behavioral and Mental Health Care
New Paradigms for Behavioral and Mental Health Care
By: Louise Hallman 

Report from the fourth collaboration with Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science now online

The report from the Salzburg Global program New Paradigms for Behavioral and Mental Health Care is now available is now available online to read, download and share.

In December 2014, Salzburg Global Seminar, together in partnership with the Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science at Dartmouth College, and with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Robert Bosch Stiftung, convened the program to help 68 participants from 17 nations design their country's future behavioral health care systems in full knowledge of the successes and mistakes of the West, as well as cutting-edge developments in human rights, health care delivery science, and behavioral health technologies. 

As report author, Manish Mishra explains, “The Salzburg Global Vision calls for Imagination, Sustainability and Justice. This [program] could be seen as a focused meditation on those three programmatic clusters...  The people who assembled in Salzburg for Session 536 are deeply committed to the working with mental illness in important ways... Although we are working on systems-level care with contexts that reach across the planet, maybe this all is built on one simple premise: every single person matters. None of this is possible unless people rigorously care about the wellbeing of relative strangers. Perhaps this is the guiding theme that emerged from this week and will help inform the upcoming health care sessions in this Salzburg Global series.” 

Download the report as a PDF


The session New Paradigms for Behavioral and Mental Health Care was part of the multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/536.

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Nurturing the New Creator
Nurturing the New Creator
By: Salzburg Global Seminar staff 

Report from Athens workshop now online

The report from the June 2015 workshop Nurturing the New Creator - hosted by Salzburg Global Seminar and the Athens-based collective cultureFWD - is now available online to read, download and share.

cultureFWD is an independent cultural network founded by the five Young Cultural Innovators from Athens who participated in the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2014. Forty-eight participants from a broad spectrum of cultural organizations and creative enterprises in Greece, the United States and the United Kingdom gathered at the BIOS center for art and cross media in Athens for the intensive gathering.

The interactive, education Athens workshop represents part of the greater plan of cultureFWD to help reinforce the role of culture and the arts in society and the economy in Athens. Applying the successful Salzburg Global model in the regional context, cultureFWD aims to break new ground for the culture and creative industries of Greece, by forming  a regional hub that highlights the value of the arts, promotes the work of local creatives and connects them to a global community of cultural innovators.  

Salzburg Global Program Director for Culture and the Arts, Susanna Seidl-Fox said: “Given the dramatic course of events in Greece since the June 23  workshop, we hope that the Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum can help by providing capacity building and networking opportunities to even more young cultural innovators in Athens, whose creativity will be critical for driving innovation and sustainable development in their communities in the future.”

Download the report as a PDF


For more information on the Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum, please visit:yci.SalzburgGlobal.org 

For more information on the workshop, please visit: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/fellow52 

The event was made possible thanks to the support of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Fulbright Greece and BIOS.

 
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Youth, Economics, and Violence - Implications for Future Conflict
Youth, Economics, and Violence - Implications for Future Conflict
By: Salzburg Global Seminar staff 

Salzburg Global Seminar releases report on implications of future conflict on marginalized youth to mark the International Youth Day

On the occasion of the International Youth Day on 12 August 2015, Salzburg Global Seminar released its report on Session 549 | Youth, Economics & Violence: Implications for Future Conflict in partnership with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The session aimed to produce a prioritized policy framework for countries and regions most affected by the changing youth demographics and its related challenges.

Over 60 researchers, policy-makers, practitioners, and young people gathered at Schloss Leopoldskron for five days in April 2015 to discuss the issues affecting the marginalized youth around the world.

The session was co-chaired by Ahmad Alhendawi, the first UN Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth, who mentioned in a recent interview with the UN News Service, that "this is [a] unique year in the history of the United Nations; a year where we are adopting new Sustainable Development Goals, a very bold promise for the future, [and] a new climate change agreement. That is, it is so fitting that we celebrate this International Youth day under the theme 'Youth Civic Engagement,' because I believe the password to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals is engaging young people in their implementation."

The Salzburg Global session brought together representatives from a wide range of disciplines and sectors to create a network of stakeholders related to large youth populations, economic insecurity, and social conflict to find ways of assisting areas in greatest need.

In their discussions, the Fellows highlighted diverse, complex, and inter-sectional issues affecting youth around the world: from micro issues such as adolescent development, school bullying, family violence, identity, and hope; to macro issues such as employment, demography, social, economic, and development systems, conflict, and innovation; and cross cutting issues such as activism, religion, gender, and ethnicity.

Marginalized youth, young men especially, have long been associated with revolution, protest and social disorder. In many countries young people are being left at the margins while their governments focus on maintaining law and order at the expense of their needs and wants.

The program also recognized the hard truths - that many radical or terrorist programs, by championing systems overhaul, are getting it right. Reconciliation was a key theme, recognizing the need to use awareness of differences as a bridge for empathy, understanding, trust, and progress.

A number of participants spoke of the pressing need to use the diverse range of talents and expertise assembled for the session, from activists to practitioners, researchers and policy-makers, to continue the work begun at Salzburg Global Seminar and translate their engagement with each other into concrete action.

Download the session report here:

Download the report as a PDF


The program Youth, Economics, and Violence: Implications for Future Conflict was convened by Salzburg Global Seminar, with support from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York, at Schloss Leopoldskron, Austria, April 26 to May 1, 2015.

More information can be found here. www.salzburgglobal.org/go/549

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Britain’s International Obligations - Fetters or Keys?
Dominic Grieve MP gives the 2015 Palliser Lecture
Britain’s International Obligations - Fetters or Keys?
By: Louise Hallman 

Second Annual Lecture in Honor of Sir Michael Palliser Delivered by Former UK Attorney General Dominic Grieve

Are the UK’s international obligations – such as being members of the EU and NATO – restraints which undermine its sovereignty or keys with which it can unlock the opportunity to maintain global influence? 

This was the question at hand for the second annual lecture given in honor of long-serving Salzburg Global board member and Senior Fellow Sir Michael Palliser, who passed away in 2012.

Speaking at the London event, this year’s lecturer former UK Attorney General Dominic Grieve MP said:

“British foreign policy, even during the height of Empire was driven by a desire to engage internationally, both to secure peace and ensure national prosperity. Today, when we are in the midst of inevitable globalization, we seem too often preoccupied by twin political narratives of exceptionalism and decline. Neither is true. 

“In a world in which power is shifting and getting increasingly diffuse, a country such as ours with extensive soft power assets, giving us the ability to be listened to and to provide leadership on international norms of behavior, is important to the maintenance of a complex and increasingly global legal and financial system and also has the capacity to derive great advantage from it.  

“But we need the confidence and determination to grasp the keys which we have and open up our opportunities in the promotion of sound political and financial institutions and the Rule of Law not only within our own country but in Europe using the multiple layers of global partnership that our forebears and our history have given us. 

“We should build on what is on offer and not hanker after some simpler world that does not and has never existed,” he concluded.

Download the full transcript

Grieve’s strong support for the UK’s role in the European Union and meeting it international obligations made him an excellent fit to deliver the second annual Palliser Lecture as Sir Michael Palliser was also a staunch supporter of European unity, forming part of the team that negotiated Britain’s membership of what was to become the European Union; he then helped to ensure that Britain played a constructive role in European institutions. 

Palliser’s extraordinary career in the British Diplomatic included positions as Head of the Policy Planning Staff, a Private Secretary to the Prime Minister, Minister at the British Embassy in Paris, Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the European Communities, and Permanent Undersecretary of State and Head of the Diplomatic Service, to name a few. He came out of formal retirement from April to July 1982, during the Falklands War, to act as special adviser in the Cabinet Office to then Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher.

In addition to his esteemed diplomatic career, Sir Michael also served on the board of many other organizations, including Salzburg Global Seminar, where he was Vice Chair of the Board; 21st Century Trust, of which he was a founding trustee and was instrumental in forming the exclusive partnership between the two organizations in 2009; and the London investment bank Samuel Montagu and Co. Ltd, which is now a subsidiary of HSBC – the hosts of the 2015 Palliser Lecture.


The full text of Dominic Grieve's lecture is available online.

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Russian Civil Society Symposium - Building Bridges to the Future
Russian Civil Society Symposium - Building Bridges to the Future
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

Report from the Salzburg Global-Yeltsin Center session now online

In April 2014, Salzburg Global Seminar, in cooperation with the Yeltsin Presidential Center and Yeltsin Foundation, hosted the Russian Civil Society Symposium: Building Bridges to the Future to address the challenges and opportunities currently facing civil society in Russia as a means to understand the needs and perspectives of Russian civil society groups and to consider new approaches to international civil society engagement with Russia.

The report is now available online. 

Download the report as a PDF

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Salzburg Global LGBT Forum - Creating Long-Term Global Networks to Sustain LGBT Human Rights Organizations
Salzburg Global LGBT Forum - Creating Long-Term Global Networks to Sustain LGBT Human Rights Organizations
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

Report from 2014 program of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum now online

The report from the May 2014 program of the Salzburg Global LGBT* Forum is now available online.

The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was formed in June 2013 to establish a truly global, open and conducive space to reflect upon and advance the LGBT human rights discussion worldwide.

To ensure a sustainable follow-up to the Salzburg gathering, the German Federal Foreign Office, in conjunction with Salzburg Global Seminar, brought together, in Berlin, human rights leaders from China, India, Germany, Lebanon, Russia, South Africa, Syria, Uganda, and Venezuela for three days of consultations in May 2014 as part of the Salzburg Global session Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: Creating Long-Term Global Networks to Sustain LGBT Human Rights Organizations.

You can read more about the sessions and the Salzburg Global Fellows' recommendations in the report below.

Download the report as a PDF

*LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is currently widely used in human rights conversations on sexual orientation and gender identity in many parts of the world, but we would not w ish it to be read as exclusive of other cultural concepts, contemporary or historical, to express sexuality and gender, intersex and gender-nonconforming identities.  

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Technology and Optimism for the Future
Technology and Optimism for the Future
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt delivers the fifth Lloyd R. Cutler Lecture on the Rule Of Law at the US Supreme Court

"We’re beginning to understand how humans actually think, work, and play... But the one that’s really going to change everything... is generalized AI," declared Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google at the fifth Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law on November 17, 2014.

Speaking at the US Supreme Court, Schmidt expressed his optimism for the future: "The US took 50 years for GDP to double. China did it in 15. It took 60 years for air conditioning...to get to 80 percent of US citizens. And it took 10 years for 80 percent to have mobile phones. Things happen quicker now."

Quoting H.G. Wells, Schmidt said, “'Civilization is in a race between education and catastrophe. Let us learn the truth and spread it as far and wide as the circumstances allow, for the truth is the greatest weapon we have.' When you look at the problems that our political leaders are addressing around the world; in almost every case, more education, more
civilization, [and] more of a buy-in to the international system would cure most of the problems. Right? He was right. We are right.”

Download and read the full transcript

The Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law is held annually by Salzburg Global Seminar and features a distinguished speaker on a vital legal issue of international interest. 

The Fifth Cutler Lecture was hosted by Salzburg Global Fellow and Associate Justice, the Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the US Supreme Court. Lloyd Cutler was a long-time champion of Salzburg Global Seminar and served as chair of its Board of Directors for a decade. Believing passionately in the role that law plays in nation building, and in the ability of the law and legal experts to contribute solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges, Lloyd Cutler was able to attract high court judges from around the world
to Salzburg. In addition, he was personally committed to ensuring that promising young international lawyers, academics, and jurists had access at Salzburg Global to a rich variety of judicial traditions, international legal institutions, and the international legal community at large.

Since joining Google in 2001, Eric Schmidt has helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader in technology. From 2001-2011, he served as Google’s
chief executive officer, overseeing the company’s technical and business strategy alongside founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page. Prior to joining Google, Schmidt was the chairman and CEO of Novell and chief technology officer at Sun Microsystems, Inc. Previously, he served on the research staff at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), Bell Laboratories, and Zilog. 

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Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention - Sharing Experiences Across Borders
Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention - Sharing Experiences Across Borders
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

Report from 2014 Symposium now published

The report from the June 2014 Salzburg Global Seminar session Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention: Sharing Experiences Across Borders is now available online. 

The program, held as part of the joint Salzburg Global-United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Salzburg Initiative on Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention, brought together 47 educators, museum directors, civil society leaders, policy influencers, public officials and other working in Holocaust and genocide education from 29 countries across the world.

You can read more about the session in the report below:

Download the report as PDF

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Re-Envisioning Salzburg Global Seminar
Re-Envisioning Salzburg Global Seminar
By: Salzburg Global Seminar 

Salzburg Global Chronicle 2012-13 published – available in print and online

Salzburg Global Seminar proudly presents its new periodical, The Salzburg Global Chronicle.

Replacing the traditional annual President’s Report, the new publication “chronicles” Salzburg Global’s programs at Schloss Leopoldskron and around the world, including profiles on both “up-and-coming” leaders and high profile Salzburg Global Fellows, and features on the impact Salzburg Global Seminar, its programs, staff and Fellows have in the world beyond the Schloss.

Highlights include:

15 Faces for the Future  

Salzburg Global Seminar’s mission is to challenge current and future leaders to tackle problems of global concern. To this end, Salzburg Global brings young, emerging leaders to Schloss Leopoldskron, not only for our Academies programs, but for every Salzburg Global session. Nearly 500 of our 1844 Fellows who attended sessions between 2011 and 2013 were under the age of 40, in addition to the more than 800 Academies participants. Below are just 15 of our remarkable young Fellows.

The Power of Partnership 

Salzburg Global Seminar’s programs would not happen without our partners. Partners provide not only the intellectual capital and input to drive the session forward but often the much needed financial capital necessary to bring Fellows and faculty to Salzburg. But what do partners get out of working with Salzburg Global?

A Distinct History, a Universal Message  

For three days, at a palace once home to the local Nazi party leader, experts from across the globe considered the value of Holocaust education in a global context at a symposium hosted by Salzburg Global and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum. They proved the Holocaust is more than just a European or Jewish experience.

Strength in Diversity 

LGBT rights are moving up the international agenda, and while progress is being made, at the same time some countries are passing increasingly regressive laws. In June 2013, Salzburg Global convened its first ever Salzburg Global LGBT Forum addressing LGBT and Human Rights: New Challenges, Next Steps, starting a truly global conversation.

An Unlikely Constellation of Partners  

Historically Black Colleges and Universities and the Appalachian College Association, member institutions of which serve predominantly white students, do not seem like the most obvious of partners. But this did not stop them from coming together to transform their schools into sites of global citizenship through the Salzburg Global Seminar-led, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded Mellon Fellow Community Initiative.

Media Change Makers

Since helping to launch the program in 2007, Salzburg Global President Stephen L. Salyer has taken a hands-on role in the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: helping to devise the program, delivering lectures and mentoring students. This year, he met with student representatives from each region represented at the eighth annual program to find out how the Academy is helping shape them.

The Chronicle is available online at chronicle2013.salzburgglobal.org and to download as a PDF and in our ISSUU Library   

Download the Salzburg Global Chronicle as a PDF

Print copies are available at Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron and all upcoming Salzburg Global Seminar events and programs.

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Conflict Transformation Through Culture - Peace-Building and the Arts
532 Report is now online!
Conflict Transformation Through Culture - Peace-Building and the Arts
By: Tanya Yilmaz 

Report on Conflict Transformation Through Culture now available online

The report for our 2014 session on “Conflict Transformation Through Culture: Peace-building & the Arts” is now available online.

Bringing together 60 artists, activists, policymakers, educators, and cultural actors from 27 countries, the session aimed to consider the role of cultural institutions, from museums and art galleries to film studios, can play in post-conflict reconciliation and forgiveness.

The program was sponsored by the Edward T. Cone Foundation and the Robert Bosch Foundation and it is hoped that participants will foster a new attitude towards the way art presents itself as a catalyst for social impact and social change, particularly in its often underestimated role that the arts can play in peacebuilding strategies.

You can read about the session discussions in the report, below.

The session report is also available for download as a PDF:

Download Report

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Africa's Growth Engine - Partnerships for Rural Enterprise and Impact at Scale
Session 509 report is now available online
Africa's Growth Engine - Partnerships for Rural Enterprise and Impact at Scale
By: Tanya Yilmaz 

Report on Africa's Growth Engine now available

“Africa's Growth Engine: Partnerships for Rural Enterprise & Impact at Scale” report is now available online.

Participants represented 13 countries from four regions of the world and included 28 representatives from government, private sector, civil society, policy and academia. It was the session’s aim to systemically identify innovative and scalable, pro-poor and gender-sensitive ventures and develop a road map for implementation across stakeholders.

The three-day session was co-organized with the International Fund for Agricultural Development, a UN specialized agency and it was this partnership that allowed participants to recognize current trends and key assumptions that are driving renewed interest in private-sector-led development approaches to encourage growth in the region.

You can view the session report here.

The 509 report is also available for download as a PDF:

Download Report

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Getting Transition Right - A Rights-Based Approach to Diversity and Inclusivity
Report for Session 508 now online
Getting Transition Right - A Rights-Based Approach to Diversity and Inclusivity
By: Tanya Yilmaz 

Report on Getting Transition Right now available online

The report for our 2013 session on “Getting Transition Right: A Rights-Based Approach to Diversity and Inclusivity” is now available online.

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has long since been more than just “Arab” or “Muslim” and since the revolutions of 2011, opportunities have now arisen to make these diverse societies more inclusive.

Joining together 40 civil society activists, academics, donors and budding politicians, the session allowed the opportunity to retreat from the hectic work in post-revolution Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen, and to take stock and formulate plans of how to make their countries more inclusive and accepting of their long-established diverse communities.  

You can read all about the discussions in the session report.

The report is also available for download as a PDF:

Download Report

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People, Peace and Planet in 2030
People, Peace and Planet in 2030
By: Salzburg Global Staff 

Report from session held in Japan now available

People, Peace and Planet in 2030: Shaping Inclusive and Sustainable Growth in Kyoto brought together an extraordinary pool of 28 emerging leaders from the worlds of business, public policy, academia and non-governmental organizations, along with expert speakers from across the world.

Not only did the Fellows gain the opportunity to discuss pertinent issues in-depth over plenary sessions, coffee breaks, meals and “nomunication” (Japanese for discussing weighty issues over drinks), they also learned a vital new skill in scenario building.

You can read all about the discussions and the Fellows' scenarios for 2030 in the session report.

 The report is also available for download as a PDF: Download Report.

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What Future for Europe – 1814, 1914, or Something Else?
What Future for Europe – 1814, 1914, or Something Else?
By: Louise Hallman 

Salzburg Global Senior Advisor Edward Mortimer gives lecture at UK’s House of Lords in honor of the late Sir Michael Palliser

2014 marks the centenary of the start of the First World War, which began not only four years of bloodshed in the trenches of France and Belgium, but also three decades of instability, fascism and further war across Europe and much of the world, leading to the decline of European influence in the world. It also marks the second centenary of the start of the Congress of Vienna, which sought to rebuild Europe after the Napoleonic wars.

Today, Europe faces a stark choice: will its leaders be like the “sleepwalkers” of 1914, who blindly fell into decades of war and destruction? Or the architects of 1814, who had a clear vision of the future for Europe? Or, will it be something else entirely?

It was this dilemma that Salzburg Global Senior Program Advisor Edward Mortimer sought to address in the inaugural Sir Michael Palliser Lecture, an event held at the House of Lords on Monday, February 3 to commemorate the life of the late Sir Michael Palliser, long-serving British diplomat and former Salzburg Global board member and senior Fellow who died last June.

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Very great man
After serving in the Coldstream Guards during World War II, Sir Michael Palliser (1922-2012) joined the British Diplomatic Service in 1947. His extraordinary career in the Foreign Office included stints at home and abroad as Head of the Policy Planning Staff, a Private Secretary to the Prime Minister, Minister at the British Embassy in Paris, Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the European Communities, and Permanent Undersecretary of State and Head of the Diplomatic Service, to name a few. He came out of formal retirement from April to July 1982, during the Falklands War, to act as special adviser in the Cabinet Office to then Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher.

In addition to his distinguished diplomatic career, he was Vice Chair of the Salzburg Global board of directors for 13 years, and on the faculty of many Salzburg Global sessions. He was a lifelong believer in European unity, forming part of the team that negotiated Britain’s membership of what was to become the European Union; he then helped to ensure that Britain played a constructive role in European institutions.

Held at the House of Lords, under the sponsorship of long-time supporter of Salzburg Global Seminar Baroness Prashar, the lecture was introduced by a former mentee of Sir Michael, Lord Kerr of Kinlochard. Lord Kerr, who also served for many years in the British Diplomatic Service, said it was a great pleasure to introduce the event held “in honor of a very great man”.

Two crucial centenaries
Introducing his lecture, Mortimer said it was “an extraordinary honor, but also quite an intimidating challenge, to be asked to deliver this lecture in memory of Michael Palliser,” a man he dubbed “a European to his fingertips”.

Given Sir Michael’s Europhilic vision, Mortimer said it was only appropriate that he deliver the inaugural Palliser Lecture on Europe, looking not only at its future, but drawing comparisons with its past.

“In Austria, at least, 2014 brings us not one crucial centenary but two,” Mortimer explained. 

“1914, when the ‘concert of Europe’ collapsed, and 1814 when it was created; 1914, which marked the death knell of the Habsburg empire, and 1814 when a great servant of the Habsburgs…managed to make Austria the central and dominant power in Europe; 1914, the moment of the sleepwalkers – leaders who blundered into a war that few of them really wanted but many came to believe inevitable – and 1814, the moment of the architects – leaders who put together a new European state system, which was to give Europe a uniquely peaceful century, interrupted in the middle by a few short wars which tidied up the map, making Italy and Germany into single states. 

“And the question is: which of those two moments does today’s Europe most resemble? Are our leaders today sleepwalkers or architects? Or, can we learn, by studying those two epoch-making events, how to avoid the pitfalls of the one and emulate the successes of the other?”

Noting that the “architects” of 1814 were rebuilding Europe after 25 years of war, with the “sleepwalkers” of 1914 coming from 100 years of peace, Mortimer argued: “War is by definition destructive, but sometimes the destruction is creative. Obstacles to change are crushed, or bulldozed aside, in ways that are unthinkable so long as peace prevails. The world becomes molten, and therefore malleable.”

Does the world thus need another catastrophe—or at least the threat of one—to prompt it to behave as architects instead of sleepwalkers?

Balkan parallels
Parallels between the current situations in the South China Sea and the Middle East have been drawn with the pre-World War I Balkans. In the South China Sea, comparisons can be made of the tension between the US and China of today and the UK and Germany or Germany and Russia of 1914. Actions by Japan (today’s Austria-Hungary?) could, through its military alliance, draw the USA into direct conflict with China.  The ongoing conflicts in the Middle East so far do not seem to be drawing in today’s “Great Powers” as the break-up of the Balkans did in 1914, but the actions of Israel could possibly change this.

Or is the Middle East more like 1848 – a year that is known in some countries as the “Spring of Nations” for it numerous revolutions? These revolutions had long-lasting impacts on many of the nations concerned, including Germany, Italy and Austria-Hungary, but did not spread to all nations, nor did they cause inter-regional conflicts or draw in external powers. 

If today’s powers successfully avoid being drawn into widespread regional conflict, is the greatest looming catastrophe not war but instead climate change? Here is where the greatest parallel with the sleepwalkers can be made, argued Mortimer.

“All of us are aware of the danger, just as everyone was aware of the danger of a general war in 1914. But, as then, many are prepared to shrug it off, deeming that what has not happened yet – or not on a scale to interfere seriously with their personal lives – has a good chance of not happening at all, and that there are many more pressing problems to be getting on with,” he said. 

“Others are convinced that the threat is real, and take some measures to confront it, but find themselves hemmed in by a web of conflicting claims and interests which ensure that these measures are not enough to make a real difference. Each state or group of states makes its move conditional on that of some other state or states, but agreement on priorities and strategies proves endlessly elusive. The metaphor of the sleepwalkers seems even more apposite here than it does to the unfortunate statesmen of 1914. The architects are badly needed. But do we need catastrophe to strike once again before the architects are given their chance?”

Greater perspective
Following Mortimer’s lecture, responses* were given by Bronwen Maddox, editor of Prospect magazine and Terje Rød-Larsen, President and CEO of the International Peace Institute and UN under-secretary-general, a role in which he advises Ban Ki-moon on the implementation of Security Council resolution 1559, regarding free elections in Lebanon.

Rød-Larsen brought to the debate his extensive knowledge of the Middle East, having played a key role in the Oslo Accords in 1993. He also served as ambassador and special advisor for the Middle East peace process to the Norwegian Foreign Minister, and as United Nations Special coordinator in the Occupied Territories, before he himself became Norwegian deputy prime minister in 1996, and later, in 2005, negotiated on behalf of the UN Secretary-General the Syrian military withdrawal from Lebanon.

Maddox, who has been the editor and chief executive of Prospect magazine since 2010, was previously chief foreign commentator, foreign editor, and US editor and Washington bureau chief of The Times and a reporter at the Financial Times. Outside of her journalistic work, she has also been an investment analyst in the City and on Wall Street, and a director of Kleinwort Benson Securities, as well as authoring In Defence of America, a book arguing the case for supporting the US after the Iraq war.

Special series
In addition to his UN role, Rød-Larsen also now serves as the head of Vienna-based NGO, the International Peace Institute. Together with Salzburg Global Seminar, the IPI will host a series of events this year to mark the two centenaries of 1914 and 1814. The Palliser Lecture will launch this special program, in collaboration with the IPI, to analyze and explore lessons from these key historical landmarks for leaders today and tomorrow. A series of high-level debates in North America, Europe, India and the Middle East will culminate in the session ‘1814, 1914: Lessons from History for a World at Risk’ to be held in August.   

Peter Palliser, Sir Michael Palliser’s son, speaking on behalf of the Palliser family said of the event: “We found the many tributes to our father extremely moving. It seemed appropriate that Edward Mortimer’s remarkable lecture should focus on the broader issues facing Europe, particularly in a context of international peace. We are very grateful to Baroness Prashar for hosting this wonderful event, and of course to Salzburg Global Seminar for organizing it, as well as the many people who gave support to the lecture. Our thanks goes to John Lotherington who worked so hard to make this a reality. We just hope that the Palliser Lecture can now become a series.”


Edward Mortimer's lecture is available in full online

*With the exception of Edward Mortimer’s lecture, all other comments were subject to the Chatham House Rule.

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The Mellon Fellow Community Initiative - Creating Sites of Global Citizenship
The MFCI is based on Salzburg Global's Global Citizenship Program, created in 2004
The Mellon Fellow Community Initiative - Creating Sites of Global Citizenship
By: Oscar Tollast 

Publication features essays, personal reflections and the next steps forward

A new report on The Mellon Fellow Community Initiative (MFCI) is now available to view online.

Produced by Salzburg Global, the report is entitled, ‘Creating Sites of Global Citizenship’.

The MFCI offers week-long seminars and shorter workshops for faculty and administrators to develop tailored approaches of incorporating global citizenship education into the fabric of their institutions.

In the last five years, the MFCI has brought together more than 250 people from 36 colleges and universities with world-class international faculty.

These students have been taken from either designated Historically Black Colleges and Universities or members of the Appalachian College Association.

The report includes a number of essays on Global Citizenship Education, personal experiences and reflections from MFCI participants, and information on the next steps forward.

In addition to this, Salzburg Global President and Chief Executive Officer, Stephen Salyer has penned a letter outlining the MFCI’s significance.

In an extract taken from this letter, Mr Salyer writes: “As this report demonstrates, the MFCI’s unusual constellation of partners is uniquely suited to developing and implementing innovative approaches to global citizenship education in classrooms, across campuses, and throughout communities.

“Through the MFCI, our partners have embarked on a journey to explore and reinterpret their own historical legacies for the 21st century.”

The MFCI is based on Salzburg Global’s Global Citizenship Program, created in 2004, which has brought together nearly 3,000 higher education administrators, professors and students from 80 colleges and universities.

Jochen Fried, Director of Education at Salzburg Global, and David Goldman, Associate Director of Education at Salzburg Global, have been involved in all stages of MFCI conceptualization, planning and implementation.

The initiative remains committed to strengthening educational access, success and relevance.

It holds a determination to find practical ways to advance global citizenship through rigorous teaching, research, cross-cultural exchange and community outreach.

READ MORE...