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Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Persist is a multimedia publication featuring 6 chapters exploring methods to educate, inspire and motivate approaches to journalism that combat a culture of distrust
Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Paul Mihailidis 
This article was first published on persist.community, a multimedia publication produced by 2018 participants of the Salzburg Academy of the Media and Global Change. The projects in this publication include new approaches and models for storytelling, conceptual platforms, games, prototypes, and creative materials. We persist towards. We resist against. In a ubiquitous media environment, where our technologies ask for more and more of our fleeting attention, it seems challenging to stay committed to an idea, an issue, a moment. Connective technologies have succeeded in disconnect us. They have splintered our communities, polarized our politics, and normalized spectacle in our information feeds. The same online networks that once touted their collaborative potential now provide sensational content to like-minded groups, perpetuate polarizing viewpoints, spread false information, and seed distrust in the very institutions we rely on for functioning civic societies. This distrust has pervaded our media institutions above all others. The core functions of information systems are now under attack, and the weaponization of fake news by political and public leaders has further eroded such trust. Journalists, meanwhile, are losing the trust of communities who find refuge and solace in the validation of information by peers online. It is within this context that over 75 aspiring journalists, media makers and activists gathered alongside over 35 faculty and visiting scholars to re-imagine journalism. The participants in the 12th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change convened for 30 master lectures, workshops, and seminars, 5 salons, a screening series, over 40 reading groups, 2 excursions, and over 20 hours of dedicated time to work in self-facilitated groups to build responses to the problem of distrust in our journalism and media institutions. What emerged from these three weeks is the commitment to a process where passionate people from around the world work intensely to experiment with media models and practices that seed interaction, care, imagination and dialog. In just over 20 hours of dedicated time to creating a digital publication, the 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change cohort created PERSIST: NEW IDEAS FOR JOURNALISM IN AN AGE OF DISTRUST. The publication features 6 chapters, which offer transmedia narratives that experiment with new approaches to storytelling and journalism that inspire care, community, and meaningful human engagement in an age of digital abundance. Each of the chapters features multimedia content, from platforms and apps to games, facilitations and prototypes, that collectively ask us to re-insert the “human” in our media systems. Students explored concepts of imagination, culture, and care in their work, and build models that work to bridge divides that exist across cultures, across borders, and across platforms. The term persist signifies both the effort of the group process that resulted in this publication, and the effort that it will take to combat the culture of distrust within and across our online networks. Persistence is understood in our work as striving to achieve a civic minded standpoint, where we recognize our shared social location, and exercise empathy for others through a collective struggle for meaningful dialog and engagement in the world. We apply persistence to our re-imagining of a journalism ecosystem that is guided by embrace a sincere commitment to bridging gaps between institutions and the communities in which they are embedded; and possess an overarching goal of contributing to the creation of emergent publics possessing the capacity and motivation to ably address the conditions of the day. In this way, we persist towards a better future, and not against intractable obstacles. Explore the collective work of our 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media & Global Change cohort.
Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long running multi-year program Salzburg Academy of Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here. You can also follow all the discussions on Twitter and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSmedia.
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Mechanics for the Future – How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Mechanics for the Future – How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Governments worldwide are under pressure to meet complex needs as populations age, countries urbanize, and technology transforms lives and work. They have a lead responsibility to prepare their societies for a radically changing world, yet face shrinking budgets and declining trust in the public sector. The Public Sector Strategy Network, launched in partnership between the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, Salzburg Global Seminar and Apolitical, helps governments tackle complex challenges through better foresight, innovation, and implementation. Co-created with senior leaders around the world, the Network is building a mutually-supportive coalition of engaged individuals and institutions on the frontline of digital, financial and societal disruption, promoting effective public leadership and strategic communication. The 2018 program - Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? - brought together 27 participants from 16 countries – mostly senior officials from governments and multilateral institutions – to engage informally, away from media and gatekeepers, and to test out ideas for immediate follow-up at the technical level. The subsequent report focuses on two significant areas for public sector innovation: creating a new social contract and responding to external forces. This report also features specific publicly-available examples by the Apolitical team which help illustrate some of the talking points which emerged. Download the report (as a hi-res PDF to read more)
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The Promise and Perils of Technology - Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime and FinTech
The Promise and Perils of Technology - Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime and FinTech
Salzburg Global Seminar 
The “Fourth Industrial Revolution” is fundamentally changing society, economies and financial markets on a global scale. Significant and often disruptive technological developments such as artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, big data and distributed ledger technologies (DLT) have led to the digitization of assets and information, the emergence of new players, business models and ecosystems, as well as new ways of interaction between individuals and businesses. While these changes potentially increase productivity and growth, they may also trigger new risks for today’s market participants and society.  How are these technological developments impacting and challenging society and financial markets? What consequences do they imply for policy, regulation and practitioners? What measures should be taken to mitigate the potential risks associated with the impending technology-triggered transformations? These questions and more faced the policymakers, banking and securities regulators and supervisors, and cybersecurity and data experts who gathered in Salzburg for the annual meeting of the Salzburg Global Finance Forum. The 2018 program focused on The Promise and Perils of Technology: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime and FinTech. The subsequent report offers valuable insights: The rapid and often disruptive development of technological advances – from AI and robotics to big data and distributed ledger technologies – is fundamentally changing the financial landscape by altering the interaction between customers and providers of financial services, lowering the barriers for new entrants, and enabling the emergence of new business models and ecosystems.  Banks have to adapt to the new competitive environment by becoming trusted custodians of clients’ financial data while at the same time intelligently analyzing clients’ data and behavior to anticipate needs and deliver tailor-made solution by collaborating with financial as well as non-financial partners.  Key internal challenges are the acquisition of talents to achieve the perfect combination of core banking skills with tech-savvy innovative capabilities, as well as the mitigation and management of cyber risk.  The emergence of new players and business models, as well as an increased disintermediation of the value chain of financial institutions, also create new challenges for policymakers and regulators.  Activity- and principle-based regulation appears to be the most suitable approach forward to balance consumer and investor protection on one hand and the facilitation of financial innovation on the other, and to provide a technology-neutral level playing field for incumbents and new entrants.  Download the report (as a hi-res PDF) to read more The report also features: The opening remarks of the program’s two co-chairs – J. Christopher Giancarlo, chairman of the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and José Manuel González-Páramo, member of the board of directors and chief officer for global economics, regulation and public affairs at BBVA in Madrid, Spain; An interview with the keynote speaker, Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google; and  A list of all participants in attendance and the Salzburg Global Finance Forum’s Advisory Committee.
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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Combating Extremism and Promoting Pluralism
Combating Extremism and Promoting Pluralism
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Xenophobia, racism, and violent extremism are tearing at the fabric of societies across the globe. Although contexts and specifics differ, many shared human values do not: the wish to live in peace and security, and to ensure a positive future for the next generation. At the same time, where atrocities have occurred there is a need to commemorate victims and to confront perpetrators without perpetuating a cycle of violence or creating a climate overwhelmed by vengeance. Faced with a rise in violent extremism, policymakers are under pressure to invest in prevention and to show that it works. Structured efforts to reduce extremist mindsets and behaviors have existed for some time, but evidence of effectiveness is often not widely known or utilized. Many interventions require considerable time to effect change, making rigorous measurement of their success over the long-term resource-intensive with sustained political will around an often-unpopular topic. What works? How do we know? And will it work in different geographic, cultural, and political contexts? These were the questions at the front mind for the educators, practitioners and museum curators invited to take part in a new phase of Salzburg Global Seminar’s Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention multi-year program series as they devised strategies to support cultures of prevention, with a specific focus on Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.  Funded by the United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the two-year project saw Fellows collaborate within and across countries to develop locally-driven, culturally-sensitive and -specific responses to combat extremism and promote pluralism in the five focus countries: Egypt, Morocco, Pakistan, Rwanda, and South Africa. The new report, Combating Extremism and Promoting Pluralism, presents the findings of the project from August 2016 to March 2018, starting with a workshop at Schloss Leopoldskron, culminating in several successful pilot projects that are now being scaled-up across their regions, and generating a series of concrete recommendations for others wishing to implement their own projects to combat extremism and promote pluralism. Interviews with several Fellows are also included. Pilot Projects Fellows from Rwanda and South Africa collaborated in launching the Change Makers Program, a leadership program for high school students. Using case studies on the Rwandan genocide, South African apartheid and the Holocaust, students develop critical thinking skills and are empowered to be agents of positive change.  In Egypt, educators at the American University of Cairo (AUC) established the Civic Peace Education Initiative. This strives to integrate community-based learning, intergenerational dialogue and storytelling into the curriculum and prompts students and faculty to think about societal divides and adopt values of global citizenship. Similarly, Fellows at the International University of Rabat in Morocco developed a graduate degree program in Conflict Resolution and Peace Governance.  In Pakistan, as part of its mission to protect youth against extremist recruitment efforts, the Renaissance Foundation for Social Innovation, Pakistan (RESIP) used this funding to conduct a study on the effect of socio-religious identities in shaping university students’ behavior. Elsewhere in the country, Fellows at Kohat University launched a study circle to connect students across the country’s northwestern provinces.  “After the Holocaust, people have repeated the mantra ‘never again’ – but then mass atrocities keep happening,” explains Charles Ehrlich, Salzburg Global Program Director.  “In Salzburg, we’ve heard first-hand accounts of tragedies taking place right now afflicting the Rohingya and the Yazidis, among others. Many of our participants in this program have themselves witnessed or survived unspeakable horror. “As an institution based in Austria, a country which itself continues to have difficulty addressing its own Nazi legacy, Salzburg Global Seminar has an especially important role in working with our colleagues from countries across the world to both address their own difficult histories and, through grassroots action, to seek to create a future where these tragedies do not repeat. The network has grown organically – mostly consisting of Fellows from countries in the Global South – as a way to break the isolation, so they have the opportunity to share experiences and ideas and to learn from each other how to develop initiatives appropriate for the circumstances of their own countries.” All five of the pilot projects are now poised for expansion or replication over the course of 2018 and 2019. For its part, Salzburg Global intends to continue this series on Holocaust education and combating extremism through the convening of future sessions in Salzburg, as well as by supporting in-region gatherings of Fellows to aid in the execution of these initiatives. Download the Report
Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention is a multi-year program series held in partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It is funded by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, with further support from Ronald D. Abramson, the Future Fund of the Republic of Austria, The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung. 
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Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World
Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World
Louise Hallman 
Language is fundamental to national identity and an important contributor to social cohesion in modern pluralistic societies. Learning a foreign language helps you to know that country and language skills can be very valuable. However, language policy decisions can also impact detrimentally on students’ life chances. All of this raises critical questions for researchers, policymakers and practitioners about the role of language learning and testing for two public good objectives: to “untap” and optimize individual talents and to foster social cohesion and dynamic inclusive economies. To this end, Salzburg Global Seminar convened the session Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World at its home in Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, in December 2017. The five-day session resulted in the Salzburg Statement for a Multilingual World, which was published on International Mother Language Day and has since been translated into more than 50 languages. A newly published report from the session is now available to read online, download and share.  The session, held in partnership with ETS, Microsoft and Qatar Foundation International, formed part of Salzburg Global’s long-running multi-year series, Education for Tomorrow’s World. Together, the more than 40 representatives from policy, academia, civil society and business, representing over 25 countries looked specifically at language policy through the lenses of social justice and social cohesion; the relationship between multilingualism and dynamic and entrepreneurial societies; the role of language policy in achieving the fourth Sustainable Development Goal for quality education; and the evolving role of technology in this field. The session report includes not only the Salzburg Statement, but also delves into the importance of language policy and practice from different perspectives, featuring summaries of each of the different panel discussions as well as insights from several of the expert participants:  Language is both barrier and bridge to co-operation, peace and progress Learning Languages in a Globalized World Tackling the Inherent Politics of Language Policy Increasing Social Cohesion – and Avoiding Monolingualism Embracing the Economic Value of Multilingualism and Minority Languages Humanizing Language Learning Through Technology Calling for Multilingualism and Language Rights to be Valued, Protected and Promoted  Hot Topic: Why is language learning so important? Hot Topic: What makes good language policy? Hot Topic: How do we promote the value of multilingualism? Download the report (PDF) As populations change and evolve, regardless of the reason, language policies and the programs that support them have a pivotal role to play in helping new arrivals better integrate into their new host countries and enhance social cohesion. Equally important, language policies are fundamental in ensuring millions of people around the world can maintain, enjoy and develop their languages of community. Multilingual policies can sustain the unique and vital resource of language diversity and drive positive change in the world – economically, socially and politically. Like many other sectors, technological innovation has the potential to revolutionize and democratize the language teaching and learning fields, paving the way to fairer access to the job market. Led by input from session partner, Microsoft, participants considered the role disruptive technology might play in shaping future decisions about language policy. Much emphasis in schools’ curriculum in recent years has been placed on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), with languages often valued less in comparison – despite the fact this goes against the latest thinking in neuroscience. Participants looked at how the research community could counter this misalignment of evidence and policy, and gain more traction with policymakers, practitioners and the public. The final part of the session focused on the writing of the Salzburg Statement for a Multilingual World, which was conceived as a way of synthesizing and bringing these complex issues to the attention of policymakers and people of influence and which can serve as an advocacy tool for people working for change in this area. The Statement is provided in full in English in the session report. All other translations – 51 and counting – can be found online: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/statements/multilingualworld   The Statement has been circulated widely following the session and now will form the basis of a series of webinars to be held throughout Summer and Autumn 2018.
Salzburg Global Seminar would like to thank ETS, Microsoft and Qatar Foundation International for their generous support of the session Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World. Salzburg Global Fellows' scholarships were provided by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Capital Group Companies, the Korea Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, the Onodera Fellowship, the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Thompson Fellowship and the Walter & Shirley Massey Scholarship Program. We also thank all Fellows for donating their time and expertise to this session. 
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The Asia We Want - A Clean and Green Asia
The Asia We Want - A Clean and Green Asia
Salzburg Global Semianr 
In November 2017, as the world met in Bonn, Germany to agree upon the finer details of the Paris Agreement, 25 young Asian leaders gathered in Salzburg, Austria to develop a shared vision of a “Clean and Green Asia,” strengthen commitment to sustainable and equitable development that is inspired and informed by inter-regional cooperation, and to advance innovative approaches to environmental sustainability and inclusive low-carbon development in their communities.  The inaugural session of the new, multi-year program The Asia We Want: Building Community through Regional Cooperation, supported through a generous grant by the Japan Foundation and with support from the Korea and Nippon Foundations, was the first step to form a network of dynamic young leaders from across the region and to build their capacity to work together to address such environmental, climate and energy concerns. Over three intensive days, the 25 leaders heard from veterans in the region and devised their own innovative projects to achieve “a clean and green Asia”: promoting regional, integrated approaches to address air quality; catalyzing small, sustainable and scalable (3S) financing; encouraging community-led waste management schemes; and designing a framework for multiple sectors to achieve goals in contributing to a low-carbon or decarbonized society. “Rising leaders in Asia are aware of their responsibility to steer transition to sustainable and climate resilient economies and are strongly committed to Asian community development inspired by cooperation at local and global levels,” said Tatsiana Lintouskaya, Program Director, Salzburg Global Seminar. “Our new multi-year program, The Asia We Want: Building Sustainable Communities Through Regional Cooperation, is there to support and empower young leaders working to advance inclusive low-carbon development in their communities. We aim to expand this program in the coming years and build a dynamic cross-border network for practical collaboration and lasting results in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.” The report, written by Lintouskaya and Salzburg Global Fellow Roli Mahajan, was dedicated in memory of multi-time Fellow and friend of Salzburg Global Seminar, Surin Pitsuwan. The former secretary general of ASEAN died three weeks after helping to facilitate the November 2017 session.  The report also compiles the Fellows and facilitators’ insightful and often provocative op-eds written ahead of the session. A full list of their op-eds is available below. Download the report as a PDF
Marifrance Avila – “For us to achieve the Asia that we want, we need to start with achieving the country that we want” Wilson John Barbon – “Disasters are not natural phenomena. They are the result of human and social conditions” Xixi Chen – We need integrated, collaborative and bottom-up leadership to build a cleaner and greener Asia Sandeep Choudhury – “Asia we want should be one based on equitable growth and not the disparity we see today between the rich and the poor” Chochoe Devaporihartakula – A clean and green Asia needs compliance and transparency Salinee Hurley – Replacing kerosene with solar power: an incomparable way to mitigate climate change Abner Lawangen – “Asia can truly be a resilient towering continent if all countries pull together” Tari Lestari – “A clean energy transition is the only way to create a better future for Asia” Roli Mahajan – The case for mandatory environmental service Niall O’Connor – We need to take a “business as unusual” approach Minh Nguyet Pham – “Air pollution is a spider web” Magdalena Seol – Business and Investment Can Drive a More Sustainable Asia Trinnawat Suwanprik – “We must know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future” Qingchan Yu – “A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical”
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Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Salzburg Global Seminar 
“With more than 250 Young Cultural Innovators now connected in communities around the world, the YCI Forum is one of the most dynamic and impactful global cultural networks and a dynamic creative catalyst for innovation, civic transformation, and social change worldwide,” says Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Program Director for Culture & the Arts. Now entering its fifth year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) held its fourth annual session at Schloss Leopoldskron in October 2017. The global reach of Fellows now extends from Adelaide, Australia, to Valletta, Malta, and 21 cities – called “YCI Hubs” – in between. The 2017 Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) hailed from 13 countries, with each participant facing unique challenges, tied to their specific heritage and industry. They were met with 10 facilitators and five speakers, and the committed staff of Salzburg Global Seminar.  Despite their geographical distances and differences in practice, the YCIs, the facilitators and speakers are intimately connected. A commitment to the arts and cultural sector, and shared ideals of community and justice make this a cohort of peers whose differences act not as barriers, but as bridges. The YCIs see themselves in a global context. They engage in international discourse without losing sight of their own communities. The new report from the latest session, written by returning YCI Sanja Grozdanic, chronicles the week’s events including the plenary presentations, skills-building workshops, small group discussions and vibrant “Open Space” events, organized by the YCIs themselves. “I have been in search of a world city that has intellectuals, artists and those trying to make the world better through their work, I have come to find that unlike the past there isn’t just one place for all these people they are spread out throughout the world and it really takes seminars like this to bring them together,” explains Yasmine Omari from the Memphis YCI Hub in Tennessee, USA.  Linda Kaoma, from the Cape Town YCI Hub in South Africa adds: “I am walking away better equipped to continue to do my work as an artist, cultural practitioner and leader in my community and with a strong affirmation to always lead with the heart. Salzburg Global Seminar has introduced me to new friends, colleagues, accountability partners and future collaborators from all over the world.”  The report includes many more testimonials from Fellows, as well as all their bios and those of the session facilitators and guest speakers. Download the report as a PDF (low-res)
To receive a hi-res edition of the report, please email press[at]salzburgglobal.org The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. 
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Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Louise Hallman 
Since 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has challenged current and future leaders to shape a better world. For seventy years, our Fellows have tackled issues of global concern including education, health, environment, economics, governance, peace-building, the rule of law and protection of human rights.  Since 2013, the advancement of LGBT human rights has joined that list of issues as we seek to shape a better world for everyone – including people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Founded five years ago, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was formed to establish a truly global space to reflect upon and advance LGBT human rights discussions around the world.  Today, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is an international network that connects over 150 Fellows in 70 countries across six continents, spanning multiple sectors, generations, cultures and sexual orientations and gender identities. This new, 200-page publication, Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years, chronicles the first five years of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: the Fellows’ stories that they’ve shared, the wide-ranging issues we’ve addressed, and the impact the Forum has had on individuals, institutions and ideas advancing LGBT human rights around the world. The report was generously supported by the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth.  “Fundamental human rights concern us all. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum brings together queer and straight, representing gender in many expressions, in short: people with overlapping, changing identities. Whether homo-, bi- or heterosexual, cis-, inter- or transgender, our diverse backgrounds and lives are connected by our shared interest to advance LGBT equality globally.” — Dr. Klaus Mueller, Founder and Chair, Salzburg Global LGBT Forum “Throughout Salzburg Global’s history, the rule of law and protection of human rights have played a central role in our programming and impact – as critical elements for personal dignity and wellbeing, equality and social cohesion, successful economies and effective international relations. With this track record, the decision to create the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was a natural and logical, yet bold, step.” — Clare Shine, Vice President and Chief Program Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “I am extremely proud of how the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum has advanced human rights... Public understanding and public policy have advanced considerably, but the challenges across the world remain great. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is a place where they can be addressed.” — Stephen L. Salyer, President and Chief Executive Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “For our ministry, it has been very important to support the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum financially… For us, it is important to make visible these different situations as they exist in Europe and in other parts of the world, and this includes discussing the problems too. We learn from the LGBT Forum how discussions in Germany influence other countries, and how their discussions in other countries influence us in Germany.” — Ralf Kleindiek, German State Secretary for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth Download the report as a PDF
* LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is widely recognized in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as in any way exclusive of other cultures, groups or terms, either historical or contemporary.  
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