Close

Search

Loading...

Topics

Reports

Salzburg Global Fellows Design New Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety
Salzburg Statement on Moving Measurement into Action: Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety | Group photo of participants from Moving Measurement into Action | Logos of Salzburg Global Seminar and Institute for Healthcare Improvement
Salzburg Global Fellows Design New Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Earlier this year, the World Health Organization declared September 17 the first World Patient Day and presented it as an opportunity to speak up for patient safety. A week or so beforehand, health leaders from across the world had met in Salzburg, Austria, at the request of Salzburg Global Seminar and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) to explore ways of improving the measurement of patient safety. The Lucian Leape Institute, an initiative of the IHI, led the convening and content curation. Participants of Moving Measurement into Action: Designing Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety agreed “that there is no single measure that allows all stakeholders in all settings to assess the past, current, and future safety of their system.” Participants agreed a system of measures must be carefully designed to assess the safety of patients throughout their health journey. The conversations in Salzburg have helped establish eight global principles for the measurement of patient safety. They feature in a new Salzburg Statement on Moving Measurement into Action: Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety, which Salzburg Global is launching alongside the IHI and the Lucian Leape Institute. The eight principles are as follows: The purpose of measurement is to collect and disseminate knowledge that results in action and improvement. Effective measurement requires the full involvement of patients, families, and communities within and across the health system. Safety measurement must advance equity. Selected measures must illuminate an integrated view of the health system across the continuum of care and the entire trajectory of the patient’s health journey. Data should be collected and analyzed in real time to proactively identify and prevent harm as often as possible. Measurement systems, evidence, and practices must continuously evolve and adapt. The burden of measures collected and analyzed must be reduced. Stakeholders must intentionally foster a culture that is safe and just to fully optimize the value of measurement. These principles, which are expanded upon in the statement, are a call to action for all stakeholders to reduce harm.
Patricia McGaffigan, RN, MS, CPPS, vice president, safety programs, at IHI, said, “To truly advance safety, it is critical that we apply meaningful measures that proactively assess risk and provide an accurate picture of day-to-day care. “For too long, health care has lacked consistent standards for measuring the safety of care. These principles call for the creation of measures that can be applied across the continuum of care and across the globe, and be informed by the perspectives of all stakeholders.” John Lotherington, a program director at Salzburg Global responsible for health and health care programs, said, "Twenty years ago, Salzburg Global was privileged to be in a position to convene a meeting which helped to shape the vital agenda around patient safety. "We have been delighted now to work with the Lucian Leape Institute in the development of these principles to take patient safety to the next level. It is so crucial for patients, their families and loved ones, and everyone in health care working towards better, safer care." Download the Statement as a PDF View the Statement on Issuu To submit your endorsement of the Salzburg Statement on Moving Measurement into Action: Global Principles for Measuring Patient Safety, please click here.
READ MORE...
Friend or Foe: How Should Directors Face Disruptive Risk?
Friend or Foe: How Should Directors Face Disruptive Risk?
Louise Hallman 
In today’s tumultuous world, corporations face conflicting and unsettling forces. Geopolitics collide with economics, new competitors disrupt industries, and the changing nature of shareholders challenges traditional concepts of corporate stewardship. Looking forward, directors need the right skills and tools to improve risk literacy and resilience of their companies. The Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum – through its fifth annual program, Friend or Foe: How Should Directors Face Disruptive Risk? – sought to address some of these challenges. Bringing perspectives and experience spanning 13 countries, an international and intergenerational cohort of 35 company directors, lawyers, policymakers, investors, academics, and representatives of key civil society interest groups explored how directors can identify both the challenges and opportunities of disruptive risk, achieve resilience, and navigate an increasingly complicated landscape. Critical Thinking The Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum was launched in 2015 to enable critical thinking and discussion on the changing roles and responsibilities of directors across jurisdictions and cultures. This new report – Friend or Foe: How Should Directors Face Disruptive Risk? – aims to capture those discussions and share them beyond the candid yet closed discussions of Schloss Leopoldskron and the Corporate Governance Forum.  Authored by Kayla Winarsky Green, adviser in the Human Rights and Business department of the Danish Institute for Human Rights and with contributions from Melissa Obegi, Asia general counsel for Bain Capital, based in Hong Kong; Stephanie Bertels, director of the Centre for Corporate Governance and Sustainability at the Beedie School of Business of Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada; and Robert H. Mundheim, of counsel to Shearman & Sterling LLP, the report includes recommendations, takeaways, and questions focused on three key areas: Understanding Emerging Disruptive Risk Constructing a Modern Board Exploring the Shifting Role of the Corporation Throughout the report, readers can find helpful breakout boxes offering guidance on such topics as Guiding Questions for Managing Disruptive Risks, Indicators of a Coming Scandal, Responses to Risk Indicators, and Skills or Characteristics to Consider for a Diverse Board. Accompanying the report are a selection of articles written by Fellows of the Corporate Governance Forum for the monthly series The Salzburg Questions for Corporate Governance. The report is now available to download, read and share: Download the report as a PDF
The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Friend or Foe: How Should Directors Face Disruptive Risk? is part of the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum annual program. The program is held in partnership with the CLP Group and supported by Barclays, BNY Mellon, and Elliott.  
READ MORE...
What Future for Cultural Heritage? Perceptions, Problematics and Potential
What Future for Cultural Heritage? Perceptions, Problematics and Potential
Salzburg Global Seminar 
How we think about the past and ourselves determines how we understand the present and how we build for the future. Cultural heritage shapes how we see the world. It influences the philosophy of societies and impacts education. It is based on knowledges, perceptions and contexts. Cultural heritage connects people to their histories, languages, values, traditions and lifestyles. It informs who we are as human beings and shapes our identities. In today’s volatile world, links to the past and to place have become more tenuous and contested, and threats to cultural heritage – both tangible and intangible – are extremely difficult to counter. Against this complex backdrop, the Salzburg Global Seminar program What Future for Cultural Heritage? Perceptions, Problematics and Potential asked what cultural heritage actually means to different people and regions, especially in the digital era, and why it is more important than ever to preserve, enhance and share cultural heritage through all available means. The March 2019 program, part of the long-running Culture, Arts and Society series, brought together creative thinkers and groundbreaking practitioners from around the world to reflect on and critique current approaches to cultural heritage, and to explore new frontiers in heritage innovation and collaboration. The report from this program is now available online to read, download and share. Download the PDF
Participants engaged in a highly interactive program that included plenary discussions and smaller work groups, curated conversations, informal interactions, knowledge exchanges, and practical group work. The program was structured along a continuum of inquiry, with three main focus areas: Perceptions of the Past Together and sometimes in contention with each other, participants interrogated the historical frames through which cultural heritage is viewed and how such predetermined frames color the view and value of cultural heritage. Discussions included reflections on ownership of knowledge, heritage and identity, and the exiting notions of tangible and intangible heritage. Problematics of the Present  The second strand of the program sought to explore the broader social and political contexts surrounding cultural heritage and to address ways to tackle the manifold threats to cultural heritage including climate change, overtourism, conflict, and a general lack of resources. Discussions addressed issues including restitution, the intentional destruction of heritage, and sustainable development. Potential for the Future Participants then transitioned to identifying some concrete and creative recommendations to energize the field in the face of its enormous challenges including intergenerational engagement and establishing connections between cultural heritage and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  This report presents the key points of discussion, debate and learning from the Salzburg program, as well as recommendations developed by the participants. What Future for Cultural Heritage? Perceptions, Problematics, and Potential is the latest program in Salzburg Global’s Culture, Arts and Society series. The program is being held in partnership with the Edward T. Cone Foundation, the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research, Fulbright Greece, and the Korea Foundation. For more information on the program, please click here.
READ MORE...
Health Fellows Launch Two Salzburg Statements and Fellow Recommendations
Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay
Health Fellows Launch Two Salzburg Statements and Fellow Recommendations
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Earlier this year, policymakers, business representatives, academics, and representatives from civil society took part in Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health? From April 29 to May 2, participants tackled complex challenges and attempted to bridge the worlds of business, health, and economic development. At the end of the program, participants were enthusiastic to keep connected and keep the momentum going. Today, we are delighted to present three new publications resulting from this program. In addition to two Salzburg Statements, we have a set of Fellow Recommendations: The Salzburg Statement on Creating Community-Owned Narratives for Healthy Local Economies The Salzburg Statement on How Cities Can Promote Genuinely Inclusive Economies Fellow Recommendations: Spark Conversations to Protect People's Future Well-Being Each publication was worked on by different groups of Fellows who attended the program. Both Statements are also available to view on Issuu. The Salzburg Statement on Creating Community-Owned Narratives for Healthy Local Economies calls on health and economic policymakers to recognize they have a responsibility to stimulate sharing of information between communities and policymakers by the promotion of narratives as an inclusive method, complementary to other sources of evidence. Successful cities are those that create an environment which is inclusive of all people and all abilities. The Salzburg Statement on How Cities Can Promote Genuinely Inclusive Economies call for cities to lead change at the local and national level. In addition, a Fellows Recommendation worked on by Jennifer Wallace, Cat Tully, Vibeke Koushede, Hiroko Nishimoto, and Jo Nurse (among others), has been published, outlining details for a project which will generate conversations about the future and provide an insight into global well-being. If you would like to endorse either of the Statements or the Fellows Recommendation, please email press@salzburgglobal.org. If supporting a Statement, please provide your full name and affiliation.
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Launches New Magazine
Copies of the first issue of Clemens on a table
Salzburg Global Launches New Magazine
Salzburg Global Seminar 
The inaugural issue of a new Salzburg Global magazine is now available to download, read, and share. Clemens is a new publication which aims to capture opinions and big ideas shaping a better world. The first issue explores cultural innovation in Salzburg, social and emotional learning, the fourth Industrial Revolution, and one man's dream to make London a National Park City. The magazine is named after Clemens Heller, the visionary founder of what is known today as Salzburg Global Seminar. Introducing Clemens, Stephen L. Salyer, president and chief executive officer of Salzburg Global Seminar, said, "More than 70 years on, we continue to salute Clemens, the young Austrian with a dream he was determined to realize. And we celebrate his progeny, tens of thousands of young idealists, activists, innovators and leaders – Salzburg Global Fellows – who have followed in his footsteps.... "In these pages you'll meet people like Clemens determined to realize their dreams: survivors of the genocide in Rwanda and the child of Holocaust survivors instilling tolerance and pluralism in young Africans (page 15); an Indian lawyer using theater to change hearts and minds towards LGBT people (page 22) and an American lawyer determined to use the courts to shake the world out of its climate change complacency (page 32); a "guerrilla geographer" turning London into a national park (page 21); a Chilean tech entrepreneur forgoing riches to lead a government innovation lab (page 26); and young cultural innovators proving there's more to Salzburg than Mozart and The Sound of Music (page 11)... "Clemens called that first summer at Schloss Leopoldskron a 'risky experiment.' The magazine that bears his name is exactly that too. Let us know what you think (email clemens@SalzburgGlobal.org), and help ensure our next edition is worth picking up." Download the first edition of Clemens Clemens is also available on Issuu. If you would like a print version of the publication, please email press@salzburgglobal.org for more information.
READ MORE...
Agility for an Accelerating World: Can Governments Keep Up?
Agility for an Accelerating World: Can Governments Keep Up?
Salzburg Global Seminar 
In a fast-moving world, governments need to become more agile to rethink public service and envision institutions fit for new challenges and disruptions. How will innovations in technology affect governance? What are the opportunities presented, or challenges anticipated – are they fundamentally different from those in the past? Can they be dealt with through the same governance mechanisms or do we need to construct different mechanisms? What tools do public servants need to master to be fully equipped?  The 2019 Annual Foresight Retreat of the Public Sector Strategy Network, held at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, answered all these questions and more. This year’s Annual Foresight Retreat, entitled Agility for an Accelerating World: Can Governments Keep Up?, saw 30 senior public sector leaders from 19 countries gather at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, exploring these challenges, exchanging their own experiences with each other, and enhancing international relationships across the strategic policy community. As ever, these senior leaders were able to speak openly among peers, focusing on the major disruptive forces confronting governments over the next 10-20 years. The program examined effective planning strategies to face those disruptive forces.  The latest report of the Public Sector Strategy Network consists of: A summary of the discussions at the Annual Foresight Retreat accompanied by: Short case studies and examples shared in Salzburg; Links and resources provided by Network partner Apolitical; A longer case study provided by the Civil Service College of Singapore; A series of interviews with Public Sector Strategy Network members conducted by Salzburg Global Seminar; and A conclusion from Salzburg Global Program Director Charles Ehrlich. Download the report as a PDF Read the report online The Annual Foresight Retreat is held under the Chatham House Rule, which has been adhered to in this report, with all attribution provided with approval. The Public Sector Strategy Network equips governments to tackle complex challenges through improved foresight, innovation, and implementation. Co-created with senior leaders from around the world, it is building a mutually-supportive coalition of individuals and institutions on the frontline of digital, financial and societal disruption, promoting effective public leadership and strategic communication.  Following on from the retreat in Salzburg, network members from both this and past programs will devise year-round opportunities for practical exchange and follow-up among involved countries and institutions. The annual invitation-only retreat is organized by Salzburg Global Seminar and supported by the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, in partnership with Apolitical. Additional country and institutional partners include the Australian Public Service, the Privy Council Office of Canada, the Irish Public Service, and the Civil Service College of Singapore, with additional programmatic support from Nesta.  
READ MORE...
Financial Services in the 2020s: Tectonic Shifts and New Landscapes
Financial Services in the 2020s: Tectonic Shifts and New Landscapes
Salzburg Global Seminar 
The geopolitical landscape and the global economy are going through tectonic shifts with the pace of global growth becoming less vigorous and balanced. Growing polarization and protectionist tendencies give rise to continuous economic, political and financial fragmentation. The increasing importance of environmental threats as a result of climate change and their potential impact on the long-term economic and financial stability lead to a growing relevance of sustainable finance and extensive and consistent environmental, social and governance (ESG)-related disclosure.  Additionally, the rise of new technologies, the increased maturity of players like fintechs, and the entrance of large, established technology companies into financial services are transforming the financial system from a centralized framework into an open architecture. Emerging platforms and fundamental changes in the distribution mechanism of financial services result in a range of activities being offered outside of the core jurisdiction of banking regulators and create new regulatory challenges regarding contextual finance, privacy and data protection.  The ninth session of the Salzburg Global Finance Forum – Financial Services in the 2020s: Tectonic Shifts and New Landscapes – brought together stakeholders from different financial institutions, regulators, and policymakers around the world to discuss how new global trends and emerging risks are impacting and challenging society and financial markets and what consequences they imply for policy, regulation, and practitioners.  The newly published report provides an executive summary of the discussions from the two-day session (June 23-25, 2019) at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, together with a list of all participants in attendance. Download the report as a PDF The deliberations of the 2019 program of the Salzburg Global Finance Forum demonstrate that a new economic and financial system is emerging driven by technology, demographics, social and political pressures, climate change risks and the environment. New challenges ahead require new finance, which will be more greatly rooted in society, more inclusive, more responsive to the new needs of the real economy, households and entrepreneurs, and better able to support the transition to sustainable development, as well as to serve emerging digital needs. All this must be achieved while still retaining trust and maintaining resilience.  As the world of finance continues to change, the Forum’s future programs will tackle this new role of finance and explore the new implications and redefining possibilities in the banking and financial markets industry, which in turn could help enable a more sustainable and resilient economy.  The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Financial Services in the 2020s: Tectonic Shifts and New Landscapes, is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Finance Forum. This year's program is being held in partnership with JP Morgan Chase & Co. and Oliver Wyman. The sponsors are Cleary Gottlieb, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, Raiffeisen. The co-sponsors are Bearing Point, European Banking Federation, Dynex Capital Inc., and State Street.
READ MORE...
Law and Technology: Privacy, Security, and Ethics in an Asymmetric World
Law and Technology: Privacy, Security, and Ethics in an Asymmetric World
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Technology has led to fundamental disruptions across society, commercial sectors, and traditional spheres of governance. While these changes provide ample and exciting opportunities to develop products, systems, and structures designed to optimize public good, they also create new fields and grey areas that raise unprecedented challenges for policy, law, and regulation. Through its new Law and Technology Forum, Salzburg Global Seminar seeks to create meaningful partnerships and formulate tangible outcomes by encouraging participants to discuss the place of technology in today’s society, and how law and governance structures could improve this status quo. The inaugural program – Privacy, Security, and Ethics in an Asymmetric World – in April 2019 brought together stakeholders from a diverse set of technology companies, along with academics, regulators, and policymakers from around the world to tackle these issues.  Working as a small group of peers, representing multiple sectors and countries, the discussions in Salzburg enabled participants to foster meaningful and ongoing relationships with stakeholders who may have different perceptions of technology and its role in the world. Download the report as a PDF Topics of discussion:  Ensuring an ethical underpinning for technological development, consistent with the rule of law and global public good, seeking in particular to balance needs for security and privacy, law enforcement and human rights, and responsibilities for private firms and public institutions to each other and to citizens. Resolving specific priority issues and global challenges through a comprehensive and cross-sectoral process within conditions of mutual trust. Devising methods to equip rule-makers from judicial, legislative, and executive bodies with technological literacy, including both through facilitating continuing education or mainstreaming technical staff advising and supporting the rule-makers within institutional and legal processes. Developing leadership skills and competencies that help to unleash human potential to lead technological change, exploiting existing capabilities and new opportunities. The takeaways from this inaugural program, together with input from the Advisory Committee, will now inform the future topics of discussion for the Salzburg Global Law and Technology Forum, the next program of which will be held in 2020.
READ MORE...
Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia
Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia
Salzburg Global Seminar 
“Look for the rainbow in every crowd,” former Chief Justice Dipak Misra declared following India’s Supreme Court ruling to decriminalize homosexuality in September 2018. “Equality and liberty and this freedom can only be fulfilled when each one of us realizes the LGBT community has the same rights as other citizens.” The Indian court’s decision to strike down Section 377, a colonial-era law criminalizing same-sex relationships, is just one example of the momentous advocacy work being done by LGBT communities in South Asia; a region where many of these human rights issues are at tipping point. While a region of diverse cultural and religious communities and differing levels of economic development, the progress of legal and social rights for LGBT people in South Asia will have a profound impact on the region at large and globally.  During the sixth gathering of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum – Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia – more than 40 advocates from 17 countries met in Kathmandu, Nepal, to discuss how to enhance Asia’s underrepresented role in global LGBT dialogues, and engage individuals and institutions to create significant shifts in social attitudes and policy landscapes across the region. Appropriately, Nepal is a nation widely seen as a regional leader in progressive attitudes on sexual orientation and gender identity in South Asia. The significance of this was not lost on Forum participants, whose calls for wider social acceptance and rights were amplified by a united energy of strength and leadership. As with all Salzburg Global LGBT Forum meetings, the gathering brought together a widely diverse group of human rights leaders spanning government, law, diplomacy, religion, media and culture, and built on the explicit goal of the Forum to further develop a network of trust, where both Fellows’ professional expertise and their life experiences are highly valued. Underlining that fundamental human rights concern us all, the Forum meeting connects queer and straight leaders who represent gender and sexual orientation in different expressions, united by their passion to advance LGBT equality globally.  Despite – or rather thanks to – the intricate mix of nationalities, cultures and faiths represented at the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, boundaries of separation were broken as participants vowed to learn from this collective strength and resilience. “We have much in common; but we also face different challenges, and live in different contexts,” participants – now known as Fellows – were told. “Everyone has something valuable to share.” In South Asia, several LGBT human rights issues are at a “tipping point” at which legal and/or social change could soon be possible. Gender recognition and decriminalization are two such legal tipping point issues for several countries. However even in places where legal progress on these fronts has been made (for example in Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka), social discrimination and violence often persist and serve to exclude LGBT individuals and their families from access to employment, health care, education and other services. Because of this, additional action is needed across South Asia to ensure full legal and social inclusion and recognition for gender and sexual minorities, with special attention to transgender and intersex communities. The 2019 program contributed to national and regional discussions on LGBT inclusion across the South Asian region by providing a platform for open policy dialogue and debate; creating an opportunity to highlight South Asia’s unique legal, religious, and cultural history of LGBT family and community inclusion with policymakers and international organizations active in the region; and by producing multimedia products that can help illustrate the critical importance of inclusive policies. Download, read and share the Executive Summary Report from the program to find out more. Download as a PDF
* LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is widely recognized in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as in any way exclusive of other cultures, groups or terms, either historical or contemporary. The 2019 program of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was held in partnership with the UNDP’s Being LGBTI in Asia and the Pacific program, and was also supported by the German Federal Foreign Ministry and the Archangel Michael Foundation, with additional support from EQUAL GROUND, The Nippon Foundation, the Korea Foundation and the Ann M. Hoefle Memorial Fellowship.  
READ MORE...
Displaying results 1 to 9 out of 100
<< First < Previous 1-9 10-18 19-27 28-36 37-45 46-54 55-63 Next > Last >>