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All Salzburg Global reports are available to read online in our Issuu Library


New Report - The Asia We Want - A Clean and Green Asia
New Report - The Asia We Want - A Clean and Green Asia
Salzburg Global Semianr 
In November 2017, as the world met in Bonn, Germany to agree upon the finer details of the Paris Agreement, 25 young Asian leaders gathered in Salzburg, Austria to develop a shared vision of a “Clean and Green Asia,” strengthen commitment to sustainable and equitable development that is inspired and informed by inter-regional cooperation, and to advance innovative approaches to environmental sustainability and inclusive low-carbon development in their communities.  The inaugural session of the new, multi-year program The Asia We Want: Building Community through Regional Cooperation, supported through a generous grant by the Japan Foundation and with support from the Korea and Nippon Foundations, was the first step to form a network of dynamic young leaders from across the region and to build their capacity to work together to address such environmental, climate and energy concerns. Over three intensive days, the 25 leaders heard from veterans in the region and devised their own innovative projects to achieve “a clean and green Asia”: promoting regional, integrated approaches to address air quality; catalyzing small, sustainable and scalable (3S) financing; encouraging community-led waste management schemes; and designing a framework for multiple sectors to achieve goals in contributing to a low-carbon or decarbonized society. “Rising leaders in Asia are aware of their responsibility to steer transition to sustainable and climate resilient economies and are strongly committed to Asian community development inspired by cooperation at local and global levels,” said Tatsiana Lintouskaya, Program Director, Salzburg Global Seminar. “Our new multi-year program, The Asia We Want: Building Sustainable Communities Through Regional Cooperation, is there to support and empower young leaders working to advance inclusive low-carbon development in their communities. We aim to expand this program in the coming years and build a dynamic cross-border network for practical collaboration and lasting results in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.” The report, written by Lintouskaya and Salzburg Global Fellow Roli Mahajan, was dedicated in memory of multi-time Fellow and friend of Salzburg Global Seminar, Surin Pitsuwan. The former secretary general of ASEAN died three weeks after helping to facilitate the November 2017 session.  The report also compiles the Fellows and facilitators’ insightful and often provocative op-eds written ahead of the session. A full list of their op-eds is available below. Download the report as a PDF
Marifrance Avila – “For us to achieve the Asia that we want, we need to start with achieving the country that we want” Wilson John Barbon – “Disasters are not natural phenomena. They are the result of human and social conditions” Xixi Chen – We need integrated, collaborative and bottom-up leadership to build a cleaner and greener Asia Sandeep Choudhury – “Asia we want should be one based on equitable growth and not the disparity we see today between the rich and the poor” Chochoe Devaporihartakula – A clean and green Asia needs compliance and transparency Salinee Hurley – Replacing kerosene with solar power: an incomparable way to mitigate climate change Abner Lawangen – “Asia can truly be a resilient towering continent if all countries pull together” Tari Lestari – “A clean energy transition is the only way to create a better future for Asia” Roli Mahajan – The case for mandatory environmental service Niall O’Connor – We need to take a “business as unusual” approach Minh Nguyet Pham – “Air pollution is a spider web” Magdalena Seol – Business and Investment Can Drive a More Sustainable Asia Trinnawat Suwanprik – “We must know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future” Qingchan Yu – “A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical”
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Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Salzburg Global Seminar 
“With more than 250 Young Cultural Innovators now connected in communities around the world, the YCI Forum is one of the most dynamic and impactful global cultural networks and a dynamic creative catalyst for innovation, civic transformation, and social change worldwide,” says Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Program Director for Culture & the Arts. Now entering its fifth year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) held its fourth annual session at Schloss Leopoldskron in October 2017. The global reach of Fellows now extends from Adelaide, Australia, to Valletta, Malta, and 21 cities – called “YCI Hubs” – in between. The 2017 Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) hailed from 13 countries, with each participant facing unique challenges, tied to their specific heritage and industry. They were met with 10 facilitators and five speakers, and the committed staff of Salzburg Global Seminar.  Despite their geographical distances and differences in practice, the YCIs, the facilitators and speakers are intimately connected. A commitment to the arts and cultural sector, and shared ideals of community and justice make this a cohort of peers whose differences act not as barriers, but as bridges. The YCIs see themselves in a global context. They engage in international discourse without losing sight of their own communities. The new report from the latest session, written by returning YCI Sanja Grozdanic, chronicles the week’s events including the plenary presentations, skills-building workshops, small group discussions and vibrant “Open Space” events, organized by the YCIs themselves. “I have been in search of a world city that has intellectuals, artists and those trying to make the world better through their work, I have come to find that unlike the past there isn’t just one place for all these people they are spread out throughout the world and it really takes seminars like this to bring them together,” explains Yasmine Omari from the Memphis YCI Hub in Tennessee, USA.  Linda Kaoma, from the Cape Town YCI Hub in South Africa adds: “I am walking away better equipped to continue to do my work as an artist, cultural practitioner and leader in my community and with a strong affirmation to always lead with the heart. Salzburg Global Seminar has introduced me to new friends, colleagues, accountability partners and future collaborators from all over the world.”  The report includes many more testimonials from Fellows, as well as all their bios and those of the session facilitators and guest speakers. Download the report as a PDF (low-res)
To receive a hi-res edition of the report, please email press[at]salzburgglobal.org The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. 
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Report now online Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Report now online Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Louise Hallman 
Since 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has challenged current and future leaders to shape a better world. For seventy years, our Fellows have tackled issues of global concern including education, health, environment, economics, governance, peace-building, the rule of law and protection of human rights.  Since 2013, the advancement of LGBT human rights has joined that list of issues as we seek to shape a better world for everyone – including people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Founded five years ago, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was formed to establish a truly global space to reflect upon and advance LGBT human rights discussions around the world.  Today, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is an international network that connects over 150 Fellows in 70 countries across six continents, spanning multiple sectors, generations, cultures and sexual orientations and gender identities. This new, 200-page publication, Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years, chronicles the first five years of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: the Fellows’ stories that they’ve shared, the wide-ranging issues we’ve addressed, and the impact the Forum has had on individuals, institutions and ideas advancing LGBT human rights around the world. The report was generously supported by the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth.  “Fundamental human rights concern us all. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum brings together queer and straight, representing gender in many expressions, in short: people with overlapping, changing identities. Whether homo-, bi- or heterosexual, cis-, inter- or transgender, our diverse backgrounds and lives are connected by our shared interest to advance LGBT equality globally.” — Dr. Klaus Mueller, Founder and Chair, Salzburg Global LGBT Forum “Throughout Salzburg Global’s history, the rule of law and protection of human rights have played a central role in our programming and impact – as critical elements for personal dignity and wellbeing, equality and social cohesion, successful economies and effective international relations. With this track record, the decision to create the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was a natural and logical, yet bold, step.” — Clare Shine, Vice President and Chief Program Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “I am extremely proud of how the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum has advanced human rights... Public understanding and public policy have advanced considerably, but the challenges across the world remain great. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is a place where they can be addressed.” — Stephen L. Salyer, President and Chief Executive Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “For our ministry, it has been very important to support the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum financially… For us, it is important to make visible these different situations as they exist in Europe and in other parts of the world, and this includes discussing the problems too. We learn from the LGBT Forum how discussions in Germany influence other countries, and how their discussions in other countries influence us in Germany.” — Ralf Kleindiek, German State Secretary for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth Download the report as a PDF
* LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is widely recognized in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as in any way exclusive of other cultures, groups or terms, either historical or contemporary.
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Report now online - The Courageous Director - Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?
Report now online - The Courageous Director - Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Within the last year, Volkswagen and several of its executives and employees have pled guilty to criminal charges stemming from a scheme to cheat environmental standards; Wells Fargo Bank received a $100 million fine for inducing its employees to secretly and illegally open unauthorized accounts; and Google grappled with how to respond to a leaked internal memo regarding diversity in the workforce that the public perceived as demonstrating male chauvinistic bias. All three corporations faced resounding criticism from shareholders, public and press alike.   However, also within the last year, Kenneth Frazier, CEO of multi-billion-dollar pharmaceutical company Merck was hailed by as “courageous”, “brave” and even “heroic” when he resigned from US President Donald J. Trump’s American Manufacturing Council in August 2017 and publicly declared that his reason for doing so was in protest to Trump’s response to the racially driven events in Charlottesville, VA, days before. In today’s world, “courageous directors” have unprecedented opportunities to serve as global influencers. Even as private sector leaders achieve fame by engaging socially and championing brands that claim to improve quality of life, consumers, investors and employees increasingly demand that corporations act in ways beneficial to society. Looking forward, boards of directors will need to remain ahead of rapidly-evolving trends and address deceptively simple questions. What does the company seek to achieve, and where does it see its place in society? Shaping a better world - and corporate sectorSalzburg Global Seminar’s mission is to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Founded in 2015, the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance seeks to deliver on that mission in the corporate sector. The third session of the Forum, The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?, held October 2017, explored the role of the corporation as a good citizen, while assessing techniques to keep boards of directors alert, active, and effective in meeting their fiduciary duties in the current and future landscapes. It explored how directors might emerge as global thought leaders, to ensure multinational corporations can succeed both in achieving profit and in satisfying conflicting demands of the jurisdictions and societies in which they operate. This new report from Salzburg Global Seminar highlights the significant outcomes from the discussions at the two-day high-level meeting, including breakout groups that analyzed the scandals affecting Volkswagen, Wells Fargo, and Google and offered key recommendations for the three corporations.  The report also includes interviews from many corporate sector leaders, offering insights on what it takes to be a “courageous director”.  As Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine notes: “Today’s corporations are under ever closer scrutiny. Like the rest of society, their operations and culture will have to change radically as the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’ gathers pace. Attitudes to power, progress and value are already in flux. Against this backdrop, courage in the boardroom will matter more than ever before.” Download the report as a PDF
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Report now online - Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration
Report now online - Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration
Salzburg Global Seminar 
In September 2017, 57 academics, professionals, practitioners, observers, and students of American Studies from 25 countries, convened at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria for the session Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration. As this weekend marks the one year anniversary of Donald J. Trump's inauguration as president of the United States on January 20, 2017, it is a timely occasion for the publication of the report from the 15th symposium of the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association (SSASA). Since its founding in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has been examining, debating and dissecting America and its culture and institutions. Drawing on the 70 years of cross-border exchange that began at Schloss Leopoldskron in the aftermath of war, the multi-disciplinary four-day program examined what the “American Dream” means in today’s world and assessed progress in the United States toward fulfilling that potential.  Fairness and justice, immigration issues, incarceration practices, demographic changes, implications and challenges of new policies, and the fulfillment of domestic and foreign expectations were all key elements of focus for the session. The ultimate question for scrutiny and discussion was “How does the apparent reality of life and justice in America today reflect on the historic ‘American Dream’ and the ‘Promise of America,’ globally and in the United States since the founding of the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies in 1947?” This report offers summaries of each of the day’s thematic discussions and a list of resources provided by the participants, as well as interviews with some faculty members and speakers: Elaine T. May: Despite being preoccupied with safety, Americans have made themselves less secureLecia Brooks: Dedicated to ending injustice in AmericaLinell Letendre: Justice requires a culture of leadership, professionalism and respectDreamscape: Exploring race and justice in AmericaAsif Efrat: The new US administration has shown less interest in international cooperationNancy Gertner: “Lawyers should effect social change”Chris Lehmann: American justice is still a model for the world – but a flawed model  
Download the report as a PDF To request a print copy, please email press[at]salzburgglobal.org
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Urgency, Trust and Complexity - Key Concerns for Public Service
Urgency, Trust and Complexity - Key Concerns for Public Service
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Rapid global transformations place governments under intense pressure to perform to ever-higher expectations at a time of shrinking public budgets. Populations are aging, countries are urbanizing, and technology is transforming the future of work. Many citizens have lost trust in the ability of public officials to cope – let alone to excel – under these changing dynamics and constant media scrutiny. How can governments transform their culture and operations to address such challenges and disruptions? What radical changes lie ahead for the design, delivery and funding of core public services? What is the role of government in helping to change mindsets and prepare citizens for the “new normal”? It was these questions and more that a high-level group of politicians, civil servants, and private sector experts came together in Salzburg to answer at the sixth meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Round Table. The report from this session - In the Spotlight: How Can the Public Sector Excel Under Changing Dynamics? - is now available to read, download and share.  The report addresses three key concerns raised by the participants: Urgency The dramatic pace of change and the growing number of disruptive influences are creating a situation wherein governments need to be prepared for challenges they do not yet understand or even know will exist. Three particular areas of unknowns with which governments are grappling are future-proofing societies for changes to jobs and skills; harnessing advances in technology to deliver public services more effectively; and increasing tax revenues from new forms of economic activity. Trust Levels of trust in government institutions and elected officials have dropped to unprecedented lows, restricting the public sector’s ability to innovate and take risks with new approaches. A shrinking tax base, combined with rising expectations from citizens and the need to balance demands for greater transparency with effective communication techniques are putting on a strain on states’ ability to uphold their end of the social contract. Complexity Finally, the public sector must employ a complex array of responses and strategies to cope with this environment, whether through adapting internal structures, undertaking large-scale efficiency reviews, establishing new external partnerships or experimenting with new policy intervention approaches.  Interviews The report also includes several interview features, offering participants' insights on private sector innovation and risk-taking in the public sector, e-governance in Estonia, peace-building priorities in Colombia, and the need to "humanize" governments. All these interviews and more can also all be read on the session page. Looking ahead The intensive two-day session concluded with an agreement to transform the Round Table into a more formalized Public Sector Strategy Network. The Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, Salzburg Global Seminar, apolitical, and other partners are now taking the next steps to develop the terms of reference for the Network. You can read more about the plans for this new Network in the report.  Inquiries about how to become a member of this new Public Sector Strategy Network should be directed to Salzburg Global Program Director, Charles E. Ehrlich: cehrlich[at]SalzburgGlobal.org
Read the report online. Download the Report as a PDF. Order a print copy: press[at]SalzburgGlobal.org Salzburg Global Seminar convened the sixth meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Round Table – “In the Spotlight: How Can the Public Sector Excel Under Changing Dynamics?” - in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and apolitical, and with the support of Chatham House. More information on the session can be found here.
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Report now online - Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills
Report now online - Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills
Salzburg Global Seminar staff 
The report of the Salzburg Global session Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills is now available to read, download and share. The 2016 session of the multi-year series Education for Tomorrow’s World brought together forty education leaders and other stakeholders from around the world to explore the challenges and benefits of fostering SEL (Social and Emotional Learning), including how this will affect the development of academic skills and more general testing of learners’ abilities. The session was held in partnership with ETS.  Emerging evidence in education, psychology, neuroscience, and economics suggests that SEL skills can also be measured and developed to help improve academic achievement, reduce negative behaviors, and enrich interpersonal relationships. Cultivating SEL skills through a more systematic approach could therefore have long-term benefits for learners, schools and colleges, and workplaces. Policymakers, educators, innovators and researchers benefited from structured exchanges to identify the state of the evidence, policy challenges and viable solutions for measuring and enhancing SEL skills. Participants approached this topic in session-wide discussions and smaller breakout groups to consider how best to strengthen social and emotional skills through education policy, curricular development, assessment, and whole school policies. This report presents key points of discussion, debate and learning from the Salzburg session, as well as final recommendations summarized in the session Fellows' co-created Salzburg Statement on Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills.
Download the report as a PDF The Salzburg Global session Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills, which is part of the multi-year Education for Tomorrow's World. This session was held in partnership with ETS (Educational Testing Service). More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/566
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