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Josée Touchette- “Trust is at the heart of so many of the problems that we grapple with in government”
Josée Touchette- “Trust is at the heart of so many of the problems that we grapple with in government”
Maryam Ghaddar 
“There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.” These lyrics, by famous Canadian poet and singer Leonard Cohen, are words to live by. For Josée Touchette, executive director at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and Fellow of Salzburg Global Seminar, this quote rings particularly true. Touchette attended a three-week session on American Law and Legal Institutions in July, 1990. Nearly 30 years later, she returned to Schloss Leopoldskron as a member of the Public Sector Strategy Network for the program titled Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? While at the session, participants engaged in peer-to-peer learning on some of the challenges facing the public sector while looking ahead at some of the difficulties that may yet arise. Participants shared their experiences of lessons learned and cross-sector innovations, something Touchette explained was the very essence of what Salzburg Global has always aimed for. “You had a sense of hope. You had a sense of possibility,” she reflected on her previous visit. “It was a force. It was something that I fed off for many, many years. I made friendships that, to this day, are lasting. We didn’t call it design thinking back then, but the fact that we were coming from such different backgrounds meant that we were tackling issues from very different perspectives… that ability to do it in a safe place is something that hasn’t changed, and it’s a constant in what the Seminar does.” One of the key themes of this session centered around the topic of trust in governments and the underlying belief more can be done to include public opinion and ideas into the spaces for solutions. Touchette, who believes global values are “the glue that binds us,” discussed the degree to which public interests and trust can be brought into the conversation on policy-making, highlighting such issues as job inclusion, equality and inclusiveness. She explained that unless citizens are actively engaged in the government’s process of policy-making, policies are “by definition, going to be developed in a bit of a vacuum.” “Perhaps, what we need to be mindful of is the fact that we may need to change the expression of those values as we go forward because the velocity of change is simply too great to ignore the fact that how they’re expressed and how they are meaningful may not be the same way tomorrow as it is today.” Elaborating on this point, Touchette discussed the power of social media and how it relates to narratives surrounding governments and a decline in trust in political institutions. “We have to reconquer that space and make it our own,” she said. “The legitimacy of government, the legitimacy of policy, the legitimacy of policy-makers has to be a part of that, so I think that how we use social media in government is a real opportunity and we’re starting to see governments really innovate in that space… It’s a real opportunity if we’re able to do that and to have that as a platform for trust.” Management excellence, as Touchette explained, “is often the unsung hero in a lot of the things that we do in government.” Focusing on cost effectiveness, actions, services being delivered, and “engaging with citizens for citizens” paves the way for a much greater chance for success. However, there are no success stories without a string of failures behind them. Touchette clarified we must “enable the success” and create “a culture that really values those risks that need to be taken.” Speaking on her responsibility in planning a biennial budget for the OECD in Canada, for example, she stressed the importance of “developing good performance indicators” and reaping “the success stories early enough to be able to infuse them as part of the planning for the next biennial. The same thing is true, of course, of the failures.” Touchette humbly acknowledged she is just one person in a much larger team. “You have to often chunk out the problem and slice it [into] smaller slices to be able to approach and get a small solution here, followed by another one, followed by another one.” Salzburg Global Seminar has had a strong impact on Touchette’s career, anchoring a core perception of the public sector. “Governance and leadership are inseparable…trust is at the heart of so many of the problems that we grapple with in government,” she said. Rather than see the world through rose colored glasses, Touchette said stepping away from the everyday challenges and taking some quiet time to gain perspective is the most rewarding aspect of this program. From coming here as a young professional newly embarking on her career path, to returning with nearly thirty years’ experience under her belt, Touchette said, “Salzburg [Global] Seminar has a unique ability to make you think, to help you see the world in a different way and to make you want more. I think you’re a better person when you’re in Salzburg.” Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? is part of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year initiative held in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. More information on this session can be found here.
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Salzburg Cutler Fellow Serves as Rapporteur for Public Sector Strategy Network Meeting
Ashley Finger taking notes at the annual meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Network
Salzburg Cutler Fellow Serves as Rapporteur for Public Sector Strategy Network Meeting
Ashley Finger 
This article was first published by the University of Virginia's School of Law. To visit the original article, please click here. Ashley Finger, a 2018 graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law and a participant in this year’s Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program, recently served as rapporteur for the Salzburg Global Seminar. From May 13-15 in Salzburg, Austria, she documented the conference “Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves?” The public policy meeting drew high-level representatives from governments around the world. My primary role as rapporteur to the Salzburg Global Seminar, held earlier this month, was to take detailed notes on the proceedings, which will be synthesized into a final report and published by Salzburg Global Seminar sometime this summer. The report will analyze themes in government innovation based on the panels, workshops and talks. The experience ended up being much less pen-to-paper and much more engaging than I thought it would be. I got to participate in a policymaking simulation on the use of artificial intelligence in health care decisions, and I was able to meet and engage with public-sector leaders from around the world, often about substantive, global issues. Representatives came from all over, including Australia, Japan, United Arab Emirates, Portugal, the U.K., France and Finland, to name a few. Participants included secretaries of state, ministers, agency directors and senior advisers. Everyone was simultaneously incredibly accomplished and down-to-earth with boundless positive energy and enthusiasm for improving their countries and the world. What stood out to me the most about this experience is how it blended together the many facets of my career. As a former physicist (although, the physics community would say there is no such thing as a former physicist, only a physicist who has changed careers), I was able to engage with the technological aspects of the discussions, which allowed for greater understanding of the policy implications. And as a former intern with the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, I had both working knowledge of the policymaking process and a background in some of the subject areas, such as autonomous vehicles — a field that has developed tremendously since my time on Capitol Hill. In addition, some of the more unconventional classes I've taken in law school enriched my experience. Professor Mila Versteeg's Comparative Constitutional Law course proved invaluable in grasping the varied government structures at play in the discussions. Professor John Norton Moore's seminar, War and Peace: New Thinking About the Causes of War and War Avoidance, gave me a more nuanced perspective on intergovernmental relations. The conference was organized by Salzburg Global Seminar, an organization based in Salzburg with an office in Washington, D.C., that regularly organizes topical conferences and seminars to share knowledge across governmental entities. Participants discuss both successes and failures in order to learn from one another. The event was co-hosted by the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court (a center for government innovation and citizen interface in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) and Apolitical, a journalism organization focused on sharing stories in government innovation. Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? is part of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year initiative held in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. More information on this session can be found here.
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Looking Forward - Officials Reflect on Need for Foresight and Innovation in the Public Sector
Looking Forward - Officials Reflect on Need for Foresight and Innovation in the Public Sector
Oscar Tollast 
Senior officials from governments and multilateral institutions went back to the future earlier this month as they met for the annual meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Network.Nearly 30 participants from 16 countries took part in the three-day meeting titled Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? The meeting was held at Salzburg Global Seminar in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. The program supported interactive debate and hands-on problem-solving under the Chatham House Rule.  It provided a rare opportunity for senior officials to engage informally with a select group of dynamic peers, away from media and gatekeepers, and test out ideas for immediate follow-up at the technical level. Through interactive debate and hands-on problem solving, participants discussed the top priorities and risks facing their countries around the world and were encouraged to develop new ways of thinking and consider alternative perspectives to apply to their day-to-day work.Initial discussions focused on innovations in public service, optimizing procedures to counteract radical societal changes, and examining the role of future tech. Participants also worked through several case studies that focused on specific challenges they faced concerning workforce pressures and risks in three different countries to facilitate concrete exchange of ideas.Participants reaffirmed the notion that identifying the problem is easy, while finding the solution is slightly more difficult. They broke up into smaller groups to explore the strategies for government reform and transformation in the areas of public finance, decentralization, and civil service reform. A practical gamification session with simulated scenario planning allowed participants to examine the potential for advances in artificial intelligence in transforming how government will work and what steps they need to think about now to be prepared. After being divided into groups, participants explored multiple possible solutions and how they might react to events given their own differences in experience, expertise, or government role.  The theme for the final day of the program was “Mechanisms for Change.” Participants reflected on their experiences with innovation and strategy teams advising national leadership, putting forward case studies which highlighted benefits and risks of new approaches.As one participant summarized, the challenges faced by one government are challenges others have faced, are facing, and are likely to have tested solutions to resolve them. Year-round dialogue and exchange are essential to share ideas and experiences. Speaking after the meeting, Charles Ehrlich, a program director at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, “The group of highly-thoughtful senior public servants who came together here at Schloss Leopoldskron underscored the need for governments to employ foresight, proactive innovation, and effective implementation across the public sector ecosystem. “In the face of ever-more-rapid digital, financial, and societal disruptions, governments must constantly scan the horizon and anticipate trends. The conversations here considered how to strengthen public leadership and communication, sharing experiences, tools, and ideas, to create a congenial atmosphere of mutual support.”The Public Sector Strategy Network first launched in 2010 as an annual high-level Round Table by the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court. In 2017, Salzburg Global became the politically and geographically neutral convener of what has since become the Public Sector Strategy Network.  The Network is creating a dynamic platform for practical collaboration and impact, connecting governments and innovators leading the way to meet the opportunities and challenges ahead. Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? is part of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year initiative held in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. More information on this session can be found here.
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Mechanics for the Future - How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Governments are in a race against time to put mechanisms in place to help prepare their societies for a changing world
Mechanics for the Future - How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Oscar Tollast 
A select group of senior officials from governments and multilateral institutions will convene at Salzburg Global Seminar this afternoon for the annual meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Network.The Network was created at a Round Table in Salzburg in 2017 to provide a platform for collaboration and to connect governments and innovators to face the challenges and opportunities ahead for their societies.Participants at this year’s three-day meeting – Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? – will explore several topics, including the top priorities and risks facing their countries, innovative trends in public service, and how to equip governments for a new era. The future of human capital and governing in the age of artificial intelligence will also be examined.This meeting is part of a multi-year initiative which was first launched as an annual high-level Round Table by the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court in 2010. Last year, Salzburg Global was chosen to be the politically and geographically neutral convener of what has since become the Public Sector Strategy Network. This year’s meeting is being held in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. During the meeting, participants will engage in interactive debate and hands-on problem-solving under the Chatham House Rule. They will be encouraged to test out new ideas which can be followed up afterward at a technical level. In line with the Network’s goals, participants will be asked to consider how they could reimagine the design, delivery, and funding of core services and develop more effective partnerships and communication with citizens, civil society, and business. The Network aims to enable active ongoing peer-to-peer learning under the values of trust and open exchange and provide a space for the sharing of best practices.Speaking ahead of the meeting, Charles Ehrlich, a program director at Salzburg Global, said, “Complex challenges and opportunities are taking public sector leaders down uncharted paths. We need to understand the world today – and where it might be in 2030 or 2050. For governments to transform themselves, they will require the right mechanics, meaning both the mechanisms of government as well as the people in government whose job it is to fix things. Otherwise, events will leave the public sector behind, broken down at the side of the road.  “We have gathered a small group of thoughtful, committed, public servants, who will not only examine the cross-cutting priorities and risks but will together build out the Public Sector Strategy Network to inspire new thinking and action at all levels across the globe.” Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? is part of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year initiative held in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. More information on this session can be found here.
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Baroness Usha Prashar Warns Liberal Democracy is in “a Desperate State”
Baroness Usha Prashar with Stephen Salyer and Clare Shine (Credit: Salzburg Global Seminar/Rebecca Rayne)
Baroness Usha Prashar Warns Liberal Democracy is in “a Desperate State”
Sarah Sexton 
“It is not an exaggeration to say that liberal democracy is in a desperate state,” said Baroness Usha Prashar, speaking at Salzburg Global Seminar’s fourth Palliser Lecture. The audience, made up of Salzburg Global Fellows, board members, and supporters, gathered in London on March 16 would likely have agreed with the crossbench member of the House of Lords. Baroness Prashar, one of the UK’s most experienced policy advisors, pointed to the election of US President Donald Trump and Central Europe’s populist revolt against the European Union as evidence of a shift toward “illiberal democracies.”  In her lecture, titled “Democracy and Civil Society – A Shrinking Space?”, Prashar said: “Political regimes may be based on electoral politics, but the rule of law, minority rights, freedom of the press, and other liberal protections are in danger.”  Prashar warned against dismissing such events as temporary outpourings of populism. “We must not hunker down and think this is an aberration which will pass... Freedoms once lost are difficult to regain. We must understand causes and develop strategies to respond to them.” Prashar underscored the importance of democracy not only to ensure free elections, but also to protect minorities from the tyranny of the majority and to value dissent, dialogue, and participation.  Such democracy, Prashar said, depends on lively civil society. Civil society organizations must have the space and the ability to speak out, organize, and act together to fulfill their roles, be it as promoters of democracy, a watchdog holding authorities to account, a humanitarian actor, a partner in implementing government policy, or a catalyst for development.  Prashar reflected on the program series she launched with Salzburg Global Seminar in the early 1990s around civil society and democracy. As oppressive regimes collapsed and Cold War-era bipolarity faded, the role of non-governmental organizations and civil society was seen as crucial in building new emerging democracies.  “It was at that time that Civicus: World Alliance for Citizen Participation was founded,” Prashar said. “Its first Secretary General, Miklos Marschall, was an active participant in this program, and I am pleased that the current Secretary General, Danny Sriskandarajah, is here tonight.”  Marschall attended one of Salzburg Global’s first sessions on the role of NGOs as a young lecturer from Hungary. He became an early advocate of the third sector and credits Salzburg Global as being “directly responsible for the introduction and establishment of NGOs in Central and East Europe.”

View full set on Flickr As the state-dominated regimes of communist Eastern Europe receded, civil society organizations emerged as a powerful and influential force on the world stage, according to Prashar, influencing public opinion and effectively harnessing the communication revolution to expand their reach. In the 2000s, for example, the world witnessed a surge in the mobilizing power of civil society and the impact of digital campaigning as the uprisings unfolded across the Middle East and North Africa in 2011.  “Now the gains of the 1990s and 2000s appear to be under threat or are being reversed,” lamented Prashar. “Disillusionment with politics is rife, and many democracies are sliding toward autocracy.”  Institutions of democratic systems have come to be seen as dysfunctional, Prashar said, pointing to political gridlock, ideological polarization, and gerrymandering in the United States as an example.  Prashar suggested the consequences of capitalism and financial downturns have led to a crisis of inequality – manifesting in decreasing social mobility and diverging economic fortunes – which has compounded public disillusionment and spurred support for anti-establishment parties.  “To me, this is a wake-up call,” Prashar said. “Concern and outrage is not enough. We must understand the causes and develop strategies to respond to them.”  Prashar offered some examples of positive developments in civil society, including increasing public scrutiny toward technology platforms that spread extremist or false content with no regard for public interest.  She referred to a trust barometer produced by Edelman that recorded a recent plunge in trust for social media and an increase in public support for more traditional media.  “Citizens are also organizing and mobilizing in new and creative ways to defend civic freedoms, fight for social justice and equality, and to push back populism,” Prashar said, noting that civil society had advocated successfully for progressive new laws on access to information, protection of human rights, and women’s and LGBT rights.  Prashar highlighted the viral #MeToo Movement as an example of a campaign that harnessed the power of social media to give voice to the voiceless, shape awareness around a global issue, and spur a broader dialogue around power and wealth imbalances.  Social media has the power to change opinion, policy, and even legislation, but this power must be used responsibly.   Given the gravity of present threats to civil society and democracy, Prashar called for courage and leadership rooted in the civic values of human equality, social justice, and pluralism. She also challenged civil society organizations to be agents of change by building alliances with businesses, academia, media, and other partners on issues such as rule of law, freedom of expression, and inequality.  “The answers will come from collaboration between sectors – not just nationally but internationally – with one thing in common: concern for humanity and public interest,” Prashar concluded. This was the fourth lecture to be held in memory of the Rt Hon Sir Michael Palliser GCMG, who died in 2012. Sir Michael had a long and distinguished career in the British Diplomatic Service, served as Vice Chair of the Board of Salzburg Global Seminar, and was a founding trustee of the London-based 21st Century Trust, which now works exclusively with Salzburg Global.  Prashar said Salzburg Global Seminar has provided a base for such creative thinking, intercultural exchange, and collaboration between sectors and countries for 70 years. “It is institutions such as Salzburg Global Seminar, the dedication of individuals like Sir Michael, and the indomitable human spirit which make this a hopeful world.”  The fourth Palliser Lecture entitled “Democracy and Civil Society – A Shrinking Space?” was delivered by the Rt Hon the Baroness Usha Prashar on March 16, 2018 at the Grange St. Paul's Hotel in London, UK. 
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Interlinking Challenges, Interdisciplinary Solutions
Interlinking Challenges, Interdisciplinary Solutions
Salzburg Global Seminar 
The 17 global goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development are nothing short of ambitious. Building on from the Millennium Development Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to “transform our world,” calling for action in both developed and developing countries. While the broad goals each have specific targets, no one goal can be achieved in isolation. Efforts to achieve one goal will help to advance another—and failures to address some will lead to negative impacts on others.  Quality education (SDG 4) greatly improves health and wellbeing (SDG 3), which in turn can increase prosperity, but increased consumption that often comes with that can hinder local and global efforts to tackle climate change (SDG 13). Similarly, reducing conflict (SDG 16) may have benefits for employment and economic growth, but these cannot be sustained unless inequalities in education and access to health care are also addressed. Without holistic action for equality and social justice, peace may be short-lived or conflict may continue by other means. Achieving the targets set out in any of the SDGs thus calls for an interdisciplinary and cross-sector approach.  Recognizing the significant challenge that comes in adopting such an approach, Salzburg Global Seminar is convening the session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health, and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs, at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, starting this Sunday, March 18. The intensive three-day session will bring together 65 researchers, policymakers and development experts to explore how research can be more effectively translated into policy and practice in order to identify the interlinkages—and tensions—between the SDGs, and how top research funders can help lead the way. One such leading research funder is session partner, the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), which is a £1.5bn fund established by the British government to help UK researchers work in partnership with researchers in developing countries to make significant progress in meeting the SDGs. Representing the GCRF at the session is UK Research and Innovation, a newly created body that brings together the seven UK research councils, Innovate UK and Research England. Professor Andrew Thompson, Chief Executive, Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and UK Research and Innovation Champion for the Global Challenges Research Fund, said: “We're delighted to partner with Salzburg Global Seminar to explore the ways excellent research of the kind being undertaken through the Global Challenges Research Fund can help to tackle the most stubborn development challenges across and between the Sustainable Development Goals.”  The session will enable discussion and exploration that span research, policy and practice. This will be achieved through a series of panel discussions and hands-on exercises that will examine the opportunities, challenges, and trade-offs involved in developing interdisciplinary approaches to the implementation of the SDGs related to climate change, conflict, health, and education. The session will also look to identify current research gaps and look at how to communicate the complexity of interdisciplinary research in order to shape evidence-based policy and practice.  Through its programs, Salzburg Global Seminar seeks to bridge divides, expand collaborations and transform systems. In order to take the work of this session beyond Schloss Leopoldskron and advocate for change in their own sectors, participants will co-create a Salzburg Statement. The Statement will offer key recommendations for various stakeholders and serve as a call to action to help participants personally as well as their institutions and communities. “Finding solutions to long-standing, seemingly intractable problems and the specific challenges that the SDGs look to mitigate against requires new ways of thinking and new approaches,” says Salzburg Global Program Director Dominic Regester.  “We are delighted that so many experts across different sectors and geographies have given willingly of their time to come to Salzburg. We very much hope that the Statement that will be collectively authored during and after the session will help advance understanding of and opportunities for interdisciplinary research.” The session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health, and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs, is being held in partnership with UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). More information is available online: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/605 To join in the discussions online, follow the hashtag #SGSsdgs on Twitter
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Former CIA and FBI Director Calls for Renewed Trust in Beleaguered Intelligence Agencies
Former CIA and FBI Director Calls for Renewed Trust in Beleaguered Intelligence Agencies
Sarah Sexton 
“Help restore trust.”  According to the former CIA and FBI director, William H. Webster, this was the “most important thing” the audience of law students could do, “with the kind of training, education, and exposure you’re getting… to make a serious contribution to [your] country.” Webster, the first and only person to have served as director of both the CIA and the FBI, posed this challenge during the sixth annual Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program, which gathered 54 law students from the US’ top law schools last month in Washington, DC to explore how they could apply their legal training to careers in public service.  His challenge to this cadre of future top lawyers and public servants comes at a time of growing mistrust in America – mistrust of the mainstream media, mistrust of government, and mistrust of the intelligence services. The latter has surprisingly been led primarily by the country’s own president, Donald J. Trump. Now 94 years old but still chair of the Homeland Security Advisory Council, Webster reflected on his long career in public service – from his military service during World War Two, to his appointments as a Federal District Court and then US Appeals Court judge, to his work with the FBI and later CIA – commenting on the rising tension between the White House and the US intelligence community.  In the wake of attacks on the FBI for missing a tipster’s warning on the suspect who carried out the February 14 school shooting in Parkland, Florida, which saw the deaths of 14 students and three teachers, Webster came to the FBI’s defense, stating, “This is one of the really great organizations of our country, and it attracts some of the ablest, most dedicated Americans that you could want to know or work with.”  “Now, they’ll make mistakes; they’re not infallible,” Webster continued, acknowledging the missed Parkland tip as one such error that exposed a need for improvement. “But we cannot afford to undermine the credibility and trustworthiness of the FBI as long as they continue to earn that trust.”  Webster recalled the day in February 1978 when he was sworn in as FBI Director, inheriting an agency tarnished by a variety of Watergate-era abuses, including illegal break-ins called “black-bag jobs.” Standing before President Jimmy Carter and US Attorney General Griffin Bell at his swearing-in ceremony, Webster knew he needed to address the need for change.  As he closed his remarks at the ceremony, Webster said, “Together, we’re going to do the work that the American people expect of us in the way that the constitution demands of us.”  To Webster’s surprise, his words would later be engraved on a bronze medallion that now adorns the entrance to a conference room at FBI headquarters.  This, Webster said, reflects the bureau’s ongoing commitment to fulfilling its responsibilities with integrity.  As a former federal judge, Webster came to the FBI with built-in credibility, and he preferred that his agents refer to him as “judge” rather than “director,” in part to convey his independence and probity. Webster also brought in assistants with law degrees to help evaluate proposals and to ensure that bureau initiatives conformed to statutes and guidelines.  Webster carried this practice over to the CIA after his appointment as director of central intelligence. One such assistant was John Bellinger III, then a recent graduate of Harvard Law School, who joined Webster as his special assistant in 1988, supporting the judge as he led the US intelligence community through the end of the Cold War, the invasion of Panama, the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, and the Persian Gulf War.  Bellinger went on to serve as a legal advisor to both the US Department of State and the National Security Council during the George W. Bush administration. Speaking at the same event, Bellinger also shared his experiences with the students.   “I remember vividly as a 28-year-old going with [Webster] to Europe after the end of the Cold War,” Bellinger recalled. “Sitting in the back rooms with the intelligence chiefs in Germany and in Britain to talk through what the future of Europe would be after that period in time – it was for me, as a young special assistant, an extraordinary period. I learned a lot from you.”  Bellinger urged the students hailing from law schools at several of America’s top universities – Columbia University, Duke University, Georgetown University, Harvard University, New York University, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania, University of Virginia, Stanford University, and Yale University – to consider working as special assistants to political appointees throughout the government.  “I had two special assistants when I was legal adviser,” Bellinger said, “and this is an extraordinary way as a young person to watch a successful leader do their job and to help that person.” 
Bellinger and Webster now both serve on the advisory board of the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law, established by Salzburg Global Seminar in memory of the Washington “superlawyer” who served as White House Counsel to Presidents Carter and Clinton. Lloyd Cutler also served as chair of Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors for a decade and advocated passionately for mentoring young leaders – both from the US and across the globe – who displayed a commitment to shaping a better world through the rule of law. Since its founding in 2012, the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program has carried forward Cutler’s leadership in both public and private practice of law and continues to empower rising legal professionals from around the world. This year’s Salzburg Cutler Fellows represented 23 countries, including Argentina, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, Pakistan and the United States.  “It’s been my privilege to be part of the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program,” said Bellinger, who also attended the 2016 event and later delivered the annual Cutler Lecture. “It’s an extraordinary way to both recognize Lloyd Cutler, who was my senior partner when I was a young associate at Wilmer Cutler, and to help shape the careers of a rising generation of international lawyers committed to public service.”  Recognizing that, as aspiring public servants, this new generation of international lawyers might someday work in agencies charged with sensitive responsibilities, often operating under secret or classified conditions, Webster closed by further underscoring the importance of gaining and maintaining trust.  “[These agencies] have to rely on your integrity – or what they perceive as your integrity – and you have to be worthy of that trust.”   The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program is held under the auspices of the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law. The annual program collaborates with 11 of the leading US law schools. This year's session was sponsored by NYU Washington and Arnold & Porter. 
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Salzburg Cutler Fellows – Applying Legal Training to Public Service on a Global Stage
Salzburg Cutler Fellows – Applying Legal Training to Public Service on a Global Stage
Sarah Sexton 
Speaking to 54 law students at the United States Institute of Peace on Friday, February 23, Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood began her remarks with a reference to a scene from the 1993 film Jurassic Park.  As a car full of visitors to the park speeds down a dirt path to escape a charging T-Rex, Wood narrated, the camera zooms in on the warning written on the car’s side mirror: “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear.”  “I’m here to tell you today that the same message – perhaps not with such dire consequences – holds for international law,” Wood said.  Wood’s remarks opened the sixth Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program, which gathered students representing 23 countries – including Argentina, Indonesia, Israel, Jamaica, and Pakistan – in Washington, DC to discuss the future of international law and public service. While international legal frameworks put in place since World War Two have fostered the effortless flow of ideas, goods, and services around the world, Wood said, challenges have also emerged, including drug trade, online financial scams, and human trafficking.  “The borderless world has some sinister consequences too,” Wood said, “but these are things that we are dealing with right now in the courts.”  Over two days, February 23-24, the Cutler Fellows engaged with prominent legal professionals and public servants, including Judge Wood; Ivan Šimonović, United Nations Assistant Secretary-General and Special Adviser on the Responsibility to Protect; and William H. Webster, former CIA and FBI director.   The Fellows also worked with faculty advisors from each of the participating law schools – University of Chicago, Columbia University, Duke University, Georgetown University, Harvard University, University of Michigan, New York University, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and Yale University – to sharpen their research papers tackling issues in international law ranging from trade and investment law to the law of war. Faculty representatives Matthew Waxman of Columbia Law School and Alex Whiting of Harvard Law School engaged in a luncheon discussion with the Fellows, focusing on the role and recent developments of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Whiting spoke from his experience in the Office of the Prosecutor at the ICC from 2010-13.  On Friday evening, former FBI and CIA director Judge Webster joined in a conversation with John B. Bellinger, III, former US Legal Adviser, reflecting on recent events in the United States and calling for the restoration of the values of public service and fierce integrity across party lines.  On Saturday at NYU Washington, Šimonović offered the Fellows advice based on his own work in diplomacy, justice, and international institutions. Recalling his experience as a member of the Croatian Delegation at the 1995 Dayton Peace Talks, Šimonović said, “Always remember the importance of cultural context in international negotiations.”  The Fellows were also joined on Saturday by mentors from institutions including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and New Markets Lab to discuss how legal training can be used for the public good. Two mentors, Joseph Klingler and Eric Lorber, described their journeys from their participation as students in the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program to their current work as an associate at Foley Hoag LLP and senior advisor to the Undersecretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence at the US Treasury Department, respectively.  The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program was established in memory of Lloyd N. Cutler, the Washington “superlawyer” who served as White House Counsel to Presidents Carter and Clinton. Cutler also served as Chair of Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors for a decade and advocated passionately for mentoring young leaders with a commitment to shaping a better world through law and rule of law.  Since its founding in 2012, the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program has carried forward Lloyd Cutler’s legacy and continues to empower rising legal professionals from around the world.  Following this year’s Program, one student will be selected to travel to Salzburg, Austria – the home of Salzburg Global Seminar – in May 2018 to serve as rapporteur at this year’s high-level meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year initiative at Salzburg Global run in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and apolitical. The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program is held under the auspices of the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law. The annual program collaborates with 11 of the leading US law schools. This year's program was sponsored by NYU Washington and Arnold & Porter. More information on the session is available here. 
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Salzburg Global Explores How Radical Technology-Driven Changes are Impacting Financial Markets and Economies
Salzburg Global Explores How Radical Technology-Driven Changes are Impacting Financial Markets and Economies
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar helped cap off the Securities Commission Malaysia’s (SC Malaysia) latest World Capital Markets Symposium with a candid conversation on how technology is changing the financial services industry. The program, which took place immediately after this year’s World Capital Markets Symposium, was convened by Salzburg Global and the SC Malaysia at the Hotel Mandarin Oriental in Kuala Lumpur. Guest speakers included Benjamin Glahn, vice president at Salzburg Global; Masamichi Kono, deputy secretary-general at the OECD; Douglas Flint, former chairman of HSBC and a member of the Salzburg Global Forum on Finance Advisory Committee; Junko Nakagawa, executive vice president, executive managing director and chief risk officer at Nomura Asset Management; and David Wright, chair of EUROFI, a partner at Flint-Global, former secretary general of IOSCO, and a member of the Salzburg Global Forum on Finance Advisory Committee. Around 40 securities regulators, investors, bankers, and market practitioners engaged in the program and were welcomed by Ranjit Ajit Singh, chairman of the SC Malaysia. Following Singh’s remarks, Glahn, Kono, Flint, Nakagawa, and Wright engaged in discussion and debate about the topic of the 2018 Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World, The Promise and Perils of Technology: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime, and FinTech. The annual Forum, which is off-the-record, takes place at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria each June. Public and private sector thought leaders are invited to take part in the two-day gathering, which focuses on issues critical to the future of financial markets and global economic growth and stability, and aims to stimulate important conversations on major trends unfolding across today’s financial landscape, including their implications and the responses they necessitate. The 2018 Forum will assess how radical technology-driven changes may impact societies, economics and financial markets around the world, what this means for policy, regulation, and practitioners in the short and longer term, and how technology can be utilized positively. Speaking after the discussion, Benjamin Glahn said, “This was a highly engaging panel and debate, and I would like to extend our sincere thanks to the Securities Commission Malaysia and Ranjit Ajit Singh for co-hosting this panel at the conclusion of a very successful World Capital Markets Symposium. I would also like to express our gratitude to each of our panelists who shared their time and expertise following the conclusion of the World Capital Markets Symposium. “Artificial intelligence, big data, cryptocurrencies, fintech, and cybercrime heavily featured in this year’s World Capital Markets symposium, and in the discussion afterward there was an interest to engage in this area further. It’s critical for us to understand the implications and responses to the changes taking place in global financial markets, and everyone agreed that the 2018 Forum on Finance in a Changing World will be a perfect place to continue these discussions in June.”

View full set on Flickr The Salzburg Global Seminar session, The Promise and Perils of Technology: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime, and FinTech, will take place at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, between June 24 and June 26, 2018. For registration information, please click here.
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