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Hot Topic - Fellows Discuss Take Aways from Building Healthy, Equitable Communities Program
Salzburg Global Fellows reveal their main take aways from Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment
Hot Topic - Fellows Discuss Take Aways from Building Healthy, Equitable Communities Program
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
A select number of Fellows at Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment were asked: What is one of the take aways you'll leave this program with? We have published their answers below. “This seminar is not only for idea exchange or expert exchange, but also we focused on upper-level philosophical norms, and this time it was equity...This is something I was really impressed with. As I am from [the] health care policy field, I have felt that need of collaboration between health policy, urban design, urban planning, so I [would] like to have an applicable exchange forum in Tokyo which is facing an aging population and population decline [while also hosting the 2020 Olympics]… I would like to invite some Fellows I have met here to Tokyo to have some applicable discussions on how Tokyo could be more a healthier, more equitable city from the perspective of urban planning.” Ryoji Noritake, Japan President of the Health and Global Policy Institute (HGPI) “The uniqueness of this seminar is that we have people from academic institutions who try to generate evidence, we have people who are policy makers and we have [people] who are directly working on the ground at community health, local governments and urban planning departments, as well as NGOs. So for me, it provided me with a unique opportunity to interact with these people. With the connections I have made, I will try to cultivate those connections and look at potential opportunities where we can collaborate in a reciprocal and fruitful manner.” Chinmoy Sarkar, India Assistant professor of geographic/land information system (GIS), urban health and environment at the University of Hong Kong “There is a meeting waiting for me back home in Bangkok on community development. We are on phase one of my project, which I presented about here at the Seminar. I think the knowledge and many techniques learned from here will make my project stronger. I think this was a good opportunity to learn from experts from around the world.” Kornsupha Nitvimol, Thailand Director of human resource and social strategy division at the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) “My takeaway message is that trying to build equitable, healthy, liveable communities is extremely complicated. But what I have realised is that we are all dealing with very similar issues from different contexts, different countries, from countries with different economic development...I think this meeting is an important part of the process of doing that, they are small steps but I think we need to keep the big picture in mind. What I will be doing far more off than I did in the past is to engage much more closely with local councils and with place planners and with people who are actively engaged in designing and building cities... My role as an academic sometimes leaves me somewhat removed from what is going on, on the ground, but increasingly now I realise from mixing with the groups here that I would like to become far more involved in a direct way with groups, policy makers, practitioners, planners [and] with people who are actively using the evidence that I generate to build healthy equitable communities. It has been a fantastic experience... I have learnt so much, it has been challenging, it has taken me out of my comfort zone and introduced me to a whole range of experiences and ideas that I didn’t have before I came here. So I will go away with some new friends, collaborations and a great sense of belonging to something that is exciting and holds a lot of hope.” Gavin Turrell, Australia Professor of place and health at Deakin University, Melbourne The program Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year's program is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program. Follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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What We Can Learn from Cape Town’s Water Crisis
Noxolo Kabane, researcher and public policy practitioner with the Western Cape Department of Human Settlement, at Salzburg Global Seminar
What We Can Learn from Cape Town’s Water Crisis
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
“By 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water” is the stark warning which accompanies the sixth goal of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. But for the people of Cape Town and neighboring towns in the Western Cape province of South Africa, 2050 has already arrived. Over the past few years, climate change has meant rainfall for Cape Town has significantly reduced. As such, the Cape Town dam supplying much of the city’s water has been drying up quickly. “Day Zero,” a day where taps run dry in the city of 4.2 million habitants, had been scheduled for August 2018. This ominous occasion has since been pushed back until 2019. While climate change contributed majorly to reclining dam levels, the failure of city authorities to manage water effectively and the unsustainable use by citizens also played a role. “It became really really bad in that our dam levels reached less than 20% in terms of water capacity…[and so we had] to put in place water restrictions,” says Noxolo Kabane, researcher and public policy practitioner with the Western Cape Department of Human Settlements, speaking at the Salzburg Global Seminar program, Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment. The decision to push back “Day Zero” came after significant rainfall and a raft of drastic measures to control water use, which were implemented by the provincial government. Water use was reduced to 50 liters per person, many public toilets were shut, and watering lawns with tap water was discouraged. The government used a system to monitor water meters and cut off and fined households deemed to be wasting water. The water crisis had great implications for health. In some cases, hospitals were not getting water because of the restrictions. “If it’s yellow, let it mellow, if it’s brown, flush it down” was the mantra used to urged Capetonians to flush feces, not urine. Not flushing increased the risk of urinary tract infection and the closure of handwashing sinks in public places also increased the risk of other diseases. One of the legacies of apartheid which remains is the race divide in housing that exists in many parts of South Africa. The end of apartheid witnessed an increase in urbanization as the majority black population were able to move freely. But decades of racial exclusion meant cities such as Cape Town had no plans for them hence the spawning of informal settlements such as Khayelitsha. For residents of Cape Town’s informal settlements, who already had limited access to basic sanitation services, the crisis hit hard. Kabane says, “But the flip side to that is that we were learning from them [on how to cope] because that was a daily reality: not having access to water and the resilience [they had built over time] ... around water saving and being more water savvy.” The dams are rising now, but Kabane warns of complacency. “There is this perception that we are fine,” she says, “but I don’t think this is the attitude we should be having. We should still be sticking to using water in a sustainable manner...” Kabane says “we should not take water for granted because we assume that when the dams are full, we have got water in abundance and that it will never run out. We should always be futuristic in terms of the resource and how we use it.” Kabane hopes Cape Town’s crisis will spark conversations around water use by governments and citizens. She says, “Being more proactive is what I think other countries can learn from Cape Town. We’re faced with a situation where we had to act very quickly, whereas if we had planned before the time...I think we could have handled the situation better.” In hindsight, Kabane believes a benefit of the crisis was people began to evaluate how they used water. She says, “It was not something that was just left to environmentalists who are the ones that normally advocate for sustainable use of natural resources. But now, it became the whole of society... [with] people actually sharing ideas with each other in terms what they are doing in their homes to save water, so people stood together and held hands to walk through the crisis.” The program Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year's program is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program. Follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Building Healthy, Equitable Communities - Moving Forward
Participants pose for a group photo outside Schloss Leopoldskron at Salzburg Global Seminar
Building Healthy, Equitable Communities - Moving Forward
Oscar Tollast 
Participants of Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment have left Salzburg encouraged to pursue their projects and continue their work to build healthier, equitable communities. Following five days of discussion, participants came together on the final day of the program to present their ideas on how to take their work forward. The group, featuring 60 health and urban planning experts, had previously split up into seven working groups. The first group discussed their desire to create a more inclusive process for development, stressing the need for a holistic impact analysis which takes things which are hard to quantify into consideration. This can be done by defining the landscape and developing an accountable action plan. The second group to present focused on governance and advocated for all types of decisions relating to urban development to increasingly prioritize equity and health. If a decision does not meet set criteria, let it be known as a “toxic decision.” These are the decisions that cause inequity. Another group oriented their presentation around the “Salzburg Global Framework to Enable Living Life Well – Getting Equity on the Agenda.” These participants focused on health and politics. They discussed the need to create an ongoing dialogue and an inventory of literature to support ideas. The framework elements should focus on creating a vision, partnerships and collaboration, intelligence, and power. Other participants created a “Seven Days of Change” program, which guides users how to make one change a day that can lead to a more sustainable lifestyle. The group attached Sustainable Development Goals to each of the activitiy suggestions, indicating the positive things people can do for their communities. The penultimate group to present asked how we could better develop evidence-based policy to help build healthy, equitable communities. Participants discussed the potential concept of having an “interpreter of data” to help inform policymakers. The final group presented the “Committee in De-Fence of the Revolution.” They spoke of the neeed for new forms of thinking, problem-solving, governance and decision-making. They called for the creation of a “Brave Space,” a space to understand ourselves and others better. Salzburg Global Seminar will continue to support discussions which stem from the program. The program Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year's program is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program. Follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Building Healthy, Equitable Communities - The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment
Photo by Blake Wheeler on Unsplash
Building Healthy, Equitable Communities - The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment
Anna Rawe 
Over half of the world’s population live in urban areas. As that number continues to rise to unprecedented levels, the question of how this affects our health becomes much more urgent to answer. Cities appear to be in the midst of rapid change with new building developments and gentrification increasingly becoming defining fixtures. Despite this, inequality still remains constant. Cities have a symbiotic relationship with the people who live in them. As demographics fluctuate, how can they adapt to meet the needs of aging populations, millennials or rising obesity levels? Key to this is the symbiotic relationship between people and public transport, as well as who has access to and ownership of different spaces and areas within a city. How can housing, alternative transportation methods, and parks be distributed to allow access to a higher number of people? Furthermore, do these changes ensure that everyone has a fair and just opportunity to be healthier? Essential to this discussion is looking at how communities can take ownership of these changes and a how a shared sense of community can be fostered, combatting the inherent compartmentalization of cities. Citizen science and data could perhaps be a new area through which we can ensure the health benefits of new changes are spread equably through communities and is one of many new trends that policymakers and community advocates must investigate and respond to. As part of Salzburg Global Seminar's Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series, 60 health and urban planning experts will convene at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, for Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment. Partnering with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, this five-day program will see participants investigate how action can be taken at local and regional levels and identify innovative approaches which can be incorporated into best practice. This program follows on from last year's program, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals, which looked at how we can create a culture of health that goes beyond purely treating illnesses in hospitals. From Thursday, participants will share their knowledge and experiences from working in vastly different communities in countries all over the world. Participants have engaged with these issues from standpoints varying from citizen groups, central government agencies, nature conservationists and beyond and will come together in working groups to create practical solutions. John Lotherington, program director at Salzburg Global Seminar responsible for health and health care, said, "We're very much looking forward to this second in our present series of programs collaborating with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We will be looking at the conditions which can create and protect health and wellbeing and going beyond the traditional focus on health care for when people get sick.  "Here we'll be thinking about how much-added value can be gained when urban planners and place-makers, and those responsible for housing, for transportation, for green spaces, engage with each other and communities to realize fully the impact they can achieve on health.  This is going to be an exciting exploration of how we can make healthier cities." The program Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year's program is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program. Follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Salzburg Global Calls for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on World Alzheimer’s Day
Two out of every three people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries, according to Alzheimer’s Disease International
Salzburg Global Calls for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on World Alzheimer’s Day
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Two out of every three people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries, according to Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI). As ADI marks World Alzheimer’s Day on September 21, Salzburg Global Fellows are calling for greater innovations in care and support for those diagnosed with Dementia and their families and communities. The Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, which was written by Fellows of the Salzburg Global program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, was first published in July and has since garnered endorsements from health professionals around the world. A dementia-friendly community, as defined by Alzheimer’s Disease International, is a place or culture in which people with dementia and their carers are empowered, supported and included in society, understand their rights and recognize their potential. This Salzburg Statement calls on community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, researchers and advocates to: Work collaboratively and alongside people impacted by dementia to design and implement innovative community-based solutions to improve the wellbeing of persons living with dementia and their care partners. Initiate and support the transformation toward “Dementia-Inclusive and -Friendly Communities.” Promote community-based solutions that can be translated across the boundaries of households, health and social service systems, municipalities, and nations. Health professionals are called to: Ensure increased access to a timely and honest dementia diagnosis using words and language that enable and empower individuals. Place a high value on community-based programs and social services by being informed about what is available and sharing this information with those living with the disease and their families. Researchers and policymakers to: Invest in rigorous qualitative research to define quality of life and wellbeing from the perspective of people with dementia. Develop more accurate measures of quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and their care partners, as well as measures that demonstrate the role of community in supporting people with dementia and their care partners. Implement rigorous evaluations of Dementia Friendly Communities, including structural readiness, person-centered outcomes, and community-level impact in order to ensure better transparency, dissemination, and transfer of best practices and collaborative tools from community to community. Support policies that utilize the resources and capacity of the community to the greatest extent possible. View the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on Issuu
The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running Health and Health Care Innovation series and was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic in December 2017. Around 50 participants from all regions of the world, including health and social care leaders, patients and their representatives, and policymakers, took part in a highly participatory program focusing on building new insights and aggregating perspectives from different sectors. Salzburg Global Fellows Chris Roberts and Jayne Goodrick, a couple from North Wales, UK, took part in the program to share their lived experiences of dementia and to help bridge divides between service providers and patients. Roberts has a diagnosis of mixed dementia, vascular damage and Alzheimer’s, while Goodrick’s mother has a diagnosis of dementia and small vessel disease. Alongside healthcare professionals and policymakers working in the field, their experiences helped influence the creation of the Salzburg Statement. Goodrick said, “People are very paternalistic and will give what they think we on the ground need, and what we on the ground need is actually sometimes something very much different to what we’re offered.” John Lotherington, program director for health and health care programs at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, "There have been great strides forward in the development of dementia care and dementia friendly communities in recent years, but much remains to be done to take this to further scale and meet greatly increasing need. At Salzburg Global Seminar it has been a privilege to work with some of the great pioneers in this work to extend the global call to community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, health professionals, and researchers and advocates to come together to achieve dementia friendly communities for all those living with dementia and those who care for them." Download the Statement as a PDF To submit your endorsement of the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, please click here.       #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; } #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Fellows are pressing for the committed support of dementia inclusive and friendly communities across the world. This call to action features as part of a Salzburg Statement published as a result of discussions at the Salzburg Global program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities. The program was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic in December 2017. Around 50 participants from all regions of the world, including health and social care leaders, patient representatives, and policymakers, took part in a highly participatory program focusing on building new insights and aggregating perspectives from different sectors. Alzheimer’s and related neurodegenerative diseases have a profound impact on the person with dementia, their carers and families, the local community, and the broader society. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects the number of people living with dementia to triple from 50 million in 2017 to 152 million by 2050. A dementia-friendly community, as defined by Alzheimer’s Disease International, is a place or culture in which people with dementia and their carers are empowered, supported and included in society, understand their rights and recognize their potential. This Salzburg Statement calls on community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, researchers and advocates to: Work collaboratively and alongside people impacted by dementia to design and implement innovative community-based solutions to improve the wellbeing of persons living with dementia and their care partners. Initiate and support the transformation toward “Dementia-Inclusive and -Friendly Communities.” Promote community-based solutions that can be translated across the boundaries of households, health and social service systems, municipalities, and nations. Health professionals are called to: Ensure increased access to a timely and honest dementia diagnosis using words and language that enable and empower individuals. Place a high value on community-based programs and social services by being informed about what is available and sharing this information with those living with the disease and their families. Researchers and policymakers to: Invest in rigorous qualitative research to define quality of life and wellbeing from the perspective of people with dementia. Develop more accurate measures of quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and their care partners, as well as measures that demonstrate the role of community in supporting people with dementia and their care partners Implement rigorous evaluations of Dementia Friendly Communities, including structural readiness, person-centered outcomes, and community-level impact in order to ensure better transparency, dissemination, and transfer of best practices and collaborative tools from community to community. Support policies that utilize the resources and capacity of the community to the greatest extent possible. View the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on Issuu
Download the Salzburg Statement in full by clicking here The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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