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Salzburg Global Mourns the Death of Ernest Mokganedi
Salzburg Global Mourns the Death of Ernest Mokganedi
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar would like to pay tribute to Ernest Mokganedi, a transboundary conservation champion and Salzburg Global Fellow, who has passed away at the age of 48. Mokganedi was killed after being involved in a motorbike collision on Saturday, July 28. Two other bikers were also injured in the incident, whom we both wish a strong recovery. Salzburg Global was first introduced to Mokganedi when he attended one of our programs, The Next Frontier: Transboundary Cooperation for Biodiversity and Peace, in November 2016. Mokganedi was one of a diverse group of participants who helped identify the most promising approaches with regards to inclusive and sustainable development, regional economic growth, cohesion, and peace-building. The program was the second in the series of the Parks for the Planet Forum. Since 2002, Mokganedi had been director of the Transfrontier Conservation Areas in South Africa, a position which allowed him to utilize his extensive knowledge and experience in the fields of public policy development, public policy implementation, labor relations, and dispute resolution. In a statement, Edna Molewa, minister of environmental affairs for South Africa, said, “Mr. Mokganedi was instrumental in establishing, managing and extending the Transfrontier Conservation Areas (TFCA) in Southern Africa having grown this network of conservation areas from a concept to the successful reality it is today. “His role and commitment to ensuring that all the countries linked through the TFCAs in Southern Africa benefited from these areas will always be recognized.” Mokganedi also served as a board member for the Southern African Wildlife College. As part of a tribute, the College said Mokganedi “loved life and lived true to the five mottos of the Tshwane Legends Bikers Club; Family-hood, Brother-hood, Respect, Love and Discipline … He often lent his support when working through strategic issues and was incredibly supportive of the College’s work." Our thoughts remain with Ernest Mokganedi’s family and friends.
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Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of “Generous Supporter” Vi Lort
Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of “Generous Supporter” Vi Lort
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar would like to pay tribute to Vi Lort, a long-time friend and supporter of Salzburg Global Seminar who passed away on July 8, 2018. Vi was the widow of Roger Lort, who served as vice-president, resident director, and treasurer at the Seminar between 1965 and 1991. Vi, along with Roger, was a recipient of the Salzburg Cup, an honor bestowed upon individuals whose service to Salzburg Global merit special recognition. She was a crucial part of the Lort team when the organization first visited the Middle East to recruit Fellows. Efforts in this direction were so successful because she was along to share the challenge of making contacts and conducting interviews. She was also one of the most active and supportive volunteers in memory, continually helping in the office with any task that needed doing, and was also a superb hostess, caring tirelessly for the needs of Fellows and Faculty.   Vi played a pivotal role in the Seminar’s life for many decades. She contributed to the organization’s general operating budget and the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association. Marty Gecek, chair of the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association and director of American studies symposia at Salzburg Global, said, “All who had the privilege of knowing and working with Vi Lort, can attest to her love and affection for the Salzburg Seminar, which was demonstrated in countless ways throughout the many decades she was at the side of her husband Roger Lort, vice president, and treasurer. “Vi was not only gracious, poised and welcoming to all who came to Schloss Leopoldskron, her wonderful humor and enthusiasm endeared her to all. For many years, she was a generous supporter of the Seminar, in particular, the American Studies program. Vi was one of the most positive individuals I have ever met, always seeing the bright side of things, despite her many medical challenges. With her passing, an important era of the Salzburg Global Seminar’s history has come to a close." Tim Ryback, former director of Salzburg Global Seminar, said, “Roger and Vi were a model of dignity, honesty, kindness, and generosity of spirit, indeed the very embodiment of the Seminar spirit.  Roger could have been a high-flying New York investment banker, which indeed he was for a time, and Vi an even higher flying (in the literal sense of the word) airline hostess, but both decided to devote their lives to the Seminar, and saw the institution through complex times with a firm but gentle hand.   “There is much talk about the spirit that continues to inhabit the walls of Schloss Leopoldskron. I believe the spirit of Roger and Vi remains in the very spirit of the Seminar.”
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Salzburg Global Fellow Danny Ramadan Wins Canadian Authors Book Award
Salzburg Global Fellow Danny Ramadan Wins Canadian Authors Book Award
 
Salzburg Global Fellow Danny Ramadan has received another accolade for his latest book, The Clothesline Swing. Ramadan, who has previously attended two programs of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, recently won the 2018 Fred Kerner Book Award, which is given each year by the Canadian Authors Association. This tale takes place during the aftermath of the Arab Spring and tells the story of two lovers anchored to the memory of a dying Syria. The book has already been widely acclaimed and was named among the Best Books of 2017 by the Globe and Mail and the Toronto Star. It also received an Independent Publisher Gold Medal in the category of LGBT Fiction. Ramadan is a a Syrian-Canadian author, storyteller and LGBTQ refugees activist. Born in Syria, Ramadan moved to Vancouver, Canada in September 2014. During the Salzburg Global program, The Many Faces of LGBT Inclusion, Ramadan discussed his experiences as a gay refugee and his search to find a place to belong. After winning his latest award, Salzburg Global caught up with Danny to discuss his reaction, the messages he wants his readers to take away, and his experience as a Fellow of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum. Read our Q&A below. SG: Congratulations on winning the Fred Kerner Book Award. What were your first thoughts when you found out you had won? DR: I was completely floored when I found out I won that award. Being recognized for my art is the highest form of recognition I can think of. It says that my art, despite it being about characters on the margins, and being an unconventional form of storytelling, can still hold value in my new community here in Canada. SG: Was it a surprise to be featured on the shortlist? Did you have any expectations when you first published the book? DR: When I published the book, I wished the best for it but knew that my expectations might be too high. I'm thankful the book won this award, and one more award, as well as was featured in multiple shortlists and best books of 2017 lists. It honestly came as both a confirmation that I'm on the right track and a surprise that my work as an author can hold value for others who don't necessarily share the same lived experiences with me.   SG: What was the drive behind writing a book and how did you find that process? Is it a skill that came naturally to you? DR: I have always thought of myself as an author. If we queer people are superheroes, my superpower was my ability to write. It always felt natural and comfortable for me to write. If anything, my storytelling skills are the reason I managed to leave a mark in all aspects of my life as an activist or a journalist. I was driven to write this book because there were stories that I found unique to the experiences of queer Syrian refugees that I believed should be told, and I didn't even know if those stories will be read by anyone else other than me, so having this opportunity for those stories to be shared means the world to me. SG: What message(s) do you want readers to take away from The Clothesline Swing? DR: I think the main message behind the story of The Clothesline Swing is that there is a lot of resilience in the spirits of queer refugees everywhere. Their stories are not that of hardship, but also of survival and finding love and being true to who they are; as well as finding paths to accomplish their dreams both as humans but also as humans who are marginalized and second-rate in many communities around the world. SG: You’ve received excellent feedback so far, but has there been a particular piece of feedback or a review you’ve received that sticks in your mind? DR: Being shortlisted for the Lambda awards was a highlight in my life and the best accomplishment I've ever managed to achieve. I've known about the awards since I was a unique fella back in Syria, and I dreamed one day of winning one. I can now say I was shortlisted for that prestigious award and who knows, maybe I win it with my next book. SG: How would you describe your experience as a participant of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum? What impact has it had on you? DR: How to describe a life-changing event that truly affected me positively throughout the years it followed? This is too difficult. I have met folks that I learned so much from, and people that I connected with on spiritual and meaningful ways. I've seen stories unfold in front of my eyes on the panels that means so much to me. I'm a witness for this Forum, and it made me a better person for sure. Danny Ramadan has attended two Salzburg Global programs. This includes The Many Faces of LGBT Inclusion (2016) and Home: Safety, Wellness, and Belonging (2017).
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Salzburg Global to Help Design First Universal Charter of National Park Cities
Salzburg Global to Help Design First Universal Charter of National Park Cities
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Seminar is delighted to play a part in a new initiative to launch the world’s first Universal Charter of National Park Cities. Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer of Salzburg Global, will be a facilitator at a two-day event in London organized by the National Park City Foundation, ahead of the first-ever London National Park City Week. Shine is one of 18 people attending the event, which starts on Thursday, July 19. She is joined by Salzburg Global Fellows Dan Raven-Ellison (National Park City Foundation), Kathy MacKinnon (IUCN), Pamela Veinotte (Parks Canada), and Andrew Simms (New Weather Institute). Raven-Ellison, MacKinnon, and Veinotte have each played an active role in Salzburg Global’s Parks for the Planet Forum multi-year series and ongoing activities around the world.   The Parks for the Planet Forum is a ten-year collaboration to reconnect people and nature in an urbanized world. Launched in 2015 with IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), this series catalyzes innovative alliances to conserve and expand access to nature for human health and wellbeing, communities and economies in the cities of the future. Simms, meanwhile, attended Philanthropy in the Golden Age in December 2015, the inaugural convening of The Global Friends, a consortium of global philanthropists leading value-driven social innovation. This meeting has been convened by London National Park City and the National Park City Foundation, which is promoting a "greener, healthier, wilder" way of life. The discussions are being held in partnership with World Urban Parks, the City of London, the Mayor of London, Farrells, Therme Group and Salzburg Global Seminar. Attendees will spend the first day of the meeting visiting a range of nature rich spaces in London that engage and open up opportunities for community engagement and demonstrate the National Park City ideals. They will take these examples on board as they consider how to develop the Universal Charter on the second day of the program. Shine will facilitate this program and provide opening remarks to kick-start discussions. During the day, table groups will focus on different parts of the charter. One group will review the case, ambitions, and values of the charter. Another will focus on the suggested framework for engagement, and the third group will explore methods of delivery and calls to action. Attendees will then review the milestones and timeline toward launching a year-long collaboration to agree the Universal Charter. London will become the world’s first National Park City in 2019. The aim of the Universal Charter of National Park Cities is to provide inspiration, vision, leadership and a framework for the creation, delivery, and monitoring of National Park Cities around the world. This meeting will lead straight into the first London National Park City Week, which takes place from July 21-29. Events are taking place across the capital, including talks, walks and an experience fair. For more information about London National Park City Week, please click here.
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Fellows Around the World Meet to Celebrate Salzburg Global Day
Participants from this year’s Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change join in the fun on their first day in Salzburg
Fellows Around the World Meet to Celebrate Salzburg Global Day
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows from all over the world came together on Sunday to celebrate Salzburg Global Day. Building on last year's inaugural celebration, Fellows from different programs stretching across many years met up at organized events in Europe, South America, Asia, and Africa. This took place as other Fellows joined in the fun online, sharing photos and memories of their experiences using Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Salzburg Global Day takes place on July 15 each year, the anniversary of the beginning of the Salzburg Seminar in American Civilization in 1947. At this program, scholars and advanced students convened at Schloss Leopoldskron for six weeks of study. The Seminar – what would later become Salzburg Global Seminar - made it possible for present and future leaders of European thought and education to study with Americans a well-defined subject of common interest. The Seminar offered a program of learning and reflection for young leaders who sought to build a united Europe. On Sunday, events took place in Abuja, Nigeria; Athens, Greece; Bengaluru, India; Berlin, Germany; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Cairo, Egypt; Cape Town, South Africa; Chiang Mai, Thailand; Mumbai, India; Nairobi, Kenya; and Paris, France. Informal gatherings are also due to take place this evening (Monday, July 16) in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, and in Washington, D.C., the United States. Before all of these events, organizers were given e-kits which included posters, photo props, a link to Salzburg Global's 70th-anniversary video, and a flyer. Sakuntala Narasimhan, a Fellow of Sustainable Rural Community Development and Who Will Control the Food System?, helped organize the event in Bengaluru, India. It was hosted by the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS) and featured a talk by Nirupama Menon Rao, who served as India’s foreign secretary between 2009 and 2011 and was a former ambassador for India to the US. Rao spoke about sensitizing youth to the needs and priorities of the country to ensure progress and development in real terms. In Chiang Mai, Thailand, Trinnawat Suwanprik, a Fellow of The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia and Nature and Childhood: From Research and Activism to Policies for Global Change, hosted a meeting featuring representatives from Chiang Mai University and Chiang Mai's Chamber of Commerce to enhance co-creation, the sharing of best practices and new ideas. Attendees discussed how to increase awareness to change the culture of the people with regards to waste utilization and urban transportation. On Sunday morning, Mark Sparvell, from Microsoft Education, hosted a TweetMeet which prompted other Salzburg Global Fellows to think about the programs they attended, the importance of expanding collaboration, their memories of Salzburg Global, and how their experience changed their lives. This year's Salzburg Global Day also coincided with the start of the 12th program of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. In his welcoming remarks, Stephen L. Salyer, president and chief executive officer of Salzburg Global Seminar, told participants it was a "special day" for the organization and hoped participants would join in future celebrations and add to the memories. While this year's Salzburg Global Day may be over, Fellows are encouraged to continue sharing their memories on social media using the hashtags #ShareWithSGS and #SalzburgGlobalDay. Posts are being amalgamated into one social media feed, which can be seen here. To make your post visible to other Salzburg Global Fellows, please make your posts public rather than sharing only with your friends. Listed below are some of the events which have taken place so far: Salzburg Reunion Berlin! Treasuring the Salzburg - Berlin connection. Klaus Mueller, Founder & Chair Global LGBT Forum; Ivan Capriles, Rapporteur LGBT Forum; Marc Pachter, SGS Advisory Council Culture & Arts; filmmaker Benjamin Cantu, LGBT Forum #ShareWithSGS #SalzburgGlobalDay pic.twitter.com/5UyhqEhqXp — Klaus Mueller (@KlausMuellerkm) July 14, 2018 #SalzburgGlobalDay Nairobi, Kenya. We are so honoured to be part of a Global Team making an impact and driving change in our Society cc. #ShareWithSGS pic.twitter.com/vI1KTD0eQ2 — Moses Osani (@osanimose) July 15, 2018 #SalzburgGlobalDay Cape Town under way. #ShareWithSGS cc. @TanjaHichert pic.twitter.com/xKJ6WwUfnN — Heinrich Dirk (@Hein404) July 15, 2018 Relevance of @SalzburgGlobal in today's world - panel discussion in Mumbai.#salzburgglobalday pic.twitter.com/6hygqBkcq1 — PuneLitFest (@PuneIntLitFest) July 15, 2018 Hoy compartiendo el #SalzburgGlobalDay #SharewithSGS en Buenos Aires con compañeros queridos en vivo y a través de las redes. pic.twitter.com/mD9MqpZNYo — Lala (@Lalapasq) July 15, 2018
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Hal Varian – Data, like oil, needs to be refined in order for it to be useful
Hal Varian speaking at Salzburg Global Seminar
Hal Varian – Data, like oil, needs to be refined in order for it to be useful
Maryam Ghaddar 
For decades, science fiction films and books have foretold of a future where robots dominate the world, where human action becomes obsolete, and subsequently, human intelligence dwindles into oblivion. Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google, is of a different mindset. He believes technology will set its own course. “My theory is,” he jested, “we want to make sure robots think humans are cute - kind of like doggies and puppies and kitty cats… because if they think we’re cute, then they’ll take care of us.” Varian, who attended this year’s program of the Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World on the recommendation of a friend, has worked at Google since 2002 on algorithm designs for auctioning and marketing systems, as well as policy-related issues, like privacy and intellectual property. During the Finance Forum, titled The Promise and Perils of Technology: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime and Fintech, he presented a keynote speech on the economics of artificial intelligence (AI). More specifically, he explained the economic implications of data on education, the workforce, research and development, and demographics. Varian later elaborated on this point, saying data needed to be turned into information, knowledge, and action to be coined as meaningful. “I think there’s a mystical belief in the power of data,” he said. “Data is like oil in one respect… namely, it needs to be refined in order to be useful. So the data itself is not the important components, the know-how to refine it into something that’s useful. It’s the same [when] we talk about oil or data – it’s just the raw material, it’s not the finished product.” When it comes to considering what the Fourth Industrial Revolution will look like, it’s easy to fall into the trap of fearing the unknown. The societal response to this radical revolution, whether it concerns technology, big data, or mass industrial change, is one massive question mark. Varian suggested past industrial revolutions occurred gradually, and then all at once, adding there were challenges and risks involved but then also a plethora of opportunities. He suggested it will be similar this time around. “In Silicon Valley, they always say you overestimate what can be done in a year; you underestimate what can be done in ten years. So a lot of technology that looks so exciting and so obvious today will probably take many years to deploy… The mobile phone has come up as an example. The first working mobile phone was in 1970; the first commercial version was in 1980 – it cost over a thousand dollars, it weighed several [kilograms], it was the size of a brick. So, that technology took… more than a decade to really disseminate in a meaningful way.” The chief economist offered another example that cropped up several times over the course of the Finance Forum: autonomous vehicles. For years, companies worldwide have been endeavoring to circulate driverless cars more widely. It is, as Varian underlined, “a trillion-dollar industry” that works on a mobile and a technological level, but human error and human behavior have thus far been too strong a poison against its operational and marketing advancement. Preserving the human spirit in the face of such technological developments is essential to maintaining the situation in the future. “Demography is destiny,” Varian said. He described a concept of “Bots & Tots,” which essentially pins automation against procreation. Whereas age distribution is indicated through demographics, technology is not as widely understood. “We don’t really know where we’ll go, even in three [or] five years; it’s hard to forecast what will happen in that time period. But, based on the estimates that I’ve developed using the demographic data and various forecasts of the technology data, it looks like the demographic data is the bigger effect, at least for the next ten or 15 years.” Regarding education and labor, he said, “We are a long way away from truly intelligent robots, but at the same time… we’ve seen tremendous advances in just the last five years about tasks that were thought to be extremely difficult, like image recognition and automatic translation and voice transcription… I think that within the next two years, your mobile phone will be able to translate in real time… that doesn’t mean that translators would entirely disappear because there are still cases where the translator might need to know special vocabulary, technical work, physics, chemistry, mathematics, or specific literary skills.” So how do we prepare for this new industrial revolution adequately and in a purposeful way? With the Finance Forum taking place directly after the Salzburg Global Board of Directors Gala Weekend titled Who’s Afraid of Artificial Intelligence?, Varian offered his input on the topic, stressing both the benefits and dangers of these changes. “You certainly shouldn’t be blasé,” he noted. “You should recognize that every technology can be misused… There are tremendous possibilities for improvement in how people live, but they also can be used as weapons, and that’s not even thinking about the technological advancements. That’s simply taking ordinary devices that you would use every day – a car, a truck, a drone perhaps.” His time at Schloss Leopoldskron provided Varian with the opportunity to exchange ideas and viewpoints with others in the field of economics and finance. “You learn things here,” he concluded. “Having these meetings… plus government meetings, plus institutional meetings, that’s what makes the world go round.” If Varian could leave his fellow participants with one piece of wisdom, what would that be? “Keep an open mind.” The Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World convenes an internationally representative group of leaders from financial services firms, supervisory and regulatory authorities, and consultancies, auditors, law firms and other professional service providers in a small and intimate setting. The annual gathering at Schloss Leopoldskron offers private and public sector leaders an opportunity for in-depth, off-the-record conversations on the issues affecting the future of global markets. For more info please click here.
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Bruce Adolphe - "Salzburg Global Seminar Has Been a Great Inspiration to Me"
Bruce Adolphe - "Salzburg Global Seminar Has Been a Great Inspiration to Me"
Bruce Adolphe 
The Salzburg Global Seminar has been a great inspiration to me and, most directly, has powerfully influenced my concepts and programming for the Off the Hook Arts Festival in Colorado, of which I have been artistic director since its founding seven years ago. The two Salzburg Global [programs] in which I participated intensified my commitment to combining the arts with urgent social issues: mixing artistic programming with science-oriented educational events; breaking down barriers between artistic and academic disciplines; and strengthening the music community's ability to affect positive change in the world.   The 2018 summer festival, for example, examines climate change from a variety of angles by bringing together music, visual arts, and science for four weeks of concerts, lectures, films, art exhibitions and STEAM-based educational events for all ages. We are calling the festival Mission Earth and dedicating the entire summer to the life and work of the late astronaut and scientist, Dr. Piers Sellers OBE. Inspired by the interdisciplinary investigations so typical of the Salzburg Global Seminar, I have invited over 20 scientists from around the United States to speak to our audiences in a variety of settings: lectures; pre-concert presentations; panels and roundtable talks. As always, the festival presents classical chamber music and jazz, with a mix of standard repertoire and new music, including several world premieres.   Here are the scientists who will join our music/art festival this summer: Edward Barbier, Department of Economics, CSU Joseph Berry, Carnegie Institution, Stanford Michele Betsill, Department of Political Science, CSU SueEllen Campbell, Department of English, CSU Scott Denning, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, CSU Juergen Drescher, Director of the German Aerospace Center Lindsay Ex, City of Fort Collins Climate Change Inez Fung, University of California, Berkeley Bob Henson, The Weather Company Jeff Hill, Bounce Software, LLC Julia Klein, Department of Ecosystem Science, CSU Erika Osborne, Department of Art, CSU John Pippen, Department of Music, CSU Susan Quinlan, Jax Mercantile David Randall, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, CSU Monique Rocca, Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, CSU David Schimel, Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena Pete Seel, Department of Communications, CSU Lucinda Smith, City of Fort Collins Environmental Services Mayor Wade Troxell, City of Fort Collins Compton Tucker, Goddard Space Center NASA   Here is the link to our SummerFest website: https://offthehookarts.org/summerfest/   Last summer, we focused the festival on human rights, and my friend KAL (Kevin Kallaugher), editorial cartoonist of The Economist, was our artist-in-residence. KAL and I met at the Salzburg Global Seminar and not only have we remained friends ever since, [but] we have [also] created some unusual collaborations, mostly improvisational, to highlight the creative process in the service of social and political awareness (while getting laughs.)   In my own composing, I have increasingly addressed political and social issues, feeling the energy and mission of the Salzburg [programs] in my thinking. My violin concerto, "I Will Not Remain Silent," is inspired by the life of Rabbi Joachim Prinz, whose activism in Nazi Germany and later in the United States is legendary. Continuing that line of thought, my latest orchestral work is called "I too Bleed," and "Hope for Beauty" and is dedicated to the memory of Alma Rosé, Mahler's niece and the conductor of the women's orchestra in Auschwitz.   With America now facing serious threats to democracy, rising racism, and brutal governmental policies, musicians and artists cannot remain complacent, cannot merely entertain or provide escapist experiences. We need to be in the front lines, where the arts belong: music and art have the ability to awaken our humanity, illuminate our frailties, vulnerabilities, and our hopes. What good is music if it does not help us feel our commonality?   Thank you, Salzburg! Bruce Adolphe has attended two programs at Salzburg Global Seminar. In 2011, he attended Instrumental Value: The Transformative Power of Music. In 2015, he was a participant at The Neuroscience of Art: What are the Sources of Creativity and Innovation? Has Salzburg Global had an impact on your career or your way of thinking? Do you have a story you would like to share? Email fellowship@salzburgglobal.org! We'd love to hear from you!
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Cutler Fellow to Work at International Court of Justice at The Hague
Marcos Kotlik, a recent LLM graduate from the University of Michigan Law School, at the sixth annual Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program in Washington, D.C. earlier this year
Cutler Fellow to Work at International Court of Justice at The Hague
Oscar Tollast 
A Salzburg Cutler Fellow has been selected to undertake a 10-month Judicial Fellowship at the International Court of Justice at The Hague.  Marcos Kotlik, a recent LLM graduate from the University of Michigan Law School, attended the sixth annual Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program in Washington, D.C. earlier this year.  He was one of five MLaw Cutler Fellows who explored the future of public and private international law.  Speaking to LegalNews.com, Kotlik said, "Beyond the professional and academic aspects of the program, it was a really nice opportunity to meet wonderful people from around the world, learn about their countries and the universities they belonged to, and make new friends." This year's Cutler Fellows Program saw participants engage with prominent legal professionals and public servants, including Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood; Ivan Šimonović, United Nations Assistant Secretary-General and Special Adviser on the Responsibility to Protect; and William H. Webster, former CIA and FBI director.   Kotlik and his peers also worked with faculty advisors from each of the participating law schools – University of Chicago, Columbia University, Duke University, Georgetown University, Harvard University, University of Michigan, New York University, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and Yale University – to sharpen their research papers tackling issues in international law ranging from trade and investment law to the law of war. The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program was established in memory of Lloyd N. Cutler, the Washington “superlawyer” who served as White House Counsel to Presidents Carter and Clinton. Cutler also served as Chair of Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors for a decade and advocated passionately for mentoring young leaders with a commitment to shaping a better world through law and rule of law.  Since its founding in 2012, the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program has carried forward Lloyd Cutler’s legacy and continues to empower rising legal professionals from around the world. 
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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