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Rocio Rapoport - I Help Empower Women With Music
Rocio Rapoport at Salzburg Global Seminar - Rapoport started her career as a singer and main composer in rock and fusion bands, among other styles
Rocio Rapoport - I Help Empower Women With Music
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
“I was a feminist even before I knew I was a feminist… [because as a child] I didn’t know the word existed,” says Rocio Rapoport, an Argentinian musician specializing in experimental pop. Women are undervalued in the music industry, says Rapoport, speaking as a participant of the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. She puts this down to the “sustained power of men” in the industry with women enjoying very little or no visibility. “Women in history have done a lot of things, but they have not had the same level of visibility [as men],” Rapoport says forthrightly. To tackle this issue, Rapoport cofounded Blazar in 2014. Taking its name inspiration from an astronomical phenomenon that produces a high energy force, she describes Blazar as “a communion of women artists with the goal of creating better opportunities for women in the music industry.” The collective is now made up of 12 musicians of diverse genres including rock, jazz, electronic music, experimental music, and Argentina’s folklore genre. To ensure women gain more acknowledgment for their work, Blazar aims to get more women on and off the stage at music festivals. Although many festivals are attended by roughly an equal percentage of women and men or sometimes more women than men, the stage has eluded many female acts thus far. A BBC analysis of posters of the UK’s nine biggest music festivals found that 77% of the 756 acts advertised were male in 2018. Rapoport reckons the situation is no different in Argentina and the wider region of Latin America and Spain. Offstage, Blazar also hopes to help groom a cadre of women technicians, producers and festival organizers to ensure that there is gender equality in all aspects of the music business. Another objective of Blazar is to help establish creative collaborations between and among female musicians. For many years, female musicians have been portrayed as rivals, forced into competition with each other for the limited space the music industry has carved out for them. Instead of pitching their music and personalities against each other, Rapoport and her commune of artists work on collaborations among themselves and with those outside the group. “We need to break that idea [that women cannot work together] … so that we can be more strong together, to achieve together...” While many Latin American countries including, until recently Argentina, have had women at the apex of political leadership, a culture of “machismo” persists. “I love Cristina [Fernández de Kirchner],” Rapoport proclaims, “but so many people hate her for being a woman. They criticize how she dresses; they say ‘she talks too much.’ If it was a man that will not be important.” She also talks about the glass ceiling and the gender pay gap in the music industry. The 33-year-old hopes that with her work with Blazar, she can help remove stereotypical notions of women and achieve greater rights for women. She has been prominent in the fight to legalize abortion in Argentina. So many women have died because they resorted to backstreet clinics and unsafe methods to terminate pregnancies, she says. As such, Rapoport uses her music to speak out about women’s rights and advocate for social justice issues such as racism and LGBT rights. Where does Rapoport hope to be in five years? She says, “I hope that Blazar will not really need to exist and thatthere will be no reason for me to make music to empower women." The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.  
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Hot Topic - Fellows Discuss Take Aways from Building Healthy, Equitable Communities Program
Salzburg Global Fellows reveal their main take aways from Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment
Hot Topic - Fellows Discuss Take Aways from Building Healthy, Equitable Communities Program
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
A select number of Fellows at Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment were asked: What is one of the take aways you'll leave this program with? We have published their answers below. “This seminar is not only for idea exchange or expert exchange, but also we focused on upper-level philosophical norms, and this time it was equity...This is something I was really impressed with. As I am from [the] health care policy field, I have felt that need of collaboration between health policy, urban design, urban planning, so I [would] like to have an applicable exchange forum in Tokyo which is facing an aging population and population decline [while also hosting the 2020 Olympics]… I would like to invite some Fellows I have met here to Tokyo to have some applicable discussions on how Tokyo could be more a healthier, more equitable city from the perspective of urban planning.” Ryoji Noritake, Japan President of the Health and Global Policy Institute (HGPI) “The uniqueness of this seminar is that we have people from academic institutions who try to generate evidence, we have people who are policy makers and we have [people] who are directly working on the ground at community health, local governments and urban planning departments, as well as NGOs. So for me, it provided me with a unique opportunity to interact with these people. With the connections I have made, I will try to cultivate those connections and look at potential opportunities where we can collaborate in a reciprocal and fruitful manner.” Chinmoy Sarkar, India Assistant professor of geographic/land information system (GIS), urban health and environment at the University of Hong Kong “There is a meeting waiting for me back home in Bangkok on community development. We are on phase one of my project, which I presented about here at the Seminar. I think the knowledge and many techniques learned from here will make my project stronger. I think this was a good opportunity to learn from experts from around the world.” Kornsupha Nitvimol, Thailand Director of human resource and social strategy division at the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) “My takeaway message is that trying to build equitable, healthy, liveable communities is extremely complicated. But what I have realised is that we are all dealing with very similar issues from different contexts, different countries, from countries with different economic development...I think this meeting is an important part of the process of doing that, they are small steps but I think we need to keep the big picture in mind. What I will be doing far more off than I did in the past is to engage much more closely with local councils and with place planners and with people who are actively engaged in designing and building cities... My role as an academic sometimes leaves me somewhat removed from what is going on, on the ground, but increasingly now I realise from mixing with the groups here that I would like to become far more involved in a direct way with groups, policy makers, practitioners, planners [and] with people who are actively using the evidence that I generate to build healthy equitable communities. It has been a fantastic experience... I have learnt so much, it has been challenging, it has taken me out of my comfort zone and introduced me to a whole range of experiences and ideas that I didn’t have before I came here. So I will go away with some new friends, collaborations and a great sense of belonging to something that is exciting and holds a lot of hope.” Gavin Turrell, Australia Professor of place and health at Deakin University, Melbourne The program Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year's program is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program. Follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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What We Can Learn from Cape Town’s Water Crisis
Noxolo Kabane, researcher and public policy practitioner with the Western Cape Department of Human Settlement, at Salzburg Global Seminar
What We Can Learn from Cape Town’s Water Crisis
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
“By 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water” is the stark warning which accompanies the sixth goal of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. But for the people of Cape Town and neighboring towns in the Western Cape province of South Africa, 2050 has already arrived. Over the past few years, climate change has meant rainfall for Cape Town has significantly reduced. As such, the Cape Town dam supplying much of the city’s water has been drying up quickly. “Day Zero,” a day where taps run dry in the city of 4.2 million habitants, had been scheduled for August 2018. This ominous occasion has since been pushed back until 2019. While climate change contributed majorly to reclining dam levels, the failure of city authorities to manage water effectively and the unsustainable use by citizens also played a role. “It became really really bad in that our dam levels reached less than 20% in terms of water capacity…[and so we had] to put in place water restrictions,” says Noxolo Kabane, researcher and public policy practitioner with the Western Cape Department of Human Settlements, speaking at the Salzburg Global Seminar program, Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment. The decision to push back “Day Zero” came after significant rainfall and a raft of drastic measures to control water use, which were implemented by the provincial government. Water use was reduced to 50 liters per person, many public toilets were shut, and watering lawns with tap water was discouraged. The government used a system to monitor water meters and cut off and fined households deemed to be wasting water. The water crisis had great implications for health. In some cases, hospitals were not getting water because of the restrictions. “If it’s yellow, let it mellow, if it’s brown, flush it down” was the mantra used to urged Capetonians to flush feces, not urine. Not flushing increased the risk of urinary tract infection and the closure of handwashing sinks in public places also increased the risk of other diseases. One of the legacies of apartheid which remains is the race divide in housing that exists in many parts of South Africa. The end of apartheid witnessed an increase in urbanization as the majority black population were able to move freely. But decades of racial exclusion meant cities such as Cape Town had no plans for them hence the spawning of informal settlements such as Khayelitsha. For residents of Cape Town’s informal settlements, who already had limited access to basic sanitation services, the crisis hit hard. Kabane says, “But the flip side to that is that we were learning from them [on how to cope] because that was a daily reality: not having access to water and the resilience [they had built over time] ... around water saving and being more water savvy.” The dams are rising now, but Kabane warns of complacency. “There is this perception that we are fine,” she says, “but I don’t think this is the attitude we should be having. We should still be sticking to using water in a sustainable manner...” Kabane says “we should not take water for granted because we assume that when the dams are full, we have got water in abundance and that it will never run out. We should always be futuristic in terms of the resource and how we use it.” Kabane hopes Cape Town’s crisis will spark conversations around water use by governments and citizens. She says, “Being more proactive is what I think other countries can learn from Cape Town. We’re faced with a situation where we had to act very quickly, whereas if we had planned before the time...I think we could have handled the situation better.” In hindsight, Kabane believes a benefit of the crisis was people began to evaluate how they used water. She says, “It was not something that was just left to environmentalists who are the ones that normally advocate for sustainable use of natural resources. But now, it became the whole of society... [with] people actually sharing ideas with each other in terms what they are doing in their homes to save water, so people stood together and held hands to walk through the crisis.” The program Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year's program is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program. Follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Young Cultural Innovators Present at Better Together Challenge 2018
Rebecca Chan speaking at Better Together Challenge 2018 in Daejeon, the Republic of Korea
Young Cultural Innovators Present at Better Together Challenge 2018
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows Rebecca Chan and Yu Nakamura have expressed their delight after appearing at an international conference in the Republic of Korea. Chan, a program officer at LISC National Creative Placemaking Program, delivered a <C!talk Global> presentation on arts, culture, and equitable development at Better Together Challenge 2018. Yu Nakamura also delivered a <C!talk Global> talk about her current project, Grandma’s Happy Recipes Storybook, a book in which Nakamura gathers recipes from octogenarians who lived through the Second World War and other significant events. This event was organized by World Culture Open and the Presidential Committee on National Balanced Development of Korea. It took place in Daejeon at the beginning of September. Nakamura has recently published a Korean edition of her book and produced a 10-part YouTube series featuring some of the grandmas she spoke to. She was invited to talk about her project and how her experiences in an earthquake in 2011 led to its creation. She said, "I was in Tokyo [during the earthquake] and of course I was scared but what made me more scared was the fact that we cannot eat anything if logistics didn’t work… If we consider innovation as evolution, then people who [have relied] on systems, have they really evolved since [our] grandmas’ era?" She concluded her talk by challenging the audience to think about how “our world now is so convenient thanks to technology but our lives [are] relying on a visible system too much, and we are not good at dealing with contingence." Speaking about the conference, Nakamura said, “It was [such a] fruitful event where I [got] to know [what] Korean young people were passionate about, and talking to other global speakers, includ[ing] Rebecca was super inspiring.” Rebecca Chan, who lives in Baltimore, Maryland, said, “My work at LISC is usually hyper-local, yet there are so many parallels between US community development and what I heard and saw presented in Daejeon; challenges of gentrification, urban/rural divides, waning civic engagement, and how to leverage cross-sector partnerships. “I am so thankful for the opportunity to share and learn, and to witness the dynamism and rigor with which these challenges are being tackled in Korea. I am ever more inspired by and grateful for all the intrepid local leaders I encounter in this work. [They] are the real deal. “Thank you to World Culture Open, in particular, Joo Im Moon, [and] Salzburg Global Seminar for building an international network of cultural innovators, and of course, my Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) colleagues for constant inspiration. Finally, [I would like to give a] shout out to my fellow <C!talk Global> presenters, Ivan Mitin, Yu Nakamura, & Thomas Cavanagh.” Chan attended the second program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2015. At the time, she was a program officer at the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, a Baltimore-based philanthropic organization which promotes innovation in science and technology, arts, education, and social justice. Chan has also served as the program director of Station North Arts & Entertainment Inc. Nakamura attended the third program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016. She is the co-founder of 40creations, which amongst other things sells local hand-made wine, and she currently working on a project that introduces European wine and Japanese sake to Thailand. To learn more about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
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Can Games Help Senior Officials Govern in the Age of Artificial Intelligence?
This case study was used at Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Can Games Help Senior Officials Govern in the Age of Artificial Intelligence?
Oscar Tollast 
The growth of artificial intelligence (AI) has been steadily rising. Visions of the future once only present in films and books are becoming a step closer to reality. There is a pressing need to understand the risks and opportunities of AI and what it means for societies across the world. With this argument in mind, one could argue the time for fun and games is over. However, that might not be the case, according to Kevin Desouza, a professor in the School of Management at the Queensland University of Technology. Desouza and others believe one way to examine the potential for advances in AI in transforming how we govern is through gamification. The concept was floated at this year’s annual retreat of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year series held at Salzburg Global Seminar in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. This initiative is designed to build a “mutually-supportive coalition of individuals and institutions on the frontline of digital, financial and societal disruption, promoting effective public leadership and strategic communication.” The meeting – Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? – involved participations taking part in a simulation devised by Desouza and two co-authors: Richard Watson from the University of Georgia and David Bray from the People-Centered Internet Coalition. Participants were presented with three consecutive cases and were asked to reflect on multiple possible solutions and how they might react to events given their own differences in experience, expertise, or government role. The case study takes place in the world of Intelligensia. Players are assigned roles such as minister of health, chief information officer, or as a patient with a terminal illness. Together, they work through a scene and capture responses to several questions. In a brief explaining the case study, which can be downloaded in full here, Desouza, Watson, and Bray write, “The case study is deliberately focused on issues that take place 6-24 months from now, a technological reality about to challenge society’s conventions. The case is intended to stretch the imagination of participants and to encourage independent thought regarding potential challenges and opportunities based on current R&D trajectories for AI as well as deliberative political, social, and economic systems.” The idea for the case came from discussions with public managers and senior leaders from public, private and non-profit institutions. Speaking with Salzburg Global, Desouza said, “In my discussions, two things became clear. First, individuals needed a more nuanced introduction to the implications of machine learning systems… Second, they needed tools to help them envision how the future of autonomous systems will impact all facets of society to think through the economic, political, and policy implications.” Writing a case study appeared to be a “natural idea,” according to Desouza. It would give people something tangible to work through, both as individuals and in group settings. Desouza said, “The case study allows people to get their minds and hands dirty as they wrestle with scenarios, fill in incomplete information, make their assumptions explicit, and debate responses and logic behind them.” Desouza believes it is important for senior officials to get ahead when it comes to the future of autonomous systems. When it comes to AI, Desouza says, “What we do not yet understand is how autonomous systems operating at the ecosystem level… will shape outcomes and interactions across all levels of our society… This is where we need a more holistic approach to imagining the future of these systems. We need to think about their design implications and their influences and impacts on the principles and values of our societies.” To download and read Desouza, Watson and Bray’s case study in full, please click here. Alternatively, view the publication on ISSUU
Desouza attended Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? This meeting was part of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year initiative held in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. More information on this session can be found here.
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Salzburg Global Fellow Animates Campaign Against New Hydropower Development in Albania
Kleidi Eski, a design professional and multimedia artist, at Salzburg Global Seminar in October 2017
Salzburg Global Fellow Animates Campaign Against New Hydropower Development in Albania
Oscar Tollast 
The Valbona River flows through northern Albanian Alps and this beautiful, wild river forms part of what local activists like to call the “blue heart of Europe.” But, they warn, “the Blue Heart of Europe is at risk of a heart attack” thanks to the proposed development of hydropower plants along this biologically diverse artery. Enter the eco-cardiologists determined to save the Balkans’ rivers from such destructive development. One such activist is multimedia artist and Salzburg Global Fellow Kleidi Eski, who was inspired to take action, in part, thanks to his participation at the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2017. Eski currently runs Light and Moving, a multidisciplinary design and animation studio in Tirana, Albania, and attended the fourth program of the YCI Forum alongside four other “YCIs” from his country thanks to support from the Albanian-American Development Foundation. Since leaving Salzburg, Eski has collaborated with others to campaign against the development of hydropower plants along the Valbona River. Campaigners believe the development could cause much of the river to dry up, which would have a knock-on effect on the ecosystem and local communities who use water for drinking and irrigation purposes. Construction has been ongoing inside Valbona Valley National Park since 2016. Earlier this year, Eski was asked to conceptualize a protest billboard campaign to be utilized in Tirana. He created “Po Flet Valbona” (“Valbona Speaks Out”) as a slogan and logo. Working alongside Collective68, an open source web agency, Eski also helped set up a website providing information around the campaign and details on how people can join. Eski says the streets of central Tirana were filled with “Po Flet Valbona” adverts for 10 days earlier this spring, while campaign brochures and stickers still continue to decorate many popular bars. Eski and his peers are continuing their efforts to stop construction of the plants. He worked alongside a group of musicians, including singers Elina Duni and Eda Zari, to produce a song and animated music video in support of the campaign. The video has already received thousands of views on YouTube and Facebook and has been shared across social media, attracting the attention of mainstream media outlets. Eski told Salzburg Global his time at Schloss Leopoldskron had a significant effect on his way of thinking. He said, “The YCI Forum [at] the Salzburg Global Seminar has profoundly influenced me in believing that culture, art, and design can affect the world around us. “More importantly, this experience proved [to] me that in order to create impact, it is important to join forces with everyone who shares the same ideals. Of course, I have done a little part of it, but this is already a [motivator] to do more in the future.” You can learn more about the campaign here. #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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Ryan Broderick - You Can Tell a Story in a Million Ways
Ryan Broderick during his talk at the 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change
Ryan Broderick - You Can Tell a Story in a Million Ways
Stephanie Quon 
Ryan Broderick started his career at BuzzFeed writing stories about memes and breaking international news. Now, as deputy global news director of BuzzFeed, Broderick continues to report on ongoing and convoluted international events stemming from online connections and engagement. “That’s like every single story right now,” says Broderick. “It’s just some insane crazy thing that has no geographical borders because the internet is bringing weird people together.”  Given the complexity and interconnectedness of international stories, Broderick offers a new perspective on what makes an important story. He explains “the old guard” of international reporting focuses on large formal events while the new guard focus more so on covering a story while it is in motion, building engagement through various social media platforms. The ability to adapt to different reporting styles is also telling of the interests and participation of audiences in modern storytelling. “Our generation has a lot of more interest in street-level protesting and political movements and human storytelling,” Broderick says. “People want context; they want to understand why people care about this stuff; they want to hear from people. It’s a very different… philosophy.” Broderick was a guest scholar for this year's Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. During his time here, Salzburg Global spoke with Broderick about his experiences at BuzzFeed and his perspective on the current state of journalism. This Q&A with Broderick has been edited for length and clarity. Salzburg Global: You’ve spent six years at BuzzFeed, and already there’s been a lot of change. What are some of the biggest changes in terms of your job and BuzzFeed’s presence online? Ryan Broderick: I would say very little is the same from when I started to now. I’d say in six years my job is totally different; my point of view on the world is totally different; I think BuzzFeed’s idea of itself is totally different. When I started, we had a small beginning news operation. The big idea was: do some politics, write a few news stories… lists and quizzes and fun articles and blog posts and just have a good time and make stuff people want to share. Over the last six years, every time we’ve come up against a thing where we’re like, ‘Oh we’ve never done this before,’ instead of saying ‘Well, let’s not do it,’ we’ve just said, ‘Well, let’s try it’… We invest in things that we find interesting and we’re not afraid to scrap stuff we don’t. SG: You were asked about the launch of BuzzFeed News’ stand-alone website. Why is it important that there’s a distinction between this and other features of the website? RB: In this new really hyper-competitive, hyperintense media world, the need for kind of saying to people, ‘This is a news story, this is factual, this is non-fiction, this is real, this isn’t fun’ was worth doing, and it was worth making that distinction for people. And I think it’s a good idea, but it makes me upset that a lot of the reaction to it has been by like - I saw a journalism professor tweet, ‘I’ve been telling my students for years that this was a good idea. Finally, BuzzFeed is respectable!’ Like, f**k off. Seriously, if you can’t handle the fact that your news article is touching a story for a young woman in the sidebar, you have much bigger problems than the design of BuzzFeed.com. SG: You used to work at BuzzFeed in America, and now you cover international news for BuzzFeed and live overseas. Even though your focus is on a global perspective of news, why is it important for you to continue to bring in the perspectives of the United States in your reporting? RB: I sort of believe still that America… its best hope is when it looks outward. Like, when America becomes too insular, you have really disastrous things happening, but I think when America realizes that they are part of a much larger society and there are things to be learned from other countries, things are a lot more interesting. I was trying to make that clear in the talk today… every country is going through very similar things, but they’re different enough where you can learn a lot. As I traveled around, every time I’d go to a place I’d be like, ‘So, tell me about your memes, tell me about your vloggers, tell me about your election history, tell me about your fake news,’ and I’d learn a lot of cool stuff. And then I would try to incorporate that into my stories which I thought would make my stories a little more interesting than the normal like ‘Cambridge Analytica has your data!’ Instead it’s a lot more complicated than that, and I would like to think that the readers sort of find that interesting, and I can say that traffic wise they typically do. I did a lot of live video over the last two years which I just like doing. I find it’s an easy way to get people to - well it’s an easy way to build trust because it’s live, so people are just like, ‘Oh yeah it’s a live feed’ … People will call me fake news in [Periscope recordings], and I always talk about it on camera. I’ll be like “How am I fake news? Is it [a] green screen? Where do you think I am right now? Come hang out with me if you think I’m fake!” So, I’ve been really interested in [figuring out] how do you make Americans feel more connected to the rest of the world? … How do you make them trust things better? And live video helps a lot with that. SG: Fake news is a global problem. How can we begin to tackle it at an individual level? How do countries come together to tackle a problem that has no borders? RB: On a practical level, I have no idea. On a philosophical level, I think it just comes back to if enough people want it, it will happen. If people want reforms for information technology, they will happen. Historically, that seems to be the way it goes… The problem and the big if is if people want real news. I would like to believe that they do, but on a fundamental level, I sort of don’t think people want real news. I think for the most part people think that they want the truth until the truth is something that makes them feel bad, and then they don’t want it. Most people on a day-to-day basis don’t even want to think about whether their news is real or fake, but in most societies that lose the ability to tell what is real or fake in their news bad things follow. All these things are giant “what ifs?” that I don’t know, but there are things that are happening that are promising... The EU [and its] fights with Google and Facebook are good, India’s fights with Facebook are good, the UK has been sort of successful in certain ways in dealing with Cambridge Analytica once they discovered it… we’ll see. I think we’ve got a couple years’ worth of watching, but I think we’ll see.” SG: How do journalists reach parts of societies who instantly dismiss their outlets as fake? Where does that conversation begin? In the US it’s easier, you can just say you’re lying, and then that’s it. In other countries it’s harder… report the truth, build credibility, be transparent with your readers, but also good luck. When I say be transparent, I don’t mean take a camera into the newsroom and film journalists at their computers…we use a term internally at BuzzFeed called ‘showing your work’ which is like, if you come to a conclusion in your piece it should be clearly understandable by reading your piece how you got to that conclusion… If you write your stories like that, readers aren’t confused, and they can figure out how you got to that point so at least they can get mad at you for the facts. SG: You mentioned in your lecture that you had been a comment moderator for BuzzFeed. What was your biggest take away from that experience in regard to internet culture? Has that influenced your approach to news writing at all? RB: Yeah, it totally influenced it. Basically, I just started to realize that the internet was a series of communities that basically would fight with each other. So, I became really interested in the anthropology of the internet - the sociology of the internet. When I write stories I’m always thinking about ‘Okay, what is this group? How are they built? And how are they colliding or not with another community?’ The best stories in my mind are when like one community accidentally slams up against another and then you have tension there. I think a lot of great stories are like this one part of the internet accidentally [colliding] with another and now we all have to deal with it... A lot of stories right now are between social groups, and I think the internet is creating that because it’s so easy to form a social group. I think the internet brings people together, you can then form a little community, and then those communities can fight with each other… It might not stay that way but for right now… that’s what I learned as a community moderator. Once you can look for the communities, then you can find cool stories. SG: There are many reasons to be pessimistic about the future of journalism and this year’s theme for the Media Academy is re-imagining journalism. In your opinion, where can we be optimistic to re-imagine journalism? RB: I think we are at a time of unparalleled creativity… you can tell a story in a million ways. You can tell a story with a live video - with an edited video. You can tell a story with a photo album, you can tell a story with a list, or a long-form essay, or a breaking news post or a huge retrospective long-form feature piece. There are so many ways to tell a story right now that it’s like you should never be bored. You could tell a story on a Twitter thread! A super viral Twitter thread. You could tell a story in one Facebook post; you could tell a story in a YouTube channel… There are so many options. It’s up to journalists to learn how to use them because bad actors are doing it faster. The fact that media organizations are dragging to keep up with that is embarrassing. Because it’s not complicated, these are all free things. It doesn’t cost any money to start a YouTube channel and then take your 22-year old news desk person and say, ‘Can you vlog the news story for the next five days?’ Kassy [one of the members on my team] is trying an experiment on Instagram where if users ask questions a lot in the comment section of a post, she’ll then bring on one of our reporters, and they’ll just like do a Q&A on Instagram, and the engagement is huge! … It’s a really exciting time to do a million things… So that I’m optimistic about. Ryan Broderick was a guest scholar at the 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change.                                                                                                                                                         
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Dan Russell - Searching for Ways to Separate Fact from Fiction
Dan Russell speaking during one of his lectures at the 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change
Dan Russell - Searching for Ways to Separate Fact from Fiction
Stephanie Quon 
Dan Russell’s job is to teach people how to Google better. Throughout his 25-year career of experimenting and understanding the user search experience, Russell has taught over four million students how to improve their information literacy and researching skills. Participants from this year’s Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change were his latest pupils. If you want to find accurate answers through a Google search, you need strategy, time and a bit of skepticism. The truth is “big, hairy, complicated” and “socially contextualized”, and Russell wants people to know how to effectively find information and be able to trace it back to the source. He demonstrated various ways to utilize the advanced search techniques and filter tools Google provides and details that can help or hinder specific search results. During his second lecture, Russell created exclusive exercises for participants from this year’s Media Academy to practice these skills using their laptops. Russell later followed up on this adding, “people’s skills grow stale because the search engines constantly improve, both in their feature set, and in the way they process information.  You can’t not pay attention to how your online research tools evolve.  That way lies staleness.” By incorporating these techniques and using them deliberately, participants were taught how to prevent their search skills from becoming stale quickly.   Russell also gave a talk about his method and perspective on innovation during an evening salon later that week. He quoted photographer Chuck Close who once said that “Inspiration is for amateurs, the rest of us just get back to work.” This is how Russell thinks of innovation: it’s not magical, but pedestrian. “Inspirational innovation,” Russell says, “where you have suddenly flash on this great idea for a product or for a story or whatever, that’s for amateurs. The rest of us just work every day. So there’s this mistaken belief that innovation happens overnight… we worked on this for ten years and then, all of a sudden, ‘Ooh! It looks like an innovation!’ It’s not innovation; I’ve been working on this for a decade! But people think of it as innovation. My take on innovation is it’s the previous nine years you forgot about.” Participants at this year’s Academy weren’t the first to reimagine the future of journalism. Earlier this year, Google news chief Richard Gingras said, “We need to rethink journalism at every dimension.” Russell agrees: “Richard speaks the truth!” In his view, Google News has had a monumental impact on the journalism landscape. One of the latest ventures Google is undertaking in this field is the Google News Initiative. According to Amol Rajan, BBC News media editor, the main goals of this project are to “elevate high quality news,” “help evolve new business models,” and “use new technology to empower news organizations… developing mechanisms that give them better data on their audiences.” The Google News Initiative has a goal of “spreading knowledge to make life better for everyone.” Russell recognizes the traditions and practices of the past cannot be continued into the future. He said, “There [are] too many things that have changed; the velocity of news has changed, the velocity at which information spreads [has] changed so I think there’s a lot of stuff that has to be done.” In addition to velocity, Russell states the business model for journalism needs to change. “Every newsroom in the universe has been cut back… we’re in some sense [at] a critical point. We need to figure out how we can get this to go forward.” To adapt to these changes, Russell thinks people need to become more information literate.  “Let’s talk about what an index is, let’s talk about what metadata is, let’s talk about sort order, let’s talk about the properties of information. Once you start to understand that, then you’re empowered not just as a consumer, but as a user of information…” Journalists aren’t excluded from this advice. Google has about “60 hours-worth of educational content just for journalists,” according to Russell, to learn how to use specific tools to improve their reporting. Google is working on resources to help journalists face the challenge of photo manipulation. Russell shares his experience watching a video of someone who identified a specific chair in a photograph, found it on an IKEA catalog, and used the 3D model and representation from the catalog to move and reposition the chair in the original picture. Russell said “this is a phenomenal demo…you can actually change the depiction of reality in very high quality and so this is an interesting challenge for journalism going forward.”   Russell did come forward with one informal proposal to counteract photo manipulation: create a digital signature in photographs. He says, “Imagine that every camera when you take a photograph creates a digital signature for that image. Meaning that if you change the photograph, it won’t match the signature anymore which means it’s been manipulated. It’s as if you provide a way to check on the validity of every image. This would be an international standard that we all would have to agree to, but the beauty of that is that if somebody sends you a photograph and the signature doesn’t line up with the photograph, you know somebody tinkered with it. Or if it comes to you without a signature, you know you can’t trust it.” Whatever obstacles new media and technologies present journalists, Russell is more than willing to play a role to help overcome them. As long as people search online for answers, his services will remain in demand. Russell says, “Even though, at this point, I’ve taught over four million students, there’s still a billion left. More than a billion people left to go! So I’ve got a lot of work to do yet.” Dan Russell was a speaker at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change 2018.
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Charlotte Kalanzi – Salzburg Global Puts You On a Different Level
Charlotte Kalanzi, founder of the H.E.A.R.T stars club, sitting in Max Reinhardt’s former study at Schloss Leopoldskron
Charlotte Kalanzi – Salzburg Global Puts You On a Different Level
Oscar Tollast 
After attending this year’s Salzburg Global Seminar program – Nature and Childhood: From Research and Activism to Policies for Global Change – Charlotte Kalanzi indicated her life would never be the same. The 33-year-old spoke candidly with Salzburg Global midway during the program. Kalanzi, an environmental education officer for C&L Fumigation and Cleaning Co., in Uganda, said, “I applied for some other [program], but then [Salzburg Global] recommended this [program], and I think it’s so applicable to what I’m doing because this is my passion.” The program, which took place as part of the Parks for the Planet Forum multi-year series, focused on four targeted interventions: using play as a lever for economic and social resilience; designing parks for community well-being; influencing the next generation of conservation leaders, and establishing cross-sectoral partnerships. The discussions which took place were relevant to a project Kalanzi had just launched off the ground – the Hygiene, Environment, Attitude, Relationship, Talent (HEART) stars club. The project aims to equip children with environmental knowledge, skills, and communication tools. Kalanzi said, “The members are the stars. They use their talents to pass on hygiene and environment messages. We emphasize a good relationship and a positive attitude for the environment.” The club has been able to grow through money raised by Kalanzi’s day-to-day job. Despite limited resources, Kalanzi’s efforts are already having an impact. She said, “We’ve been able to reach a number of schools in different places in Uganda, and the kids love the program. The fact that we publish their work, their original compositions - they are so passionate about it.” Kalanzi is equally passionate about entertainment and believes messages can be carried through mediums such as song and dance. Even fashion can play a role. She said, “In this era, everything has changed. You see children have everything… They spend most of their time using gadgets. So, I’m thinking entertainment is a key target… Different things are coming up so you can find a way of talking to these people… to see how to engage human beings, maybe produce something with environmental conservation. It’s not the first time Kalanzi took part in a program at Schloss Leopoldskron. She attended a Salzburg Global program in 2008 called Combating Climate Change at Local and Regional Levels: Sustainable Strategies and Renewable Energy. Reflecting on her participation, Kalanzi said, “It was my first international experience, and I was so impressed. The staff, the humility [the] people are humble – everything is down to earth. I found it so, so, so appealing and so good.” This program sought to develop processes for extending useful ideas and strategies to regions and localities around the world to encourage more sustainable practices. Kalanzi said, “After the [program], I think I became more resourceful to my boss then because she started referring me to different meetings… It was my first, but after that, I went to UN-funded programs in Kenya. I went to South Africa… It was really a good experience and, of course, having that certificate from Salzburg, showing it to people that I attended… it added something to my CV.” Kalanzi said she was grateful for the way participants like herself were made to feel valued in Salzburg. She said, “Salzburg has greatly inspired me. All the information they keep sharing with us, through newsletters, attending meetings… it truly promotes you, and it puts you [on] a different level because the knowledge you get from here… a lot of that can be applied everywhere around the world.”
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