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A Positive Space in a Polarizing World
DEEPLY HUMAN: Salzburg Global Vice President Clare Shine embraces LGBT Forum Fellow Negede Gezahegn from Ethiopia following his successful asylum application in Austria.
A Positive Space in a Polarizing World
Louise Hallman 
When Schloss Leopoldskron hosted the first program of the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies in the summer of 1947, the 97 Fellows from 18 countries sought to heal the deep divisions left by two world wars in just three decades. Exactly 70 years later, as they gathered in the same place, the 82 students from five continents attending the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change did not have the same virulent rifts to overcome — but they too live in an increasingly polarized world. In the face of rising inequality, populism, anti-immigrant sentiments, religious divisions, ethnic conflicts, geopolitical rivalries and nuclear threats, finding the space and means to bridge divides has never been more important.  The annual Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change provides a safe space for healthy debate and dialogue. It also acts as a “brave space” where students can reap the benefits of challenging their perspectives and beliefs. “Seeing how people from different parts of the world can allow their perceptions to collide rather than clash has been the highlight of my time at the Academy,” says Connor Bean from Bournemouth University, UK. The intervening 70 years have seen unimagined expansion of global communications, but even in this age of social media and instant messaging, meeting “in real life” still holds great value. Over three weeks, Academy Fellows live, learn and create together, improving their academic understanding of media literacy and challenging their prejudices and stereotypes. Reflecting on his time at the Academy, Jack Lipei Tang from Chinese University of Hong Kong says, “Social contact with individuals is the only way we can resist vague, manipulating and stagnant macro-narratives full of hatred, misunderstanding and prejudice.” Diverse Voices It is not just young and rising leaders who need to bridge divides. Every Salzburg Global program is designed for impact, helping leaders at all levels understand and overcome barriers created by geographic, cultural, generational or ideological differences.  Our Health and Health Care Innovation program series engages not only clinicians, practitioners, policymakers and academics, but also patients and their advocates. The Young Cultural Innovators Forum includes artists and cultural entrepreneurs of every art form imaginable from classical music and digital design to contemporary dance and barbering — all with a shared desire to engage and improve their local communities. Truly diverse representation at the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum ensures open exchange between activists, artists and donors from Global South and North, helping avoid unintended negative consequences for communities and enabling all stakeholders take their rightful role as equal partners in the global push for LGBT human rights.  In the technology sector, middle-income countries, such as India, often lead the way as they “leapfrog” entire systems that richer countries are trying to reform incrementally, offering new, innovative solutions. Recognizing this, when members of Sciana — The Health Leaders Network wanted to learn more about patient-focused tech innovations, Salzburg Global chose Kanav Kahol, head of affordable health technologies at the Public Health Foundation in India, to present to the German, Swiss and British health care leaders.  Deeply Human All our programs actively welcome “non-standard” voices. Katrina Scotto di Carlo, who as a member of the City of Portland’s Socially Responsible Investments Committee helped lead the American city’s divestment from all corporate securities, considered herself somewhat of an outsider at the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum, where most of the participants are corporate board directors and lawyers. But after the three-day program she recognized the value of Salzburg Global’s approach: “There is a small population of people that are curious about ‘them’ in the us/them paradigm… [but] endeavoring to understand ‘them’ makes us, bit-by-bit, more isolated within our own group of ‘us’… The Schloss holds sacred space where the us/them paradigm is checked at the door in favor of open curiosity and the free exchange of ideas. It’s a place of refuge where the intellect can be in unfettered service to the greater good. My gratitude runs deep.” Salzburg Global Seminar is a “deeply human” organization that encourages all participants to shed their institutional personas at the Schloss gates and engage in personal dialogues. By bridging divides in this non-transactional setting, current and future leaders are better placed to break down silos in their own organizations and communities, respect other perspectives, find new partners for collaboration, adopt new ways of thinking and ultimately shape a better world.   
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From Students to Statesmen
From Students to Statesmen
Oscar Tollast & Maryam Ghaddar 
Checking out “Books” from the Human Library Each year, the three-week-long Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change brings together students and faculty from across the world to explore media’s role in society, both positive and negative. In a time of bitter polarization, at times driven by media, it is an “eye-opening experience” for many involved. Sarah AlNemr attended the 2017 Media Academy and returned in November for a workshop in our Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention series. Like many Fellows, the Lebanese American University student now recognizes the importance of having “different contexts… and different explanations of one story.”  Understanding diverse perspectives comes not only through lectures and working group discussions, but also through innovative exercises like the Human Library. Students become the “books,” sharing personal stories with “titles” ranging from Anxiety and Autism and Alienation to Arab Muslim Girl and Latino and Jewish. They are “checked out” by “readers” to engage in one-on-one conversations on identity, challenging stereotypes and discrimination.  “The titles taught me more in a couple of hours than I could ever learn in a year!” remarked Bournemouth student, Joshua Coase.  Convening Outstanding Talent Since 2011, the Salzburg Global Finance Forum has convened leaders and experts to address pressing challenges facing the financial system and global economy. This year, a number of the Forum’s Fellows were recognized as foremost in their fields. In Vienna, Andreas Dombret was awarded the Great Golden Medal for Services to the Republic of Austria. As a board member of the Deutsche Bundesbank, the German banker was honored for representing Austrian interests before international bodies.  In Washington, DC, Jerome Powell was appointed Chairman of the US Federal Reserve. His opening remarks from the 2017 Finance Forum were pored over by finance policy watchers for insights into his thinking. Powell’s oath of office was administered by another Finance Forum Fellow, Randal Quarles, who was also appointed to a new role at the Fed this year as Vice Chairman for Supervision, Quarles is responsible for guiding plans to “normalize” regulations imposed following the 2008 financial crisis.  Transforming health care to meet our wants and needs  Tackling the greatest health challenges facing the world means engaging not only those responsible for designing and delivering affordable health care but also those who receive it.  Salzburg Global Fellows Chris Roberts and Jayne Goodrick, a couple from North Wales, UK, are sharing their lived experiences of dementia and helping to bridge divides between service providers and patients. Roberts has a diagnosis of mixed dementia, vascular damage and Alzheimer’s, while Goodrick’s mother has a diagnosis of dementia and small vessel disease.  Together, their experiences helped influence the creation of the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, which outlines actions needed to create dementia-inclusive and -friendly communities around the world.  Goodrick said, “People are very paternalistic and will give what they think we on the ground need, and what we on the ground need is actually sometimes something very much different to what we’re offered.” Talking “Shop” at the Schloss Sebastian Jackson, founder of the Social Club Grooming Company in Detroit, MI, USA, has given more than 30,000 haircuts. But until he attended the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, none had taken place in a palace. That all changed when Jackson brought “Shop Talk” to Schloss Leopoldskron in October 2017.  Like Salzburg Global’s own programs and building on the African-American barbershop tradition, “Shop Talk” is designed to bring together diverse people to share their differing world views — all while having a haircut. For Jackson, his attendance at the Forum was not only life changing but “deeply human.”  He said, “What they are talking about is looking inside oneself and sitting still and experiencing that self and then taking action based on that feeling. I’ve had that experience here… My life has actually changed.” 
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Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect
CHANGE-MAKERS. High school students in South Africa examine photos of the Holocaust as part of the Change Makers Program, launched by Salzburg Global Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention Fellows.
Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect
Louise Hallman 
Salzburg Global Seminar has always been rooted in the belief shared by our first faculty co-chair in 1947, Margaret Mead: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” Salzburg Global Fellows leave Schloss Leopoldskron brimming with new perspectives and plans for new projects, but it is when these committed citizens can combine their efforts that we see the greatest impact. Salzburg Global helps its Fellows forge the connections needed to turbocharge their work — both through the programs they attend and through the wider Salzburg Global Fellowship. Schloss Leopoldskron is a place where an American academic can meet a Korean translator and reach new audiences with her book on LGBT inequality. It’s where an Indian doctor and entrepreneur can share his tech startup’s innovations with those from entrenched national health systems in the UK, Germany and Switzerland. It’s where the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals can be unpacked to facilitate new thinking by researchers from the Global North and South. Going forward, we seek to scale up our direct support for the most promising innovations and alliances. Pilot Projects After attending the 2016 workshop Learning from the Past: Promoting Pluralism and Countering Extremism and recognizing the similarities between their respective countries’ violent pasts and the need to engage their bulging youth populations to avoid such atrocities in the future, South Africans Tali Nates and Richard Freedman and Rwandans Freddy Mutanguha and Aloys Mahwa joined together to launch the “Change Makers Program.” The Program teaches high school students critical thinking and how to act as “upstanders” instead of bystanders, drawing on case studies from the Holocaust, as well as the South African apartheid era and the Tutsi genocide in Rwanda.  This pilot project was one of several supported by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, which provided funding for Salzburg Global Fellows to travel from the UK, the US, Turkey and Tunisia to act as peer advisors to projects in South Africa, Rwanda, Pakistan, Egypt and Morocco. When the pilot project leaders and peer advisors returned together to Salzburg in November 2017, they were joined by a wider group of Fellows from the focus countries who have since helped expand and strengthen the original pilot projects. The Change Makers Program will now be scaled up to reach seven more African countries — The Gambia, Guinea, Kenya, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, and Senegal — during 2018 and 2019, using case studies from the countries’ own histories. Tali Nates, Director of the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre, says they now plan to “bring our experiences to politicians, education policymakers, media and civil society leaders” to expand the Program across Africa. Similar small-scale grants were offered to some of the “hub” cities engaged in the Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum to launch local community projects and to health systems leaders in the Sciana network, who traveled from the UK to Israel on a study trip. As part of Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar, Salzburg Global is integrating practical activities for longer-term impact into our multi-year program series, sparking even more collaboration. Institutional Connections Salzburg Global’s vision for collaboration extends much further than individual projects. In recent years we have placed ever-greater emphasis on connections between institutions and networks, recognizing the need to sharpen the framing of complex problems that cannot be tackled in isolation. We listen, consult and co-create, bringing together organizations from different geographies and sectors to harness shared interests and enhance their own effectiveness.  Education Testing Services (ETS) has partnered on Salzburg Global’s multi-year program series, Education for Tomorrow’s World since 2010. In 2017, new partners were drawn in: tech giant, Microsoft, and cultural organizations, Qatar Foundation International and the British Council. Together, we have expanded the scope of the program series, enabling the partners to draw on each other’s expertise and reaching out to key regions of the world through targeted multi-stakeholder workshops. “ETS and Salzburg Global share the same commitment to improve the lives of people worldwide,” says, Michael Nettles, Senior Vice President at ETS who has chaired several programs held in Salzburg. He adds that partnership provides a “unique opportunity to meet and interact with colleagues who bring different professional and personal experiences to the most important topics of the day.” From university departments like the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice to government ministries such as the German Federal Ministry of Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth; international agencies like the World Bank and United Nations Development Programme to philanthropic foundations such as Ford, Hewlett and Robert Wood Johnson, our broad spectrum of partners are all welcome and willing collaborators as we tackle complex issues, define plans for action and collectively shape a better world. 
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From Ideas to Impact
From Ideas to Impact
Oscar Tollast & Maryam Ghaddar 
Combating Extremism and Promoting Pluralism  Discussions in Salzburg spark new ideas and initiatives. To help ignite innovative projects, Salzburg Global and our partners have started offering travel and project grants. Throughout 2017, Salzburg Global and UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office supported pilot projects from the Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention series, aimed at combating extremism and promoting pluralism. Fellows from Rwanda and South Africa collaborated in launching the Change Makers Program, a leadership program for high school students. Using case studies on the Rwandan genocide, South African apartheid and the Holocaust, students develop critical thinking skills and are empowered to be agents of positive change.  In Egypt, educators at the American University of Cairo (AUC) established the Civic Peace Education Initiative. This strives to integrate community-based learning, intergenerational dialogue and storytelling into the curriculum and prompts students and faculty to think about societal divides and adopt values of global citizenship. Similarly, Fellows at the International University of Rabat in Morocco developed a graduate degree program in Conflict Resolution and Peace Governance.  In Pakistan, as part of its mission to protect youth against extremist recruitment efforts, the Renaissance Foundation for Social Innovation, Pakistan (RESIP) used this funding to conduct a study on the effect of socio-religious identities in shaping university students’ behavior. Elsewhere in the country, our Fellows at Kohat University launched a study circle to connect students across the country’s northwestern provinces.  All five pilot projects are poised for expansion or replication over the course of 2018 and 2019. Sparking Creative Responses to Climate Change UK-based charity Julie’s Bicycle helps the creative community inspire action on climate change. Following The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal, they partnered with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and Salzburg Global to take this to the world stage. Alison Tickell, founder and CEO of Julie’s Bicycle, and Nick Nuttall, UNFCCC Director of Communications, harnessed our Fellowship network to launch #Art4Climate. In the run-up to the 2017 UN Climate Conference, this campaign showcased innovative arts initiatives every week on the UNFCCC website, featuring the world’s first “sustainable dance floor,” comic art, interactive art exhibitions, pollution mask art and much more. Tickell believes #Art4Climate was just the “tip of the iceberg” and has already returned to Salzburg to expand awareness of artistic activism with the international research and development community. Extending Human Rights Driving sustainable change requires coalition-building. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum has created many mutually-beneficial partnerships among civil society, governments and international agencies.  “Taking part in the conversations and understanding the main topics, not only globally but in Africa and Latin America, and understanding how they relate to Asia has been invaluable,” says Edmund Settle, UNDP Bangkok Regional Policy Advisor.  To mark the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia, and Transphobia (IDAHOT) in 2017, Salzburg Global Fellow Tamara Adrian, Chair of the IDAHOT committee, helped adopt the theme of “LGBT families” following her participation in our “Family is…” project, run in partnership with the German Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women & Youth since 2015. The LGBT Forum also joined forces with the World Bank on IDAHOT to call for inclusion and equality for families and their LGBT children, sharing the message of “Family is Love.” Marrying Implementation and Evaluation In 2016, researchers and evaluators attended Better Health Care: How Do We Learn About Improvement? The discussions led five Fellows to co-author a supplement for the International Journal for Quality Health Care (ISQua), published in April 2018. Rashad Massoud, Leighann Kimble, Don Goldmann, John Øvretveit and Nancy Dixon also invited other Fellows to contribute peer-reviewed articles, reflecting on the Salzburg program and the need to design, implement and evaluate improvement in health care.  Concluding the ISQua supplement, program chair, Massood wrote: “The principal accomplishment of the [meeting] was to ‘marry’ the world of improvement and evaluation… A ‘wedding ceremony’ between rigorous implementation and insightful evaluation concluded the [program] in the inspiring environment of Schloss Leopoldskron.” Inspiring Artistic Exchange As an internationally-acclaimed multi-disciplinary artist and designer, Francis Sollano is known for his work with unusual fabrics, such as upcycling garbage into wearable art. He has now also become an advocate for the welfare of aboriginal communities and the use of their fabrics. He said, “It was during the Salzburg week that I realized that I have to work closely with the indigenous communities.” Sollano has since launched a collection of shirts made with indigenous fabrics, helping to provide a community with higher profit margins for their products.  As Executive Director of Youth for a Livable Cebu, the Filipino artist has taken part in campaigns on urban sustainability. Thanks to Salzburg Global, Sollano has found more “complementary” collaborators, including Margaret Shiu, an artist based in Taiwan. Together they have formed a program teaching students about environmental conservation. 
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From Local to Global
From Local to Global
Oscar Tollast & Maryam Ghaddar 
Engaging Local Communities Supported by the Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovators Forum, YCI Fellows are leading grassroots approaches to drive social, economic and urban change in their communities. Beginning in 2016, Salzburg Global began making small grants to help YCI Fellows implement follow-on projects in their city or regional “hubs.” These projects have so far created an intercultural toolkit, a storytelling kiosk, a skill-sharing workshop on housing issues and an initiative using art to build healthier communities.  Salzburg Global has recently launched a second round of micro-grant projects, assisting YCIs from Detroit, Memphis, New Orleans and across Canada to advance local innovation for more inclusive communities. Salzburg Global is actively fostering cross-border collaboration within and between city hubs, and we are excited to see the outcomes of these new projects. Tackling the Tough Questions Talking about death is hard to do, perhaps especially among doctors and health professionals whose training encourages them to do everything to delay it. Recognizing this difficulty, Fellows of Rethinking Care Toward the End of Life challenged themselves and others to radically re-examine the way health systems and wider societies tackle the complexities of death.  Looking beyond Salzburg, they launched a global social media campaign in the form of nine “Salzburg Questions,” one posed each month on Twitter. Strategically aligned with major international days and events to maximize visibility and awareness-raising, the campaign was accompanied by blog posts authored by Fellows and shared across numerous websites worldwide.  Throughout 2017, people around the world debated sensitive questions for themselves, their loved ones and their communities. #allmylifeQs has now engaged more than 500 Twitter users, who posted over 3,500 tweets, garnering a total of 11 million impressions, amplifying new voices and reaching untapped audiences. Driving Change Agendas Fueled by a long-running partnership with ETS (Education Testing Service), Salzburg Global’s multi-year program series Education for Tomorrow’s World is drawing worldwide attention to social and emotional learning (SEL).  Nurturing SEL skills is vital to improve children’s wellbeing and optimize their talents and future employability. Salzburg Global has scaled up regional sharing and testing of key findings to accelerate the spread of knowledge relevant to smart policy and practice. Following Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills (December 2016), two Fellows, Carolina Flores and Elena Arias Ortiz, hosted an SEL workshop in Santiago, Chile, in November 2017. Salzburg Global then teamed up with the British Council and ETS to hold a Middle East, North Africa and Turkey workshop in Amman, Jordan, in February 2018. A third workshop for Mexico, USA and Canada took place in Princeton, USA in June 2018 and will be followed by a synthesis program in Salzburg in December.  Sharing Ideas on the Global Stage Sharing the findings and new insights generated in Salzburg is key to driving change agendas.  Through the Parks for the Planet Forum, Salzburg Global Seminar is committed to advance innovative nature-based solutions to improve health, wellbeing and quality of life in an urbanizing world. Presenting the Salzburg Statement on The Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play at the 15th World Public Health Congress in Melbourne, Australia, Salzburg Global Vice President Clare Shine shared key takeaways from the Forum on ways to reconnect people and nature and generate societal and economic benefits. Safe outdoor play and accessible green spaces help children to grow, discover and interact, yet natural spaces and biodiversity are being lost while diseases like diabetes, depression and cardiovascular ailments are on the rise. The high-level Congress panel explored how their institutions could better link health and environment and strengthen collaboration. 
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Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
Lala Pasquinelli (center) engaging in an activity at last year’s program of the Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
Oscar Tollast 
A visual artist based in Buenos Aires has spoken of her gratitude after attending the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Lala Pasquinelli, the founder of Mujeres que no fueron tapa (Women who were not on the cover), has revealed how her time at Schloss Leopoldskron has helped her project grow in size and stature. Mujeres que no fueron tapa encourages people to use intuitive artistic experiences to express their diversity and potential. This expression is achieved by hacking magazines and stereotypes and transforming them through art actions and workshops. Since leaving Salzburg, Pasquinelli has taken on board the advice of faculty and has collaborated with fellow YCIs to create a Festival of Hacking Magazines, which is taking in place in more than 150 schools across Argentina until September. Pasquinelli said, “The project and the activities are about [having] a critical view of stereotypes in media, and [discovering] what [is] the thing we love in our lives, and the distance between that and the things the media are trying to impose [on] us. The idea of the Festival is to share with the teachers from private and public schools the tools that we developed the years before.” Schools participate for free and receive guides and materials as to what activities to undertake and how. Once finished, teachers will send photographs and surveys back to Pasquinelli and her colleagues. The results from these surveys will be compiled into a book featuring testimonies and images of the Festival, plus results of the research carried out. “At [the] moment, some of the schools are hacking magazines in different cities of Argentina, and I am watching photographs of blackboards from different schools with the phrase, ‘When do you love being yourself?’ …. It is amazing,” Pasquinelli said. For this project, Pasquinelli received help from fellow YCIs Moira Rubio Brennan and Luciana Chait. Pasquinelli said, “It was very important to me to attend the [YCI Forum] last year, to make this idea grow and develop.” Pasquinelli also highlighted the influence of YCI guest speaker Uffe Elbæk, a member of the Danish Parliament and leader of The Alternative political party, and YCI facilitator Adam Molyneux-Berry, managing director of iceHubs, on her work. She said, “Adam talked a lot about to do things without money, or about money, was not a limit to [doing] the things you dream to change the world. The story Uffe told us about how he started his own party was very inspiring.” Pasquinelli said she wanted to thank Salzburg Global, the sponsors, and organizations which make scholarships possible for the Forum. She said, “I think it is very important for artists to have the possibility of [experiencing] the seminar – to grow in our work and develop our tools.” Pasquinelli's participation at the YCI Forum was supported by American Express. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please visit: https://yci.salzburgglobal.org/overview.html 
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Springboard to Success – How Social and Emotional Learning Helps Students in Getting To, Through and Beyond College
Stakeholders taking part in the program will learn about current practices and identify scalable solutions
Springboard to Success – How Social and Emotional Learning Helps Students in Getting To, Through and Beyond College
Oscar Tollast 
Practitioners, scholars and policymakers from Canada, Mexico and the USA are among those who will gather in Princeton, New Jersey, for the latest program of Salzburg Global Seminar’s Education for Tomorrow’s World multi-year series. The three-day program, Springboard to Success: How Social and Emotional Learning Helps Students in Getting To, Through and Beyond College, has been organized in partnership with ETS, our long term education series partner. 40 participants are expected to meet today at ETS’ Princeton Campus. Together they will examine how Social and Emotional Learning programs can help more students get into college, do well there and find or create the jobs they want when they graduate in Canada, Mexico and the United States. They will also look at ways of improving student learning outcomes and expanding opportunities and knowledge of students’ needs for support. This program follows on from a regional workshop held in Jordan earlier this year – Mainstreaming Innovations in Social and Emotional Learning in MENAT (Middle East, North Africa and Turkey). Before this, a similar event took place in Santiago, Chile in November 2017. These workshops were organized following Salzburg Global Seminar’s 2016 program, Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills. Recommendations and insights from each workshop will be developed further during a global synthesis program later this year. Mainstreaming Innovations from Social and Emotional Learning Around the World will be held at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, from December 2 to 7. Participants will address several key questions during this week’s program. These include: What are the key student SEL experiences (classroom, co-curricular, home and work) as students make their way to, through and beyond college?How should SEL opportunities be packaged and promoted to colleges and universities for use in admissions, for recognition during college and as students look beyond college?How do faculty, administrators and staff incorporate and make use of SEL into their efforts to increase student progress into college, through college and beyond?What current SEL metrics are currently being used? What SEL measurement issues that need to be considered?How does technology help students to acquire - and maintain – the SEL skills they need? Dominic Regester, program director at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, "This session expands the focus of our ongoing work around SEL to look at the role SEL programs have in helping students from marginalized communities get into tertiary education, succeed there and then go on to find or create the kind of jobs they want after graduation. This will bring a strong social justice aspect to the conversations which is an important and often overlooked aspect of SEL research." Salzburg Global’s Education for Tomorrow’s World multi-year series shapes new approaches to learning, skills and inclusion for radically different societies. Topical programs and regional workshops address emerging challenges and opportunities for education, assessment and the future of work, generating strategic recommendations and practical projects to re-calibrate and reform current systems. Springboard to Success: How Social and Emotional Learning Helps Students in Getting To, Through and Beyond College is the third workshop designed to examine social and emotional skills learning from different geographic perspectives. It was developed following the Salzburg Global program, Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills. This workshop is held in partnership with ETS. Information on the workshop is available here. If you want to follow the conversation on Twitter, search for #SGSedu and #mainstreamingSEL. You can learn more about the series by visiting education.salzburgglobal.org
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