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Community Party at Schloss Leopoldskron
Community Party at Schloss Leopoldskron
 
When? Tuesday, 18 December from 18.30 Where? Great Hall, Schloss Leopoldskron Feel free to bring your partner or a friend, while we provide the drinks and food in a festive atmosphere! Please RSVP by email to Jan Heinecke or phone at +43 (662) 83983-303 
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Open House at Schloss Leopoldskron
Open House at Schloss Leopoldskron
 
This year’s event will also include a traditional Christmas market with handmade products. In among the festivities, there will be a “Christkind” ready to hear children’s Christmas wishes. Under the arcades of the beautiful Schloss terrace, visitors can enjoy traditional sausages, roast chestnuts, homemade mulled wine and more. The gates of Schloss Leopoldskron will be open between 1:30-6pm. Join us and enjoy the great atmosphere at the lake, as well as the unique sounds of the Leopoldskron baroque ensemble. Find out more about Schloss Leopoldskron at: https://www.schloss-leopoldskron.com.
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The 8th Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law
The 8th Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law
 
“A world protected by robust laws where people and nature thrive together” is the vision of ClientEarth, Europe’s first nonprofit environmental law firm, which seeks to “use the power of the law to protect people and the planet.” Established in 2007, the globally-operated law firm uses advocacy, litigation, and research to create practical solutions to key environmental challenges. ClientEarth has successfully closed down polluting industries and protected vulnerable habitats and species, and works to empower other NGOs and individuals to exercise their legal rights to fight their own environmental battles. On November 14, James Thornton, founder of ClientEarth, will deliver the Eighth Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law in Washington, DC, drawing on his rich experience in harnessing the power of law, science, and policy to protect people and the planet. Thornton’s experience includes advising the Supreme People’s Court of China on the development and enforcement of environmental law, preventing Poland from building a new generation of coal-fired power stations, and almost singlehandedly restoring the enforcement of the Clean Water Act in the United States after the Reagan Administration flouted the law.  The Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law is presented in memory of Lloyd N. Cutler, who served Salzburg Global Seminar for more than two decades as Board Chair, and features a distinguished speaker on a vital legal issue of international interest. The Eighth Cutler Lecture will be hosted by Salzburg Global Seminar on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at The Phillips Collection in Washington, DC.  Venue & Time Venue: The Phillips Collection | 1600 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20009 Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 Time: Doors open at 6:00 p.m. Program: Reception and Lecture  For more information or to RSVP, please contact Maggie Spiller, Cutler Center Program Coordinator. About Lloyd N. Cutler Lloyd N. Cutler (1917-2005), who has been described as the last "super lawyer," had a brilliant legal career. A founder of the Washington, DC law firm, Wilmer Cutler & Pickering, and White House Counsel to two US presidents, he fulfilled the calling of a public servant over his lifetime. He was a long-time champion of Salzburg Global Seminar and a friend and colleague to many of the distinguished jurists, attorneys and policymakers whom he encouraged to attend its sessions. For almost 30 years, Cutler played a central role in guiding Salzburg Global Seminar, serving as board chairman from 1984 to 1994, and as the visionary who helped broaden the focus of Salzburg Global's distinguished series of law sessions. As a lasting tribute to the Cutler legacy, Salzburg Global Seminar has established the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law whose mission is threefold:  To seek solutions to global problems in areas where the law is inadequate or unfolding To advance the role of independent judiciaries globally and promote universal access to justice To employ innovative methods to engage new audiences and raise awareness of legal principles and why they matter. Lloyd Cutler's influence on both people and institutions is felt thoughout the United States and around the world. In his tradition and his name, Salzburg Global Seminar continues to advance the Rule of Law through the Lloyd N. Cutler Center with the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program and the Annual Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture.
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Change-Makers Meet in Salzburg for Fifth Program of Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Participants taking part in the fifth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Change-Makers Meet in Salzburg for Fifth Program of Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
Emerging cultural leaders from around the world will meet in Salzburg, Austria, this week as they become the latest Fellows of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Fifty-five professionals are taking part in the fifth program of the YCI Forum at Schloss Leopoldskron, which takes place between October 16-21. Now in its fifth year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is a 10-year project which aims to build collaborative networks for human capital and leadership development within the cultural sector globally. The YCI network now has more than 250 members across all continents. The one-week program in Salzburg will comprise a series of workshops, discussions and practical capacity-building exercises centered on leadership and values, communicating the value of one's work and principles of self-organization. Aged between 25 and 35, the participants represent diverse creative disciplines, gender and geographic contexts. Participants are working across a broad range of cultural professions including architecture, urban planning, creative placemaking, design, performing and visual arts. This year’s program will be attended by participants from YCI Hubs in Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Detroit, Japan, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Nairobi, New Orleans, Salzburg, Seoul, Tirana, and the Upper Midwest United States. Several participants from previous YCI programs will return to act as resource specialists and facilitators. Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director for culture and the arts at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, “The main goals of this week’s Forum in Salzburg are to welcome fifty-five new members from around the world into the YCI network, connect them with each other, and provide opportunities for them to reflect on their own practices as well as their roles in their communities, cities, and as part of the YCI network worldwide. “Their participation is the beginning of what we hope will be a long term engagement with an active community of creative people around the globe, who are striving to make this world a better place for all.” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators V is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Arts Council Korea, Asia-Europe Foundation,  Bush Foundation, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Foundation Adelman pour l’Education, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, Korea Foundation, the Llewellyn Thompson Memorial Fellowship, Robert Bosch Stiftung, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, World Culture Open, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the program can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.  
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Young Cultural Innovators Present at Better Together Challenge 2018
Rebecca Chan speaking at Better Together Challenge 2018 in Daejeon, the Republic of Korea
Young Cultural Innovators Present at Better Together Challenge 2018
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows Rebecca Chan and Yu Nakamura have expressed their delight after appearing at an international conference in the Republic of Korea. Chan, a program officer at LISC National Creative Placemaking Program, delivered a <C!talk Global> presentation on arts, culture, and equitable development at Better Together Challenge 2018. Yu Nakamura also delivered a <C!talk Global> talk about her current project, Grandma’s Happy Recipes Storybook, a book in which Nakamura gathers recipes from octogenarians who lived through the Second World War and other significant events. This event was organized by World Culture Open and the Presidential Committee on National Balanced Development of Korea. It took place in Daejeon at the beginning of September. Nakamura has recently published a Korean edition of her book and produced a 10-part YouTube series featuring some of the grandmas she spoke to. She was invited to talk about her project and how her experiences in an earthquake in 2011 led to its creation. She said, "I was in Tokyo [during the earthquake] and of course I was scared but what made me more scared was the fact that we cannot eat anything if logistics didn’t work… If we consider innovation as evolution, then people who [have relied] on systems, have they really evolved since [our] grandmas’ era?" She concluded her talk by challenging the audience to think about how “our world now is so convenient thanks to technology but our lives [are] relying on a visible system too much, and we are not good at dealing with contingence." Speaking about the conference, Nakamura said, “It was [such a] fruitful event where I [got] to know [what] Korean young people were passionate about, and talking to other global speakers, includ[ing] Rebecca was super inspiring.” Rebecca Chan, who lives in Baltimore, Maryland, said, “My work at LISC is usually hyper-local, yet there are so many parallels between US community development and what I heard and saw presented in Daejeon; challenges of gentrification, urban/rural divides, waning civic engagement, and how to leverage cross-sector partnerships. “I am so thankful for the opportunity to share and learn, and to witness the dynamism and rigor with which these challenges are being tackled in Korea. I am ever more inspired by and grateful for all the intrepid local leaders I encounter in this work. [They] are the real deal. “Thank you to World Culture Open, in particular, Joo Im Moon, [and] Salzburg Global Seminar for building an international network of cultural innovators, and of course, my Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) colleagues for constant inspiration. Finally, [I would like to give a] shout out to my fellow <C!talk Global> presenters, Ivan Mitin, Yu Nakamura, & Thomas Cavanagh.” Chan attended the second program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2015. At the time, she was a program officer at the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, a Baltimore-based philanthropic organization which promotes innovation in science and technology, arts, education, and social justice. Chan has also served as the program director of Station North Arts & Entertainment Inc. Nakamura attended the third program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016. She is the co-founder of 40creations, which amongst other things sells local hand-made wine, and she currently working on a project that introduces European wine and Japanese sake to Thailand. To learn more about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
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Can Games Help Senior Officials Govern in the Age of Artificial Intelligence?
This case study was used at Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Can Games Help Senior Officials Govern in the Age of Artificial Intelligence?
Oscar Tollast 
The growth of artificial intelligence (AI) has been steadily rising. Visions of the future once only present in films and books are becoming a step closer to reality. There is a pressing need to understand the risks and opportunities of AI and what it means for societies across the world. With this argument in mind, one could argue the time for fun and games is over. However, that might not be the case, according to Kevin Desouza, a professor in the School of Management at the Queensland University of Technology. Desouza and others believe one way to examine the potential for advances in AI in transforming how we govern is through gamification. The concept was floated at this year’s annual retreat of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year series held at Salzburg Global Seminar in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. This initiative is designed to build a “mutually-supportive coalition of individuals and institutions on the frontline of digital, financial and societal disruption, promoting effective public leadership and strategic communication.” The meeting – Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? – involved participations taking part in a simulation devised by Desouza and two co-authors: Richard Watson from the University of Georgia and David Bray from the People-Centered Internet Coalition. Participants were presented with three consecutive cases and were asked to reflect on multiple possible solutions and how they might react to events given their own differences in experience, expertise, or government role. The case study takes place in the world of Intelligensia. Players are assigned roles such as minister of health, chief information officer, or as a patient with a terminal illness. Together, they work through a scene and capture responses to several questions. In a brief explaining the case study, which can be downloaded in full here, Desouza, Watson, and Bray write, “The case study is deliberately focused on issues that take place 6-24 months from now, a technological reality about to challenge society’s conventions. The case is intended to stretch the imagination of participants and to encourage independent thought regarding potential challenges and opportunities based on current R&D trajectories for AI as well as deliberative political, social, and economic systems.” The idea for the case came from discussions with public managers and senior leaders from public, private and non-profit institutions. Speaking with Salzburg Global, Desouza said, “In my discussions, two things became clear. First, individuals needed a more nuanced introduction to the implications of machine learning systems… Second, they needed tools to help them envision how the future of autonomous systems will impact all facets of society to think through the economic, political, and policy implications.” Writing a case study appeared to be a “natural idea,” according to Desouza. It would give people something tangible to work through, both as individuals and in group settings. Desouza said, “The case study allows people to get their minds and hands dirty as they wrestle with scenarios, fill in incomplete information, make their assumptions explicit, and debate responses and logic behind them.” Desouza believes it is important for senior officials to get ahead when it comes to the future of autonomous systems. When it comes to AI, Desouza says, “What we do not yet understand is how autonomous systems operating at the ecosystem level… will shape outcomes and interactions across all levels of our society… This is where we need a more holistic approach to imagining the future of these systems. We need to think about their design implications and their influences and impacts on the principles and values of our societies.” To download and read Desouza, Watson and Bray’s case study in full, please click here. Alternatively, view the publication on ISSUU
Desouza attended Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? This meeting was part of the Public Sector Strategy Network, a multi-year initiative held in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and in cooperation with Apolitical. More information on this session can be found here.
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Building Healthy, Equitable Communities - The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment
Photo by Blake Wheeler on Unsplash
Building Healthy, Equitable Communities - The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment
Anna Rawe 
Over half of the world’s population live in urban areas. As that number continues to rise to unprecedented levels, the question of how this affects our health becomes much more urgent to answer. Cities appear to be in the midst of rapid change with new building developments and gentrification increasingly becoming defining fixtures. Despite this, inequality still remains constant. Cities have a symbiotic relationship with the people who live in them. As demographics fluctuate, how can they adapt to meet the needs of aging populations, millennials or rising obesity levels? Key to this is the symbiotic relationship between people and public transport, as well as who has access to and ownership of different spaces and areas within a city. How can housing, alternative transportation methods, and parks be distributed to allow access to a higher number of people? Furthermore, do these changes ensure that everyone has a fair and just opportunity to be healthier? Essential to this discussion is looking at how communities can take ownership of these changes and a how a shared sense of community can be fostered, combatting the inherent compartmentalization of cities. Citizen science and data could perhaps be a new area through which we can ensure the health benefits of new changes are spread equably through communities and is one of many new trends that policymakers and community advocates must investigate and respond to. As part of Salzburg Global Seminar's Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series, 60 health and urban planning experts will convene at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, for Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment. Partnering with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, this five-day program will see participants investigate how action can be taken at local and regional levels and identify innovative approaches which can be incorporated into best practice. This program follows on from last year's program, Building Healthy Communities: The Role of Hospitals, which looked at how we can create a culture of health that goes beyond purely treating illnesses in hospitals. From Thursday, participants will share their knowledge and experiences from working in vastly different communities in countries all over the world. Participants have engaged with these issues from standpoints varying from citizen groups, central government agencies, nature conservationists and beyond and will come together in working groups to create practical solutions. John Lotherington, program director at Salzburg Global Seminar responsible for health and health care, said, "We're very much looking forward to this second in our present series of programs collaborating with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We will be looking at the conditions which can create and protect health and wellbeing and going beyond the traditional focus on health care for when people get sick.  "Here we'll be thinking about how much-added value can be gained when urban planners and place-makers, and those responsible for housing, for transportation, for green spaces, engage with each other and communities to realize fully the impact they can achieve on health.  This is going to be an exciting exploration of how we can make healthier cities." The program Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year's program is held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the program. Follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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