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Research Communication Takeaways from Interdisciplinary Research for the SDGs
Research Communication Takeaways from Interdisciplinary Research for the SDGs
Sajid Chowdhury 
This op-ed was written by Sajid Chowdhury, director at Big Blue Communications. Chowdhury attended the Salzburg Global Seminar session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs. In March, I joined a brilliant three-day seminar of 60+ researchers, funders and policymakers brought together to highlight opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary research in meeting Sustainable Development Goals.The session was convened by Salzburg Global Seminar in partnership with the UK Global Challenges Research Fund and with UK Research and Innovation. Salzburg Global has held 500+ similar events since post-World War II, bringing people together to address complex challenges and build networks.Interdisciplinary research is what it sounds like. It brings together minds from diverse fields, attempts to break siloed thinking, and tackles research challenges from varied viewpoints. It also has challenges. According to journal Nature in 2015: ‘Research that transcends conventional academic boundaries is harder to fund, do, review and publish — and those who attempt it struggle for recognition and advancement.’ This sentiment was echoed through the seminar.Through interactive exercises and discussions, we mapped interlinkages and tensions between the SDGs that relate to four sectors of climate change, conflict, health, and education. We also discussed strategies for communicating complexity and shaping policy to help countries meet those SDGs. Finally, we jointly offered recommendations to research funders, policymakers, and practitioners for future research. Day 3 Panel: ‘Communication for the Infobesity Era’ On Day 3, our four-person panel discussed research communication in an era of information overload. How can communicators compete for audiences’ attention? How can research teams ensure that their engagement with audiences is meaningful, relevant, and current? Where do concepts such as social media, mobile phones, fake news, and increasingly aggravated perceptions of 'experts' fit in? My take: More than ever, research findings must compete with a whole lot of other messaging. That means research communication should be targeted, with the fat trimmed off so that a journalist or politician or citizen can understand the important bits right away.By nature, research findings can be complex, and complexity takes time to clarify. Assuming that audiences such as citizens and government representatives and politicians may not have much time, then it makes sense for research teams to ensure their messages are clear, compact, and punchy. Research findings will often need to exist in different formats, whether as news, a series of memorable events, communication campaign, or visual experience featuring stories that audiences can connect with. This can be a new, but exciting, world for research teams that may be more accustomed to [the] production of written content for academic publications.For research teams that want to rise above the noise, there is incredible value in finding great communicators. Just as there are people who love conducting cutting-edge research, equally, there are people who love to communicate it. A great starting point, then, is for research teams to align with people who know and love research communication. Yes, information overload is real, but there are also tremendous storytelling opportunities for research teams that take the plunge into the world of faster, visual, online communication. Four Key Research Communication Takeaways from Salzburg Not everyone sees science and research in the same way. In general, researchers see empirical knowledge, science, and expertise as necessary, but they are not the ‘be all, end all’ to influence behavior and lead to positive change. Some audiences may just value science and research differently or may see research as vulnerable to politics, corruption, and falsification.Dialogue, not dissemination. Researchers can tend to see ‘communication’ as one-way, and indeed, this is reflected even right down to project terms of reference, when research teams are asked by donor teams to produce a ‘dissemination’ strategy that assumes that production will lead to uptake. But at Salzburg, we repeatedly returned to the idea that localized, contextualized dialogue and conversation can be more effective creators of change.Communication throughout the research process. Communication and conversation around research needs to start before the research, not as an add-on at the end.Involve communicators, and craft your research messages. We talk about the gap between research and policymakers, but this overlooks communities and citizens. For well-thought communication, researchers need to consider message, language, and medium. The session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs, was held in partnership with UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). More information on the session can be found here.To join in the discussions online, follow the hashtag #SGSsdgs on Twitter.
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Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans (Photo: Flickr/Reading Tom)
Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
Oscar Tollast 
YCIs from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans have been reunited to take part in the second US regional meeting. Thirty Salzburg Global Fellows, all of whom have attended the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in recent years, will convene at the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, on Saturday afternoon (April 7). The two-day program will see YCIs reflect on what it means to be part of a creative hub in cities undergoing radical urban transformation and social renewal. The opening conversation is titled “From Me to We.” Fellows will explore city-based change-making and civic innovation. They will go onto share city briefs and reflect on what’s currently happening in Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans. Several YCIs have agreed to lead site visits in New Orleans on the first evening of the program, offering a range of options for participants to choose from. This includes a tour of Jockum Nordström’s “Why is Everything a Rag” exhibition and Sarah Morris’ “Sawdust and Tinsel” exhibition, both of which are at the Contemporary Arts Center. Alternatively, participants have the chance to attend an exhibition opening and performance of The Rent is Too Damn High, which takes place at the Crescent City Boxing Club. This event, run by YCI Fari Nzinga, is described as a combination of visual art with performance and political satire, exploring themes of home, belonging, cultural transmission, gentrification, and displacement. A third option is to walk to New Orleans’ French Quarter to visit the French 75 bar and the New Orleans Mardi Gras Museum. In this group, participants will discuss subjects involving private foundations and privately-funded cultural activities. A “Cultural Corridor Tour” will also take place, including visits to the Ashe Cultural Arts Center, Tulane Small Center for Collaborate Design, and Roux Carre. All three of these organizations are engaged in community-based art, education, and design. On top of this, participants could also take part in a tour of Studio BE, a 35,000 sq ft warehouse of art, currently housing Brandan Odums’ first solo show. Regardless of which site participants visit, all will be asked how their learning from it could relate to their own work and home city. They will report back at the start of the second day of the program. The rest of the day will be spent discussing modes of collaboration and developing impact plans for the hubs, before wrapping up and outlining the next steps forward. The YCI Forum has hubs in six regions. Hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. The Forum also has a dedicated hub for Rhodes Scholars. The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators engages the world’s most dynamic young creative change-makers. Launched in 2014 as a 10-year project, 50 innovators are invited each year to take part in a session held at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria. Salzburg Global Seminar is committed to fostering creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide. The Forum aims to help build a more vibrant and resilient arts sector while advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide. The Regional Fellows Event is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This session is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/594
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New Report - The Asia We Want - A Clean and Green Asia
New Report - The Asia We Want - A Clean and Green Asia
Salzburg Global Semianr 
In November 2017, as the world met in Bonn, Germany to agree upon the finer details of the Paris Agreement, 25 young Asian leaders gathered in Salzburg, Austria to develop a shared vision of a “Clean and Green Asia,” strengthen commitment to sustainable and equitable development that is inspired and informed by inter-regional cooperation, and to advance innovative approaches to environmental sustainability and inclusive low-carbon development in their communities.  The inaugural session of the new, multi-year program The Asia We Want: Building Community through Regional Cooperation, supported through a generous grant by the Japan Foundation and with support from the Korea and Nippon Foundations, was the first step to form a network of dynamic young leaders from across the region and to build their capacity to work together to address such environmental, climate and energy concerns. Over three intensive days, the 25 leaders heard from veterans in the region and devised their own innovative projects to achieve “a clean and green Asia”: promoting regional, integrated approaches to address air quality; catalyzing small, sustainable and scalable (3S) financing; encouraging community-led waste management schemes; and designing a framework for multiple sectors to achieve goals in contributing to a low-carbon or decarbonized society. “Rising leaders in Asia are aware of their responsibility to steer transition to sustainable and climate resilient economies and are strongly committed to Asian community development inspired by cooperation at local and global levels,” said Tatsiana Lintouskaya, Program Director, Salzburg Global Seminar. “Our new multi-year program, The Asia We Want: Building Sustainable Communities Through Regional Cooperation, is there to support and empower young leaders working to advance inclusive low-carbon development in their communities. We aim to expand this program in the coming years and build a dynamic cross-border network for practical collaboration and lasting results in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.” The report, written by Lintouskaya and Salzburg Global Fellow Roli Mahajan, was dedicated in memory of multi-time Fellow and friend of Salzburg Global Seminar, Surin Pitsuwan. The former secretary general of ASEAN died three weeks after helping to facilitate the November 2017 session.  The report also compiles the Fellows and facilitators’ insightful and often provocative op-eds written ahead of the session. A full list of their op-eds is available below. Download the report as a PDF
Marifrance Avila – “For us to achieve the Asia that we want, we need to start with achieving the country that we want” Wilson John Barbon – “Disasters are not natural phenomena. They are the result of human and social conditions” Xixi Chen – We need integrated, collaborative and bottom-up leadership to build a cleaner and greener Asia Sandeep Choudhury – “Asia we want should be one based on equitable growth and not the disparity we see today between the rich and the poor” Chochoe Devaporihartakula – A clean and green Asia needs compliance and transparency Salinee Hurley – Replacing kerosene with solar power: an incomparable way to mitigate climate change Abner Lawangen – “Asia can truly be a resilient towering continent if all countries pull together” Tari Lestari – “A clean energy transition is the only way to create a better future for Asia” Roli Mahajan – The case for mandatory environmental service Niall O’Connor – We need to take a “business as unusual” approach Minh Nguyet Pham – “Air pollution is a spider web” Magdalena Seol – Business and Investment Can Drive a More Sustainable Asia Trinnawat Suwanprik – “We must know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future” Qingchan Yu – “A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical”
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The Shock of the New – Using Tech to Drive Social Innovation
The Shock of the New – Using Tech to Drive Social Innovation
Helena Santos 
When picturing a utopian or dystopian future, technology invariably features. Technology already plays such a ubiquitous role in today’s life; one can only guess how humanity’s relationship with it can evolve further. Is this something which should scare us or excite us? Projects such as Chowberry and Wazi Vision, however, remind us of the positives contributions technology is making to society and the social change it can drive. Both were highlighted as examples during the Salzburg Global Seminar session, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology, and Making Sense of the Future. Through innovation and enabling technologies, Chowberry aims to provide affordable nutrition to millions of people. The cloud-based application service is the brainchild of Oscar Ekponimo and was developed as a result of his own experiences. Having gone through a period of financial difficulty while growing up, he was determined to improve access to quality food in Nigeria for others. Through the app those in need get access to quality food from the stores that sell products reaching the end of their shelf-life for lower prices, thus combating food waste and hunger at the same time. While a lot of requests to export Chowberry to countries in Africa and South America arrive at Ekponimo’s door, he is currently focused on starting a new project in Nigeria. With Ars Electronica as partners, he is working on the Gallery of Code to plug the intellectual gap in Nigeria and build a relationship for cultural exchange from both artistic and technological points of view. Expanding on this further, Ekponimo says, “We have put together a lab, or what I would call a creative space that would have a blend of arts and also creative technology. A collaboration between artists coming in from all around the world to understand the contexts of the local community and produce installations, works of art, [...] creative technologies using a leveraging of skills and intellects from the West here in Europe to work with local hands on the ground, to develop creative technologies that can help solve problems.” Giving back to the community is something that is also present in Brenda Katwesigye’s work. With Wazi Vision, she works alongside female artisans in Uganda to transform recycled plastic into affordable eyewear. As the business continues to grow, Wazi Vision is preparing to launch a range of glasses on Amazon, taking their concept worldwide. Meanwhile, Katwesigye’s company is also developing an app that will make eye tests more accessible. “The reason that people in hard to reach areas do not have access to [conventional testing methods] is because you cannot open up an optical center in the village or somewhere. So these people don’t have access to optical centers and also, at least in Uganda, optometrists and opticians they are not as evenly distributed in the country as they should be … You find all of them in Kampala, in the capital, and then outside of Kampala maybe one or two if any. What we are trying to do with the app is for everybody … that’s how technology is actually changing society and integrating into culture and into the way we do life overall,” Katwesigye explains. WATCH: An Introduction to Wazi Vission's Mission The Salzburg Global session Ekponimo and Katwesigye attended sought to bridge divides between creative talents and technologists, scientists, futurists, policymakers, and educators. Despite their different backgrounds, all were united behind the idea to chart collaborative pathways to more livable futures.Accessibility is a theme which runs through Ekponimo and Katwesigye comments – whether that’s access to resources, people, or food. Technology can enable different parties to come together and provide more opportunities for people previously left out of the conversation. When humans and their needs are at the core of projects, integrated change is possible, and technology can act as a social enhancer as these two innovative ideas show. Ekponimo, who won a Rolex Award for Enterprise for his work in 2016, says, “People just need to be empowered with the right skills and when they have the right skills, when they have the right know-how they can solve problems whether it’s in health, whether it’s in agriculture because this is key because they understand the problem more than an outsider coming in. “All they just need [are] skills, whether it’s technology skills for example and they can then use [those] technology skills and be creative … Technology gives you a huge amount of creative power, and with that huge amount of creative power you can solve problems within your community and be effective in that problem-solving approach.”. The Salzburg Global program The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future is part of the multi-year series, Culture, Arts and Society. The session is supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation. More information on the program can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter using #SGSculture.
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Keshav Jha - Cities Are Leading the Battle for Climate Change
Keshav Jha (center) in conversation at Salzburg Global Seminar
Keshav Jha - Cities Are Leading the Battle for Climate Change
Oscar Tollast 
Keshav Jha is focused on promoting the transfer of knowledge and expertise in Asia-Pacific. In his role as a senior officer at the Energy & Climate Division of ICLEI South Asia, he is looking to improve mitigation and adaptation measures in Asian cities. He has assisted number of emerging countries and subnational authorities on low-carbon climate-resilient development and is currently developing the sustainable urban development framework for a growth-triangle involving Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. He has also recently co-authored a case analysis on resilient economies from emerging countries in the Asia-Pacific region which was published by Springer International Publishing, Cham, Switzerland. It’s this background and expertise which brought him back to Salzburg Global Seminar. Jha took part of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation – The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I – A Clean and Green Asia. Working alongside 29 other participants, representing 14 countries, Jha represented India and sought to address key questions around sustainable development and ensuring a low-carbon future. Describing his latest experience in Salzburg as “constructive,” Jha said Fellows had discussed the frameworks and processes to assist countries on their low emission ambitions and sustainable development goals. He says, “We have a unique set of professionals from different countries with varied background who have shared their insight and their dynamic situations in which they perform…” It’s not just about defining processes, however. It’s about building on this thinking and moving forward. “Fellows are going to individually test those iterative frameworks back in their home countries dynamic settings,” Jha added. “It’s important to document the processes experience, outcomes and challenges that we encounter. Eventually, the process outcomes will be disseminated with larger audiences and public/private sectors stakeholders for its wider visibility and recognition and replicability across Asia.” The UN publication, The World’s Cities in 2016,  suggested by 2030, “urban areas are projected to house 60 per cent of people globally and one in every three people will live in cities with at least half a million inhabitants.” Jha believes the rise of the global urban population will present an unparalleled amount of challenges and opportunities. He said, “Cities [are] where the main actions are happening and countries do not realize the cost-of-inaction which is getting unaffordable for number of least developed and island countries. I feel this discussion [at the session] is extremely crucial with respect to the long-term goal of the Paris Agreement to achieve climate neutrality and a low-emission world in the second half of the century.” By infusing this wisdom into day-to-day work, Jha says we can move forward quickly on the low carbon development agenda. One idea proposed to participants was the creation of regional knowledge hubs in countries across Asia. Jha said, “I think we should pursue it and fellows should converge more often and undertake initiatives to address the consequences of a changing climate. It is also important for decision makers in governments and businesses institutions to ensure that their plans and actions are technically sound, robust and based on scientific evidences.” Jha previously attended Salzburg Global Seminar in June 2013 for the session, A Climate for Change: New Thinking on Governance for Sustainability. This session resulted in a Salzburg Statement on New Governance for Sustainability. Describing his relationship with Salzburg Global, Jha said, “Personally, Salzburg defines who I am right now and it helped me tremendously in my personal and professional life. I am very happy to witness and be part of the work at Salzburg which will advance the development of country-specific strategic plans to promote economic growth while mitigating carbon emissions – without causing trade-offs to environmental pressures—in the Asia region.” Keshav Jha was a participant of The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia, the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.
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Niall O'Connor - We're Seeing a Bigger Impact on Natural Resources
Niall O'Connor presenting at Salzburg Global Seminar
Niall O'Connor - We're Seeing a Bigger Impact on Natural Resources
Oscar Tollast 
“Everything we work at is to try and get the right research to support people and to support the environment to be sustainable,” remarks Niall O’Connor, director of the Stockholm Environment Institute’s Asia Centre. O’Connor is speaking during a break at the Salzburg Global Seminar session, The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia. O’Connor is acting as one of several facilitators for the session, offering advice to leaders stemming from ASEAN +3 and India. Speaking earlier, O’Connor says, “Given that I’m now kind of overseeing the development of the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) in Asia it is interesting for me to hear what other people think the vision for the future is - what is it that they want to achieve?” Without knowing what people living in Asia want, he can’t direct where his organization should be heading. “There’s a good opportunity here of meeting people from maybe 10 [or] 11 countries,” he continues. “We’re all experts in our field. We're all working at various institutions… I have an opportunity to grow a bigger network and reach out to people, so that’s kind of an interesting opportunity for me.” At the time of recording, O’Connor has been in his role at SEI for around a year and a half.  He had spent the previous 15 years in senior leadership and management positions in Western, Eastern and Southern Africa. He has worked for the likes of Concern Universal, WWF, and the government of Gambia. His experience has enabled him to view frustrations from the perspective of a researcher, developer, and implementer. He asks, “How do you get all of the development initiatives right? How do you get all of the environmental initiatives right? How do you get the right data and information to implement properly? I kind of went full circle and said, let’s go back to the research side. With SEI, the beauty of it is even though it says environmental institute, it is an environment and development institute.” In short: O’Connor is absorbing knowledge with the intention of being able to push back toward implementing and developing changes. When asked for his thoughts on the main environmental challenges specific to Asia, O’Connor says, “The population explosion that’s happened over the last 20, 30, [or] 40 years is causing huge pressures on natural resources. In many cases, you can probably find ways around that, but couple that with levels of mismanagement, with corruption, with poor political leaders and institutions driving sustaining economies, sustainable business, sustainable environment, sustainable whatever form you want to look at. We’re not seeing a solution; we’re seeing a deepening of the problems. We’re seeing a bigger impact on all natural resources, less respect for the environment over a greater need to drive economic profit. While that’s bringing people out of poverty, it is fundamentally knocking away the foundations for long-term sustainability.” This is the biggest challenge in O’Connor’s eyes. How do you recreate solid foundations on which sustainable economies can be built? We can no longer have a “business as usual” approach. He says, “What’s unusual is working with businesses to make sure that they fully understand the issues of sustainability and that business is linked then to the Sustainable Development Goals, that business has seen that the bottom line is not necessarily your investment.” O’Connor suggests challenging the financial set-up of business industries. In quarterly reports, sustainability could be seen as much of an achievement as profitability. He adds, “Change the paradigm, change the approach, and make sure that we actually credit people for taking positions on long-term sustainability.” In and among the discussions at Salzburg, O’Connor has recognized the diverse pool of participants who have brought experience from the public, private and civil society sectors. He says, “Everybody else that’s here has similar experiences they may have and may have been able to overcome them, or they may have solutions. I think that peer-to-peer [networking] is going to be very important, but it also takes people out of the context for a little bit out of their own working day. It gives then just a blue sky thinking approach, which I think is quite useful.” Niall O'Connor was a facilitator at The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia, the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.
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Salinee Hurley - We Work With the People and Put Them in Charge
Salinee Hurley presenting at Salzburg Global Seminar
Salinee Hurley - We Work With the People and Put Them in Charge
Oscar Tollast 
As an engineer and a social entrepreneur, Salinee Hurley likes to solve problems. In her capacity as director of the Border Green Energy Team (BGET), Hurley has been providing renewable energy technology to underprivileged communities along the Thailand-Burma border. This type of experience encouraged her to take part in the Salzburg Global Seminar session, The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia. “We all have common issues that we go through, you know, in different countries, but we’re similar, right. The program is really interesting because it’s only including ASEAN, India, Japan, Korea, and China… I thought, maybe, I could learn from other Fellows and also share some experience.” In addition to her work with BGET, Hurley has also been working on behalf of Sun Sawang, a company she founded in 2013. This social enterprise offers solar-powered products and services for rural villages in Thailand. Hurley concedes this has proven to be more sustainable. By focusing only on solar energy, it has been able to deliver products and services. It’s a topic she knows well, having graduated with a Master’s degree in solar energy engineering from the University of Massachusetts Lowell in 2005. But how has this enterprise affected the BGET? Hurley says, “The Border Green Energy Team is a shift to focusing on the educational part by providing the knowledge of sustainable living techniques, renewable energies, and how to use the resources from the land and to grow rice and crops in the area.” Farmers within communities in Asia depend on natural resources, according to Hurley. She says, “It is difficult to manage the resources when [farmers] only think about taking advantage of the land.” Hurley believes there is a greater benefit if more farmers are educated about how soil can be nourished and continually used over time. This idea of living sustainably is something Hurley practices, as well as preaches. Just over seven years ago, Hurley took a course on sustainable living. She learned how to make her own shampoo and soap. She learned how to harvest produce and make food. Last, but not least, she learned how she could build herself a home. Four years after first taking part in the course, she decided that’s what she would do. Hurley viewed several houses made out of natural materials such as bamboo, mud, and wood, but she left unimpressed. She told herself, “I could do better than this.” Using most of her savings, Hurley built a home in Mae Sot, a district in Thailand which shares a border with Myanmar. Despite the occasional problem here and there, Hurley said the experience had been good. She says, “I think that was the best decision that I’ve made - to actually do it… now I can talk about it because I would not be confident just talking if I had not done it.” Ahead of the session in Salzburg, Hurley authored an op-ed on her experience convincing people to switch from kerosene lamps to solar powered products. She admits people were apprehensive to go from a cheaper option to a product which was more expensive. Hurley’s solution was to come up with a model which would allow products and services to be paid for over time. Thought was also put into how the system could be maintained and not become a one-off exercise if something were to break. “We bring in the knowledge,” Hurley says, “and then we look for the local person and then hire them and train them as a technician who would be in charge of maintaining this unit. That’s how we earn the trust from the people. We [are] not just an outsider, but we work with the people and give them the job[s], so they can be in charge of this.” Hurley was included in the BBC’s list of 100 women in 2014 considered to be changing the world. When asked what inspires her work, Hurley replies, “I honestly have to answer God.” She enjoys the results of her work and being close to the people who have benefited from it. “You hardly find these kinds of communities in urban settings, or in the big cities, these days. I feel blessed to be able to work in this position.” Salinee Hurley was a participant of The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia, the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.
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