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Looking Back - Chanel at the Schloss
Looking Back - Chanel at the Schloss
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Staff at Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron were sad to learn iconic designer Karl Lagerfeld passed away on Tuesday. We remember hosting his show in 2014 where he unveiled his pre-Fall 2015 collection for Chanel. This show brought together the great and good of the fashion world and brought Leopoldskron to life in a new and exciting way. Our thoughts remain with Mr. Lagerfeld’s family and friends. The article below was first published in December 2014. Schloss Leopoldskron, home of Salzburg Global Seminar, has played host to people from across a multitude of backgrounds in its 400 years – from politics to business, civil society to the arts – providing many with “pure inspiration.” This month, the historic Schloss hosted the great and good of the fashion world as world famous designer Karl Lagerfeld unveiled his pre-Fall 2015 collection for Chanel. Speaking from the lakeside terrace of Schloss Leopoldskron, Lagerfeld explained to Vogue magazine about his choice of venue: “Schloss Leopoldskron is where Max Reinhardt founded the Salzburg Festival. This was the seat of intellectual and cultural creative genesis.”  In an exclusive interview with Salzburg Global Seminar after the successful show, Lagerfeld spoke warmly of his own memories of Schloss Leopoldskron, having visited previously and long held a fascination with the palace's history. “I know Schloss Leopoldskron very well,” said Lagerfeld. “We took great photos here already 26 years ago... For me, the Schloss belongs to the history of the German-language theater and culture between 1920 and 1938, together with Max Reinhardt. These things are very dear to my heart.” Following in the footsteps of Coco Chanel and her own Austrian experience in the 1930s when she saw a hotel bellboy’s jacket that inspired her famous braid-trimmed jacket, Lagerfeld’s “Paris-Salzburg 2014/15 Metiers d’Art collection” incorporates elements of traditional Austrian dress with a modern, fashionable twist. A short film – Reincarnation – chronicling Coco Chanel’s bellboy encounter and starring model Cara Delevingne and singer Pharrell Williams premiered in Salzburg ahead of the December 2 show at Schloss Leopoldskron. In the two weeks leading up to the show, the international team of Chanel had exclusive use of Schloss Leopoldskron as the whole of the first floor of the palace was transformed into an unorthodox catwalk with models such as Delevingne, Kendall Jenner and Lara Stone parading down the stairs to the Venetian Room and the White Room, through the Marble Hall, to the Chinese Room and the Max Reinhardt Library.  Accompanying the sumptuous buffets in every room, additional period furniture was brought in, with floors re-polished, rooms re-painted and details re-fixed especially for the star-studded show.  As well as actresses Rooney Mara and Geraldine Chaplin and singer Lily Allen, guests also included Salzburg Global Seminar’s own Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine and Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron General Manager Daniel Szelényi. “We often tell both our Salzburg Global Fellows and hotel guests that this magnificent building isn’t a museum – it’s a living, breathing space. Reinhardt famously said that he had ‘lived every room, every table, every chair, every light, and every picture’ here at Schloss Leopoldskron. That Karl Lagerfeld has taken the same approach with his show is a great honor to Reinhardt,” said Shine. “We were delighted to have Chanel choose Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron as the location for their pre-Fall show,” said Szelényi. “We are especially delighted with the various detailed improvements they were able to deliver for the show, which will continue to help us in our transformation and stewardship of this beautiful building,” he added. You can see more of the photos from the show, along with social media posts from journalists, guests and the models themselves in our Storify collection: View the story "Chanel transforms Schloss Leopoldskron for Métiers d'Art" on Storify Coverage from Chanel:
Blog: chanel-news.chanel.com/en/home.html Photos: chanel-news.chanel.com/en/home/2014/12/the-show-decor.gallery.html Coverage from Vogue: Photos: www.vogue.com/slideshow/5719479/chanel-pre-fall-2015-backstage/ Review: www.vogue.com/fashion-week/5710619/chanel-pre-fall-2015-rtw/ “Best Instagrams”: www.vogue.com/5715271/chanel-pre-fall-2015-show-best-instagrams-salzburg/ #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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LGBT Rights in South Asia: What Next?
LGBT Rights in South Asia: What Next?
Heng Yeh Yee 
“We have to bid adieu to prejudices and empower all citizens,” said Dipak Misra, who was Chief Justice when India’s Supreme Court decriminalized homosexuality in September 2018. The court’s decision to strike down Section 377, a colonial-era law banning gay sex, was a watershed victory in the fight for human rights. Progress like this, naturally, does not happen in a vacuum. India’s verdict directly referenced Nepal’s landmark ruling in 2007, which resulted in legal protection for LGBT individuals, as well as official recognition of a third gender. In subsequent years, similar legislation acknowledging a third gender was enacted in Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India; Pakistan celebrated its first Trans Pride Parade just last year. Moreover, Sri Lanka and Bhutan have allowed people to change their legal gender.  However, discrimination and abuse against the LGBT community, including transgender and intersex people, are still prevalent in the region. Even in India and Nepal, the decriminalization of homosexuality is only the first step of many in the battle for civil rights and wider acceptance.  Elsewhere in South Asia, similar colonial-era laws prohibiting same-sex relations are found in the penal codes of Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. Although few cases are actually prosecuted under these laws, such criminalization contributes to the stigmatization of LGBT individuals in the media, public, and the workplace. Attempts to push for regulations that safeguard the existence of LGBT individuals in Pakistan, Maldives, and Afghanistan have to grapple with the presence of Sharia law.  These issues and more will be addressed at the Salzburg Global LGBT* Forum at its sixth program to be held in Kathmandu, Nepal, February 24 to March 1. The program, Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia, again held in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)’s Being LGBTI in Asia and the Pacific program, will consider recent legal and political developments in the region, along with how participants may engage in these shifts to mobilize societies towards legal and social acceptance of the LGBT community.  The Forum is no stranger to highlighting region-specific challenges and solutions – a previous program in Thailand focused on the progress of the LGBT rights movement in South East Asia, giving space to voices often underrepresented in global discourse, and in 2014, the Forum met to provide advice to the German, Dutch and EU Foreign Offices on how their embassies around the world could better support LGBT human rights organizations. Nepal, the location for this year’s program, is a nation widely seen as a predecessor for progressive attitudes towards sexual orientation and gender identity within South Asia. The six-day program shall include approximately 40 Fellows from various professional backgrounds, with a majority from South Asia. The assembly of this network will aid in forming connections between human rights defenders across nations, regions, and generations, who will then expand their collaboration in devising new projects and campaigns to help advance legal and social equality in countries across South Asia and around the world. Launched in 2013, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum has brought together over 150 Fellows from more than 70 countries who work for the advancement of LGBT and human rights. “Together with Salzburg Global, I conceived the Forum as a safe space to curate a truly global conversation on LGBT equality among diverse leaders from human rights, legal, artistic, and religious backgrounds,” wrote Founder and Chair of the Forum, Dr. Klaus Mueller.  “Fundamental human rights concern us all. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum brings together queer and straight, representing gender in many expressions, in short: people with overlapping, changing identities. Whether homo-, bi- or heterosexual, cis-, inter- or transgender, our diverse backgrounds and lives are connected by our shared interest to advance LGBT equality globally.” The Forum aims to create an open platform for discussion that will result in the promotion of inclusive policymaking at a national level, which should benefit and protect gender and sexual minorities.  In Nepal, there will also be a focus on how humanistic storytelling through multimedia productions may serve to destigmatize LGBT identities, sharing the narratives of these marginalized voices with wider society. Videos produced by and with Fellows of the Forum will be shared online in the coming months. As in 2016 in Thailand, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is being held in partnership with the UNDP’s Being LGBTI in Asia and the Pacific program, and is this year also supported by long-time supporters of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, the German Federal Foreign Ministry and the Archangel Michael Foundation, with additional support from EQUAL GROUND, The Nippon Foundation, the Korea Foundation and the Ann M. Hoefle Memorial Fellowship.   * LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender. We use this term as it is widely used in human rights conversations on sexual orientation and gender identity in many parts of the world. We wish it to be read as inclusive of other cultural concepts that express sexuality and gender, intersex and gender-nonconforming identities.
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On the Cutting Edge - Introducing This Year's Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program
Students at the top of their game from 11 law schools will take part in this year’s Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program
On the Cutting Edge - Introducing This Year's Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program
Allison Cowie 
More than 50 of the country’s top law students will gather together in Washington, DC, this weekend to discuss the current challenges and opportunities facing the international legal community. In this seventh annual meeting of the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program, held Feb. 21-23, the 2019 Cutler Fellows represent 11 law schools, 22 countries, and myriad interests in the international law and public service sectors. Over the course of the weekend, Cutler Fellows will hear from leading figures in the international legal community, including Wendy Cutler, vice president of the Asia Society Policy Institute, who will kick off the program on Friday morning with an armchair discussion on “Asia and the Future of Trade: What’s at Stake?” She will be joined by Cutler Fellows program chair Mark Wu, Henry L. Stimson professor of law at Harvard Law School. Later that day, former White House counsels Kathy Ruemmler and Ambassador C. Boyden Gray, who served in the Barack Obama and George H. W. Bush administrations, respectively, will discuss the role of the legal counsel within the executive branch. They will be joined on stage by John B. Bellinger, III, former US legal adviser and current partner at Arnold & Porter LLP, over dinner sponsored by Bellinger’s firm. Friday’s program will open at the United States Institute of Peace. With the guidance of faculty advisors from each of the participating law schools, the Cutler Fellows will workshop research papers tackling issues such as human rights, trade and sustainable development, space law, corporate accountability and international arbitration. As in the past, Cutler Fellows come from the top 11 law schools in the country: Chicago, Columbia, Duke, Georgetown, Harvard, Michigan, New York University, Penn, Stanford, the University of Virginia, and Yale. On Saturday, Fellows will participate in a knowledge café with mentors from the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, New Markets Lab, the US Department of State, and Coptic Orphans. Two mentors, Sara Salama and Thomas Weatherall, are Cutler Fellows from previous years; Katrin Kuhlmann, Gomiluk Otokwala, and Adejoke Babington-Ashaye are returning to the knowledge café after each serving as mentors in past Cutler Fellows programs. The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program is the flagship program of the Cutler Center for the Rule of Law, named for Lloyd N. Cutler, a Washington super-lawyer and counselor to two US presidents. Cutler, who also served as Chairman of the Board of Salzburg Global Seminar, firmly believed in mentoring young leaders to use the rule of law as a tool to make the world a better place. Cutler’s daughter, Judge Beverly Cutler of the Alaska Superior Court, will attend a portion of this year’s program. The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program is held under the auspices of the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law. The annual program collaborates with eleven of the leading U.S. law schools. This year's program is being sponsored by Arnold & Porter LLP, and NYU Washington, DC, and contributors to the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law.
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Sharing Ideas and Creating Bonds – The Power of Networks
Martin Gilbert at Salzburg Global Seminar
Sharing Ideas and Creating Bonds – The Power of Networks
Lucy Browett 
Founded in 1934 and working in over 100 countries, the British Council has established itself as a remarkable force in the world, creating opportunities for people worldwide, promoting the study of the English language and providing the resources for cultural exchanges. Martin Gilbert, director of the British Council Austria, attended Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change, a three-day immersive learning program hosted by Salzburg Global Seminar, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance. The program, in particular, focused on the way organizations can better utilize their alumni networks for good - networks which the British Council has in abundance. Gilbert said, “We make networks of people. They might not be formal networks, but they’ll be networks of people who we share values with that we want to work with towards achieving some goal. You can formalize these networks and write them down, but even if they’re not formalized, they still exist.” He emphasizes while these networks can be born from British Council programs, it is up to participants to sustain and grow them. He said, “Be active. Take part…join up with your peers. “Take opportunities to be involved, join chat groups. If there’s nothing available, create something. Be clear about what you want to achieve and how the network can actually help you.” Going Global is an annual conference run by the British Council for leaders in international education, which this year will be held in Berlin. Gilbert says, “Now there’s an opportunity there for the individuals to take part to actually create networks within the network, so they can. If you’re clear when you go into that conference what you want to get out of it, who you want to join up with, then you’re much [more] likely to create a functioning network at the end.” With so many alumni networks from various programs, it is likely that not every network following such programs is prosperous and utilized to its full potential. What makes a successful network? Gilbert says it is down to the primary aims of the network when it is first established and to what extent these aims have been achieved. He said, “You create a network in order to actually achieve something. So, I would say in order to evaluate whether it’s been effective or not, you’ve got to look at what you want to achieve.” “For example, I might want to bring in a variety of different people working in the field of disabled art or artists who are disabled, working in some particular field of the arts together. I’d work, I’d set up a network of other institutions who are working in that area and then maybe organize a conference. Now with the help of that network, if I’ve achieved the aim of running a conference that has a good outcome, then I think I could say it’s been an effective network.” However, Gilbert recognizes a need not to put pressure on networks to thrive. He said, “I’m also a believer in deactivating networks. I don’t keep networks alive unless there’s a particular reason because it’s just wasting people’s time.” Certain long-running programs such as the Erasmus+ scheme, Study UK program and the Language Assistants Program seem to have had the greatest effect in creating long-lasting networks of like-minded people. Gilbert recognizes qualities and skills practiced by the many young people embarking on these programs every year are indicative of citizen diplomats. He said, “A diplomat to my mind is someone who shares ideas, creates bonds between groups. So the people have the opportunity when they’re taking part in these programs to actually develop as some kind of diplomat.” He added, “If we’re looking at citizen diplomats, that’s what you want them to do. You want them to create bonds with other people and look for opportunities to work together, to challenge each other and to have fun with each other.” Gilbert even points to programs such as the Language Assistants Program paving the way for some of its participants to become diplomats, citing the current UK Ambassadors to Canada and Switzerland among others as former language assistants. What is Gilbert’s highlight of a network born from a British Council program? The answer is FameLab - a global competition to discover and nurture the world’s next great science communicators. Gilbert said, “That program has created a huge network of science communicators who are incredibly passionate about what they do. The people in the British Council that work on the program are incredibly passionate about what they do. It brings in partners from all sorts of organizations.” The program Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change was held in partnership with The German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance, as part of the Global Leaders Consortium (GLC).
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Improving Transatlantic Relations and Bringing Out the Best in People
Lora Berg at Salzburg Global Seminar
Improving Transatlantic Relations and Bringing Out the Best in People
Oscar Tollast 
Lora Berg’s motivation is to help strengthen future transatlantic relations. In her role at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, she helps guide the Inclusive Leadership portfolio within the Office of Leadership Programs. What does that mean exactly? It partly involves developing partnerships on the international stage which strengthen diversity and inclusion. It’s perhaps no surprise Berg recently found herself at Salzburg Global Seminar. Berg was one of more than 40 participants who attended Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change, a three-day immersive learning program hosted by Salzburg Global, the German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance. Reflecting on this arrangement, Berg said, “This is the Global Leadership Consortium, which is an informal network of people who are involved in leading leadership development programs that are global in perspective and bring participants from different countries. This particular year, it’s so special for us to be able to be here at Salzburg Global whose mission really aligns with the mission of our fellowship community and, in particular, the strengthening of transatlantic relations which we’re engaged in.” The German Marshall Fund of the United States’ longstanding flagship fellowship program, the Marshall Memorial Fellowship, brings rising leaders from both sides of the Atlantic to an intensive learning across and builds long-lasting relationships. Berg said, “We look for people who would like to have a lifelong commitment to transatlantic relations in their work. Many are local leaders, but they keep that transatlantic lens in the work that they are doing.” The Fund is also responsible for the Transatlantic Inclusion Leaders Network, a group which focuses on the demographic changes on both sides of the Atlantic and reaches out to rising and diverse elected leaders. One of these leaders is based in Salzburg: Tarik Mete, judicial and political advisor, and former member of the Salzburg State Parliament. “It was a joy to be here in Salzburg,” said Berg. “Among other things, we were able to have an alumnus of our program, Tarik Mete, speak with the whole group here. He reflected a little bit on his experience in our fellowship. He is for us one of the very wonderful change-makers in that network.” The program took place at Schloss Leopoldskron, the historic home of Salzburg Global Seminar. Its location enabled the Fund and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance to invite more colleagues from Europe. Participants took part in workshops, panels, and case-study discussions. Berg said, “Salzburg Global has a wonderful team - dedicated and visionary - who are so innovative in using this historic and meaningful space to bring out the best in the people who participate and to make it possible for them to have really constructive co-creation imaginative purposeful dialogue. “With the right use of time and the right use of the space… creating these different ways for us to interact and to learn and integrate together in large groups and small groups in different timeframes and with a range of really gifted facilitators. We've been able to think about big ideas and innovations and the potential for collaboration, the synergies among our programs and to explore some of the big challenges that we're facing together.” There were a number of “unexpected and wonderful things” which came up in every session, according to Berg, describing she had learned so much. Expanding on this point further, she said, “We’ve been thinking a lot of about the alignment of our leadership programs in the area of international engagement [and] global engagement: how do you create opportunities for our alumni communities to continue engaging throughout their lives in citizen diplomacy and in transatlantic leadership?” The conversations may have started in Salzburg, but the work continues outside the walls of Schloss Leopoldskron. Berg said, “I’m definitely anticipating that every participant who has been here will leave with new and powerful connections, [as well as] a great sense of trust within the community that gathered here that can only be developed over a program like this that allows you sufficient time to be together to really grow to trust one another…” The program Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change was held in partnership with The German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance, as part of the Global Leaders Consortium (GLC).
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Building New Bonds and Exploring Valuable Opportunities
Gregory Feifer at Salzburg Global Seminar
Building New Bonds and Exploring Valuable Opportunities
Oscar Tollast 
Between 2000 and 2002, Gregory Feifer was an Institute of Current World Affairs Fellow, reporting on the culture and politics in Russia under Vladimir Putin. Just over 16 years later, in March 2018, he was announced as the Institute’s new executive director. It’s not a position he expected to take up – even if others felt differently. Feifer said, “It’s actually interesting [in] that when I was a Fellow, the then executive director said, ‘Someday you will be executive director.’ I don’t know if he was serious or kidding, but I certainly thought he was kidding.” Prior to his appoint, Feifer had been serving as interim director since June 2017. He had also served as a trustee of the Institute from 2015 to 2017. It’s evidently an organization whose mission he believes in. Feifer said, “It was started in 1925, and the idea was to enable the US to have a better understanding of foreign affairs at a time that the country had just emerged as a great power and was operating at a disadvantage compared to the traditional great powers because they had very good on the ground information from their colonial administrators in Asia and Africa, and we didn’t.” Young professionals were sent out into the field in areas such as journalism, diplomacy, business, and law. Feifer said the aim was to “become culturally immersed and come back and function as part of a living endowment of wisdom for the country.” Initially, fellowships were open-ended and lasted as long as seven years, but now they are limited to two. Fellows pick a region or country to live in and a topic to study. After spending two years immersed in the field, they come back and inform the American public. Reflecting on his own experience as a Fellow, Feifer speaks positively. “I had a terrific experience. I was already living in Moscow, so I was unusual… but I was working for a small English language newspaper that couldn’t afford to send me much beyond the city limits to do any reporting. The fellowship enabled me to travel all over the country and to other former Soviet republics, and it really formed my basis of understanding that served me very well in my future career as a reporter for NPR and other outlets in Russia.” The Institute’s core mission has very much remained unchanged since its establishment in 1925, but Feifer recognizes the world is a different place. He said, “There are now Americans living all over the world, and you can get the tiniest bit of information from the smallest village anywhere in the world, but we feel that in this time of bombardment of information from all sources, the value of spending two years immersed in a society and really getting to know it is as valuable as ever.” Feifer attended Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change, a three-day immersive learning program hosted by Salzburg Global Seminar, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance. More than 40 participants from various foundations and organizations with fellowship programs convened at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, to take part in the program. Feifer said the opportunity to discuss his work with peers at a “beautiful place” like Schloss Leopoldskron was very attractive. He said, “The ability to sort of hear from many of the participants in a group and then split off and have small discussions and have time to socialize, I think it provides a lot of opportunities to not only learn about best practices but also get a sort of a sense of reinforcement that many of the things one is doing are correct… “You know we're each running our own programs, we each have a million things to do, and it's very good to be able to come together and to share common experiences and not only learn but also understand that some or many things we're doing aren't all that mistaken.” During the program, which included presentations, group work, and panel discussions, Feifer took part in a fireside chat on transatlantic trends. Speaking ahead of this activity, he said, “Unfortunately, there’s not a lot of great news to report there, but the flipside of that is that the value of civil society, fellowships, [and] citizen diplomats is as great as it has been in recent memory at a time when state institutions and international organizations are failing us for all sorts of reasons.” In addition to his role at the Institute, Feifer is also a member of the steering committee for the Transatlantic Democracy Working Group, a bipartisan and transatlantic group which comes together in defense of democracy, security, and alliances. Making connections between both sides of the Atlantic is key, according to Feifer. “At a time when our president is one of the chief threats to the transatlantic alliance and to democratic values in general, it’s very important that American send out a signal that we still care about shared values and try to build as many bonds as possible on lower levels and try to effect change that way.” The program Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change was held in partnership with The German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance, as part of the Global Leaders Consortium (GLC).
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Revisiting the Salzburg Spirit and Opportunities for Connection
Elizabeth Power Robison at Salzburg Global Seminar
Revisiting the Salzburg Spirit and Opportunities for Connection
Oscar Tollast 
Elizabeth Power Robison is no stranger to Schloss Leopoldskron. In addition to being a Salzburg Global Fellow, Robison is one of a few who can count the palace as a former home. Robison interned at Salzburg Seminar – the former name of the organization – in the summer of 1992. While she’s returned multiple times since this internship, this was her first trip in her role as vice president of Center Advancement at the Milken Institute. Robison was one of more than 40 participants to attend Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change, a three-day immersive learning program hosted by Salzburg Global Seminar, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance. Alongside others, Robison took part in workshops, panels, and case-study discussions. She said, “When Ben [Glahn] said how much had changed at the organization, I kind of smiled because from an outside perspective, I haven’t been back at the Schloss since 2005, and it feels like nothing has really changed. I say that in a very positive way in that the culture of the organization… the energy, the spirit of the team that [is] here, I think have those important Salzburg values.” Robison suggested she may have been distressed if she had felt a change, as she expanded further on what the “Salzburg values” consist of. She said, “Interestingly, given the topic we have here, fellowship is, I think, a really core part of the Salzburg experience… I think connection both in our conversations and relationships here but [also] the interconnectedness of the world, especially at a time where our leaders are using rhetoric that’s so divisive… “For me, the Seminar represents that coming together of that community, that fellowship, but also a willingness to speak in candor and transparency that you might not find in another setting. There’s something kind of like a truth filter that comes out here.” Robison joined the Milken Institute in January 2018, a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank “determined to increase global prosperity by advancing collaborative solutions that widen access to capital, create jobs and improve health.” Robison says it’s also referred to as an “action tank.” It has offices in North America, Asia, and Europe. “My role there is quite broad but focused on what I’ve done for my whole career, which is raising funds and building relationships for the organization. It’s been great,” Robison said. One of her latest projects has involved interviewing world leaders about their dreams of impact, where they’ve come from, what they’ve achieved, and what education has meant in their process. Robison said, “It really is uplifting to talk to people who have really achieved great things, and you realize the challenges everyone faces in the world.” Robison was attracted to return to Salzburg to reflect on the idea of global leadership and the responsibility of organizations to cultivate global leadership through their fellowship programs. Speaking on the second day of the program, Robison said, “We haven’t even been here 24 hours, and people are friendly, communicative, [and] conversational. Everyone wants to engage. You don’t see anyone kind of drifting away. They’re in such a short time creating a connection and engagement, and it to me is spectacular. I feel like I’m right back in it.” Robison was born in Massachusetts but grew up in Vermont. In high school, she went on American Field Service and was given the opportunity to study in Israel. After graduating from college, she moved to Salzburg for her second experience of living outside the US. “I think the experience of Israel and then Salzburg, which are very different countries and cultures, really, I think gave me a sense of the diversity of the world, at least in the kind of European context. “It’s always been important in my whole career, even if my career didn’t seem aligned. International travel and experience and global communication [were] very important to me, so even working in higher education for 25 years I built international programs, funded international travel opportunities, created faculty-led trips and have continued to be very active in that.” The program Citizen Diplomacy at the Crossroads: Activating Networks for Change was held in partnership with The German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance, as part of the Global Leaders Consortium (GLC).
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