Salzburg Global Seminar Collaboration Leads to Dementia Research Funding

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Mar 23, 2019
by Lucy Browett
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Salzburg Global Seminar Collaboration Leads to Dementia Research Funding

Grant awarded to Salzburg Global Fellows to advance research of rare dementia in rural communities From left to right - Salzburg Global Fellows Dr. Mary Pat Sullivan, Stéphanie LeClair, Dr. Paul Camic, and Dr. Sebastian Crutch

After backing a Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, four Salzburg Global Fellows will collaborate again as a result of a million-dollar research partnership.

A grant of over $6,000,000 funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and the National Institute for Health Research will enable several institutions to explore new forms of dementia support.

Salzburg Global Fellows Dr. Mary Pat Sullivan of Nipissing University, Dr. Sebastian Crutch of University College London, Stéphanie LeClair of Alzheimer Society Sudbury-Manitoulin North Bay & Districts and Dr. Paul Camic of Canterbury Christchurch University, will be brought together once again through the work.

All four attended the Salzburg Global Seminar program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, in December 2017. The program was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and the Mayo Clinic.

In a joint statement, the Fellows said, “Nipissing University, University College London, Canterbury Christchurch University and the Alzheimer Society Sudbury-Manitoulin North Bay & Districts valued an opportunity to work together to explore the provision of dementia support, particularly for people with rare forms of dementia, in diverse geographical, social, and cultural contexts.

“Our networking during the [program] confirmed our shared commitment to continue to promote dementia-friendly communities and learn from one another.”

The research will focus on effective support for those living with rare forms of dementia, with a focus on what support looks like in different contexts, illustrated by the work of LeClair in rural Canadian communities.

Living with rare forms of dementia is challenging enough, let alone living in areas which may not have the support groups to help.

The Fellows said, “We anticipate our partnership will raise awareness to the varied experiences of living with dementia and develop support solutions for people with dementia, including digital ones, that will connect people with rare dementia no matter where they live.”

The group’s experience at Salzburg Global allowed them to learn from others through panels, workshops, and discussions.

They said, “Our participation at Salzburg Global Seminar provided us with an opportunity to explore opportunities to build resilience in countries, cities, neighborhoods, and families to improve the quality of life for people with dementia.

“We valued [Salzburg Global’s] interactive discussions to more thoroughly understand the experience of dementia in different contexts and learning of the innovative initiatives around the globe that are supporting people and their families.”


The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, was held as part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This program was held in partnership with The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and The Mayo Clinic.