International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity - The Challenge of North Korea

Search

Loading...

News

Latest News

Newsletter
Register for our Newsletter and stay up to date
Register now
International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity - The Challenge of North Korea

Report from session on how to deal with North Korea now published

The report from the Salzburg Global symposium International Responses to Crimes Against Humanity: The Challenge of North Korea, part of the Salzburg Initiative on Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention is now available is now available online to read, download and share.

In June 2015, Salzburg Global Seminar, with support from the National Endowment for Democracy and the Open Society Foundation, convened the symposium in Salzburg to address how the international community should respond to the crimes against humanity perpetrated in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, or North Korea).

As this newly published report shows, there is no consensus on what should be done – neither about what is most likely to bring about positive change for the people of North Korea “today”, nor about how to provide a modicum of justice for the millions of victims, whether living or already perished. These goals, while intertwined, often lead to rather different opinions on what is most likely to be effective. Among the diverse experts that convened for the Salzburg symposium, there was a broad range of opinion spread across a continuum of possible actions from a very strong accountability stance to one that gives priority to engagement and cooperation.

The report seeks to provide a summary of many of the key points raised, highlight the diverse perspectives expressed, and reflect the range of strategies discussed, without suggesting there was unanimity around any of the recommendations or cataloging a complete record of the very deep and complex discussions that were held. This is a glimpse, at best, into the range of issues and opinions that were examined and shared over a very intense five day gathering – but one that can help elucidate core challenges related to the case of the DPRK and highlight various concrete strategies that are being, or could be, adopted in an effort to improve the lives of people living in North Korea.

Download the report as a PDF


Salzburg Global Seminar is grateful to our program partners, the National Endowment for Democracy and the Open Society Foundation, and our other partners for their generous support of Session 556 and to the Citizens Alliance for North Korean Human Rights for their programmatic co-operation.