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Past Program

Mar 20 - Mar 27, 1999

The Transatlantic Agenda at the Turn of the Century

Session 365

Abstract

Relations between Europe and the United States have evolved significantly over the past decade as a result of the end of the Cold War, the continuing consolidation and enlargement of the European Union, the expansion of NATO, and the increasing interpendence of a globalized world economy. One response to these changes has been the launching of the New Transatlantic Agenda in 1995 which has provided a framework for expanding and intensifying cooperation between the United States and the European Union in the areas of security, diplomacy, economic relations, and cultural exchange. The Partnership for Peace initiative and the expansion to the East of NATO have also sought to address changes in transatlantic and regional security relationships.

 

The purpose of this Salzburg Seminar session will be to examine transatlantic relations against the changing backdrop of this new, post-cold war order and to identify the underlying values and goals of the transatlatic relationship as Europe and the United States approach the next century. Areas of focus will include the continuing evolution of the European Union and NATO, questions of burden-sharing in response to global challenges, economic security and competitiveness, multi-lateral trade relationships, the transatlantic business agenda, and the expansion of social and cultural ties between Europe and the United States in an increasingly interdependent and globalized world. Further consideration will be given to the following questions: Will Europe assume a larger role in world leadership in the new century? What type of foreign policy will the European Union develop? What relationship will the transatlantic partners develop toward other regions of the world? What impact will the continuing enlargement and consolidation of the European Union and NATO have on the transatlantic relationship? What steps might be taken by the United States and Europe to resolve problems on the periphery of Europe, particularly in Russia and Turkey.