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Salzburg Global Calls for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on World Alzheimer’s Day
Two out of every three people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries, according to Alzheimer’s Disease International
Salzburg Global Calls for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on World Alzheimer’s Day
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Two out of every three people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries, according to Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI). As ADI marks World Alzheimer’s Day on September 21, Salzburg Global Fellows are calling for greater innovations in care and support for those diagnosed with Dementia and their families and communities. The Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, which was written by Fellows of the Salzburg Global program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, was first published in July and has since garnered endorsements from health professionals around the world. A dementia-friendly community, as defined by Alzheimer’s Disease International, is a place or culture in which people with dementia and their carers are empowered, supported and included in society, understand their rights and recognize their potential. This Salzburg Statement calls on community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, researchers and advocates to: Work collaboratively and alongside people impacted by dementia to design and implement innovative community-based solutions to improve the wellbeing of persons living with dementia and their care partners. Initiate and support the transformation toward “Dementia-Inclusive and -Friendly Communities.” Promote community-based solutions that can be translated across the boundaries of households, health and social service systems, municipalities, and nations. Health professionals are called to: Ensure increased access to a timely and honest dementia diagnosis using words and language that enable and empower individuals. Place a high value on community-based programs and social services by being informed about what is available and sharing this information with those living with the disease and their families. Researchers and policymakers to: Invest in rigorous qualitative research to define quality of life and wellbeing from the perspective of people with dementia. Develop more accurate measures of quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and their care partners, as well as measures that demonstrate the role of community in supporting people with dementia and their care partners. Implement rigorous evaluations of Dementia Friendly Communities, including structural readiness, person-centered outcomes, and community-level impact in order to ensure better transparency, dissemination, and transfer of best practices and collaborative tools from community to community. Support policies that utilize the resources and capacity of the community to the greatest extent possible. View the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on Issuu
The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running Health and Health Care Innovation series and was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic in December 2017. Around 50 participants from all regions of the world, including health and social care leaders, patients and their representatives, and policymakers, took part in a highly participatory program focusing on building new insights and aggregating perspectives from different sectors. Salzburg Global Fellows Chris Roberts and Jayne Goodrick, a couple from North Wales, UK, took part in the program to share their lived experiences of dementia and to help bridge divides between service providers and patients. Roberts has a diagnosis of mixed dementia, vascular damage and Alzheimer’s, while Goodrick’s mother has a diagnosis of dementia and small vessel disease. Alongside healthcare professionals and policymakers working in the field, their experiences helped influence the creation of the Salzburg Statement. Goodrick said, “People are very paternalistic and will give what they think we on the ground need, and what we on the ground need is actually sometimes something very much different to what we’re offered.” John Lotherington, program director for health and health care programs at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, "There have been great strides forward in the development of dementia care and dementia friendly communities in recent years, but much remains to be done to take this to further scale and meet greatly increasing need. At Salzburg Global Seminar it has been a privilege to work with some of the great pioneers in this work to extend the global call to community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, health professionals, and researchers and advocates to come together to achieve dementia friendly communities for all those living with dementia and those who care for them." Download the Statement as a PDF To submit your endorsement of the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, please click here.       #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; } #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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The Shock of the New - Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future
The Shock of the New - Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future
Salzburg Global Seminar 
In times characterized by complexity, disruption and an unprecedented speed of change, uncertainty about the future is staring us in the face. Throughout history, artists have deciphered prospective futures in their work; from Neolithic shrines and cave paintings, to modern film interpretations of utopian and dystopian futures. But can these creative outputs be used effectively to help minimize the shock of the new, and allow for a positive unified vision of our shared future? This was the main question facing a diverse group of artists, futurists, cultural theorists and activists, museum professionals, technologists, educators and policymakers when they met in Salzburg, Austria in February 2018.  Salzburg Global Seminar gathered the 50 future thinkers from 25 countries to re-imagine the nexus between the arts and technology, questioning what it means to be human in the Anthropocene and beyond. Their discussions, learnings and insights have now been gathered in a new report, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future. Download the report as a PDF The goal of five-day program, which forms the basis of the report, was to identify ways in which artists, technologists, scientists and futurists could harness the transformative power of the arts to make sense of and advance our understanding of the future (or futures). Recognizing that at the intersection of arts and technology is the ability to challenge the constraints of the present, the Salzburg Global Fellows – as participants of Salzburg Global programs are known – sought to discover how artists and cultural practitioners can expand their role in advancing policymaking for desirable futures. Salzburg Global Seminar was founded on the intrinsic belief that we must look to the future in order to challenge the building blocks of our society. This program, part of the long-running multi-year series, Culture, Arts and Society, builds on Salzburg Global’s mission to challenge present and future leaders to shape a better world, while advancing its commitment to demonstrate the transformative power of culture, creativity and the arts by challenging participants to reimagine the possible.  As well as summaries of each of the program’s panel discussions and group work output, this report also includes interviews with artist Amy Karle, musician DJ Spooky, designer Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino, UN Live co-founder Michael Edson and Berlin’s Futurium director Stefan Brandt. Download the report as a PDF
The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future is part of the multi-year series Culture, Arts and Society. The program was supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation. 
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Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Persist is a multimedia publication featuring 6 chapters exploring methods to educate, inspire and motivate approaches to journalism that combat a culture of distrust
Persist - New Ideas for Journalism in an Age of Distrust
Paul Mihailidis 
This article was first published on persist.community, a multimedia publication produced by 2018 participants of the Salzburg Academy of the Media and Global Change. The projects in this publication include new approaches and models for storytelling, conceptual platforms, games, prototypes, and creative materials. We persist towards. We resist against. In a ubiquitous media environment, where our technologies ask for more and more of our fleeting attention, it seems challenging to stay committed to an idea, an issue, a moment. Connective technologies have succeeded in disconnect us. They have splintered our communities, polarized our politics, and normalized spectacle in our information feeds. The same online networks that once touted their collaborative potential now provide sensational content to like-minded groups, perpetuate polarizing viewpoints, spread false information, and seed distrust in the very institutions we rely on for functioning civic societies. This distrust has pervaded our media institutions above all others. The core functions of information systems are now under attack, and the weaponization of fake news by political and public leaders has further eroded such trust. Journalists, meanwhile, are losing the trust of communities who find refuge and solace in the validation of information by peers online. It is within this context that over 75 aspiring journalists, media makers and activists gathered alongside over 35 faculty and visiting scholars to re-imagine journalism. The participants in the 12th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change convened for 30 master lectures, workshops, and seminars, 5 salons, a screening series, over 40 reading groups, 2 excursions, and over 20 hours of dedicated time to work in self-facilitated groups to build responses to the problem of distrust in our journalism and media institutions. What emerged from these three weeks is the commitment to a process where passionate people from around the world work intensely to experiment with media models and practices that seed interaction, care, imagination and dialog. In just over 20 hours of dedicated time to creating a digital publication, the 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change cohort created PERSIST: NEW IDEAS FOR JOURNALISM IN AN AGE OF DISTRUST. The publication features 6 chapters, which offer transmedia narratives that experiment with new approaches to storytelling and journalism that inspire care, community, and meaningful human engagement in an age of digital abundance. Each of the chapters features multimedia content, from platforms and apps to games, facilitations and prototypes, that collectively ask us to re-insert the “human” in our media systems. Students explored concepts of imagination, culture, and care in their work, and build models that work to bridge divides that exist across cultures, across borders, and across platforms. The term persist signifies both the effort of the group process that resulted in this publication, and the effort that it will take to combat the culture of distrust within and across our online networks. Persistence is understood in our work as striving to achieve a civic minded standpoint, where we recognize our shared social location, and exercise empathy for others through a collective struggle for meaningful dialog and engagement in the world. We apply persistence to our re-imagining of a journalism ecosystem that is guided by embrace a sincere commitment to bridging gaps between institutions and the communities in which they are embedded; and possess an overarching goal of contributing to the creation of emergent publics possessing the capacity and motivation to ably address the conditions of the day. In this way, we persist towards a better future, and not against intractable obstacles. Explore the collective work of our 2018 Salzburg Academy on Media & Global Change cohort.
Re-Imagining Journalism: News and Storytelling in an Age of Distrust is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long running multi-year program Salzburg Academy of Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here. You can also follow all the discussions on Twitter and Instagram by following the hashtag #SGSmedia.
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Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Fellows are pressing for the committed support of dementia inclusive and friendly communities across the world. This call to action features as part of a Salzburg Statement published as a result of discussions at the Salzburg Global program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities. The program was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic in December 2017. Around 50 participants from all regions of the world, including health and social care leaders, patient representatives, and policymakers, took part in a highly participatory program focusing on building new insights and aggregating perspectives from different sectors. Alzheimer’s and related neurodegenerative diseases have a profound impact on the person with dementia, their carers and families, the local community, and the broader society. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects the number of people living with dementia to triple from 50 million in 2017 to 152 million by 2050. A dementia-friendly community, as defined by Alzheimer’s Disease International, is a place or culture in which people with dementia and their carers are empowered, supported and included in society, understand their rights and recognize their potential. This Salzburg Statement calls on community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, researchers and advocates to: Work collaboratively and alongside people impacted by dementia to design and implement innovative community-based solutions to improve the wellbeing of persons living with dementia and their care partners. Initiate and support the transformation toward “Dementia-Inclusive and -Friendly Communities.” Promote community-based solutions that can be translated across the boundaries of households, health and social service systems, municipalities, and nations. Health professionals are called to: Ensure increased access to a timely and honest dementia diagnosis using words and language that enable and empower individuals. Place a high value on community-based programs and social services by being informed about what is available and sharing this information with those living with the disease and their families. Researchers and policymakers to: Invest in rigorous qualitative research to define quality of life and wellbeing from the perspective of people with dementia. Develop more accurate measures of quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and their care partners, as well as measures that demonstrate the role of community in supporting people with dementia and their care partners Implement rigorous evaluations of Dementia Friendly Communities, including structural readiness, person-centered outcomes, and community-level impact in order to ensure better transparency, dissemination, and transfer of best practices and collaborative tools from community to community. Support policies that utilize the resources and capacity of the community to the greatest extent possible. View the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on Issuu
Download the Salzburg Statement in full by clicking here The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Mechanics for the Future – How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Mechanics for the Future – How Can Governments Transform Themselves?
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Governments worldwide are under pressure to meet complex needs as populations age, countries urbanize, and technology transforms lives and work. They have a lead responsibility to prepare their societies for a radically changing world, yet face shrinking budgets and declining trust in the public sector. The Public Sector Strategy Network, launched in partnership between the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, Salzburg Global Seminar and Apolitical, helps governments tackle complex challenges through better foresight, innovation, and implementation. Co-created with senior leaders around the world, the Network is building a mutually-supportive coalition of engaged individuals and institutions on the frontline of digital, financial and societal disruption, promoting effective public leadership and strategic communication. The 2018 program - Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? - brought together 27 participants from 16 countries – mostly senior officials from governments and multilateral institutions – to engage informally, away from media and gatekeepers, and to test out ideas for immediate follow-up at the technical level. The subsequent report focuses on two significant areas for public sector innovation: creating a new social contract and responding to external forces. This report also features specific publicly-available examples by the Apolitical team which help illustrate some of the talking points which emerged. Download the report (as a hi-res PDF to read more)
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The Promise and Perils of Technology - Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime and FinTech
The Promise and Perils of Technology - Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime and FinTech
Salzburg Global Seminar 
The “Fourth Industrial Revolution” is fundamentally changing society, economies and financial markets on a global scale. Significant and often disruptive technological developments such as artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, big data and distributed ledger technologies (DLT) have led to the digitization of assets and information, the emergence of new players, business models and ecosystems, as well as new ways of interaction between individuals and businesses. While these changes potentially increase productivity and growth, they may also trigger new risks for today’s market participants and society.  How are these technological developments impacting and challenging society and financial markets? What consequences do they imply for policy, regulation and practitioners? What measures should be taken to mitigate the potential risks associated with the impending technology-triggered transformations? These questions and more faced the policymakers, banking and securities regulators and supervisors, and cybersecurity and data experts who gathered in Salzburg for the annual meeting of the Salzburg Global Finance Forum. The 2018 program focused on The Promise and Perils of Technology: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime and FinTech. The subsequent report offers valuable insights: The rapid and often disruptive development of technological advances – from AI and robotics to big data and distributed ledger technologies – is fundamentally changing the financial landscape by altering the interaction between customers and providers of financial services, lowering the barriers for new entrants, and enabling the emergence of new business models and ecosystems.  Banks have to adapt to the new competitive environment by becoming trusted custodians of clients’ financial data while at the same time intelligently analyzing clients’ data and behavior to anticipate needs and deliver tailor-made solution by collaborating with financial as well as non-financial partners.  Key internal challenges are the acquisition of talents to achieve the perfect combination of core banking skills with tech-savvy innovative capabilities, as well as the mitigation and management of cyber risk.  The emergence of new players and business models, as well as an increased disintermediation of the value chain of financial institutions, also create new challenges for policymakers and regulators.  Activity- and principle-based regulation appears to be the most suitable approach forward to balance consumer and investor protection on one hand and the facilitation of financial innovation on the other, and to provide a technology-neutral level playing field for incumbents and new entrants.  Download the report (as a hi-res PDF) to read more The report also features: The opening remarks of the program’s two co-chairs – J. Christopher Giancarlo, chairman of the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and José Manuel González-Páramo, member of the board of directors and chief officer for global economics, regulation and public affairs at BBVA in Madrid, Spain; An interview with the keynote speaker, Hal Varian, the chief economist at Google; and  A list of all participants in attendance and the Salzburg Global Finance Forum’s Advisory Committee.
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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Combating Extremism and Promoting Pluralism
Combating Extremism and Promoting Pluralism
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Xenophobia, racism, and violent extremism are tearing at the fabric of societies across the globe. Although contexts and specifics differ, many shared human values do not: the wish to live in peace and security, and to ensure a positive future for the next generation. At the same time, where atrocities have occurred there is a need to commemorate victims and to confront perpetrators without perpetuating a cycle of violence or creating a climate overwhelmed by vengeance. Faced with a rise in violent extremism, policymakers are under pressure to invest in prevention and to show that it works. Structured efforts to reduce extremist mindsets and behaviors have existed for some time, but evidence of effectiveness is often not widely known or utilized. Many interventions require considerable time to effect change, making rigorous measurement of their success over the long-term resource-intensive with sustained political will around an often-unpopular topic. What works? How do we know? And will it work in different geographic, cultural, and political contexts? These were the questions at the front mind for the educators, practitioners and museum curators invited to take part in a new phase of Salzburg Global Seminar’s Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention multi-year program series as they devised strategies to support cultures of prevention, with a specific focus on Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.  Funded by the United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the two-year project saw Fellows collaborate within and across countries to develop locally-driven, culturally-sensitive and -specific responses to combat extremism and promote pluralism in the five focus countries: Egypt, Morocco, Pakistan, Rwanda, and South Africa. The new report, Combating Extremism and Promoting Pluralism, presents the findings of the project from August 2016 to March 2018, starting with a workshop at Schloss Leopoldskron, culminating in several successful pilot projects that are now being scaled-up across their regions, and generating a series of concrete recommendations for others wishing to implement their own projects to combat extremism and promote pluralism. Interviews with several Fellows are also included. Pilot Projects Fellows from Rwanda and South Africa collaborated in launching the Change Makers Program, a leadership program for high school students. Using case studies on the Rwandan genocide, South African apartheid and the Holocaust, students develop critical thinking skills and are empowered to be agents of positive change.  In Egypt, educators at the American University of Cairo (AUC) established the Civic Peace Education Initiative. This strives to integrate community-based learning, intergenerational dialogue and storytelling into the curriculum and prompts students and faculty to think about societal divides and adopt values of global citizenship. Similarly, Fellows at the International University of Rabat in Morocco developed a graduate degree program in Conflict Resolution and Peace Governance.  In Pakistan, as part of its mission to protect youth against extremist recruitment efforts, the Renaissance Foundation for Social Innovation, Pakistan (RESIP) used this funding to conduct a study on the effect of socio-religious identities in shaping university students’ behavior. Elsewhere in the country, Fellows at Kohat University launched a study circle to connect students across the country’s northwestern provinces.  “After the Holocaust, people have repeated the mantra ‘never again’ – but then mass atrocities keep happening,” explains Charles Ehrlich, Salzburg Global Program Director.  “In Salzburg, we’ve heard first-hand accounts of tragedies taking place right now afflicting the Rohingya and the Yazidis, among others. Many of our participants in this program have themselves witnessed or survived unspeakable horror. “As an institution based in Austria, a country which itself continues to have difficulty addressing its own Nazi legacy, Salzburg Global Seminar has an especially important role in working with our colleagues from countries across the world to both address their own difficult histories and, through grassroots action, to seek to create a future where these tragedies do not repeat. The network has grown organically – mostly consisting of Fellows from countries in the Global South – as a way to break the isolation, so they have the opportunity to share experiences and ideas and to learn from each other how to develop initiatives appropriate for the circumstances of their own countries.” All five of the pilot projects are now poised for expansion or replication over the course of 2018 and 2019. For its part, Salzburg Global intends to continue this series on Holocaust education and combating extremism through the convening of future sessions in Salzburg, as well as by supporting in-region gatherings of Fellows to aid in the execution of these initiatives. Download the Report
Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention is a multi-year program series held in partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It is funded by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, with further support from Ronald D. Abramson, the Future Fund of the Republic of Austria, The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung. 
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Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World
Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World
Louise Hallman 
Language is fundamental to national identity and an important contributor to social cohesion in modern pluralistic societies. Learning a foreign language helps you to know that country and language skills can be very valuable. However, language policy decisions can also impact detrimentally on students’ life chances. All of this raises critical questions for researchers, policymakers and practitioners about the role of language learning and testing for two public good objectives: to “untap” and optimize individual talents and to foster social cohesion and dynamic inclusive economies. To this end, Salzburg Global Seminar convened the session Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World at its home in Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, in December 2017. The five-day session resulted in the Salzburg Statement for a Multilingual World, which was published on International Mother Language Day and has since been translated into more than 50 languages. A newly published report from the session is now available to read online, download and share.  The session, held in partnership with ETS, Microsoft and Qatar Foundation International, formed part of Salzburg Global’s long-running multi-year series, Education for Tomorrow’s World. Together, the more than 40 representatives from policy, academia, civil society and business, representing over 25 countries looked specifically at language policy through the lenses of social justice and social cohesion; the relationship between multilingualism and dynamic and entrepreneurial societies; the role of language policy in achieving the fourth Sustainable Development Goal for quality education; and the evolving role of technology in this field. The session report includes not only the Salzburg Statement, but also delves into the importance of language policy and practice from different perspectives, featuring summaries of each of the different panel discussions as well as insights from several of the expert participants:  Language is both barrier and bridge to co-operation, peace and progress Learning Languages in a Globalized World Tackling the Inherent Politics of Language Policy Increasing Social Cohesion – and Avoiding Monolingualism Embracing the Economic Value of Multilingualism and Minority Languages Humanizing Language Learning Through Technology Calling for Multilingualism and Language Rights to be Valued, Protected and Promoted  Hot Topic: Why is language learning so important? Hot Topic: What makes good language policy? Hot Topic: How do we promote the value of multilingualism? Download the report (PDF) As populations change and evolve, regardless of the reason, language policies and the programs that support them have a pivotal role to play in helping new arrivals better integrate into their new host countries and enhance social cohesion. Equally important, language policies are fundamental in ensuring millions of people around the world can maintain, enjoy and develop their languages of community. Multilingual policies can sustain the unique and vital resource of language diversity and drive positive change in the world – economically, socially and politically. Like many other sectors, technological innovation has the potential to revolutionize and democratize the language teaching and learning fields, paving the way to fairer access to the job market. Led by input from session partner, Microsoft, participants considered the role disruptive technology might play in shaping future decisions about language policy. Much emphasis in schools’ curriculum in recent years has been placed on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), with languages often valued less in comparison – despite the fact this goes against the latest thinking in neuroscience. Participants looked at how the research community could counter this misalignment of evidence and policy, and gain more traction with policymakers, practitioners and the public. The final part of the session focused on the writing of the Salzburg Statement for a Multilingual World, which was conceived as a way of synthesizing and bringing these complex issues to the attention of policymakers and people of influence and which can serve as an advocacy tool for people working for change in this area. The Statement is provided in full in English in the session report. All other translations – 51 and counting – can be found online: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/statements/multilingualworld   The Statement has been circulated widely following the session and now will form the basis of a series of webinars to be held throughout Summer and Autumn 2018.
Salzburg Global Seminar would like to thank ETS, Microsoft and Qatar Foundation International for their generous support of the session Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World. Salzburg Global Fellows' scholarships were provided by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Capital Group Companies, the Korea Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, the Onodera Fellowship, the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Thompson Fellowship and the Walter & Shirley Massey Scholarship Program. We also thank all Fellows for donating their time and expertise to this session. 
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