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Young Cultural Innovators

Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
Young Cultural Innovators to Host Celebration of Afropunk
Oscar Tollast 
A celebration of Afropunk featuring photographs, live music, discussion, and dancing will be held in Detroit, Michigan, later this week. “Here You Can Be Whatever You Want: A Celebration of Afropunk” is taking place at The Baltimore Gallery, Detroit, on September 14 between 6 pm and midnight. The free event has been organized by Salzburg Global Fellows Lauren Rossi and Karah Shaffer, in partnership with Facing Change: Documenting Detroit. Rossi, creative industries program manager at Creative Many, and Shaffer, co-founder and executive director of Facing Change: Documenting Detroit, both attended the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in October 2017.   After taking part in this program, the duo received support and funding from Salzburg Global, the Kresge Foundation, and the Knight Foundation to inspire innovation and collaboration at a local level. On Friday, visitors will be able to view an exhibition of images made at Afropunk festivals around the world by photographers Kholood Eid and Bunni Elian. Music will be provided by internationally acclaimed DJ and vocalist Shaun J. Wright and DJ Holographic, a local emerging artist also known as Ariel Corley. For more information about the event, please click here.
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
Lala Pasquinelli (center) engaging in an activity at last year’s program of the Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
Oscar Tollast 
A visual artist based in Buenos Aires has spoken of her gratitude after attending the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Lala Pasquinelli, the founder of Mujeres que no fueron tapa (Women who were not on the cover), has revealed how her time at Schloss Leopoldskron has helped her project grow in size and stature. Mujeres que no fueron tapa encourages people to use intuitive artistic experiences to express their diversity and potential. This expression is achieved by hacking magazines and stereotypes and transforming them through art actions and workshops. Since leaving Salzburg, Pasquinelli has taken on board the advice of faculty and has collaborated with fellow YCIs to create a Festival of Hacking Magazines, which is taking in place in more than 150 schools across Argentina until September. Pasquinelli said, “The project and the activities are about [having] a critical view of stereotypes in media, and [discovering] what [is] the thing we love in our lives, and the distance between that and the things the media are trying to impose [on] us. The idea of the Festival is to share with the teachers from private and public schools the tools that we developed the years before.” Schools participate for free and receive guides and materials as to what activities to undertake and how. Once finished, teachers will send photographs and surveys back to Pasquinelli and her colleagues. The results from these surveys will be compiled into a book featuring testimonies and images of the Festival, plus results of the research carried out. “At [the] moment, some of the schools are hacking magazines in different cities of Argentina, and I am watching photographs of blackboards from different schools with the phrase, ‘When do you love being yourself?’ …. It is amazing,” Pasquinelli said. For this project, Pasquinelli received help from fellow YCIs Moira Rubio Brennan and Luciana Chait. Pasquinelli said, “It was very important to me to attend the [YCI Forum] last year, to make this idea grow and develop.” Pasquinelli also highlighted the influence of YCI guest speaker Uffe Elbæk, a member of the Danish Parliament and leader of The Alternative political party, and YCI facilitator Adam Molyneux-Berry, managing director of iceHubs, on her work. She said, “Adam talked a lot about to do things without money, or about money, was not a limit to [doing] the things you dream to change the world. The story Uffe told us about how he started his own party was very inspiring.” Pasquinelli said she wanted to thank Salzburg Global, the sponsors, and organizations which make scholarships possible for the Forum. She said, “I think it is very important for artists to have the possibility of [experiencing] the seminar – to grow in our work and develop our tools.” Pasquinelli's participation at the YCI Forum was supported by American Express. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please visit: https://yci.salzburgglobal.org/overview.html 
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YCI Project Helps Develop Historical Understanding of Memphis’ Past and Present
YCI Project Helps Develop Historical Understanding of Memphis’ Past and Present
Oscar Tollast 
A creative-writing project initially designed to bridge divides and help Memphis’ underserved communities thrive will leave behind a lasting physical imprint. Project Gratus, the brainchild of Steven Fox, highlighted the theme of gratitude to create workshops that kick-started intergenerational conversations between the youth and elderly generation. In addition to project-based workshops, dialogue and reflection sessions also took place, which then evolved into financial literacy workshops for youth and an MLK50 project Fox was selected for. Fox said, “The mission of these workshops was to develop [a] historical understanding of past and current events, invoke empathy and leverage self-confidence, self-worth, creative and critical thinking skills necessary to help citizens thrive artistically, socially, educationally and economically. “The need for this innovative approach was and still is high due to the persistent issue of childhood poverty, high crime rates and failing students/schools in the Memphis community.” Fox is a writer and spoken-word artist who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. After participating in the session, Fox received a follow-on grant to push ahead with Project Gratus. In June 2017, Project Gratus hosted financial literacy workshops at Ed Rice Community Center in the Frayser Area of Memphis, Tennessee. Educator and volunteer Dione Smith used a financial literacy curriculum called JA Our City. In five sessions, twelve students from a third-grade social studies class were introduced to subjects such as the importance of economic exchange and how money is managed by people and businesses in cities. As a result of the program, students were able to examine the importance of money to a city, why people pay taxes and develop an understanding of how entrepreneurs promote a healthy economy within a city. Between August and September 2017, Project Gratus worked alongside Cliff Garten Studio, the City of Memphis, and the Urban Art Commission. Together they looked at community workshops focused on the I Am A Man Plaza, based next to Clayborn Temple, a gathering place for Martin Luther King Jr. and sanitation workers before they marched during the Sanitation Workers Strike in 1968.   As part of the interactive plaza, which opened last month a day after the 50th anniversary of King’s death, a stone sculpture was built. Fox wrote the text that is etched in it. He was recommended for the role by Lauren Kennedy, a fellow member of the Memphis YCI Hub. The plaza gives visitors the opportunity to interact with art and inspire future generations to stand up for positive change. Discussing the content of the workshops, Fox said, “Each workshop included project details and proposed design elements for the I Am A Man Plaza, as well as a review of quotes and text identified from prominent civil rights leaders that will be incorporated in the plaza design. As collaborator… I led a conversation with participants to derive contemporary text for the plaza design.” Project Gratus hosted workshops at the New Chicago Community Development Corporation, Orange Mound Community Center, Clayborn Temple, and Whitehaven Community Center. Fox asked visitors how to honor the sanitation workers and if there was something they could say to them now, what would that be? Citizens were encouraged to be present with one another, learn from one another, and recognize the impact of the Sanitation Workers Strike. Commenting on this methodology, Fox said, “When we do this, we will fulfill the purpose of the I Am A Man Plaza with intention, and it will truly be a place of reflection, inspiration and hard work. Through these workshops, our hope is that the community will recognize opportunities and actions through our commemorating the strike in the history of Memphis.” For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
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Young Cultural Innovator Creates Online Poetry Archive
Visitors exploring the 2017 Detroit Art Book Fair (Picture: Maia Asshaq)
Young Cultural Innovator Creates Online Poetry Archive
Helena Santos 
A young cultural innovator (YCI) has created a free poetry audio archive where artists from all over the world can share their work in their mother tongue. Maia Asshaq, a member of the Detroit YCI Hub, is hoping the Recording Reading Archive will provide a connection between artists that goes beyond the poetry readings she hosts in Detroit. Asshaq, co-founder of the Detroit Art Book Fair and founder of DittoDitto, said, “Since many of those performances occur undocumented, and many of the performers live elsewhere my focus has shifted slightly from events to figuring out a way to connect these artists and make their work more accessible.” The archive, which is available to access online, came about after Asshaq’s experience at the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. During this session, Asshaq met a Japanese writer, Mariko Asabuki, with whom she connected through the power of poetry-reading. Asshaq said, “Even though I can’t speak or understand Japanese, I was so curious as to how she may read her own work and what I could learn about it just by listening. I began work immediately on collecting recordings from friends and poets I was familiar with.” After experimenting with playing pre-recorded poetry in both Paris and Berlin, Asshaq went back to Detroit where she designed a “sort of release party” with musician Matthew Conzett. Each month, Asshaq invites an experimental musician to incorporate recordings of their choice into a live performance. Musicians are then free to manipulate the recordings. Asshaq timed the first official release party with the Detroit Art Book Fair, an annual event which draws thousands of people. This event featured performances from Detroit musicians Claire Cirocco and Matthew Conzett, which have since been added to the Recording Reading Archive. The Recorded Reading Archive is available online, and even though the files cannot be downloaded, everyone can listen to the recordings for free. Asshaq said the archive gives “listeners a chance to not only listen to works by their friends and favorite writers but also to explore new work.” So far, the archive has more than 20 recordings. This project was made possible after Asshaq received a follow-on grant after attending the YCI Forum at Salzburg Global Seminar. Discussing the next steps for the archive, she said, “In addition to building the archive and the monthly releases, my hope is that bookshops all over the world that I’ve built relationships with will feature the recordings as well. I am also trying to tap into existing archives and feature those sounds on my site as well.”
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Young Cultural Innovators “Move from Me to We” at Regional Meeting
Fellows and program staff who attended the second US regional meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Young Cultural Innovators “Move from Me to We” at Regional Meeting
Oscar Tollast 
Young cultural innovators (YCIs) from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans have strengthened their network following the conclusion of the second US regional YCI meeting. This year’s program, supported by the Kresge Foundation, took place at the Contemporary Arts Center of New Orleans with 27 YCIs from both the third and fourth sessions of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators participating. The two-day program involved YCIs taking part in a series of discussions, workshops, site visits, and interactive exercises. Fellows from the New Orleans YCI Hub led site visits. This included an exhibition opening and performance of The Rent is Too Damn High, an event curated by YCI Fari Nzinga; an exhibition tour and talk from the Curator of the Contemporary Arts Centre, exploring new models for interdisciplinary arts centers; a walk-through of Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard, a cultural corridor in New Orleans; and a tour of Studio BE showcasing work of Brandan 'Bmike' Odums. The workshop’s theme was “Moving from Me to We,” exploring further what it means to be a YCI Hub and what YCIs want to accomplish as a community of Fellows in their cities and local communities. Salzburg Global’s Young Cultural Innovators Forum has hubs in six regions around the globe. Hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. Chase Cantrell, the founder of Building Community Value, based in Detroit, said, “Every time I get together with other YCIs, I realize how universal problems are in each of our cities. It has gotten me to think more about how to leverage the network for learning and collaboration.” Yasmine Omari, marketing and education outreach coordinator at Germantown Performing Arts Center, said “meeting the YCI Fellows from the year before was really wonderful. Reconnecting with the YCIs from my year was also really great. I learn so much from listening to their struggles and projects that they are working on and it really makes me feel less alone in the work that I am doing.” Alphonse Smith, director of place and civic design at the Arts Council New Orleans, said the experience of being able to evaluate his work and potential collaboration opportunities was productive. He said, “It challenged me to take a step back and critically reflect on the work. It was also nice to hear constructive feedback from non-New Orleans Hub members.” YCIs were joined in New Orleans by Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director for culture and the arts at Salzburg Global, and Faye Hobson, a program associate at Salzburg Global. Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer at Salzburg Global, and Andy Ho, US development Director at Salzburg Global, also attended the meeting to engage with Fellows. The program was led by YCI Forum facilitators Amina Dickerson, Peter Jenkinson, and Shelagh Wright. Seidl-Fox said, “As creative change-makers, the YCIs confront similar challenges in their cities. Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans are all contending with social inequality, weak public education systems, high unemployment levels, economic disparities, and a general lack of public support for the cultural sector.    “Working at the intersection of the arts and social change, all 27 YCIs are committed to addressing these challenges. This regional YCI meeting in New Orleans provided a rich opportunity for the YCIs to share experiences, coach each other, and strategize for the future. They represent and will shape the future of their cities.   “Their energy, talent, and commitment are what Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans need to help them overcome the challenges of the 21st century.” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is a ten-year project of Salzburg Global Seminar that champions young artists and cultural change-makers who are using innovative and creative practices to catalyze civic, social, and urban transformation in their communities around the globe. For more information on the Forum, please click here. The Regional Fellows Event is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. More information on this event, which was supported by The Kresge Foundation, can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/594
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Detroit YCI Launches Project which Identifies Ways to Increase Creativity
Melvin Henley leads a discussion during Creativity in "Non-Creative" Places
Detroit YCI Launches Project which Identifies Ways to Increase Creativity
Maryam Ghaddar 
What does it mean to be creative in a work environment that often challenges the very definition of the word? How is creativity integrated into sectors and communities that are not considered creative per se? Everyone has a creative streak, whether or not it’s immediately apparent. Melvin Henley, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, sought to explore this notion in a project titled Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places in Detroit, Michigan. The event was hosted in October 2017 at Lawrence Tech University’s Center for Design and Technology, which welcomes people from various backgrounds, fosters design thinking, and serves students, professionals, architects, artists, designers, innovators, entrepreneurs, etc. Henley received funding for the event through a follow-on grant from Salzburg Global after attending the forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Initially intended to convene industry experts from sectors not typically seen as “creative,” such as food, government, sports and education, Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places evolved into a series of group discussions, panel presentations, and an interactive activity between professionals from both “creative” and “non-creative” sectors. The aim was primarily to bounce ideas off each other, form networks, and engage in a friendly and open atmosphere for inspiration on creative brainstorming and idea generation. Shelly Danner, co-founder and program director of Challenge Detroit and another Detroit YCI from the 2016 Forum, led some of these idea generation exercises. Reflecting on the event, Henley said: “Four core competencies were identified as being essential for creative expression: capturing, challenging, broadening and surrounding. All are measurable and trainable, which means that no matter what a person’s current creative output is, when you build on these competencies, your creative output is likely to increase.” Conversations were prompted by a straightforward, yet thought-provoking inquiry: “Innovation and creativity are critical to our personal and professional growth as well as our economy. Do you agree or disagree?” Four dynamic panelists were convened to speak at the event and were chosen based on their diverse work and experiences in the community. The speakers included Sandra Yu Stahl, lead evaluator at Citizen Detroit; Abir Ali, director of design and culture at The Platform; Delphia Simmons, chief strategy and learning officer at COTS, and Rachel Perschetz, director of community investment at Quicken Loans. This particular project brought together 23 people from both “creative” and “non-creative” sectors, nurtured peer-learning opportunities for attendees, highlighted how creative thinking is used every day and offered ways to tap into that creativity in the workplace. In essence, it challenged participants to apply creative problem solving and encouraged individuals to acknowledge and embrace their creative confidence. While Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places was geared towards peer-learning, coaching of young and green programs, and applying brain science and social intelligence in work settings, Henley explained that it was a “prototyping event” and that there is still much room for improvement. For instance, gathering more individuals from the community and focusing more on age diversity would emphasize the project’s central goal. “Moving forward,” Henley noted, “the event has the potential to turn into a series of conversations that happen quarterly, but would like to start with one and see how it goes from there and/or if we can secure additional funding. One of the things that did emerge that I would like to build on is how creative can make room for “non-creative” in their creative output. Sometimes it feels like creatives produce work or spaces or experiences that can only be enjoyed by other creatives.” Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places investigated creative leadership and the many methodologies that can emerge when a group of individuals endeavors to bring about positive change. With this in mind, Henley said that “the THNK program in Amsterdam comes to mind as a great case study. One of the takeaways from the conversation is that people are unsure how to embrace creative ideas and use them to propel ideas and movements. The people in the room were unsure how to design programs for scalability, relevance, and impact outside of traditional business models. There appears to some [an] opportunity to further develop a framework or materials that could be helpful. If possible, I’d like to use more remaining funds to further investigate this subject and develop a Creative Leadership toolkit that is shared with others.”
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Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
The Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans (Photo: Flickr/Reading Tom)
Salzburg Global YCIs Travel to New Orleans for Regional Meeting
Oscar Tollast 
YCIs from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans have been reunited to take part in the second US regional meeting. Thirty Salzburg Global Fellows, all of whom have attended the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in recent years, will convene at the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, on Saturday afternoon (April 7). The two-day program will see YCIs reflect on what it means to be part of a creative hub in cities undergoing radical urban transformation and social renewal. The opening conversation is titled “From Me to We.” Fellows will explore city-based change-making and civic innovation. They will go onto share city briefs and reflect on what’s currently happening in Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans. Several YCIs have agreed to lead site visits in New Orleans on the first evening of the program, offering a range of options for participants to choose from. This includes a tour of Jockum Nordström’s “Why is Everything a Rag” exhibition and Sarah Morris’ “Sawdust and Tinsel” exhibition, both of which are at the Contemporary Arts Center. Alternatively, participants have the chance to attend an exhibition opening and performance of The Rent is Too Damn High, which takes place at the Crescent City Boxing Club. This event, run by YCI Fari Nzinga, is described as a combination of visual art with performance and political satire, exploring themes of home, belonging, cultural transmission, gentrification, and displacement. A third option is to walk to New Orleans’ French Quarter to visit the French 75 bar and the New Orleans Mardi Gras Museum. In this group, participants will discuss subjects involving private foundations and privately-funded cultural activities. A “Cultural Corridor Tour” will also take place, including visits to the Ashe Cultural Arts Center, Tulane Small Center for Collaborate Design, and Roux Carre. All three of these organizations are engaged in community-based art, education, and design. On top of this, participants could also take part in a tour of Studio BE, a 35,000 sq ft warehouse of art, currently housing Brandan Odums’ first solo show. Regardless of which site participants visit, all will be asked how their learning from it could relate to their own work and home city. They will report back at the start of the second day of the program. The rest of the day will be spent discussing modes of collaboration and developing impact plans for the hubs, before wrapping up and outlining the next steps forward. The YCI Forum has hubs in six regions. Hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. The Forum also has a dedicated hub for Rhodes Scholars. The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators engages the world’s most dynamic young creative change-makers. Launched in 2014 as a 10-year project, 50 innovators are invited each year to take part in a session held at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria. Salzburg Global Seminar is committed to fostering creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide. The Forum aims to help build a more vibrant and resilient arts sector while advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide. The Regional Fellows Event is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This session is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/594
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Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Connecting Local Innovators with Global Resources
Salzburg Global Seminar 
“With more than 250 Young Cultural Innovators now connected in communities around the world, the YCI Forum is one of the most dynamic and impactful global cultural networks and a dynamic creative catalyst for innovation, civic transformation, and social change worldwide,” says Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Program Director for Culture & the Arts. Now entering its fifth year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum) held its fourth annual session at Schloss Leopoldskron in October 2017. The global reach of Fellows now extends from Adelaide, Australia, to Valletta, Malta, and 21 cities – called “YCI Hubs” – in between. The 2017 Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) hailed from 13 countries, with each participant facing unique challenges, tied to their specific heritage and industry. They were met with 10 facilitators and five speakers, and the committed staff of Salzburg Global Seminar.  Despite their geographical distances and differences in practice, the YCIs, the facilitators and speakers are intimately connected. A commitment to the arts and cultural sector, and shared ideals of community and justice make this a cohort of peers whose differences act not as barriers, but as bridges. The YCIs see themselves in a global context. They engage in international discourse without losing sight of their own communities. The new report from the latest session, written by returning YCI Sanja Grozdanic, chronicles the week’s events including the plenary presentations, skills-building workshops, small group discussions and vibrant “Open Space” events, organized by the YCIs themselves. “I have been in search of a world city that has intellectuals, artists and those trying to make the world better through their work, I have come to find that unlike the past there isn’t just one place for all these people they are spread out throughout the world and it really takes seminars like this to bring them together,” explains Yasmine Omari from the Memphis YCI Hub in Tennessee, USA.  Linda Kaoma, from the Cape Town YCI Hub in South Africa adds: “I am walking away better equipped to continue to do my work as an artist, cultural practitioner and leader in my community and with a strong affirmation to always lead with the heart. Salzburg Global Seminar has introduced me to new friends, colleagues, accountability partners and future collaborators from all over the world.”  The report includes many more testimonials from Fellows, as well as all their bios and those of the session facilitators and guest speakers. Download the report as a PDF (low-res)
To receive a hi-res edition of the report, please email press[at]salzburgglobal.org The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. 
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