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Moving Toward More Effective Collaborations in Philanthropy
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Moving Toward More Effective Collaborations in Philanthropy
Kwasi Gyamfi Asiedu 
  “You can definitely not stay in your solitary corner and do a great job,” says Vincent Faber. Reaffirming his view with a well-known proverb, he says, “If you want to go quickly, go alone but if you want to go far, go together.”   Faber, the executive director of Trafigura Foundation, was one of 40 participants at the latest program of Salzburg Global Seminar’s Philanthropy and Social Investment multi-year series - New Horizons in Social Investment: Global Exchange for Action and Impact. This program was held in partnership with the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network and took place at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria from October 27 to October 30, 2018.   Collaboration was the subject on one of the panel discussions at this year’s program. While there was consensus about the importance of working together, there was also a recognition of how difficult this can be sometimes. Salzburg Global asked some of the participants for their reflections on the importance of collaboration in the philanthropic sector and for tips on how foundations could work together effectively. “Collaborating is hard and it takes a lot of effort,” says Heather Grady, vice president at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors. “I think the key to collaboration is mutual respect and each side thinking ‘I am going to spend some time on this because I will get something in return,’ she adds. “We say that the network is as strong as its weakest partner,” says Ludwig Forrest who is the philanthropy advisor at the King Baudouin Foundation in Brussels. Forrest is responsible for coordinating the Transnational Giving Europe Network, which is a collaboration of 20 philanthropic organizations across Europe. Forrest says, “You can imagine how difficult this can be especially with organizations of different sizes, maturities and means.” Faber’s tip for effective collaboration hinges on “trust.” Faber says, “I have seen too many prejudices and mistrusts being [put] in the way of success. And how do you get trust? By dialogue - by just speaking to each other, by just being open about your objectives, purpose, what you do, how you do it, [and] why you do it. Just put on the table what your agenda is, your modus operandi but also your philosophy in regards to the choices that you make - as a grant maker or grantee [that] is essential.” Openness and clarity about the terms of any collaborative venture is among Grady and Forrest’s tips for achieving success. Organizations can’t placed themselves above one another. Forrest says, “We succeed together and we fail together as well.”. Grady offers an expansive list of strategies to use when working with other organizations. She says: “Collaboration, I think fails sometimes because one side doesn’t get enough out of it so it ends up not being worth their effort... So, find potential collaborators who you are sure you can offer something to [because] they will want something from you… [and] put people in charge of the collaboration who are actually collaborative…” The session New Horizons in Social Investment: Global Exchange for Action and Impact is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Philanthropy and Social Investment. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network, a network committed to building a vibrant and high impact social investment community across Asia. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGSphil on Twitter and Instagram.
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Is Blockchain the Future of Philanthropy?
Lina Lim at Salzburg Global Seminar
Is Blockchain the Future of Philanthropy?
Anna Rawe 
In a world where terms such as block chain and bit-coin increasingly appear in our media, our businesses, and our culture, the time to understand its potential for the philanthropic sector has arrived. This is the view of Lina Lim who works as the director of impact investment at the Blockchain Philanthropy Foundation. The Foundation was founded last year to research and collaborate on the ways to use blockchain to improve the philanthropic sector’s capabilities and service delivery. The Foundation also looks at how blockchain can help charities access funding and is currently partnering with Melbourne’s La Trobe University to develop a platform for digital currency donations. Of blockchain’s potential, Lim says, “Everyone says technology is a tool, [and] I agree. However, blockchain can add more value beyond just being a tool of technology… it open[s] up opportunities of new ways of process[ing].” Blockchain was initially developed to support bitcoin. Lim, however, is more interested in using this new technology to empower people who are left out of the financial system. Lim’s passion for financial inclusion involves helping the estimated 1.7 billion people who, according to the World Bank, are unbanked. This lack of a paper trail and reliance on cash makes it harder for them to have access to financial institutions and services like bank accounts and credit. Lim says, “Blockchain has been very powerful in opening up that opportunity… the bank will say, ‘We don’t have any record of you’ but with the blockchain, we can create this community-based information… they can start building their information and profile into the blockchain. “[Then] the bank can come into the ecosystem so they will be able to access the same information transaction, so with that, it’s opening up for that particular individual… to build an identity transaction… with that, they can later go to the bank [who will see] ‘Ok, there is that history of information.'” Other uses of blockchain are for those working overseas to be able to send remittances back to their families a lot faster, or for donors to track where their donations are being used. Lim says, “It brings a lot of applications [for both philanthropic and business institutions] starting from building better efficiency, automation, reducing costs… and increasing the trust component.” Trust may become one of blockchain’s most valuable characteristics, particularly in an age where hacking scandals have rocked several companies and a lack of faith in governments and corporations continues to simmer. The fact that blockchain can make information “tamper proof” or “immutable” means that once data is entered into the chain, it can’t be changed. This immutability is also down to what Lim describes as the difference between “the current database model… [where information] just stays in one place, but with blockchain it allows the data to be shared amongst the other participants, or what we call nodes.” The lack of a centralized set of information may help people to trust NGOs to collect and use their data. While Lim’s foundation is still new and running on the enthusiasm of volunteers, she suggests blockchain is an area that needs further development and has the potential to become an integral part of the philanthropy sector, especially in its ability to foster collaboration. She says, “It’s kind of like the Internet when it first came, and everyone’s not sure ‘What is that?’ But then there is more adoption, and it becomes more familiar… in this sector, we look to solve common issues… we do similar projects everywhere so why can’t we have an infrastructure and storage of data then we can actually then share all of this? “Blockchain is a network, and it requires collaboration… it can bring together the ecosystem, [the service providers and the communities that benefit from this impact] we can actually build that within this technology.” The session New Horizons in Social Investment: Global Exchange for Action and Impact is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Philanthropy and Social Investment. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network, a network committed to building a vibrant and high impact social investment community across Asia. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGSphil on Twitter and Instagram.
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Philanthropists and Social Investors Explore Strategies for Social Impact
Participants of New Horizons in Social Investment – Global Exchange for Action and Impact pose for a group photo outside Schloss Leopoldskron
Philanthropists and Social Investors Explore Strategies for Social Impact
Oscar Tollast 
Philanthropists and social investors from all corners of the planet have left Salzburg with a renewed focus on talent management and its relationship with action, scale, and impact. Thirty-nine participants from 19 countries were brought to Austria by Salzburg Global Seminar and the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network (AVPN) to facilitate relationship building, knowledge exchange, and idea generation. During the four-day program - New Horizons in Social Investment: Global Exchange for Action and Impact - participants of different sectors, regions, and expertise worked together to explore talent management practices which could help increase their social impact globally. In Salzburg Global’s historic home at Schloss Leopoldskron, participants were welcomed in conditions of trust and openness, which helped encourage the spread of ideas. The scene was set for participants on Saturday evening as they considered the new frontiers in philanthropy and social investment. The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) estimates it will take five to seven US trillion dollars to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030, with an investment gap in developing countries of about two-and-a-half trillion US dollars. Social impact investment can help bridge this gap. One of the ways organizations can make the world better is by thinking how they can work differently across organizational boundaries and become co-creators. Where do these organizations already align with others and how can assets be mobilized in different ways than before? On the second day of the program, participants engaged with several panel discussions. In the morning, participants explored current and future trends in philanthropy and concrete ways in which to build engagement to increase the likelihood of achieving the SDGs by 2030. This conversation moved forward during the next panel discussion where representatives from different organizations and regions shared their experiences – good and bad – of developing new approaches to philanthropy. Here participants learned about case studies in South America, China, and the Middle East. The day concluded with a conversation on managing talent for effective philanthropy and how best practices could help achieve specific social investing goals. On Monday, participants learned new methods of collaborating, measuring impact, and managing risk beyond environmental, social and governance criteria. They took this information on board as they went on and examined two case studies, focusing on sustainability and climate change and improving access to education. Participants were asked to consider what specific collaborations and approaches had been effective and what practices to replicate. In addition to panel discussions, participants took part in workshops, including one oriented around scaling impact and systems change. Participants learned how to create and align impact strategies to meet the SDGs. Participants were encouraged to open up about their own experiences throughout the program. On Monday evening, a fireside chat took place in the Great Hall of Schloss Leopoldskron where participants asked themselves: how do we align organizational culture and systems for effective philanthropy and impact? As the program concluded, participants were asked to reflect on how their experience in Salzburg had benefited them. They spoke of the value of hearing perspectives from different parts of the world, hearing from different generations, and hearing how their peers had also faced challenges and dealt with them. One participant said they had soaked up “1,000 years of experience.” Andrew Ho, US development director at Salzburg Global, led the program. Ho said, “The program sparked candid and honest conversations about the role of innovation, collaboration, and talent management in increasing philanthropic impact within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals. It demonstrated the power of learning from the experiences of participants from nineteen countries and six continents in the spirit of finding solutions together.” The session New Horizons in Social Investment: Global Exchange for Action and Impact is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Philanthropy and Social Investment. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network, a network committed to building a vibrant and high impact social investment community across Asia. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGSphil on Twitter and Instagram.
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Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Louise Hallman 
The corporate sector puts great emphasis on hiring “the best of the best.” With the increasing importance of private philanthropy in the wake of public sector austerity and growing global challenges, how can we attract top talent to the philanthropy sector – one known for its altruism, not huge salaries?     In a period of mistrust of our institutions, and crisis in our governance and corporate systems, the philanthropic sector is playing an important role in bridging divides, re-establishing trust, and addressing the need for a new civic imagination that is inclusive of all people in a globalized connected world. While significant attention is paid to the financial resources at stake in philanthropy, less focus is given to the skills that make grantmaking for the public good possible. In philanthropies, human resources can often be viewed simply as an administration function responsible for payroll, benefits administration, and logistical aspects of recruitment.  As the global philanthropic sector continues to expand, there will be a greater need for philanthropic institutions to recognize the importance of human resources in attracting, recruiting, and engaging talented staff who can help take their organizations forward. In an effort to redress this imbalance and examine and highlight the importance of investing in human resources for philanthropy, Salzburg Global Seminar, together with partners, convened the program Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy in September 2017. The four-day program, supported by the Ford Foundation, The Hewlett Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the ZeShan Foundation, brought together 30 human resources professionals and executive directors of foundations at Schloss Leopoldskron, home of Salzburg Global Seminar, to discuss the challenges surrounding talent management, and the practices which can be implemented to achieve better results. The new report features discussion summaries, interviews with speakers and recommendations for the sector. Read the full report from this session now online.
Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Seminar series Philanthropy and Social Investment.
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New Horizons in Social Investment - Global Exchange for Action and Impact
New Horizons in Social Investment - Global Exchange for Action and Impact
Anna Rawe 
When we think of progress, we often jump to visions of futuristic cityscapes with towering high-rises and lush garden vistas. This year’s forum on New Horizons in Social Investment: Global Exchange for Action and Impact, in partnership with Asian Venture Philanthropy Network, looks at how we can make progress toward a more equitable, sustainable and ultimately better world for all. Salzburg Global Seminar started its series on Philanthropy and Social Investment in 2008, and during the multi-year series’ span, the philanthropic landscape has changed and expanded beyond traditional grantmakers to include social investors and impact investors. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been established for two years, and continue their rousing call to ”leave no one behind.” While the SDGs have started to become an integral part of the philanthropic framework, the cost of reaching them has a price tag, in particular in developing countries where the UN estimates that there could be an investment gap of $2.5 trillion. This could be an exciting opportunity for philanthropic enterprise, but also raises questions about how to scale up initiatives while fitting with localized contexts. Other challenges arise within organizations themselves, and one element of this is effective talent management. Involving and collaborating with certain people and talent profiles can be transformative, and similar transformations may be needed in the way we evaluate performance to include leadership potential, as well as to measure the impact of social investment measures taken. This is all while balancing brand and bottom line considerations, particularly for corporate philanthropies and social enterprises, which must also be taken into consideration to utilize philanthropic strategies. As every sector takes technological leaps forward and social trends fluctuate, can philanthropy keep pace and use these opportunities to increase impact and empower people through new models of social investment? What are the benefits of experiments with new models of social impact bonds, collaborative philanthropy, and impact investment funds, as opposed to more traditional philanthropic avenues? How can we work together and foster partnerships across geographies and sectors to ensure the global nature of the SDGs is achieved in time while working in a range of cultures and contexts? The four-day program held at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria, takes aim at some of these questions, inviting philanthropists, social investors, and nonprofit executives from all over the world to share their insights. Through plenaries, and small group workshops, the program aims to accelerate the effectiveness of changemakers and highlight innovative approaches, enabling participants to develop innovative practices within their organizations, expand collaborations with others regionally and globally, and shape the way talent is recruited, developed, and expanded in their organization. Andy Ho, the US development director at Salzburg Global Seminar and person responsible for this multi-year series, said, “Salzburg Global Seminar is pleased to partner with AVPN to facilitate the relationship building, knowledge exchange, and idea generation with a group of forty philanthropists and social investors from Asia and around the world. I look forward to seeing how this group will innovate, collaborate and develop strategic talent management practices to increase their social impact globally as a result of this seminar." The session New Horizons in Social Investment: Global Exchange for Action and Impact is part of Salzburg Global Seminar's multi-year series Philanthropy and Social Investment. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Asian Venture Philanthropy Network, a network committed to building a vibrant and high impact social investment community across Asia. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGSphil on Twitter and Instagram.
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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Interlinking Challenges, Interdisciplinary Solutions
Interlinking Challenges, Interdisciplinary Solutions
Salzburg Global Seminar 
The 17 global goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development are nothing short of ambitious. Building on from the Millennium Development Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to “transform our world,” calling for action in both developed and developing countries. While the broad goals each have specific targets, no one goal can be achieved in isolation. Efforts to achieve one goal will help to advance another—and failures to address some will lead to negative impacts on others.  Quality education (SDG 4) greatly improves health and wellbeing (SDG 3), which in turn can increase prosperity, but increased consumption that often comes with that can hinder local and global efforts to tackle climate change (SDG 13). Similarly, reducing conflict (SDG 16) may have benefits for employment and economic growth, but these cannot be sustained unless inequalities in education and access to health care are also addressed. Without holistic action for equality and social justice, peace may be short-lived or conflict may continue by other means. Achieving the targets set out in any of the SDGs thus calls for an interdisciplinary and cross-sector approach.  Recognizing the significant challenge that comes in adopting such an approach, Salzburg Global Seminar is convening the session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health, and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs, at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, starting this Sunday, March 18. The intensive three-day session will bring together 65 researchers, policymakers and development experts to explore how research can be more effectively translated into policy and practice in order to identify the interlinkages—and tensions—between the SDGs, and how top research funders can help lead the way. One such leading research funder is session partner, the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), which is a £1.5bn fund established by the British government to help UK researchers work in partnership with researchers in developing countries to make significant progress in meeting the SDGs. Representing the GCRF at the session is UK Research and Innovation, a newly created body that brings together the seven UK research councils, Innovate UK and Research England. Professor Andrew Thompson, Chief Executive, Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and UK Research and Innovation Champion for the Global Challenges Research Fund, said: “We're delighted to partner with Salzburg Global Seminar to explore the ways excellent research of the kind being undertaken through the Global Challenges Research Fund can help to tackle the most stubborn development challenges across and between the Sustainable Development Goals.”  The session will enable discussion and exploration that span research, policy and practice. This will be achieved through a series of panel discussions and hands-on exercises that will examine the opportunities, challenges, and trade-offs involved in developing interdisciplinary approaches to the implementation of the SDGs related to climate change, conflict, health, and education. The session will also look to identify current research gaps and look at how to communicate the complexity of interdisciplinary research in order to shape evidence-based policy and practice.  Through its programs, Salzburg Global Seminar seeks to bridge divides, expand collaborations and transform systems. In order to take the work of this session beyond Schloss Leopoldskron and advocate for change in their own sectors, participants will co-create a Salzburg Statement. The Statement will offer key recommendations for various stakeholders and serve as a call to action to help participants personally as well as their institutions and communities. “Finding solutions to long-standing, seemingly intractable problems and the specific challenges that the SDGs look to mitigate against requires new ways of thinking and new approaches,” says Salzburg Global Program Director Dominic Regester.  “We are delighted that so many experts across different sectors and geographies have given willingly of their time to come to Salzburg. We very much hope that the Statement that will be collectively authored during and after the session will help advance understanding of and opportunities for interdisciplinary research.” The session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health, and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs, is being held in partnership with UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). More information is available online: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/605 To join in the discussions online, follow the hashtag #SGSsdgs on Twitter
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