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Salzburg Global Calls for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on World Alzheimer’s Day
Two out of every three people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries, according to Alzheimer’s Disease International
Salzburg Global Calls for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on World Alzheimer’s Day
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Two out of every three people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries, according to Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI). As ADI marks World Alzheimer’s Day on September 21, Salzburg Global Fellows are calling for greater innovations in care and support for those diagnosed with Dementia and their families and communities. The Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, which was written by Fellows of the Salzburg Global program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, was first published in July and has since garnered endorsements from health professionals around the world. A dementia-friendly community, as defined by Alzheimer’s Disease International, is a place or culture in which people with dementia and their carers are empowered, supported and included in society, understand their rights and recognize their potential. This Salzburg Statement calls on community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, researchers and advocates to: Work collaboratively and alongside people impacted by dementia to design and implement innovative community-based solutions to improve the wellbeing of persons living with dementia and their care partners. Initiate and support the transformation toward “Dementia-Inclusive and -Friendly Communities.” Promote community-based solutions that can be translated across the boundaries of households, health and social service systems, municipalities, and nations. Health professionals are called to: Ensure increased access to a timely and honest dementia diagnosis using words and language that enable and empower individuals. Place a high value on community-based programs and social services by being informed about what is available and sharing this information with those living with the disease and their families. Researchers and policymakers to: Invest in rigorous qualitative research to define quality of life and wellbeing from the perspective of people with dementia. Develop more accurate measures of quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and their care partners, as well as measures that demonstrate the role of community in supporting people with dementia and their care partners. Implement rigorous evaluations of Dementia Friendly Communities, including structural readiness, person-centered outcomes, and community-level impact in order to ensure better transparency, dissemination, and transfer of best practices and collaborative tools from community to community. Support policies that utilize the resources and capacity of the community to the greatest extent possible. View the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on Issuu
The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running Health and Health Care Innovation series and was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic in December 2017. Around 50 participants from all regions of the world, including health and social care leaders, patients and their representatives, and policymakers, took part in a highly participatory program focusing on building new insights and aggregating perspectives from different sectors. Salzburg Global Fellows Chris Roberts and Jayne Goodrick, a couple from North Wales, UK, took part in the program to share their lived experiences of dementia and to help bridge divides between service providers and patients. Roberts has a diagnosis of mixed dementia, vascular damage and Alzheimer’s, while Goodrick’s mother has a diagnosis of dementia and small vessel disease. Alongside healthcare professionals and policymakers working in the field, their experiences helped influence the creation of the Salzburg Statement. Goodrick said, “People are very paternalistic and will give what they think we on the ground need, and what we on the ground need is actually sometimes something very much different to what we’re offered.” John Lotherington, program director for health and health care programs at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, "There have been great strides forward in the development of dementia care and dementia friendly communities in recent years, but much remains to be done to take this to further scale and meet greatly increasing need. At Salzburg Global Seminar it has been a privilege to work with some of the great pioneers in this work to extend the global call to community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, health professionals, and researchers and advocates to come together to achieve dementia friendly communities for all those living with dementia and those who care for them." Download the Statement as a PDF To submit your endorsement of the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, please click here.       #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; } #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Fellows Call for Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Fellows are pressing for the committed support of dementia inclusive and friendly communities across the world. This call to action features as part of a Salzburg Statement published as a result of discussions at the Salzburg Global program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities. The program was held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic in December 2017. Around 50 participants from all regions of the world, including health and social care leaders, patient representatives, and policymakers, took part in a highly participatory program focusing on building new insights and aggregating perspectives from different sectors. Alzheimer’s and related neurodegenerative diseases have a profound impact on the person with dementia, their carers and families, the local community, and the broader society. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects the number of people living with dementia to triple from 50 million in 2017 to 152 million by 2050. A dementia-friendly community, as defined by Alzheimer’s Disease International, is a place or culture in which people with dementia and their carers are empowered, supported and included in society, understand their rights and recognize their potential. This Salzburg Statement calls on community and health care leaders, entrepreneurs, policymakers, researchers and advocates to: Work collaboratively and alongside people impacted by dementia to design and implement innovative community-based solutions to improve the wellbeing of persons living with dementia and their care partners. Initiate and support the transformation toward “Dementia-Inclusive and -Friendly Communities.” Promote community-based solutions that can be translated across the boundaries of households, health and social service systems, municipalities, and nations. Health professionals are called to: Ensure increased access to a timely and honest dementia diagnosis using words and language that enable and empower individuals. Place a high value on community-based programs and social services by being informed about what is available and sharing this information with those living with the disease and their families. Researchers and policymakers to: Invest in rigorous qualitative research to define quality of life and wellbeing from the perspective of people with dementia. Develop more accurate measures of quality of life and wellbeing of people with dementia and their care partners, as well as measures that demonstrate the role of community in supporting people with dementia and their care partners Implement rigorous evaluations of Dementia Friendly Communities, including structural readiness, person-centered outcomes, and community-level impact in order to ensure better transparency, dissemination, and transfer of best practices and collaborative tools from community to community. Support policies that utilize the resources and capacity of the community to the greatest extent possible. View the Salzburg Statement on Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities on Issuu
Download the Salzburg Statement in full by clicking here The program, Changing Minds: Innovations in Dementia Care and Dementia-Friendly Communities, is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. This year’s session is held in partnership with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and the Mayo Clinic. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGShealth on Twitter and Instagram.
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Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Salzburg Global President's Report 2018
Louise Hallman 
“How does a relatively small but influential NGO help shape a better world? That is the question Salzburg Global Seminar set out to answer as we entered our 70th anniversary year,” explains Salzburg Global President & CEO, Stephen L. Salyer in this year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle.  Founded in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has the mission to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Our multi-year program series aim to bridge divides, expand collaboration and transform systems.  Features This year’s edition of the Salzburg Global Chronicle puts forth this renewed mission and strategic framework of the 70-year-old organization through a series of features and mini profiles of our Fellows and their projects. A Positive Space in a Polarizing World From Students to Statesmen Combined Efforts, Maximum Effect  From Ideas to Impact Radical Reinvention From Local to Global Campaign The Chronicle also announced the launch of Salzburg Global’s largest-ever fundraising campaign. Inspiring Leadership: The Campaign for Salzburg Global Seminar will seek to raise $18 million over the next three years to expand our scholarship program, invest in developing innovative solutions to complex problems and secure this organization and our historic home of Schloss Leopoldskron for generations to come.  “Campaigns are about vision. They support critical, compelling and transformational priorities,” states Salyer. “The Campaign Inspiring Leadership  — gift by gift, investment by investment — will empower people, policies, and placemaking that can transform the world.”  For the Love of Humankind From Scholarships to Schloss Renovations Yearbook Now in its fifth year, this year’s Chronicle is for the first time accompanied by a “Yearbook.” As Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer explains: “Our 2017 Yearbook draws these rich strands together. It provides an overview of our activities and partnerships in Salzburg and around the world, highlighting our multi-year program goals and the concrete outcomes driving short and longer-term impact. We wish you good reading and look forward to working with you in the future.” Download the Yearbook (PDF) You can read all the stories and download both sections of the 2018 President’s Report on the dedicated webpage: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/chronicle/2018 
 
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Salzburg Global Takes Active Role in Discussions at International Meetings on Planetary Health
Salzburg Global Takes Active Role in Discussions at International Meetings on Planetary Health
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Seminar has reaffirmed its commitment to helping create healthier and more inclusive societies after taking part in a strategic event held by the InterAction Council. Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer of Salzburg Global, was invited to take part in a high-level planning meeting on Monday, May 28 to design a roadmap for Collaborative Action on “One Health for People and Planet.” Shine was one of a select group of participants invited to Edinburgh to help build on the Dublin Charter for One Health, adopted by the Council in June 2017. The Dublin Charter for One Health calls for the strengthening of multi-sector solutions to enable the Sustainable Development Goals. It advocates for preventative approaches for peace and security and resilience in emerging threats. It highlights the need for the mainstreaming of One Health within health systems for universal health coverage and the strengthening of One Health governance mechanisms for systems reform. Last, but not least, it calls for the building of planetary health leadership for future generations. Shine presented to the group on the topic of planetary health, outlining the challenges to and opportunities for scaling up action. After lunch, Shine moderated a panel discussion on multi-sector responses that could enhance a healthy planet for all. This discussion included Dr Mandeep Dhaliwal, director of HIV, Health and Development Practice, UNDP; Sophie Howe, commissioner for future generations, Welsh Government; Professor Virginia Murray, from Global Disaster Risk Reduction, Public Health England; Judith Diment, a Rotary International representative to the Commonwealth; Dr Fiona Adshead, deputy CEO and director of strategy and partnerships at the NCD Alliance; and Professor Vajira Dissanayake, president of the Commonwealth Medical Association. Salzburg Global Fellows, including Tracey Cooper, chief executive of Public Health Wales, and Joanna Nurse, strategic advisor for InterAction Council, were also present at the meeting. Shine said, “Wherever we live, our health, security and life chances will increasingly depend on the health of our planet, climate, and natural systems - which are themselves fundamental to sustainable economies in a fast-urbanizing world. Given Salzburg Global’s commitment to transform systems for healthy and inclusive societies, we are delighted to work with the Interaction Council, composed of former heads of state, to advance the One Health for People and Planet agenda as a framework for the Sustainable Development Goals.” The InterAction Council, established in 1983, consists of former world leaders and former heads of government. It is co-chaired by Bertie Ahern, from Ireland, and Olusegun Obasanjo, from Nigeria.  The outcomes of this meeting will be under discussion at the next InterAction Council Plenary session, which will be held in China later this year. This meeting acted as a precursor to the second Planetary Health Annual Meeting, which took place in Edinburgh between May 29 and 31. This event aimed to “bring together new communities around the world to stimulate interdisciplinary and intersectoral collaboration towards ground-breaking solutions to major planetary health challenges.” The three-day event included keynote addresses, panel discussions, and networking opportunities. Topics under discussion included food, nutrition, environmental change, mental health, agriculture, and animals. On Wednesday, May 30, Shine spoke as part of program event titled, “Solution Space: Creating and Collaborating.” She will reflect on nature, cities, and children’s wellbeing while discussing the work and impact of Salzburg Global’s Parks for the Planet Forum. For more information on the Planetary Health Annual Meeting, click here. Review live coverage of the meeting on Twitter using the #planetaryhealth2018 hashtag.
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Salzburg Global Session Highlighted in International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Participants in discussion during the Salzburg Global session, Better Health Care: How do we learn about improvement?
Salzburg Global Session Highlighted in International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Oscar Tollast 
A supplement highlighting the conclusions reached after a Salzburg Global Seminar session has been published in the International Journal for Quality Health Care (ISQua). The publication, authored by M. Rashad Massoud, Leighann E Kimble, Don Goldmann, John Ovretveit, and Nancy Dixson, reflects on the discussions and deliberations which took place at Better Health Care: How do we learn about improvement?, a session held in July 2016. This program sought to examine how health and health care professionals could better understand how results achieved were attributable to interventions conducted. In the background section of the supplement, readers are informed, “The field is at a stage where we must now improve our understanding of how we learn about the changes we test and implement. This means that we need to better understand whether or not the results being realized are related to the interventions we are testing and implementing. If so, we must also understand to what extent, how they worked and why, as well as whether the changes are generalizable or only specific to that context. The answers to these questions are not straightforward. The purpose of the Salzburg Global Seminar — Session 565 was to convene and address these questions and to think through how to approach this concern emerging in the field of quality improvement.” Following an informative four-day program, participants took away knowledge to help in the design, implementation, and evaluation of improvement. They also left Salzburg with a greater understanding of which activities under which conditions were most effective at achieving sustained results in health outcomes. Salzburg Global organized the session in partnership with the USAID ASSIST Project and the New Ventures Fund. M. Rashad Massoud, director of the USAID ASSIST Project and senior vice president of the Quality and Performance Institute at University Research Co, took on the role as session chair. Work undertaken at the session helped enable several peer-reviewed articles to be included in the supplement, all of which address a key component of the discussions which took place. Among the conclusions reached, the authors behind the supplement agreed, “The session quickly revealed that to find solutions to these issues, implementers, evaluators and researchers must work together to better learn about improvement activities. This is in contrast to the current situation in which evaluators too often work independently, rather than collaboratively, with improvement program designers and implementers… “… In essence, participants concluded that the principal accomplishment of the Seminar was to ‘marry’ the world of improvement and evaluation to bridge gaps. A ‘wedding ceremony’ between rigorous implementation and insightful evaluation concluded the Seminar in the inspiring environment of the Schloss Leopoldskron and its magical surroundings where the 'Sound of Music' was filmed.” To read the supplement published in the International Journal for Quality in Health Care, please click here. To learn more about Better Health Care: How do we learn about improvement? and explore other related articles, please click here. Salzburg Global’s report of the session can be read below.
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Interlinking Challenges, Interdisciplinary Solutions
Interlinking Challenges, Interdisciplinary Solutions
Salzburg Global Seminar 
The 17 global goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development are nothing short of ambitious. Building on from the Millennium Development Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to “transform our world,” calling for action in both developed and developing countries. While the broad goals each have specific targets, no one goal can be achieved in isolation. Efforts to achieve one goal will help to advance another—and failures to address some will lead to negative impacts on others.  Quality education (SDG 4) greatly improves health and wellbeing (SDG 3), which in turn can increase prosperity, but increased consumption that often comes with that can hinder local and global efforts to tackle climate change (SDG 13). Similarly, reducing conflict (SDG 16) may have benefits for employment and economic growth, but these cannot be sustained unless inequalities in education and access to health care are also addressed. Without holistic action for equality and social justice, peace may be short-lived or conflict may continue by other means. Achieving the targets set out in any of the SDGs thus calls for an interdisciplinary and cross-sector approach.  Recognizing the significant challenge that comes in adopting such an approach, Salzburg Global Seminar is convening the session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health, and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs, at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, starting this Sunday, March 18. The intensive three-day session will bring together 65 researchers, policymakers and development experts to explore how research can be more effectively translated into policy and practice in order to identify the interlinkages—and tensions—between the SDGs, and how top research funders can help lead the way. One such leading research funder is session partner, the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), which is a £1.5bn fund established by the British government to help UK researchers work in partnership with researchers in developing countries to make significant progress in meeting the SDGs. Representing the GCRF at the session is UK Research and Innovation, a newly created body that brings together the seven UK research councils, Innovate UK and Research England. Professor Andrew Thompson, Chief Executive, Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and UK Research and Innovation Champion for the Global Challenges Research Fund, said: “We're delighted to partner with Salzburg Global Seminar to explore the ways excellent research of the kind being undertaken through the Global Challenges Research Fund can help to tackle the most stubborn development challenges across and between the Sustainable Development Goals.”  The session will enable discussion and exploration that span research, policy and practice. This will be achieved through a series of panel discussions and hands-on exercises that will examine the opportunities, challenges, and trade-offs involved in developing interdisciplinary approaches to the implementation of the SDGs related to climate change, conflict, health, and education. The session will also look to identify current research gaps and look at how to communicate the complexity of interdisciplinary research in order to shape evidence-based policy and practice.  Through its programs, Salzburg Global Seminar seeks to bridge divides, expand collaborations and transform systems. In order to take the work of this session beyond Schloss Leopoldskron and advocate for change in their own sectors, participants will co-create a Salzburg Statement. The Statement will offer key recommendations for various stakeholders and serve as a call to action to help participants personally as well as their institutions and communities. “Finding solutions to long-standing, seemingly intractable problems and the specific challenges that the SDGs look to mitigate against requires new ways of thinking and new approaches,” says Salzburg Global Program Director Dominic Regester.  “We are delighted that so many experts across different sectors and geographies have given willingly of their time to come to Salzburg. We very much hope that the Statement that will be collectively authored during and after the session will help advance understanding of and opportunities for interdisciplinary research.” The session, Climate Change, Conflict, Health, and Education: Targeting Interdisciplinary Research to Meet the SDGs, is being held in partnership with UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). More information is available online: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/605 To join in the discussions online, follow the hashtag #SGSsdgs on Twitter
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A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
Clare Shine 
As 2018 gets underway, I would like to express my sincere gratitude for your continued engagement with Salzburg Global Seminar. In reflection of a landmark year celebrating Salzburg Global Seminar’s 70th anniversary, I wanted to look back on the journey traveled, new projects and horizons. Our 2017 theme of “Courage” resonated throughout this turbulent year. The 1947 vision of Salzburg Global’s founders – a “Marshall Plan of the Mind” to revive dialogue and heal rifts across Europe - felt fresh as ever. Cracks widened in societies and institutions across the world, compounded by a mix of insecurity, disillusionment, and isolationism. Yet the world should be in a better position than ever to tackle common challenges. There is an open marketplace for ideas, innovation, and invention, and opportunities to engage and collaborate are growing fast. In Salzburg, we are privileged to meet individuals from all walks of life who have the courage to tell truth to power, confront vested interests, express artistic voice and freedom, build coalitions for change, and see through tough choices. In divided societies, people need courage to stay true to their beliefs. Leaders need courage to curb their exercise of power. Together, we need courage to rekindle our collective imagination to rebuild society from the bottom up and the top down.Three strategies guide our own work for this purpose.1. Given Salzburg Global’s roots in conflict transformation, our programs seek to bridge divides: Our American Studies series – a discipline born at Schloss Leopoldskron – focused on Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration, including the roots of economic and racial division;The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change had its highest-ever participation on Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism and published an interactive playbook “Against Populism”;Our Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention series is now applying tools developed in previous years to promote pluralism and tolerance and address issues of radicalization and violent extremism. Pilot projects to test these approaches are under way in five countries (Pakistan, Rwanda, South Africa, Morocco, and Egypt) with the potential to expand to other countries;The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum marked its fifth anniversary with a major report assessing the influence and personal impact of a cross-sector network that now spans more than 70 countries and has inspired new partnerships and cultural initiatives. 2. Salzburg Global Seminar aims to inspire new thinking and action on critical issues to transform systems, connecting local innovators and global resources: Our high-level leadership programs address fundamental components of dynamic and inclusive societies. We now have three annual series - Forum on Finance in a Changing World, Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum, and the Public Sector Strategy Network – and have begun a new collaboration with major foundations on Talent Management for Effective Global Philanthropy. We have expanded our work on Health and Health Care Innovation with ambitious initiatives, including the five-year Sciana Health Leaders Network which marks a groundbreaking crossborder partnership with The Health Foundation (UK), Bosch Stiftung (Germany) and Careum Stiftung (Switzerland), and a major partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation aimed at building a shared culture of health.Education for Tomorrow’s World is going global! As an outcome of our 2015 and 2016 work on innovation for social and emotional learning, we are convening meetings over 15 months in Latin America, the Middle East and Gulf, and North America. These will inform a synthesis session in Salzburg in December 2018 to frame lessons learned for decision-makers in the education sector and other key stakeholders. 3. Salzburg Global seeks to expand collaboration by fostering lasting networks and partnerships: The Young Cultural Innovators Forum, created in 2014, now has 18 city/country hubs across the world, and held its first US inter-city meeting in Detroit;We’re expanding alliances in Asia with long-standing and new partners. The Asia We Want: Building Community through Regional Cooperation is laying foundations for a bottom-up innovation network for A Clean and Green Asia. November saw our first-ever program with the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups and the Hong Kong Jockey Club on Leadership for Inclusive Futures in Hong Kong, focused on 30 rising leaders across the public, private and civil society sectors.The Salzburg Statement on The Child in the City: Health Parks and Play (Parks for the Planet Forum) was showcased at the World Congress on Public Health in Australia and will feature in webinars for US city leaders, working with the National League of Cities and the Children in Nature Network. After six years living in Schloss Leopoldskron and meeting the most diverse and talented people imaginable, I often hear myself describe Salzburg Global Seminar as “deeply human.” 2017 brought many reminders of the special bonds forged during our lifetime and the enduring need to advance trust and openness around the key issues facing today’s world.  Thank you again for your commitment and recognition of Salzburg Global’s importance in your professional and personal development. We hope you will consider joining other Fellows who have already made a donation to Salzburg Global this year. Please click here to learn more. With very best wishes from everyone at Salzburg Global Seminar, and we hope to welcome you back to Schloss Leopoldskron in the near future.
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