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Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
Lala Pasquinelli (center) engaging in an activity at last year’s program of the Young Cultural Innovators Forum
Lala Pasquinelli – It’s Important for Artists to Experience Salzburg Global Seminar
Oscar Tollast 
A visual artist based in Buenos Aires has spoken of her gratitude after attending the fourth program of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Lala Pasquinelli, the founder of Mujeres que no fueron tapa (Women who were not on the cover), has revealed how her time at Schloss Leopoldskron has helped her project grow in size and stature. Mujeres que no fueron tapa encourages people to use intuitive artistic experiences to express their diversity and potential. This expression is achieved by hacking magazines and stereotypes and transforming them through art actions and workshops. Since leaving Salzburg, Pasquinelli has taken on board the advice of faculty and has collaborated with fellow YCIs to create a Festival of Hacking Magazines, which is taking in place in more than 150 schools across Argentina until September. Pasquinelli said, “The project and the activities are about [having] a critical view of stereotypes in media, and [discovering] what [is] the thing we love in our lives, and the distance between that and the things the media are trying to impose [on] us. The idea of the Festival is to share with the teachers from private and public schools the tools that we developed the years before.” Schools participate for free and receive guides and materials as to what activities to undertake and how. Once finished, teachers will send photographs and surveys back to Pasquinelli and her colleagues. The results from these surveys will be compiled into a book featuring testimonies and images of the Festival, plus results of the research carried out. “At [the] moment, some of the schools are hacking magazines in different cities of Argentina, and I am watching photographs of blackboards from different schools with the phrase, ‘When do you love being yourself?’ …. It is amazing,” Pasquinelli said. For this project, Pasquinelli received help from fellow YCIs Moira Rubio Brennan and Luciana Chait. Pasquinelli said, “It was very important to me to attend the [YCI Forum] last year, to make this idea grow and develop.” Pasquinelli also highlighted the influence of YCI guest speaker Uffe Elbæk, a member of the Danish Parliament and leader of The Alternative political party, and YCI facilitator Adam Molyneux-Berry, managing director of iceHubs, on her work. She said, “Adam talked a lot about to do things without money, or about money, was not a limit to [doing] the things you dream to change the world. The story Uffe told us about how he started his own party was very inspiring.” Pasquinelli said she wanted to thank Salzburg Global, the sponsors, and organizations which make scholarships possible for the Forum. She said, “I think it is very important for artists to have the possibility of [experiencing] the seminar – to grow in our work and develop our tools.” Pasquinelli's participation at the YCI Forum was supported by American Express. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please visit: https://yci.salzburgglobal.org/overview.html 
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Stefan Brandt - The "Future is a Very Abstract Topic"
Stefan Brandt speaking at the Salzburg Global Seminar program, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology, and Making Sense of the Future
Stefan Brandt - The "Future is a Very Abstract Topic"
Helena Santos 
In the heart of Berlin, next to the German Bundestag and the German Chancellery, a building designed to give visitors a glimpse of the future has opened its doors for its first workshop week. Ahead of its final launch in 2019, Futurium is inviting people to get to know them in an event that will cover topics such as digitization, civic involvement, climate protection and sustainability. Between May 30 and June 9, people have the chance to experience the venue as a museum of the future, a future laboratory, a future forum, and a stage for the future. Stefan Brandt, director of the Futurium, said the concept of a museum is a valuable part of the project. Brandt spoke to Salzburg Global Seminar while attending the program, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future. Brandt said, "I think we definitely want to show and present things, objects on [the ] future but I think is not enough… We need all the other dimensions as well. There are many things, many problems, and challenges that you cannot fully address in an exhibition. You need other dimensions to deal with. For instance, you need a debate, a discussion, workshop… You need artistic performances because often in the past artists had a better feeling of what could happen in the future because they don’t think in a linear way. They rather associate or work [associatively]  with different observations and thoughts, and they get a completely surprising vision of the future that at the end is sometimes closer to reality than the more linear analysis that a scientist might do." The workshop's theme is “Areas of Tension. Approaching Possible Futures.” This is something that falls in line with the thoughts shared by Brandt during his stay in Salzburg. After all, Brandt does not believe in a single future; he believes in multiple futures. Futures are just our different ideas of what the future might look like. These ideas may be consistent, complementary or conflicting and that’s why it is important to share them in an eclectic space like the Futurium.   When Futurium opens at fully capacity in spring 2019 the first floor of the building will accommodate a permanent exhibition guided by the question “How do we want to live?” This exhibition will be divided into three different thinking spaces that will tackle the future relationship of humans with themselves, nature and technology.   In the building’s basement, visitors will find the Futurium Lab, something Brandt considers essential because the hands-on approach allows for a more intimate experience. “Future is a very abstract topic… What we have seen in our work with children, with pupils at schools is that once they are closely in touch with future, to objects or to books - to materials that are dealing directly with future - they feel connected somehow… Therefore, I think that the objects and the concrete doing is something so important for an institution like us,” Brandt clarified. During his time at Salzburg, Brandt presented the Futurium as a translator, the missing link in a fragmented society where arts, science, and policy-makers have trouble communicating with each other. “We think sometimes very simplistic about politics, and it’s good to understand what the problems for politics are to get things done. On the other hand, we also don’t value enough what arts can contribute to such a discourse because arts are not just the pretty flower on something. It is sometimes really the core of something - of our approach to future, for instance. On the other hand, without knowledge that comes from science, from scientific work we would not be able to further explore futures. Therefore, I would say that yes, we need to understand more the value of each other…to really start a qualified debate”, Brandt said. Bringing all sectors of society together to discuss which future everyone wants is the primary goal of this groundbreaking project that also aims to change lives for the better. Brandt says, “Keeping peace at least in a major part of the world will be a big achievement and the second is that we really try to solve problems solemnly and not superficially… [After questioning preexisting systems we] understand each sector is connected to the other sectors and we need holistic solutions, but it takes time, and it takes patience, and you need to have the will to go this way, and this is a difficult way. My hope is that we make at least some steps on this way.” To learn more about Futurium’s first workshop week, please click here. Brandt took part in Salzburg Global session, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future, part of the multi-year series Culture, Arts and Society. The session is supported by the Edwards T. Cone Foundation. More information on the program can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter using #SGSculture.
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Young Cultural Innovator Creates Online Poetry Archive
Visitors exploring the 2017 Detroit Art Book Fair (Picture: Maia Asshaq)
Young Cultural Innovator Creates Online Poetry Archive
Helena Santos 
A young cultural innovator (YCI) has created a free poetry audio archive where artists from all over the world can share their work in their mother tongue. Maia Asshaq, a member of the Detroit YCI Hub, is hoping the Recording Reading Archive will provide a connection between artists that goes beyond the poetry readings she hosts in Detroit. Asshaq, co-founder of the Detroit Art Book Fair and founder of DittoDitto, said, “Since many of those performances occur undocumented, and many of the performers live elsewhere my focus has shifted slightly from events to figuring out a way to connect these artists and make their work more accessible.” The archive, which is available to access online, came about after Asshaq’s experience at the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. During this session, Asshaq met a Japanese writer, Mariko Asabuki, with whom she connected through the power of poetry-reading. Asshaq said, “Even though I can’t speak or understand Japanese, I was so curious as to how she may read her own work and what I could learn about it just by listening. I began work immediately on collecting recordings from friends and poets I was familiar with.” After experimenting with playing pre-recorded poetry in both Paris and Berlin, Asshaq went back to Detroit where she designed a “sort of release party” with musician Matthew Conzett. Each month, Asshaq invites an experimental musician to incorporate recordings of their choice into a live performance. Musicians are then free to manipulate the recordings. Asshaq timed the first official release party with the Detroit Art Book Fair, an annual event which draws thousands of people. This event featured performances from Detroit musicians Claire Cirocco and Matthew Conzett, which have since been added to the Recording Reading Archive. The Recorded Reading Archive is available online, and even though the files cannot be downloaded, everyone can listen to the recordings for free. Asshaq said the archive gives “listeners a chance to not only listen to works by their friends and favorite writers but also to explore new work.” So far, the archive has more than 20 recordings. This project was made possible after Asshaq received a follow-on grant after attending the YCI Forum at Salzburg Global Seminar. Discussing the next steps for the archive, she said, “In addition to building the archive and the monthly releases, my hope is that bookshops all over the world that I’ve built relationships with will feature the recordings as well. I am also trying to tap into existing archives and feature those sounds on my site as well.”
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Young Cultural Innovators “Move from Me to We” at Regional Meeting
Fellows and program staff who attended the second US regional meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Young Cultural Innovators “Move from Me to We” at Regional Meeting
Oscar Tollast 
Young cultural innovators (YCIs) from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans have strengthened their network following the conclusion of the second US regional YCI meeting. This year’s program, supported by the Kresge Foundation, took place at the Contemporary Arts Center of New Orleans with 27 YCIs from both the third and fourth sessions of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators participating. The two-day program involved YCIs taking part in a series of discussions, workshops, site visits, and interactive exercises. Fellows from the New Orleans YCI Hub led site visits. This included an exhibition opening and performance of The Rent is Too Damn High, an event curated by YCI Fari Nzinga; an exhibition tour and talk from the Curator of the Contemporary Arts Centre, exploring new models for interdisciplinary arts centers; a walk-through of Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard, a cultural corridor in New Orleans; and a tour of Studio BE showcasing work of Brandan 'Bmike' Odums. The workshop’s theme was “Moving from Me to We,” exploring further what it means to be a YCI Hub and what YCIs want to accomplish as a community of Fellows in their cities and local communities. Salzburg Global’s Young Cultural Innovators Forum has hubs in six regions around the globe. Hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. Chase Cantrell, the founder of Building Community Value, based in Detroit, said, “Every time I get together with other YCIs, I realize how universal problems are in each of our cities. It has gotten me to think more about how to leverage the network for learning and collaboration.” Yasmine Omari, marketing and education outreach coordinator at Germantown Performing Arts Center, said “meeting the YCI Fellows from the year before was really wonderful. Reconnecting with the YCIs from my year was also really great. I learn so much from listening to their struggles and projects that they are working on and it really makes me feel less alone in the work that I am doing.” Alphonse Smith, director of place and civic design at the Arts Council New Orleans, said the experience of being able to evaluate his work and potential collaboration opportunities was productive. He said, “It challenged me to take a step back and critically reflect on the work. It was also nice to hear constructive feedback from non-New Orleans Hub members.” YCIs were joined in New Orleans by Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director for culture and the arts at Salzburg Global, and Faye Hobson, a program associate at Salzburg Global. Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer at Salzburg Global, and Andy Ho, US development Director at Salzburg Global, also attended the meeting to engage with Fellows. The program was led by YCI Forum facilitators Amina Dickerson, Peter Jenkinson, and Shelagh Wright. Seidl-Fox said, “As creative change-makers, the YCIs confront similar challenges in their cities. Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans are all contending with social inequality, weak public education systems, high unemployment levels, economic disparities, and a general lack of public support for the cultural sector.    “Working at the intersection of the arts and social change, all 27 YCIs are committed to addressing these challenges. This regional YCI meeting in New Orleans provided a rich opportunity for the YCIs to share experiences, coach each other, and strategize for the future. They represent and will shape the future of their cities.   “Their energy, talent, and commitment are what Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans need to help them overcome the challenges of the 21st century.” The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is a ten-year project of Salzburg Global Seminar that champions young artists and cultural change-makers who are using innovative and creative practices to catalyze civic, social, and urban transformation in their communities around the globe. For more information on the Forum, please click here. The Regional Fellows Event is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. More information on this event, which was supported by The Kresge Foundation, can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/594
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Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World
Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World
Louise Hallman 
Language is fundamental to national identity and an important contributor to social cohesion in modern pluralistic societies. Learning a foreign language helps you to know that country and language skills can be very valuable. However, language policy decisions can also impact detrimentally on students’ life chances. All of this raises critical questions for researchers, policymakers and practitioners about the role of language learning and testing for two public good objectives: to “untap” and optimize individual talents and to foster social cohesion and dynamic inclusive economies. To this end, Salzburg Global Seminar convened the session Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World at its home in Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, in December 2017. The five-day session resulted in the Salzburg Statement for a Multilingual World, which was published on International Mother Language Day and has since been translated into more than 50 languages. A newly published report from the session is now available to read online, download and share.  The session, held in partnership with ETS, Microsoft and Qatar Foundation International, formed part of Salzburg Global’s long-running multi-year series, Education for Tomorrow’s World. Together, the more than 40 representatives from policy, academia, civil society and business, representing over 25 countries looked specifically at language policy through the lenses of social justice and social cohesion; the relationship between multilingualism and dynamic and entrepreneurial societies; the role of language policy in achieving the fourth Sustainable Development Goal for quality education; and the evolving role of technology in this field. The session report includes not only the Salzburg Statement, but also delves into the importance of language policy and practice from different perspectives, featuring summaries of each of the different panel discussions as well as insights from several of the expert participants:  Language is both barrier and bridge to co-operation, peace and progress Learning Languages in a Globalized World Tackling the Inherent Politics of Language Policy Increasing Social Cohesion – and Avoiding Monolingualism Embracing the Economic Value of Multilingualism and Minority Languages Humanizing Language Learning Through Technology Calling for Multilingualism and Language Rights to be Valued, Protected and Promoted  Hot Topic: Why is language learning so important? Hot Topic: What makes good language policy? Hot Topic: How do we promote the value of multilingualism? Download the report (PDF) As populations change and evolve, regardless of the reason, language policies and the programs that support them have a pivotal role to play in helping new arrivals better integrate into their new host countries and enhance social cohesion. Equally important, language policies are fundamental in ensuring millions of people around the world can maintain, enjoy and develop their languages of community. Multilingual policies can sustain the unique and vital resource of language diversity and drive positive change in the world – economically, socially and politically. Like many other sectors, technological innovation has the potential to revolutionize and democratize the language teaching and learning fields, paving the way to fairer access to the job market. Led by input from session partner, Microsoft, participants considered the role disruptive technology might play in shaping future decisions about language policy. Much emphasis in schools’ curriculum in recent years has been placed on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), with languages often valued less in comparison – despite the fact this goes against the latest thinking in neuroscience. Participants looked at how the research community could counter this misalignment of evidence and policy, and gain more traction with policymakers, practitioners and the public. The final part of the session focused on the writing of the Salzburg Statement for a Multilingual World, which was conceived as a way of synthesizing and bringing these complex issues to the attention of policymakers and people of influence and which can serve as an advocacy tool for people working for change in this area. The Statement is provided in full in English in the session report. All other translations – 51 and counting – can be found online: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/statements/multilingualworld   The Statement has been circulated widely following the session and now will form the basis of a series of webinars to be held throughout Summer and Autumn 2018.
Salzburg Global Seminar would like to thank ETS, Microsoft and Qatar Foundation International for their generous support of the session Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World. Salzburg Global Fellows' scholarships were provided by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, Capital Group Companies, the Korea Foundation, The Nippon Foundation, the Onodera Fellowship, the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Thompson Fellowship and the Walter & Shirley Massey Scholarship Program. We also thank all Fellows for donating their time and expertise to this session. 
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Detroit YCI Launches Project which Identifies Ways to Increase Creativity
Melvin Henley leads a discussion during Creativity in "Non-Creative" Places
Detroit YCI Launches Project which Identifies Ways to Increase Creativity
Maryam Ghaddar 
What does it mean to be creative in a work environment that often challenges the very definition of the word? How is creativity integrated into sectors and communities that are not considered creative per se? Everyone has a creative streak, whether or not it’s immediately apparent. Melvin Henley, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, sought to explore this notion in a project titled Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places in Detroit, Michigan. The event was hosted in October 2017 at Lawrence Tech University’s Center for Design and Technology, which welcomes people from various backgrounds, fosters design thinking, and serves students, professionals, architects, artists, designers, innovators, entrepreneurs, etc. Henley received funding for the event through a follow-on grant from Salzburg Global after attending the forum for Young Cultural Innovators. Initially intended to convene industry experts from sectors not typically seen as “creative,” such as food, government, sports and education, Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places evolved into a series of group discussions, panel presentations, and an interactive activity between professionals from both “creative” and “non-creative” sectors. The aim was primarily to bounce ideas off each other, form networks, and engage in a friendly and open atmosphere for inspiration on creative brainstorming and idea generation. Shelly Danner, co-founder and program director of Challenge Detroit and another Detroit YCI from the 2016 Forum, led some of these idea generation exercises. Reflecting on the event, Henley said: “Four core competencies were identified as being essential for creative expression: capturing, challenging, broadening and surrounding. All are measurable and trainable, which means that no matter what a person’s current creative output is, when you build on these competencies, your creative output is likely to increase.” Conversations were prompted by a straightforward, yet thought-provoking inquiry: “Innovation and creativity are critical to our personal and professional growth as well as our economy. Do you agree or disagree?” Four dynamic panelists were convened to speak at the event and were chosen based on their diverse work and experiences in the community. The speakers included Sandra Yu Stahl, lead evaluator at Citizen Detroit; Abir Ali, director of design and culture at The Platform; Delphia Simmons, chief strategy and learning officer at COTS, and Rachel Perschetz, director of community investment at Quicken Loans. This particular project brought together 23 people from both “creative” and “non-creative” sectors, nurtured peer-learning opportunities for attendees, highlighted how creative thinking is used every day and offered ways to tap into that creativity in the workplace. In essence, it challenged participants to apply creative problem solving and encouraged individuals to acknowledge and embrace their creative confidence. While Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places was geared towards peer-learning, coaching of young and green programs, and applying brain science and social intelligence in work settings, Henley explained that it was a “prototyping event” and that there is still much room for improvement. For instance, gathering more individuals from the community and focusing more on age diversity would emphasize the project’s central goal. “Moving forward,” Henley noted, “the event has the potential to turn into a series of conversations that happen quarterly, but would like to start with one and see how it goes from there and/or if we can secure additional funding. One of the things that did emerge that I would like to build on is how creative can make room for “non-creative” in their creative output. Sometimes it feels like creatives produce work or spaces or experiences that can only be enjoyed by other creatives.” Creativity in “Non-Creative” Places investigated creative leadership and the many methodologies that can emerge when a group of individuals endeavors to bring about positive change. With this in mind, Henley said that “the THNK program in Amsterdam comes to mind as a great case study. One of the takeaways from the conversation is that people are unsure how to embrace creative ideas and use them to propel ideas and movements. The people in the room were unsure how to design programs for scalability, relevance, and impact outside of traditional business models. There appears to some [an] opportunity to further develop a framework or materials that could be helpful. If possible, I’d like to use more remaining funds to further investigate this subject and develop a Creative Leadership toolkit that is shared with others.”
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The Shock of the New – Using Tech to Drive Social Innovation
The Shock of the New – Using Tech to Drive Social Innovation
Helena Santos 
When picturing a utopian or dystopian future, technology invariably features. Technology already plays such a ubiquitous role in today’s life; one can only guess how humanity’s relationship with it can evolve further. Is this something which should scare us or excite us? Projects such as Chowberry and Wazi Vision, however, remind us of the positives contributions technology is making to society and the social change it can drive. Both were highlighted as examples during the Salzburg Global Seminar session, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology, and Making Sense of the Future. Through innovation and enabling technologies, Chowberry aims to provide affordable nutrition to millions of people. The cloud-based application service is the brainchild of Oscar Ekponimo and was developed as a result of his own experiences. Having gone through a period of financial difficulty while growing up, he was determined to improve access to quality food in Nigeria for others. Through the app those in need get access to quality food from the stores that sell products reaching the end of their shelf-life for lower prices, thus combating food waste and hunger at the same time. While a lot of requests to export Chowberry to countries in Africa and South America arrive at Ekponimo’s door, he is currently focused on starting a new project in Nigeria. With Ars Electronica as partners, he is working on the Gallery of Code to plug the intellectual gap in Nigeria and build a relationship for cultural exchange from both artistic and technological points of view. Expanding on this further, Ekponimo says, “We have put together a lab, or what I would call a creative space that would have a blend of arts and also creative technology. A collaboration between artists coming in from all around the world to understand the contexts of the local community and produce installations, works of art, [...] creative technologies using a leveraging of skills and intellects from the West here in Europe to work with local hands on the ground, to develop creative technologies that can help solve problems.” Giving back to the community is something that is also present in Brenda Katwesigye’s work. With Wazi Vision, she works alongside female artisans in Uganda to transform recycled plastic into affordable eyewear. As the business continues to grow, Wazi Vision is preparing to launch a range of glasses on Amazon, taking their concept worldwide. Meanwhile, Katwesigye’s company is also developing an app that will make eye tests more accessible. “The reason that people in hard to reach areas do not have access to [conventional testing methods] is because you cannot open up an optical center in the village or somewhere. So these people don’t have access to optical centers and also, at least in Uganda, optometrists and opticians they are not as evenly distributed in the country as they should be … You find all of them in Kampala, in the capital, and then outside of Kampala maybe one or two if any. What we are trying to do with the app is for everybody … that’s how technology is actually changing society and integrating into culture and into the way we do life overall,” Katwesigye explains. WATCH: An Introduction to Wazi Vission's Mission
The Salzburg Global session Ekponimo and Katwesigye attended sought to bridge divides between creative talents and technologists, scientists, futurists, policymakers, and educators. Despite their different backgrounds, all were united behind the idea to chart collaborative pathways to more livable futures.Accessibility is a theme which runs through Ekponimo and Katwesigye comments – whether that’s access to resources, people, or food. Technology can enable different parties to come together and provide more opportunities for people previously left out of the conversation. When humans and their needs are at the core of projects, integrated change is possible, and technology can act as a social enhancer as these two innovative ideas show. Ekponimo, who won a Rolex Award for Enterprise for his work in 2016, says, “People just need to be empowered with the right skills and when they have the right skills, when they have the right know-how they can solve problems whether it’s in health, whether it’s in agriculture because this is key because they understand the problem more than an outsider coming in. “All they just need [are] skills, whether it’s technology skills for example and they can then use [those] technology skills and be creative … Technology gives you a huge amount of creative power, and with that huge amount of creative power you can solve problems within your community and be effective in that problem-solving approach.”. The Salzburg Global program The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future is part of the multi-year series, Culture, Arts and Society. The session is supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation. More information on the program can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter using #SGSculture.
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YCI Creates Intercultural Toolkit for Diverse Partners to Work Together
YCI Creates Intercultural Toolkit for Diverse Partners to Work Together
Oscar Tollast 
An intercultural toolkit designed to bring partners together from diverse backgrounds has been created by a YCI Fellow. Leni Stoeva, a member of the Memphis YCI Hub, has put forward a Cross-Partnership Development Toolkit, which will soon be available in multiple languages. Stoeva views the toolkit as an “invitation to partnership and creativity,” which will allow individuals and organizations to gain more perspective, skills, and networks. She said, “A significant takeaway from the [Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators] is new relationships formed. 21st century Europe is facing a growing complexity of societies and a standardization of lifestyles and cultures. “Meanwhile, USA is facing a time of self-segregation based on class, race, and values at the root of the country’s pressing problems. The world’s future depends on inter-community connection and partnerships that foster understanding between people who may have little in common.” Stoeva, who attended the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, created the resource after partnering with the Bulgaria YCI Hub. Both worked together last year during the Bottom Up Culture Project, a project designed to highlight and discuss the current issues the creative community in Bulgaria is facing. Stoeva helped to facilitate two consecutive sessions, the first of which was a university talk in Sofia and later a workshop in Plovdiv. Both events brought more than 60 people together. Specific goals that were outlined ahead of the event to lead discussions included creating partnerships from a diverse set of interests, collaborating between major and smaller, local cultural institutions, establishing inter-sectoral partnerships, and introducing a specific cultural diversity strand to local partnerships. This project held a forum that explored culture-led urban regeneration, cultural entrepreneurs, creative places, creative quarters, and neighborhood change and gentrification. After the event, Stoeva searched for the best practices of partnership development on national levels to present as a structured toolkit. Stoeva said, “I believe that by participating in a cultural exchange seminar in Plovdiv provided me with compelling opportunities to continue conversations begun in Salzburg and foster learning across countries. With the project, we worked on identifying best practices for cross-partnership development.” For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI), please click here. Download an English version of the Cross-Partnership Development Toolkit 
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Amy Karle - "It's Really Important That We Choose and Focus on the Future We Want to Achieve"
Amy Karle - "It's Really Important That We Choose and Focus on the Future We Want to Achieve"
Carly Sikina 
From a very young age, Amy Karle was taught to envision a future full of hope, and as a transdisciplinary artist, she applies this optimism to her work. Karle is an international award-winning bioartist and designer who examines how technology can be used to support and enhance humanity. Her artwork and designs combine digital, physical and biological systems to explore what it means to be human and how technology can be used to empower humanity.  Karle attended the Salzburg Global Seminar session, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future, which took place at Schloss Leopoldskron. Karle shared her work and insights during the session’s opening panel discussion. Karle understands the importance of transdisciplinary exchange, as many of her projects cannot be created using art and design alone. While producing Regenerative Reliquary - a bioprinted scaffold in the shape of a human hand 3-D printed in a biodegradable PEGDA-hydrogel that disintegrates over time – cross-disciplinary collaboration was crucial. “I definitely had to collaborate with scientists and doctors and technologists to be able to learn how to build these scaffolds, to learn how stem cells will be triggered to turn into different kinds of bone cells… in a way that will biodegrade.” Not only did she have to create partnerships across disciplines, but she also had to collaborate with other life forms. “It was really important that I collaborated with the actual stem cells and collaborated with this intelligence that creates life ...I see a lot of disciplines trying to harness nature and trying to harness the natural and control it. I’m more interested in witnessing it and letting it teach me how it grows, how it creates.” Throughout her career, Karle has used art and design to explore what it means to be human. It’s a “very interesting” time in history, according to Karle, a point in time many still consider technology to be outside of ourselves. “However,” Karle says, “just in communicating with these devices and working with these devices, we have actually now reshaped out brains to think in different ways.” Although many people see these changes as negative, Karle recognizes the benefits of developing new technologies. By consciously thinking about how we integrate technology into our lives, Karle believes we can explore how it can help empower us. Despite her optimism, Karle understands this issue is not always black-and-white. “Human induced evolution can occur much quicker than natural evolution and we can’t undo things like this [genetic editing] so this is where it takes the most conscious awareness.” Images of the future can often appear dark or grim. There appears to be an underlying assumption parts of society will be unable to keep up with advancements in technology and will pay the price. Karle strikes a different note. She says, “When we look at combining artificial intelligence and genetic editing, we can easily see the potential doomsday scenarios, but we can also see enlightened futures as well.” Karle identifies recognition and emotions as ways to explore what it means to be human. The vision behind Regenerative Reliquary was to create something “that was uniquely and immediately recognizable as human.” She chose a human hand design because of all of human bones, hands are one of the most identifiable. She continues, “I feel my contribution to humanity as an artist is that I have a platform to first share these common emotions - common feelings - of what it means to be human. Beyond our skin tone or economic status, what country we are from, or what language we speak, there are common truths about being human that we all share, that we all experience, like death and suffering, and most of us also have an opportunity - even if it’s just for one small moment - to experience this joy and the awe and mystery of life as well.” Karle’s inspiration derives from personal experiences. “What inspires me is human needs - some of them are my own needs and internal motivations that I can’t always identify.” She states, “They are what made me who I am from the moment that I was born – the way I tap into the world, the ways that I experience the world and I’m trying to share my exploration and reflections with others.” When asked about her time at Salzburg Global, Karle speaks passionately about the ideas she’s heard, including the notion that the artist is not a PR machine for science. She says, “This is really hard for me because in a lot of ways, I am a scientific and a medical illustrator, and that speaks to me. But being a PR machine reduces the importance of the artistic and scientific stories. But it’s a tension because we need the PR in order to keep producing the work, to get the funding for the work research, whether that be an art or science.” Karle has maintained an optimistic view of the future throughout her life. “From my very beginnings, I was painted a future of hope. I was born with a life-threatening birth defect, and most of the other cases before me had passed away from this, but my parents instilled and carried this vision of a future full of hope for me. “I can see all these different kinds of futures that are available to us, and it’s really important that we choose and focus on the future that we want to achieve. We cannot always achieve that, but if we are working towards that, we can get a lot closer than if we are blindly going into the future without thinking about it – without being conscious about it. It does require some work.” Karle took part in Salzburg Global session, The Shock of the New: Arts, Technology and Making Sense of the Future, part of the multi-year series Culture, Arts and Society. The session is supported by the Edwards T. Cone Foundation. More information on the program can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter using #SGSculture.  
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