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Thank You for Helping to Make the World a Better Place
Photo by Courtney Hedger on Unsplash
Thank You for Helping to Make the World a Better Place
Salzburg Global Seminar 
As we say goodbye to 2018 and hello to 2019, we want to thank all of you, our supporters. Your commitment has ensured the successful launch of the Inspiring Leadership Campaign - the most ambitious fundraiser in Salzburg Global's history designed to expand programs, support scholarships and Fellow collaboration, and preserve and enhance our unique home in Salzburg. Your gift creates positive, lasting change in communities around the world and extends the opportunity to become a Salzburg Global Fellow to future generations. Thank you for making this possible. Stephen Salyer, President and CEO of Salzburg Global Seminar, said, "Salzburg Global Seminar connects amazing people from diverse cultures, inspires new thinking and strategy, and builds collaborations that transform communities. This is made possible by our generous donors and through the engagement of active global networks. Thank you for supporting our work worldwide." This is just the start! It’s never too early or late to make a gift. Help us offer the Salzburg experience to others who are striving to make the world a better place. Join us. Learn more at: campaign.salzburgglobal.org
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Michael Chang – “Every Little Action from Everyone Counts”
Michael Chang in conversation at Salzburg Global Seminar
Michael Chang – “Every Little Action from Everyone Counts”
Oscar Tollast 
In October 2018, health and urban planning professionals from more than 15 countries convened in Salzburg to explore how urban environments can affect health and the public good. The group came together for Building Healthy, Equitable Communities: The Role of Inclusive Urban Development and Investment. Among the participants was Michael Chang, a project and policy manager at the Town and Country Planning Association. Chang, a chartered town planner, and an honorary member of the UK Faculty of Public Health, leads the Reuniting Health with Planning initiative of stakeholder engagement and policy research across the UK. We spoke with Michael after the program to discuss what he had learned and his decision to create the Health and Wellbeing in Planning Network. Read our interview below. SG: Building Healthy, Equitable Communities was your first experience of taking part in a Salzburg Global program. What were your expectations heading into the event? MC: I had high expectations and was highly excited heading into the event, after doing a bit of research into the organization, about its work and the impacts it has had over the years. I knew there would be a presence from colleagues across the globe so there would be an exciting melting pot of ideas, experiences, and cultures. I was looking forward to harnessing that energy and the opportunity the experience would bring to enhance my own work back in the UK. SG: How would you describe your experience in Salzburg? MC: I am not usually an expressive type of person, but I would describe the experience in Salzburg as phenomenal, a once in a lifetime opportunity and such a privilege. The setting gave me a safe thinking space which I don't usually have. The connections allowed me to share my thoughts openly with others. The [program] provided a structure for me to reflect on my own circumstances.    SG: What impact did the conversations and ideas generated at Schloss Leopoldskron have on your work? Was there an idea or perspective you heard which you hadn't considered before? MC: Everyone was open and honest with their conversations and professional views. I was grateful to everyone for this level of transparency. It did raise a couple of challenging conversations especially when it came to issues around racially-related inequalities in the American and South African contexts, and the nuance between ‘gentrification’ and “regeneration.” I learned that while as professionals, we may use these terms interchangeably to suit, it doesn't alter the level of impact our actions can have on local communities. Fortunately, as the experience of attending a planning conference in New Orleans earlier in 2018 was still fresh where such issues are very much at the fore, I was able to relate and have a broader mind-set during discussions. The ideas discussed and presented show that every little action from everyone counts, and sometimes the big idea may not be the answer. We don't tend to learn and acknowledge the lessons of the past and from others, so having that critical mass of thinkers and doers was really beneficial. SG: What's inspired you to move forward with the Health and Wellbeing in Planning Network? MC: I wanted to move forward with the idea of identifying [and] then bringing together that critical mass, at least initially in the UK context which doesn't currently exist in a structured way. The ability to exchange and share experiences, potential transferable solutions or even to have those challenging conversations at the Session demonstrated that perhaps if only initially replicated in a virtual forum, it would be worthwhile. The thinking space provided during smaller group discussions with colleagues such as Gemma McKinnon towards the end of the [program], and with external colleagues such as Rachel Flowers gave me the conviction to press the “go” button for the Health and Wellbeing in Planning Network. This meant activating a series of communication platforms via a LinkedIn group, a Twitter account, and a simple website. SG: What response have you had to the Network so far? MC: In the first weekend of the Network being set up on Twitter right after #SGSHealth, it had close to a couple of hundred followers already. By 2019 new year’s day the number of followers is at 350. On LinkedIn, the Network has 48 members, and on the website, there is a list of 17 members who sent in a short biography to be included. SG: In the long-term, what are your hopes for the Network? MC: It is still early days for the Network to be fully activated across its different communication platforms. I am hoping that the Network members will increase to build a critical mass of “public health planners,” its presence enhanced through its website and its value widely recognized, which means ultimately more virtual peer to peer exchanges taking place in 2019. The Network can function in a number of different ways that is focused on its members acting as ‘peers’ to help each other signpost requests for further support and technical expertise. I hope it can be self-sustaining and become the go-to one-stop-shop for information on all things about planning for health and wellbeing. SG: What do you think practitioners working to improve health and wellbeing need to know more about when it comes to planning? MC: The first step is to understand the parameters of what you mean by “planning.” Certainly, I learned that planning in the UK is very different from planning in the USA, South Africa or New Zealand. By understanding the parameters, you can begin to think about the possibilities including the limitations of what legislation and policy allow you to do. Most importantly this allows you to know who else you have to work with, engage and involve in the process, and appreciate that working together is always better than working alone. SG: The Network is in its early days, but what is one thing you have learned already? MC: It is important to articulate a need for an idea and whether such a need is sustained and regular or just a one-off. This can really be done by having lots of conversations with others so as well as understanding more about the target audience, you are also making links and thereby helping to create the need. Come back to me in a year or so to see whether I am on the right track or not! 
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Healthy Children, Healthy Weight - Making an Impact
Participants of Healthy Children, Healthy Weight outside Schloss Leopoldskron
Healthy Children, Healthy Weight - Making an Impact
Oscar Tollast 
Innovators from across the world have outlined new ways to help promote and safeguard children’s health and wellbeing. On the final day of the Healthy Children, Healthy Weight program, participants presented outputs from their workgroup discussions with the aim to help improve children’s lives. After four days of cross-border sharing and learning, more than 50 participants came together to outline the next steps forward and prepare recommendations for action. In total, seven groups put forward ideas. The first group to present sought to reframe the debate for healthy children and make change happen at a higher level. This group suggested creating a playbook of tactics which any broker or advocate of change could use to help push policies which better serve children. Brokers and advocates need to use their expertise, participants heard. These change-makers can move further forward by building alliances and aligning partnerships. Participants referred to this process as the “Salzburg schmooze” and indicated they had plans for a destination point where this information could be visible. Building on this proposal, the next group to present discussed the need for a values-driven learning journey for child and family programs. Participants in this group discussed developing a brief for practice leaders to better support meeting their program goals. As part of this process, the group developed five principles. They argued the goal of learning and evaluation is to accompany, scaffold, and strength both child and family programs and their leaders. They said organizations could and should use data iteratively as possible to improve programming. With data in mind, the group said many forms are valuable and have different weights to different stakeholders. This diversity of data should be taken into consideration. Various methods of learning and evaluation are appropriate for different phases and can contribute toward program learning. Finally, the group indicated the voices of families and staff could strengthen the design of research and evaluation. This point is the most important to consider, participants heard. Other parts of the group’s end-product included organizational readiness for evaluation, an overview of evaluation tools and instruments, ethical and equity considerations, and a glossary of terms. In short, the group’s end game is for leaders to have a more positive perspective when it comes to learning and evaluation. Having discussed the “Salzburg schmooze,” participants were introduced to the “Salzburg shift” in the third presentation of the day. This group’s members sought to revisit the model to optimize nutritional status and wellbeing that allows children to thrive across the world. Obesity and malnutrition can exist within the same country, and neither should be seen as separate challenges, participants heard. The group focused on areas including food systems, policy, regulation and finance, cultural practices, and emerging knowledge. Participants called for a greater understanding of the food system, reviewing the subsidies which fuel it and the shift needed to move toward a more localized approach. They also want to examine the relationship between industry and regulation, accessibility toward good food options, and the sugar tax dilemma. By learning more about cultural practices in different parts of the world, participants heard healthy eating could be promoted further through education, community leaders, and institutions. There is emerging knowledge concerning inflammation, infection, gut health, and the importance of sleep. Issues of intervention investing early are also gaining traction. The group has split these topics into three groups: program-ready, worthy of further investigation, and implementation research. Moving forward, members hope to shift the conversation be it in the form of a publication or collaboration. One message which emerged during the program is the variety of stakeholders involved in improving children’s health and wellbeing. One group decided to focus on how a healthy food economy could drive a successful city – rethinking health from a business perspective. Citing Amsterdam as an example, the presenter said the city had approximately 5,300 food outlets. Food marketing is everywhere and encourages people to spend money on “anytime food.” The approach, moving forward, should involve improving the quality of “anytime food.” The presenter for this group indicated that government authority should be utilized, while consumer demands should be optimized. This process would also involve supporting shop owners. An “anytime food” standard could be established by a council, for example. Shop owners could be supported through the creation of a ranking system for “anytime food” outlets, innovation challenges, and marketing and sales training. This paradigm shift toward healthy food could also involve community debates, workshops targeted at children, capacity building, a multi-level approach reaching all aspects of a child’s circle of influence. Another group worked on principles for governments to achieve health equity with a focus on indigenous and marginalized populations. Members of this group said all children, young people, and their families are valued, have a sense of belonging and control of their own destiny. These communities are inclusive, adapt to change, actively seek out those who feel invisible and engage them. The group aims to raise the visibility and voice of indigenous and marginalized people to achieve health equity. The group will do this through a paper that outlines principles for governments to shift power, mind-sets, policy and practice toward equity. Principles for success include voice and aspiration, accountability, transparency, identifying and addressing inequity in the system, and acknowledging and addressing the past. This work is targeted at all levels of government and will be influenced by indigenous leadership structures, including tribal authorities and other marginalized groups. There is a lot of literature on scaling, but not enough on what it means when systems scale. This view was shared by the next group to put forward their idea. This group focused on shifting power conditions to scale systems change, so all children, families, and communities thrive. Members of this group would like to work on an insight paper exploring the relationship between power, equity, and scale. This approach includes examining the underlying hypothesis of power and its relationship to shaping conditions. During the presentation, participants heard how much of the focus had been on how to scale rather than the requirements needed to scale. The group discussed five core elements including leaders, stakeholders, and audience; information and insights; agents and mindsets; funders and resources; and – linked to this all – equity factors. All elements must be addressed to create conditions for scale. There is a need to reconceptualize power, so it is more accessible to more people, participants heard. The final group to present discussed the shared values and learnings which had emerged during the program. This group, which featured two participants, created an early draft of a potential Salzburg Statement, outlining a call to action. This document will be shared with other participants for their critique and feedback and will be worked on outside of the program. Participants were reminded that the health of the world and the health of children were intrinsically linked, and this Statement could be a way to bring others on board with their ideas and recommendations. As the discussion came to a close, participants were reminded of a quote by Astrid Lindgren to serve as inspiration: “I have never tried that before, so I think I should definitely be able to do that.” Participants will continue to work on their ideas outside of Salzburg and move toward disseminating their reflections to a wider audience, including key stakeholders. The program Healthy Children, Healthy Weight is part of Salzburg Global's multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation. This year’s program is being held in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
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Manjeet Kripalani - "Our Arrival Has Changed the Dynamics in the Think Tank World"
Manjeet Kripalani, pictured, is the co-founder of Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations (Photo: Gateway House)
Manjeet Kripalani - "Our Arrival Has Changed the Dynamics in the Think Tank World"
Oscar Tollast 
Manjeet Kripalani is the co-founder of Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations. She is also a Salzburg Global Fellow, having attended Mass Media in the Age of Globalization in October, 2000. At this point in her career, she was the bureau chief for Business Week magazine in Mumbai. Kripalini recently spoke with Salzburg Global to discuss the role of Gateway House, its successes, its challenges, and where its focus lies in the immediate future. SG: Manjeet, thank you for taking the time to talk with Salzburg Global. To begin, can you tell us about Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations, and the purpose behind it? MK: We are a foreign policy think tank in Mumbai, established to engage India’s leading corporations and individuals in debate and scholarship on India’s foreign policy and the nation’s role in global affairs. We are membership-based, independent, non-partisan and not-for-profit. We are located in Mumbai for several reasons, to get a non-Delhi, non-landlocked perspective of India but also because Mumbai is India’s most international, cosmopolitan city, one with historical links to the outside world. Mumbai is also at the heart of the changing international matrix – globalization, terrorism, energy, environment, innovation, technology, nation-building, and the new geoeconomics. And it is home to the country’s leaders – corporate, financial, media, artistic and technological. Mumbai is, as our logo and brand depicts the gateway to India and our face to the world. SG: As I understand it, you were inspired to establish Gateway House during your time as an Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. What was it, in particular, that gave you that lightbulb moment? MK: Three reasons: 1. The similarities between Mumbai and New York are obvious and were made even more apparent when I was at CFR. The pragmatic impact of business on America’s foreign policy is clear; it makes that country’s positioning and diplomacy more compelling and closer to the reality of people’s lives. 2. The participation of business, as members, of CFR, whether in meetings and discussions, in providing input on papers, in fund-raising and board positions, was active and impressive. I thought then – we can easily have a similar institution, a home for India’s internationalists, in Mumbai. As a business journalist who worked in both New York and Mumbai, I knew this was possible, and would be welcomed in India. 3. The time was right – India was changing thanks to the outsourcing of software, it was becoming a global participant, and it was the software business that was leading our diplomacy at that moment. The actual moment when we became a reality for the public was [on] the 26th November 2008 [after the] attacks on Mumbai. No one knew who these attackers were, and the need for a think tank in Mumbai, which could study international affairs both economically and security-wise, was felt. Our funding came in right after this. SG: What, in your opinion, are some of the success stories Gateway House can recount? MK: There are several: 1. We are now nine years old, and still, the only major non-Delhi think tank in India, one which is independent, private and membership based. Our model is unique, and I don’t think easily replicable. 2. Our arrival has changed the dynamics in the think tank world, injecting a dose of cordiality into what is a fiercely competitive think tank landscape in India. 3. Because we are in Mumbai, our study area is geoeconomics and international finance, multilateral engagements – studies that have not been a focus in India. We parley that into global geoeconomic conferences and a deep study into the G20 financial agenda. We study with maritime affairs, given Mumbai’s coastal position, and data security, so important for India’s IT and other businesses. 4. We are the only think tank in India that creates visual research – maps and infographics, usually the preserve of consultants. It has given us the edge in our industry, and globally.   5. We are perhaps the only think tank in the world founded by two women – one diplomat, one business journalist. We don’t play this up or parley it well enough in today’s politically correct world because we ourselves don’t feel any different from other entrepreneurs. But the input we receive from others is that the workplace is more congenial and that the special talents of individuals are nurtured and enabled to blossom. SG: What are some of the challenges you've faced since establishing Gateway House? With hindsight, are there things that you would have done differently? MK: Primarily, being founded by two women means that male-led institutional bastions do not treat women-led institutions with the same seriousness that they do the men’s club. We live with it, but we hope that soon it will change in India. I don’t think we would do anything differently. There isn’t much recognition of the work and necessity of a think tank in Mumbai, for Mumbai. But as India is rapidly globalizing, we find that the knowledge of world affairs is gaining currency – and that’s where we come in. SG: There are evidently a wide number of foreign policy issues to tackle. What's one area where more focus is required? MK: A greater study of finance, of economics, of business, of media, of maritime affairs, of the blue economy, of technology. And less of a western lens in viewing the world. We need to build a body of literature and analysis, case studies, on India and its foreign policy. SG: You've had an illustrious career. You've had an extensive career in journalism and gained significant experience in politics. In your current role, do you feel as if those experiences help you and provide you with an advantage in your work? MK: No question that it does. A reporter is a researcher, a questioner, a tracker, following a quest that is persevering and who never gives up until the truth is found. A think tank does that and more – it develops an analysis of the same, and makes recommendations on policy-making. Also writing is essential to communication. It is a skill, an art, a passion for me. Our website and papers do well because we do not write in dry, academic, jargon; we write in simple, clear language, so that ordinary people, young people – and in India, less literate people – can understand even the nuances of foreign policy. SG: You attended a program of Salzburg Global Seminar called Mass Media in the Age of Globalization. What can you remember about this program? Did it have an impact on you in any shape? MK: This was very long ago, but I do remember that it brought together groups of people from different parts of the world and from different areas of expertise and experience, all of whom were put together to bring forth a common solution. That has stayed with me as the defining characteristic of Salzburg. It taught me a lot. #s3gt_translate_tooltip_mini { display: none !important; }
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Salzburg Global Fellow Shahidul Alam Profiled for TIME Magazine’s “Person of the Year” Feature
Shahidul Alam speaking at Salzburg Global Seminar
Salzburg Global Fellow Shahidul Alam Profiled for TIME Magazine’s “Person of the Year” Feature
Oscar Tollast 
TIME magazine has profiled Salzburg Global Fellow Shahidul Alam as part of its “Person of the Year” feature. The Bangladeshi photographer and activist is a part of TIME magazine’s spotlight on “the Guardians” and the “War on Truth” – this year’s winner. The Person of the Year feature profiles a person, group, idea, or object that has done the most to influence the events of the year. The magazine honored several journalists, including Jamal Khashoggi, Capital Gazette staffers, Maria Ressa, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo. It also highlighted numerous examples of journalists who have been attacked in the course of their work, including Alam. Karl Vick, writing for TIME, said, “In 2018, journalists took note of what people said, and of what people did. When those two things differed, they took note of that too. The year brought no great change in what they do or how they do it. What changed was how much it matters.” Earlier this year, Alam was jailed for more than 100 days in response to statements he made during student-led mass protests in Dhaka. Speaking with TIME, Alam said, “The world over, journalism is under threat. Whether you’re a teacher, a dancer, a painter, or a journalist, each one of us needs to be constantly fighting.” In August, Salzburg Global expressed its concern for the welfare of Alam and helped spread information about his situation with the wider Fellowship. Last month, Alam was granted bail by Bangladesh’s high court. He had previously applied for bail four times. Alam still faces up to 14 years in prison on charges of spreading propaganda against the government under the Bangladeshi’s International Communication and Technology Act (ICT), according to TIME. Despite this possibility, Alam remains undaunted and plans to cover elections in Bangladesh this month. Alam has previously attended two Salzburg Global programs. In 2013, he joined Salzburg Global as a faculty member for Power in Whose Palm? The Digital Democratization of Photography. In 2016, meanwhile, he was a participant at Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability. At both programs, he shared his photography and activism with Fellows from around the world.
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Transforming the Citizens of Tomorrow through SEL
Picture by hari_mangayil on Pixabay
Transforming the Citizens of Tomorrow through SEL
Anna Rawe 
India’s population is approaching 1.35 billion. With 29 states and seven union territories, a one-size-fits-all model might not be appropriate for its education system. Changes to just one region, or even city, can affect vast numbers of people. An example of this is in Delhi, through the emergence of a happiness curriculum. Launched by the Dalai Lama, the policy is a considerable shift towards social and emotional learning (SEL). The Delhi Government is responsible for 1,000 schools, around 20,000 teachers and 1.5 million students. It provides happiness classes for students from nursery to Grade Eight. These classes often take place at the beginning of the day and have three parts: mindfulness exercises, a story, and a discussion where every student has to speak. Students are encouraged to question teachers instead of just writing and memorizing. Shailendra Sharma is the principal advisor to the director of education for the Government of NCT Delhi. In his position, he was heavily involved in reforms which he hopes will develop mindfulness, critical thinking, and empathy in Delhi students. When asked why the Delhi Government made this ambitious move, Sharma said, “Privately, everybody would complain about the aggression, maladjustment, corruption, you name it, and these are issues that are cited. They would all expect that something should be done in the school, ‘We are not doing enough.’ But, these two narratives [of social problems and SEL] were not converging, and through [the] happiness curriculum, we have attempted to bring about this convergence.” Sharma believes unless societal issues are addressed in schools, systems will not transform, and another generation will carry on cycles of behavior. He hopes this mandated happiness class is the first step in introducing SEL principles to Delhi classrooms, and once teachers get used to the methods used, they will integrate them with their lessons throughout the day. However, SEL is still not widely visible in India’s education system. Despite this issue, there are other informal avenues for SEL to take place, as Dream a Dream in Bangalore demonstrates. The organization currently works with 10,000 young people through its School Life Skills and Career Connect programs, with the aim of helping young people overcome adversity and thrive. Vishal Talreja was working in investment banking before he set up Dream a Dream in 2000. Talreja had the desire to spread the idea “every human being is unique and special, and they need to be respected for who they are, irrespective of the background they come from.” But this leads to a dilemma. Talreja asks, “How do we enable that in a society that largely has been established on a strong caste and class system?” Talreja suggests more needs to be done within education to move away from the system inherited from India’s colonial past. Talreja wishes education could do more to encourage the traits of empathy, respect, and dignity that nurture citizens of tomorrow. He believes SEL has a vital role to play in helping children living in poverty by facilitating them as they learn to learn, build life skills, and encourage them to help others. Talreja has found kids that have been through his program want to go on to become active citizens in their communities, and currently, 40% of their 92 people strong team are graduates from Dream a Dream programs. Dream a Dream has grown massively in the 18 years it’s been active, but how can SEL be spread on a nationwide scale in India? Sukhmani Sethi, program manager for Porticus Asia, in Delhi, believes philanthropy has an essential role in the SEL space in India. Sethi says, “Philanthropy really helps amplify a voice or a theory of change, because… if a couple of funders back up a certain approach… that voice for that approach gets amplified. I think that’s how those kinds of approaches get traction by even policymakers.” Sethi studied history at Delhi University where her professors encouraged her to “invest in knowing more about outside your bubbles.” She ended up in educational research by accepting a job at Pratham, an NGO, which changed her understanding of privilege. Now, she aims to move the needle on SEL in India and encourage school systems to look at a child’s development as a whole, and she looks for others who share the same goal. Different charitable funders could be vital in helping provide opportunities for researchers and organizations who can help deliver the social and emotional learning that is key to children’s development. As Vishal Talreja says “If you want to impact how society looks in the future, then you have to impact children today.” The program Social and Emotional Learning: A Global Synthesis is part of Salzburg Global's multi-year series Education for Tomorrow’s World. This year’s program is being held in partnership with ETS, Microsoft and Qatar Foundation International, who will also co-chair the program, together with additional partners, the British Council, the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and the Inter-American Development Bank.
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Community Party at Schloss Leopoldskron
Community Party at Schloss Leopoldskron
 
When? Tuesday, 18 December from 18.30 Where? Great Hall, Schloss Leopoldskron Feel free to bring your partner or a friend, while we provide the drinks and food in a festive atmosphere! Please RSVP by email to Jan Heinecke or phone at +43 (662) 83983-303 
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