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Palliser Lecture 2019
Palliser Lecture 2019
 
The Palliser Lecture 2019 will be delivered by The Rt Hon Lord Patten of Barnes CH, in conversation with Professor Rana Mitter on the topic Europe and the Rise of China - How Can European (including British) Interests and Values Best Be Protected in a Multipolar World? The invitation only event is jointly organized by Salzburg Global Seminar and the 21st Century Trust and kindly hosted by The Aga Khan Centre in London, UK. This will be the fifth lecture in memory of the Rt Hon Sir Michael Palliser GCMG, who died in 2012.  He served as Vice-Chair of Salzburg Global Seminar and was a founding trustee of the London-based 21st Century Trust, which now works exclusively with Salzburg Global Seminar.  His counsel and support were a huge boon to our work over many years.  Sir Michael enjoyed a long career in the British Diplomatic Service, culminating as Permanent Under Secretary of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Head of the Diplomatic Service. For more information on the lecture, please visit the Palliser Lecture program page here or contact Danielle Karnoff, Salzburg Global's Development Manager, Campaign & Individual Giving.
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John Cannon & Stacy Baird: Is The Board Ready to Address Disruption? 
John Cannon & Stacy Baird: Is The Board Ready to Address Disruption? 
John Cannon and Stacy Baird 
This article is part of the series, the Salzburg Questions for Corporate Governance by the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum Disruptive innovation is now a fact of life in most industries. Entrepreneurs and established businesses alike are challenging incumbent companies by creating paradigm-changing new products, services, and business models that supplant existing products, markets, and value networks. Disruption challenges traditional business paradigms, but it often also brings with it opportunity. The question to address for any business entity: is its board adequately equipped to anticipate, address or take advantage of disruption? A board needs traditional knowledge of markets and competition, but also an understanding of the impact of network effect and evolving customer relationships for businesses. Innovation has always – by definition – underpinned new business models, and new products and services. But a new dimension is the pace of innovation, the impact of network effect, and the fact that innovation substantially is coming from non-traditional market players. Businesses never present before in a particular sector are entering with very creative offerings to challenge, often blindside, more traditional businesses.  Another necessary board competency is an understanding of technology. For example, can your board anticipate the impact of machine learning (ML) or artificial intelligence (AI) on your company? These technologies will have profound impact on all industries. But in what way? The most recent wave of disruption has been as a result of advances in network technology, means of access to consumers, and the ability to network individuals on a mass scale to match individual service providers to consumers through new and evolving channels such as the internet, handheld devices and more recently, the Internet of Things. Companies now have many more ways to interact with consumers and can develop new products and services that take advantage of the ubiquity of the digital domain. Further, it is easier than ever for companies and individuals to network directly with consumers to provide new services that challenge old providers, e.g., online payment systems (Alipay, Apple Pay, Google Pay) v. traditional credit providers; Uber v. taxis; AirBnB v. hotels; Spotify v. traditional music distribution channels; and Netflix content production v. traditional movie studios. Even in this context, data analytics is having a transformative impact. AI and ML will go further to transform the marketplace, but how remains the critical question.  Putting it all together, there is a substantial need for an understanding of the potential for radical new business models facilitated by new technologies.  What expertise does your board have, or need, to address potential paradigm-changing disruptive innovation, the impact of technology on the traditional market, and the potential for new business models that can be anticipated as technology evolves? It seems unrealistic to rely exclusively on educating existing directors on the accelerating pace of technological change and disruption of business models. As a consequence, board “refreshment” – already an objective of institutional shareholders – should actively be pursued and involve the identification of director candidates with expertise in the real-world applications of technology and/or business reinvention.  Technological sophistication may not alone be sufficient for these purposes. Equally important is the capacity of directors to think “outside the box” with management regarding a company’s business model. The dangers of groupthink – particularly in being wedded to the status quo operation of a business – can be mitigated through populating a board with individuals with a diversity of backgrounds and thinking as well as a leavening of knowledge of technological trends and experience with disruption.  Yet even this may not be enough for boards to successfully navigate the challenges ahead, especially given the ever-increasing oversight and compliance responsibilities also imposed upon them. Boards of directors should consider retaining as soon as possible permanent staff, outside advisors or panels of experts to assist them in dealing with the impact and implications of artificial intelligence and other disruptive technologies.  Prompt action may mean the difference between a company being the victim or the beneficiary of technological revolution. HAVE AN OPINION?  We encourage our readers to share your comments by joining in the discussion on LinkedIn. John Cannon is a partner in the Compensation Governance and Employment Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) Group of Shearman & Sterling LLP, and co-chair of the firm's Corporate Governance Advisory Group. He is an inaugural fellow of the American College of Governance Counsel, and is a frequent speaker to boards of directors, professional groups, and law students on executive compensation and corporate governance matters as well as the international regulation of pay in the financial services industry. In his practice, John focuses on all aspects of corporate governance and executive compensation and benefits, including state corporation, securities, banking, bankruptcy, employment and tax laws, and the ERISA. John has extensive experience in advising corporations and boards of directors on management succession, shareholder engagement, compliance with Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley, and the employee issues raised in the mergers and acquisitions context, including in cross-border transactions. He received a J.D. from the New York University School of Law and an A.B. from Harvard College. John is a Fellow of Salzburg Global Seminar and a member of the advisory committee for the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum. Stacy Baird is a consulting director at the Singapore-based consulting firm TRPC. His expertise lies in law and advising businesses and governments on information technology, privacy, data protection, cloud computing, and intellectual property (IP) public policy matters. Stacy also serves as executive director of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Forum Intellectual Property Program, where he helps address bilateral technology transfer and IP issues in the context of clean energy research and commercialization. Previously, Stacy served as Senior Policy Advisor to U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell, including work on the U.S. Patriot Act, and advisor to U.S. Congressman Howard Berman on issues of first impression related to the then-nascent internet and the mapping of the human genome. Prior to law, Stacy worked as music recording engineer with clients including Madonna, Stevie Nicks, Elvis Costello, Brian Eno, and Francis Coppola. He held appointments as Visiting Scholar at the University of Southern California College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and Visiting Fellow at the University of Hong Kong Faculty of Law. Stacy has a J.D. from Pace University and a B.A. in radio and television communications from San Francisco State University. Stacy is a Fellow of Salzburg Global Seminar and a member of the advisory committee for the Salzburg Global Law and Technology Forum. The Salzburg Questions for Corporate Governance is an online discussion series introduced and led by Fellows of the Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum. The articles and comments represent opinions of the authors and commenters, and do not necessarily represent the views of their corporations or institutions, nor of Salzburg Global Seminar. Readers are welcome to address any questions about this series to Forum Director, Charles E. Ehrlich: cehrlich@salzburgglobal.org To receive a notification of when the next article is published, follow Salzburg Global Seminar on LinkedIn or sign up for email notifications here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/corpgov/newsletter 
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How Can European Values Be Protected in a Multipolar World?
The Rt Hon. the Lord Patten of Barnes CH, the last Governor of Hong Kong and former European Commissioner (Photo: Wikimedia Commons/James Yuanxin Li)
How Can European Values Be Protected in a Multipolar World?
Martin Silva Rey 
International relations theorist G. John Ikenberry said, "The rise of China will undoubtedly be one of the great dramas of the twenty-first century. China's extraordinary economic growth and active diplomacy are already transforming East Asia, and future decades will see even greater increases in Chinese power and influence. But exactly how this drama will play out is an open question. Will China overthrow the existing order or become a part of it?" The world's most populous country and the fourth largest is gaining influence much beyond its continent. The Belt and Road Initiative (OBOR) entails a massive flow of foreign direct investment of Chinese capital in 152 countries, where that country is sponsoring infrastructure development to set up the "Silk Road Economic Belt." Since 2012, the 16+1 mechanism has brought together 16 Central and East European states and China for annual meetings between the heads of state and cooperation. Earlier this year, a joint communication by the European Commission was published on "EU-China – A strategic outlook," where China was labeled a "systemic rival." In response to China's growing economic power and political influence, the report indicated the European Union should "deepen its engagement with China to promote common interests at global level… seek more balanced and reciprocal conditions governing the economic relationship… [and] adapt to changing economic realities and strengthen its own domestic policies and industrial base." The communication states the EU and China are "linked by an enduring relationship," but questions remain open for debate. How should Europe position itself in a multipolar world where the support of historic allies can no longer be taken for granted? Can a Britain in the throes of Brexit still contribute to a European response to China's rise? Must it or can it carve out an independent role for itself? These are some of the questions to be debated during this year's Palliser Lecture, organized by Salzburg Global Seminar in partnership with 21st Century Trust. The event will convene two major experts in Europe-China relations: The Rt Hon. the Lord Chris Patten of Barnes CH, the last Governor of Hong Kong and former European Commissioner Rana Mitter FBA, historian and political scientist, and Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China at Oxford University The Aga Khan Foundation UK will kindly host the fourth edition of The Palliser Lecture. The event will take place on May 21, 2019, at 10 Handyside Street, London N1C 4DN. The reception will begin at 17:30, and the discussion between Patten and Mitter will take place from 18:30. John Lotherington, director of 21st Century Trust, said, "This event couldn’t be more timely with developments in the trade war between the United States and China, the controversy around Huawei, and political strife in Hong Kong. But it is also about the slower underlying changes as Europe reacts to the expansion of Chinese power and reach." The Palliser Lecture honors the Rt Hon. Sir Michael Palliser GCMG PC, who served as a senior British diplomat and was the vice chairman of the Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors. It is part of the Salzburg Global Lecture Series.
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Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia
Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia
Salzburg Global Seminar 
“Look for the rainbow in every crowd,” former Chief Justice Dipak Misra declared following India’s Supreme Court ruling to decriminalize homosexuality in September 2018. “Equality and liberty and this freedom can only be fulfilled when each one of us realizes the LGBT community has the same rights as other citizens.” The Indian court’s decision to strike down Section 377, a colonial-era law criminalizing same-sex relationships, is just one example of the momentous advocacy work being done by LGBT communities in South Asia; a region where many of these human rights issues are at tipping point. While a region of diverse cultural and religious communities and differing levels of economic development, the progress of legal and social rights for LGBT people in South Asia will have a profound impact on the region at large and globally.  During the sixth gathering of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum – Advancing Legal and Social Equality in South Asia – more than 40 advocates from 17 countries met in Kathmandu, Nepal, to discuss how to enhance Asia’s underrepresented role in global LGBT dialogues, and engage individuals and institutions to create significant shifts in social attitudes and policy landscapes across the region. Appropriately, Nepal is a nation widely seen as a regional leader in progressive attitudes on sexual orientation and gender identity in South Asia. The significance of this was not lost on Forum participants, whose calls for wider social acceptance and rights were amplified by a united energy of strength and leadership. As with all Salzburg Global LGBT Forum meetings, the gathering brought together a widely diverse group of human rights leaders spanning government, law, diplomacy, religion, media and culture, and built on the explicit goal of the Forum to further develop a network of trust, where both Fellows’ professional expertise and their life experiences are highly valued. Underlining that fundamental human rights concern us all, the Forum meeting connects queer and straight leaders who represent gender and sexual orientation in different expressions, united by their passion to advance LGBT equality globally.  Despite – or rather thanks to – the intricate mix of nationalities, cultures and faiths represented at the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum, boundaries of separation were broken as participants vowed to learn from this collective strength and resilience. “We have much in common; but we also face different challenges, and live in different contexts,” participants – now known as Fellows – were told. “Everyone has something valuable to share.” In South Asia, several LGBT human rights issues are at a “tipping point” at which legal and/or social change could soon be possible. Gender recognition and decriminalization are two such legal tipping point issues for several countries. However even in places where legal progress on these fronts has been made (for example in Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka), social discrimination and violence often persist and serve to exclude LGBT individuals and their families from access to employment, health care, education and other services. Because of this, additional action is needed across South Asia to ensure full legal and social inclusion and recognition for gender and sexual minorities, with special attention to transgender and intersex communities. The 2019 program contributed to national and regional discussions on LGBT inclusion across the South Asian region by providing a platform for open policy dialogue and debate; creating an opportunity to highlight South Asia’s unique legal, religious, and cultural history of LGBT family and community inclusion with policymakers and international organizations active in the region; and by producing multimedia products that can help illustrate the critical importance of inclusive policies. Download, read and share the Executive Summary Report from the program to find out more. Download as a PDF
* LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is widely recognized in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as in any way exclusive of other cultures, groups or terms, either historical or contemporary. The 2019 program of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was held in partnership with the UNDP’s Being LGBTI in Asia and the Pacific program, and was also supported by the German Federal Foreign Ministry and the Archangel Michael Foundation, with additional support from EQUAL GROUND, The Nippon Foundation, the Korea Foundation and the Ann M. Hoefle Memorial Fellowship.  
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Moving from Me to We in Memphis, Tennessee
Beale Street, Memphis (Photo by Heidi Kaden Lopyreva on Unsplash)
Moving from Me to We in Memphis, Tennessee
Oscar Tollast 
The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators will go stateside this week for a Regional Fellows Event in Memphis, Tennessee. The three-day program, Moving from Me to We: US Regional Young Cultural Innovators Event, will convene 30 Salzburg Global Fellows from Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans from May 9 to May 12. Fellows will be encouraged to “move from me to we” while reflecting on their roles within their respective hubs and cities and exploring what they want to achieve together in their local communities. This is the third time the YCI Forum has held a regional meeting in the United States, having previously convened programs in New Orleans (2018) and Detroit (2017). This meeting is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. Memphis, Detroit, and New Orleans are cities undergoing radical urban transformation and social renewal. During the program, Fellows are encouraged to share their experiences, coach each other, and strategize for the future. There will also be panel discussions on creating safe spaces, shifting work, community building, and partnerships. YCI faculty members Amina J. Dickerson, Peter Jenkinson, and Shelagh Wright will return to facilitate the event. Salzburg Global Seminar will be represented by Susanna Seidl-Fox, program director, culture and the arts; Benjamin Glahn, vice president, development and operations; Andy Ho, US development director; Faye Hobson, program manager, culture, arts, and education; and Clare Shine, vice president and chief program officer. Activities will be hosted at the Memphis Music Initiative, the National Civil Rights Museum, and CMPLX. Fellows will have the opportunity to hear from the people behind these organizations and learn how their work is shifting the narrative in Memphis’ cultural sector and amplifying voices often overlooked. Guest speakers at this year’s event include Amber Hamilton, chief operations and strategy officer at Memphis Music Initiative, Britney Thornton, executive director of Juice Orange Mound, and Noel Trent, director of interpretation, collections, and education at the National Civil Rights Museum. The meeting will conclude with a closing night concert featuring performances from YCI artist IMAKEMADBEATS and other artists from Memphis label Unapologetic. Moving from Me to We: US Regional Young Cultural Innovators Event is the third US regional meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This event is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. For more information on this program, please click here.
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Salzburg Global Reaches New Agreement with the Korea Foundation
Logos of Salzburg Global Seminar and the Korea Foundation
Salzburg Global Reaches New Agreement with the Korea Foundation
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar is delighted to announce a new agreement with the Korea Foundation which will help expand its fellowship. The Korea Foundation has agreed to support Salzburg Global by providing financial assistance for seven participants from the Republic of Korea to attend and take part in its programs up until April, 2020. The mission of the Korea Foundation is to promote better understanding of Korea within the international community and to increase friendship and goodwill between Korea and the rest of the world through various exchange programs. Since 2012, the Korea Foundation has sponsored many next-generation global leaders to attend Salzburg Global’s programs, and in 2014, both organizations established an international intern program, which continues to flourish. Salzburg Global is deeply grateful for the Korea Foundation’s dedicated ongoing support and looks forward to welcoming new participants from the Republic of Korea in the near future.
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Building Bridges - Outlining the Next Steps Forward
Fellows of the Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?
Building Bridges - Outlining the Next Steps Forward
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows have been encouraged to “keep connected and keep the momentum going” after a fruitful program on inclusive economies and better health. Policymakers, business representatives, academics, and representatives from civil society were among those who took part in Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health? The program is part of Salzburg Global’s Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series and was held in partnership with the Health Foundation. From April 29 to May 2, participants tackled complex challenges and attempted to bridge the worlds of business, health, and economic development. Toward the end of the program, participants worked in smaller groups to come up with solutions. On the final day, participants presented their ideas. The first group to present focused on developing a conceptual model of the relationship between inclusive economies and health in places. Participants came up with two tools. The first tool was a list of simple conversation starters designed to encourage dialogue between the health and economic sector. The second tool – named the Reinhardt Model – puts well-being economy at the center of discussions. This model has been designed for economic leaders to speak with health practitioners. It features a set of dynamics such as esteem, place, and well-being that feed into economies. The next group sought to establish “new normals” for business and the public sector in a sustainable way when it comes to scaling. Participants came up with a short playbook with chapters exploring how we design for scale, understanding the market, finance, and what models people might choose. This group also looked at partnership models and structures, how to work with different sectors, and putting in place the right governance. Evaluation is key. Has the scaling produced the expected results? Has the scaling led to diminishing returns? This group is keen to bring the playbook alive using case studies from around the world. Several participants pushed for the creation of a new Salzburg Statement for Cities to Lead Change at the Local and National Level. They argued successful cities create environments which are inclusive of all people and abilities. Participants encouraged city administrators to work with businesses to identify which groups are most marginalized and under-utilized, co-produce solutions with these communities, and address system-based barriers of unemployment for these groups. Cities can measure their performance through a clearly defined governance framework, by working with multiple organizations to establish a shared dataset, and by contributing to global knowledge and lessons for other cities through networks and sectors. Cities can build on the positive contributions they are already making by promoting an inclusive economic agenda in their strategies and actions. Participants working in the McGowan Room considered how to engage citizens and stakeholders through new narratives. They concluded narratives could be used to create bridges between different sectors. A good narrative is a shared story which incorporates many voices and can be retold. It captures a vision of the future and complements data, evidence, and the application for resources. A story, however, does not have to be a written statement. There are other ways to be creative and to empower people during the process. Narratives can act as a framework for actions, participants heard, as well as bring forward a cast of new characters. Participants working within this group indicated they would like to develop a Salzburg Statement and take their work back to their employers and refine their ideas. The final group to present emphasized the need to act now for the future, managing transition and inter-generational justice. Participants discussed creating a language around “whole life thinking” and facilitating conversations between different generations. On a practical level, this work could be embedded within existing projects, participants heard. The methodology behind the project is crowd contribution. Participants are looking for input from as many places as possible. Participants heard the group had the seed of an idea, but the backers who become involved in the project will help this seed grow. John Lotherington, the program director at Salzburg Global for health and health care, urged participants to stay in touch, noting, “There is so much possibility in what you have been talking about.” Lotherington proposed a three-month check-in to see where participants were with their projects. Salzburg Global Seminar will be on hand to provide logistical and catalytic support where possible. The Salzburg Global Seminar program, Bridging Worlds: How Can We Use Business and Economic Development Strategies to Support Better Health?, is part of the Health and Health Care Innovation multi-year series. More information on this multi-year series is available here.
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