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Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Rethinking care toward the end of life - Outcomes from a Salzburg Global Seminar
Rethinking care toward the end of life - Outcomes from a Salzburg Global Seminar
Julie Ling and Sheila Payne 
This article first appeared on the EAPC blog, which will continue to publish more posts on the Salzburg Question series. Julie Ling, Chief Executive Officer of the European Association for Palliative Care, and Sheila Payne, Emeritus Professor, International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, UK, were in Salzburg, Austria, to attend this global gathering. Here, they set the scene for a new series of posts that we shall be publishing throughout 2017 to encourage a global dialogue and shine a spotlight on the key topics affecting palliative care. Sixty invited international delegates met in December 2016 to consider global opportunities and challenges in palliative care. They gathered at the Schloss Leopoldskron (some scenes from ‘The Sound of Music’ were filmed here) to discuss and debate seven key questions: How do we engage patients and families to ensure that end of life care honours what matters most to them, with respect for culture and for context at the level of the individual and the population?What are the relative contributions of health care and community-based social care in different contexts? How can they best be joined up to maintain function, independence, and agency for people for whom death is near?How can healthcare systems better support families,  caregivers and community members in caring for people of all ages for whom death is near?How are robust processes established and implemented for arriving at decisions when patients can no longer express their own preferences? What role does public engagement and government have in this?Which are the most promising evidence-based and cost-effective innovations in care towards the end of life? What yields the greatest value to patients, especially in low- resource settings?What can we learn from the systems failures in high-income countries with regard to supporting patients, families and caregivers with palliative care?How can palliative care best be undertaken in the context of societal deprivation or conflict? Salzburg Global (SG) was founded in 1947 with the aim of encouraging intellectual dialogue in post-war Europe. SG aims to challenge leaders to help solve important global issues and since its establishment, SG has been a catalyst for global engagement on critical issues in education, health, environment, economics, governance, peace-building and more. SG achieves this by designing, facilitating and hosting international strategic programmes (seminars). Uniquely, Salzburg Global builds connections with and between people from a broad range of expertise, cultures and professional backgrounds. Over the duration of the seminars, government officials, institutions and individuals at all stages of their professional development and from all sectors are asked to rethink their relationships and identify shared interests, goals and outcomes. A key outcome of the session was aimed to be the development of ‘A Salzburg Statement of key principles guiding care towards the end of life’. It was a testament to the freethinking and originality of the participants that for the first time in the history of SG, the outcome was not a statement, but instead, a set of nine questions. The questions are designed to highlight challenges facing the global community and will be linked to international ‘days’. Each of the nine questions will be explained more fully in EAPC blogs over the coming year. There was snow and plenty of hard work, interspersed with some time to socialise and make the most of the beautiful location and, of course, there was schnitzel, Glühwein and a Christmas market. Find out more.... Follow the global dialogue on Twitter. Using the hashtag #allmylifeQs the nine Salzburg Questions will be debated throughout 2017. Follow the EAPC Blog for more posts in the Salzburg series.
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Pierre Schoonraad - “Are we happy with what we’re bringing to the citizens? Are we satisfied?”
Pierre Schoonraad - “Are we happy with what we’re bringing to the citizens? Are we satisfied?”
Chris Hamill-Stewart 
Pierre Schoonraad, Head of Research and Development at South African Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI), has over ten years of experience working to find innovative solutions to problems affecting the public sector. He brought this wealth of experience to the Salzburg Global Session Future of Public Service: Program Strategy Meeting, in which participants from all over the world came together to discuss the future of public service in a changing and increasingly dynamic world. His expertise in coordinating innovation efforts, and bridging the gap between those creating and those in need of solutions introduced a fresh perspective on the issue of innovation in the public sector. Schoonraad asserts in most situations the solutions to problems already exist – accessing them is the problem: “We’ve seen that there are so many examples of solutions, but they’re not well known.” Rather than needing to create a new solution every time a problem arises, Schoonraad and the CPSI focus on coordinating between different sectors. He says, “We link the offerings that the engineers have with the challenges offered by the public sector.”  His work is in making innovation accessible for those in need of solutions. Schoonraad says, “There are so many examples of solutions and things that people can do, so we develop case studies for people to see what other people are doing, and use this as a basis for innovation themselves.” These case studies are simple, easy to read and made widely available, which maximizes the opportunities for those in the public or private sector to identify solutions to disruptions in their work. By producing the document and working with clients on specific issues, their relatively small team is having a significant impact across South Africa. On top of finding and coordinating solutions, Schoonraad advocates preparing for future disruptions. This level of preparation can be particularly difficult to implement in developing countries, such as South Africa, where fundamentally significant challenges such as poverty and gang violence remain. Schoonraad says, "As a developing country, we’re so focused on existing challenges that we don’t always focus on the future of public services.” A lack of awareness of, and planning for, potential disruptions affected South Africa. Changes to laws meant that road accident compensation claims increased substantially in a small time frame, and greater access to legal services led to an increasing number of people claiming malpractice against hospitals when they felt their own or a relative’s care wasn’t adequate. The state was unprepared for both of these disruptions. The state's lack of preparation ended up costing them a lot of money and forced them to rapidly rethink aspects of their services that they hadn’t considered before. These kinds of disruptions are why those people working for CPSI “want to help people rethink the future, and start planning accordingly.”  The problems that the South African public sector has faced provide ample evidence of the importance of planning for future disruptions, or “disrupting yourself, before someone else can,” as is Schoonraad’s philosophy. He believes that, in the public sector, the best way to prepare is by continuously asking, “Are we happy with what we’re bringing to the citizens? Are we satisfied?” By asking these questions, the public sector can continue to provide the best service possible, while remaining resilient to the disruptions that are becoming “more and more frequent.” Future of Public Service: Program Strategy Meeting looked at how public service may change in the 21st century, and one thing has become apparent after the session and speaking with Schoonraad: the innovation is out there, but accessing it, and having the foresight to plan for the future effectively, is an increasingly important skill. The Salzburg Global Session Future of Public Service: Program Strategy Meeting is part of the multi-year series Salzburg Global Forum on the Future of Public Service. The series is being hosted in partnership with Arizona State University. More information on the session can be found here: http://www.salzburgglobal.org/go/568
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Rajan Kotru - “If the Himalayan ecosystem remains intact, there will be people rushing there to pursue their spiritual ideals...”
Rajan Kotru - “If the Himalayan ecosystem remains intact, there will be people rushing there to pursue their spiritual ideals...”
Christopher Hamill-Stewart 
Rajan Kotru, head of the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) program on Transboundary Landscapes, attended the Salzburg Global Seminar session The Next Frontier: Transboundary Conservation for Biodiversity and Peace. His project “Kailash Sacred Landscape” is a transboundary conservation initiative covering an area in the Himalayas where China, India, and Nepal all have territory. The project focuses on the preservation of ecosystems and biodiversity, but with an additional emphasis on cultural conservation – conservation aimed at maintaining the culturally and spiritually significant parts of the landscape. While in Salzburg, Kotru took some time to discuss the importance of integrating spiritual and cultural conservation with more traditional conservation. Despite a range of conservation efforts in the region beginning in 2005, issues of cultural conservation have remained largely ignored. The majority of efforts focused on tangible or measurable issues, such as ensuring the preservation of natural resources. Rajan Kotru wants to change this. Kotru believes “the cultural legacy of the Indian sub-continent is linked to the ecosystems and the geographic assets that we have,” with the most important “sacred asset” being the Himalayas. The degradation of geographic assets can have a similar effect on the area's cultural history and significance. These assets are valuable to the local populations, and they are a large source of income for the region: “people are rushing to the Himalayas to meet Buddhists and to meditate.”  Kotru claims many of the services coming from the Kailash Sacred Landscape are quickly degrading. Nevertheless, there is cause to remain optimistic. Kotru says, "Despite all this degradation that has been happening in the recent years, people are still coming to the Himalayas for spiritual reasons.” The Himalayas clearly still have great value to many individuals from a spiritual perspective, but, because of this rapid degradation of the ecosystems and environment, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to preserve this cultural heritage. The narrow lens of protecting physical resources, like wood and water, is leaving valuable but less tangible assets, like sacred landscapes and important religious sites, to be eroded away. Kotru believes that to change the way we preserve these precious areas, we need to “change the way we think.” The example of the Bhutanese model, which measures the happiness of the nation as an important factor in assessing the effectiveness of government, is one example that Kotru studied when looking at the value of cultural preservation. “Culture and spirituality are pillars of happiness,” he says, and so this model is one that is worth studying. In Bhutan, the preservation of cultural heritage is important to the people and the state, because they measure the nation’s happiness. He concedes, “It would be difficult to emulate Bhutan’s model in other countries,” but the emphasis on “respect for culture and for nature” is a lesson that can be almost universally applied. Kotru makes it clear that “if the Himalayan ecosystem remains intact, there will be people rushing there to pursue their spiritual ideals.” If we change our way of thinking, as Bhutan has, by emphasizing the protection of cultural and spiritual landscapes this will have benefits for biodiversity conservation, for the economic well-being of the areas and its inhabitants, and for the ancient cultures and traditions that are so important in these regions. Rajan Kotru was a participant in the Salzburg Global session The Next Frontier: Transboundary Cooperation for Biodiversity and Peace, which is part of the multi-year Parks for the Planet Forum. This session was hosted in partnership with IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), MAVA Foundation, Arcus Foundation, Aga Khan Foundation, German cooperation (Deutsche Zusammenarbeit), Huffington Foundation, Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Foundation, and others. More information on the session can be found here.
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Eileen Briggs - "We are definitely in a reactionary mode"
Eileen Briggs spoke to FM4 while she attended The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal
Eileen Briggs - "We are definitely in a reactionary mode"
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Eileen Briggs has revealed how art and creativity is being used to express opposition to the controversial Dakota oil pipeline. Briggs, a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, spoke to Bethany Bell for FM4 while attending Salzburg Global's session The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal. US President Donald Trump has signed an executive order for the construction of the Dakota oil pipeline to be completed.  Protestors from the Standing Rock movement believe the construction of the pipeline will affect the quality of drinking water. Briggs tells FM4 that she's "fiercely" part of the protection of her water and, "We are definitely in a reactionary mode." Prayer and songs have been used to express opposition. While being interviewed, Briggs performs a song that talks about walking on Mother Earth in a gentle way. You can listen to the full interview below. 
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Media Academy Fellow Taylor Gandolfi to appear at SXSW exhibition
Media Academy Fellow Taylor Gandolfi to appear at SXSW exhibition
Oscar Tollast 
An alumna of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change will showcase her work at an SXSW exhibition. Taylor Gandolfi will appear at SXSW Create next month as a result of her project "My Robotic Hand". SXSW Create is the hardware hacking and maker arm of SXSW. Gandolfi will be among drone users, biohackers, users of 3D printers and others who are developing solutions to shape our future. Speaking to Salzburg Global, Gandolfi explained how the project originated. She said: "It was for my capstone project in grad school. I was going through ideas with my professor. "I've always liked Arduino. I wanted to take that to the next level. I thought it would be cool if I had a robot in my portfolio." Gandolfi applied to appear at SXSW Create in December. She found out her application was successful earlier this month. She said: "I was super excited. I've always wanted to go to SXSW. It's the best tech conference around here. "Being in the conference now, I get a badge to go to the whole thing after my exhibition." Last year, Gandolfi attended the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Migration, Media and Global Uncertainty. Gandolfi said: "I love to travel. I studied abroad in my under grad and then I saw this project. Sanjeev Chatterjee, he was the professor from my school. I have always been interested in civic media. It's really something good to be involved in.  "It was a really good experience." Gandolfi was one of 70 students exploring the role of media literacy in engaging citizens, journalists, and government bodies in cross-cultural dialogue about migration and its representation in digital culture.  During her time at the Academy, Gandolfi created a Twitter bot to counter against negative tweets about refugees. Each time a negative tweet was detected, the bot would send a tweet in response, tagging the original sender, and informing them of a positive fact to change the sender's opinion.  "My Robotic Hand" has a website which outlines how people can build their own 3D printed robot.  Gandolfi lists the necessary components, plus a how-to guide split into four parts. If users follow this guide correctly, they will end up with a fully functioning robot. SXSW Create takes place in Austin, Texas between March 10 and March 12.  Gandolfi will appear in the Open Source Pavilion. This area, presented by Red Hat, will celebrate the amazing things happening with collaborative engineering, open source hardware, and shared design.
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Anida Yoeu Ali - “You can have very powerful conversations without speaking a single word”
Anida Yoeu Ali - “You can have very powerful conversations without speaking a single word”
Andrea Abellan 
Anida Yoeu Ali likes to refer to herself as a “global agitator” It is the best way for her to define the social provocation her art is constantly seeking. The poem she shared with the audience at the opening of the recent Salzburg Global Seminar session The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal, set the tone for the following five days, creating a special and inspiring atmosphere:  I will return to a country I have never known That burns a hole inside my heart the size of home The piece, titled Visiting Loss, describes how she felt before returning to Cambodia, her country of origin, after 25 years living in the United States. Her path to self-discovery and reflections about her own identity play a fundamental role in her work.  Ali combines her work as an Art and Global Studies teacher at the University of Washington Bothell with the development of her own projects through Studio Revolt, a media-lab she manages with the Japanese filmmaker Masahiro Sugano. Together they develop “unconventional narratives” that range from short videos and films to live performances. These projects largely differ to what audiences are used to finding in traditional media, both in terms of content and form. Although she points out that they are not always fully understood by the audience, Ali keeps believing in that “sort of chemistry” that emerges when connecting her creative performances with Masahiro’s special visual aesthetics. The Buddhist Bug, one of her most recognized projects, is one such example. It consists of a bright, huge, saffron-colored creature that Ali has taken to a number of open spaces. The main goal of this project is to raise awareness about identity and displacement issues. Ali’s body is a fundamental part of the performance as it makes the bug be alive and able to move so it can get closer to people.  “The work I do would not mean anything without the use of my body,” she explains. “I truly think that arts, and specifically performance, can engage the audience through the energy that our body emits. Of course I want people to ask themselves questions while observing my work, but I also want them be aware of those different emotions that are surfacing. You can have very powerful conversations without speaking a single word.”  Another important feature that characterizes the Buddhist Bug is the use of humor to talk about challenging and compelling topics. “It leads the audience to reflect on different subject such as the challenges of religious hybridity, or what the sense of belonging and tolerance means. However, people always have to look twice to understand what is really happening. Then they smile, or laugh because in the end they are just looking at a bug,” Ali states. Her work is usually placed in public spaces; location a key part of her performances. Ali’s goal is to take contemporary arts out of galleries, the “boxes” where artistic representations are frequently trapped. Her hope is to open conversations with bigger populations. The “surprise element” is another of her priorities when building a project. The original – and not discreet – clothes she wears together with her unexpected actions enable her to catch audience’s attention when they less expect it. The artist likes playing with the surprise factor as a form of engagement.  Even though she recognizes that she could not imagine herself doing anything else rather than arts and teaching, she is very clear when talking about the difficulties that being an artist involves. “You must have a lot of faith and courage to do what you do. As artists we often lack resources and proper support. Also, we are constantly judged, especially in my case as my work is always placed in the street. I get a lot of criticism and judgement by the press and through social media. I guess you need a very thick skin to do this” she declares. Despite the many difficulties her work involves, she still has many ideas to keep the audience surprised. For instance, she is planning to focus her next project in the United States on the so called “Trumplands,” those areas where the current president was voted for the most. “I am very interested in opening up discussion there. These are mostly rural areas where people do not see difference so they can only imagine what difference means and that often relies just on stereotypes and misinformation,” Ali explains. When asked about the outcomes she was expecting to achieve through her participation it the session The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal, she didn’t hesitate for a second. “I believe we have to create and reinforce these international connections as we have already started to do. We need to break up our bubbles and try to put ourselves on the radar. As artists we should work together for our communities and the world.”  To conclude, Ali insists on “the need to produce new and innovative projects, instead of keep trying to make old models work – which did not help in the past.”  The Salzburg Global program The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage, and Renewal is part of the multi-year Culture, Arts and Society series. The session is being supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation. More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSculture.
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Orijit Sen - "Comics allow the audience to identify with the characters – it lets them enter their world"
Anida Youe Ali
Orijit Sen - "Comics allow the audience to identify with the characters – it lets them enter their world"
Andrea Abellan 
Comics have traditionally been used to tell fictional stories, but the medium can also be an interesting format to portray reality. In fact, in recent years well-established media outlets have increasingly used this storytelling method, publishing cartoons to inform about current affairs. Indian graphic artist and designer Orijit Sen, a participant of the Salzburg Global Seminar session The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal, shares his thoughts on the medium and how he has used illustrations to tell difficult and compelling stories. AA: You say that Art Spiegelmann’s graphic novel Maus had a strong influence on you. In this work the artist talks about his own challenges of being in a Jewish family during the holocaust. Do you also find motivation from your own experiences to create your drawings? OS: I am a visual artist and my main goal is to tell stories through my drawings. It is the reason why I prefer to define myself as a “storyteller”. I grew up in India during the 70s – in that time TV was not as common as it is nowadays. I have been drawing since I was a child as comics were the easiest way we had to create our own visual culture. Every time I build a story I fully immerse myself in it first. My work is all about my personal experience so I would never make a piece of a place where I have never been or someone I have never met. I came across Art Spiegelmann’s Maus while I was at college studying graphic design and as soon as I found this piece I realized that serious comics were the thing I wanted to do for my whole life. AA: Your piece, River of Stories, considered to be India’s first graphic novel, talks about environmental, social and political issues surrounding the construction of the controversial dam on the Narmada River. Why do you think comics are suitable medium to raise public awareness? OS: Comics as a medium of storytelling allow the audience to identify with the characters – it lets them enter their world. In my illustrations, I try to be very detailed. I like painting people’s faces, their eyes and gestures, trying to be as accurate as possible. When I finished university, I got involved in an environmental group. We travelled together to Jhabua area, in central India. We met a lot of people there fighting against the dam project. However, the story of all these protests did not make it to the city. People would only see one side of the story: how great it was to have electricity and other facilities thanks to the dam construction. They did not reflect on how much did that the electricity cost and how many people had been displaced to pay for it. Stories like this one are usually told by figures and numbers so it is hard for individuals to relate to them. You can of course understand what it means when 1,000 people have lost their homes if you read about it, but it is not the same as when you can see it. Comics help us to engage with a topic and become immersed in it. You are one of the founders of the Pao Collective, which seeks to supports comics as a medium in India. How would you describe the state of comics industry in the country? The status of comics has evolved a lot since I first published River of Stories in 1994. Mainstream publishers are relying on Indian cartoonists more and more. But even today, comic artists in India cannot make of it a full-time job and still must dedicate their time to something else for their living. We have many good, young, talented artists with amazing ideas but we unfortunately are still lacking funding. From 2009 to 2011 you collaborated in the creation of A Place in Punjab, one of the world’s largest hand-painted mural installed at Virasat-e-Khalsa Museum. What message did you want to convey with it? The government asked me to make a mural for the museum to represent the cultural heritage and landscape of Punjab area. Again, my main goal was to tell the real stories of the people living there and properly describe their hopes and tragedies. I realized how many different perspectives Punjab’s inhabitants have about the same place. People used to talk a lot about how different the area was before the green business arrived. For instance, they repeatedly mentioned the ponds, where they used to spend lot of their time swimming with the buffalos and mingling with other people. However, when I was there I found all these ponds to be very dirty and only full of trash. I decided to create the Landscape of Memories where I portrayed both perspectives, past and present, so it was easy for visitors to compare them. The mural acts as a “storytelling mirror”. In your presentation at the Salzburg Global Seminar session The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal, you have showed some pieces of your project Mapping Mapusa Market. What inspired you to start it? In the past I used to live in Goa and go to Mapusa market with my family quite frequently. It was always fascinating as it was full of amazing products and people. Later, when I was invited as a visiting professor at Goa University, I thought it would be a good idea to involve students from very different fields such as arts or history to work together. What we are doing at the moment is tracking and mapping different aspects of the market. This work is resulting in a visual map where people, products, and techniques are depicted. What are you expecting from this session? This is a very special opportunity. Here we are, 50 people from all over the world sharing so many different perspectives. It is a unique situation. More than specific expectations I am looking forward to be “surprised”. And so far, I think this is what will happen. The Salzburg Global program The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage, and Renewal is part of the multi-year Culture, Arts and Society series. The session is being supported by the Edward T. Cone Foundation. More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSculture.
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