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Samantha Gilbert - “Organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people - at all levels”
Samantha Gilbert opens the Salzburg Global Seminar session Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Samantha Gilbert - “Organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people - at all levels”
Mirva Villa 
With hundreds of staff in dozens of offices around the world, managing all their staff and ensuring they hire the most enthusiastic, engaged and efficient employees is important to the Ford Foundation. At the conclusion of the recent Salzburg Global Seminar session, Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy, Samantha Gilbert, vice president for talent and human resources at the Ford Foundation, answered questions from Salzburg Global Seminar’s communications intern, Mirva Villa.  Salzburg Global Seminar’s Mirva Villa: What drew you personally to work in philanthropy?  Samantha Gilbert: I started my career fresh out of university as a social worker and over time moved into human resources management and leadership roles, the first ten years or so working in the government and not-for-profit sectors. I then worked for a decade in a global leadership role in a for-profit international knowledge-based business – a professional services arts business – which taught me a great deal and fulfilled my desire to work internationally and in a dynamic environment. Over time I realized that I needed to be doing my work back in a mission-driven environment – that’s where my values come through strongly, as I experienced earlier in my career. I was eager to take all the rich learning I gained from the private sector and contribute my experience and skills in an environment that was aiming to make a positive impact in the world. Philanthropy allowed me to continue to work internationally, fulfilling my interests in diverse cultures and experiences, and matching my deep-rooted values about work that enables the well-being of people. With your work in talent and human resources at the Ford Foundation, you clearly believe in the importance of the staff development. Why do you believe this is so important? I truly believe that organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people. At all levels. And I believe all individuals carry unique talents, and when nurtured in the workplace, great outcomes occur. At all levels. Organizational development is all about people development – creating a work environment where people feel inspired to do their best work. This is why I believe human resources functions have a critical role in organizational development – to understand the unique aspects of the organization’s culture, nurture the best of it, and put into place the support, systems, policies and practices that enable employees to give their best. That’s a “win” for the organization and a “win” for employees because they learn, grow and develop a sense of pride, purpose and confidence in the contributions they make. What are the biggest challenges the philanthropy sector faces in acquiring talent?  The world offers a rich diversity of people and abilities and it will take all of them to solve the problems of today’s complex world. Sometimes I think we do not look broadly enough for talented people to work within our organizations. We are often too risk-averse to consider someone from another sector. We are often not strong enough in our onboarding practices to enable diverse talent to effectively acclimate in our world of philanthropy. We are strong on knowledge-mentorship as manager but not as strong on career coach as manager. These are some good skills we could learn from the private sector. What did you hope to gain by attending this session? What will you go back with?  I created this session in many ways over four years ago at a first of its kind forum at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center for learning. This is the second follow-up, but with a larger number of philanthropic organizations joining this time, and with broader co-sponsorship. I hoped that we would have a rich discussion about the landscape of our field of mission-driven work, and what it means for our talent needs and practices. I hoped to build a network of global leaders who think about our work through the lens of people, and therefore share and exchange ideas about how to make our sector stronger and more impactful. I believe we have all walked away with some new insights and understanding, and a commitment and bond with each other, and I can say I have also walked away with some new tangible ideas. How was this session different to the one held in Bellaggio 2013? It was not different in spirit and goals, but this time it was larger in size (an additional ten organizations) and therefore more diverse, which brought an even greater richness and opportunity for learning. It also benefited significantly from the programming and facilitation support from Salzburg Global Seminar. Thanks to Salzburg Global we moved a few notches up in content design and delivery. Other than that….it rained on Lake Como when we were there in 2013, and it rained in Salzburg this week, and both lakes and the rain offered a special quiet for reflection and learning. What were the reasons for the Ford Foundation for joining in partnership with Salzburg Global to create this session? What are the benefits of events like this?  The Ford Foundation’s President, Darren Walker, my boss, believes deeply in continuous learning and the value of collaboration and network building to achieving impact. He leads in a people-focused way and Ford has a long history in supporting institutions, individuals and ideas. Our co-sponsors – Carnegie Corporation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the ZeShan Foundation – share these values. So together we knew that Salzburg Global would be the perfect partner to carry forward this seminar given their similar ideals and rich history of supporting these dialogues and developments. What change do you wish to see in the field of philanthropy?  I hope we will continue to be brave and innovative. Samantha Gilbert was a participant of the session, Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. You can read more about the session on the website: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/581
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Wangsheng Li - “One of the most distinct assets of philanthropic institutions is its people”
Wangsheng Li speaking at the Salzburg Global Seminar session Driving Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Wangsheng Li - “One of the most distinct assets of philanthropic institutions is its people”
Mirva Villa 
The constantly evolving world of philanthropy offers exciting opportunities for open-minded workers globally. A rising player in this field is China, where the modern philanthropic movement is still taking shape. As the philanthropic sector develops, talent management becomes increasingly important, emphasizes Wangsheng Li, a participant of the recent Salzburg Global Seminar session Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. His diverse background, working in charitable organizations in Asia and the US, has given him a unique viewpoint to the developments in the philanthropic sector globally. Li is currently the president of ZeShan Foundation, which supported the latest Salzburg Global session on philanthropy. The advancement of global philanthropy and supporting diverse participation is important to the family foundation. “One of the most distinct assets of philanthropic institutions is its people. Talent management fits well with that line of thinking,” Li says, “Personally, it’s always a very inspiring and a worthwhile effort in terms of learning from your peers and an opportunity to have some time to reflect and think, and hopefully to be inspired – even challenged – in a sense.” Philanthropy in China Philanthropy and charitable giving in China has always existed in one form or another – from tightly-knit communities helping each other in their daily lives to leaders of the past preparing for the tough times by stocking up food supplies, like grain, and medicine. “In classic Chinese literature, you can find how local governments and local philanthropists would prepare themselves a year or longer ahead in anticipation of, say, floods, famine, etc. “Local doctors would be asked to stock up herbal medicine in case of an epidemic or digestive diseases caused by unclear water. That tradition has always been, and not only in China,” Li explains. However, the modern, institutionalized form of philanthropy is still taking its shape.  “Institutionalized philanthropy is a relative new phenomenon in comparison with the US,” Li explains, “Donors want to take their work to the next level, and there is an increasing recognition that institutionalized giving is the future of philanthropy. Institutionalization also means bringing on board professionals, so that gave rise to this kind of professionalization of grant-making. Now where do you get people? It was – and still is – a relatively new phenomenon, so where is your pipeline?” Currently a large portion of the people working in the field of philanthropy in China come from a background of social work training, instead of having experience in public policymaking or public administration. This is the case in many other countries in Asia and Latin America, Li says: “They’re trained as social workers, but they have a pretty sound understanding of the social issues and the community’s needs, and policy issues.” The challenge now facing the Chinese philanthropy sector is how to diversify their workforce, and more importantly, prepare them for their work in this evolving industry. “One [challenge] is how to encourage more young people or professionals of diverse backgrounds to go into the philanthropy field, and two is really looking at how to prepare them to go into this field. So it’s a pipeline issue.” The future of philanthropy So what lies in the future for philanthropy in China? Li expects to see the philanthropic sector move away from the traditional ways, and become more of a hybrid: “Social entrepreneurship has already become a very important part of contemporary philanthropy. The donors are younger, and have become increasingly hands-on. That poses also a challenge, even a conflict of interest.”. He also expects to see charitable giving no longer be perceived as the privilege of the “super rich.” “It also has become part of the social movement, you could say, of the development of civil society. Ordinary citizens can also be donors.” Wangsheng Li was a participant at Session 581 - Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy, which is part of Salzburg Global's multi-year initiative on philanthropy and social investment. Read more about the session here.
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Finding good people to do good work for the greater good
Session 581
Finding good people to do good work for the greater good
Louise Hallman 
The corporate sector puts great emphasis on hiring “the best of the best.” With the increasing importance of private philanthropy in the wake of public sector austerity and growing global challenges, how can we attract top talent to the philanthropy sector – one known for its altruism, not huge salaries? The challenge of hiring good people to do good work for the benefit of the greater good is the focus of Session 581 - Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. After a keynote speech, panels and working groups, participants came away with key insights. Identify motivation Etymologically, philanthropy means “love of humankind,” and certainly this seems to be primary motivation for many in the room at Schloss Leopoldskron to have sought (or in some cases, unexpectedly found) careers in the sector. Some have come to the field from elsewhere, having worked in human resources in the corporate or academic sector. Some are drawn to the sector as a whole, others are motivated by specific causes, be that the environment, public health or women’s rights. Understanding motivations for working in our sector can help us be better recruiters. Develop a positive workplace culture Those who share the same motivations and values as their colleagues and the organization as a whole are likely to perform better in their role – a key component in developing a strong workplace culture. Other components of a workplace culture include the organization’s structure, policies and procedures, communications style, technology use, dress code and the physical environment. “A clearly articulated and authentically realized culture will ensure alignment of mission, values, practice and people.” Developing a culture that is both inclusive and diverse can be a challenge, especially in organizations that are multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-location. Get it right though and it can pay dividends – building a positive workplace culture and hiring people who fit into it can help productivity, morale and retention of the best talent. Introduce flexibility One distinct example of work culture that was shared in Salzburg was one of great flexibility: no fixed working hours, no fixed working place, and unlimited annual leave. “Until I worked in a flexible workplace, I never realized how much I would value it. Now I couldn’t imagine working anyway else,” remarked the speaker introducing the idea. This culture “treats employees as adults with lives,” allowing people to work around their lives, in hours that suit them and their families. “We get more out of people who want to give more.” However, this isn’t for everyone, the speaker admitted. Introducing a culture like this without having laid the groundwork by building a high degree of trust between employers and employees would likely fail. Employers need to trust that the work will be done without imposing fixed working hours and employees need to trust that they won’t be so overworked that they will work all the time and never take any annual leave. Assess character, not just skills  “Hire for the characteristics you want, not just the skills,” was one piece of advice. The characteristics desired will be driven in part by the culture and strategy of the organization. In one case study presented in Salzburg, for a Brazilian foundation, which was wanting to expand ambitiously and rapidly, hiring young people who were also ambitious and eager for societal change was key. Why young? “Young people are more open change,” and an organization going through rapid growth will need to change and adapt accordingly. These new people were then included in helping to develop the newly expanded organization’s culture – which, although put them at odds with longer-serving employees, placed the organization on the stronger footing to meet its strategic goals. Attract Millennials Young people (a.k.a. Millennials, born approximately between the nearly 1980s and the early 2000s) are commonly thought of to be seeking purpose, highly values-driven, eager for social change and justice, an embracing of innovation, inclusivity and diversity. This should make them a perfect fit for the philanthropic sector. And they can be – but they can also be demanding.  Talk your talk, walk your walk and embrace diversity Many Fellows in Salzburg remarked that Millennials frequently put pressure on their employers to include them in decision-making, preferring horizontal to hierarchical structures, and for them to “walk their walk,” said one participant. If your organization’s programs espouse values such as diversity, inclusivity and transparency, you must be willing to ensure your organization, work culture and employees also live up to these values. Diversity in the workplace brings diversity of experiences and ideas – hugely important if we’re to meet the world’s challenges. Have courage We live in challenging times – from political polarization and unrest to persistent social inequality and climate change – and philanthropy has an important role to play in helping the world address these challenges. To do that, philanthropy needs to be bold – both in our program delivery and in hiring the people to deliver those programs. Is philanthropy a sector, a field, an industry or a movement? If we’re to be a movement – encouraging collaboration across organizations and interest groups – then we not only need leaders to start the movement, but also brave first followers who can then encourage more followers to help build momentum and drive us forward. The Salzburg Global program Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy is part of Salzburg Global’s longstanding series Optimizing Institutional Philanthropy. It is being held in partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Zeshan Foundation. More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSphil.
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Andrés Thompson - “I think I’ve played a role in advancing philanthropy in Latin America"
Andrés Thompson
Andrés Thompson - “I think I’ve played a role in advancing philanthropy in Latin America"
Mirva Villa 
Activist, thinker, teacher, dispruter, maybe even an influencer – during his career in the philanthropic sector, spanning over four decades, Andrés Thompson has played many roles. Starting at the age of 17 as an activist, Thompson’s lifelong passion on improving the life of people around him has showed him the world of big foundations and grassroots movements. “I think I’ve played a role in advancing philanthropy in Latin America,” Thompson says modestly, and that includes both his professional and personal commitments to the social issues in the area. One of his proudest moments includes encouraging a group of young people to put pressure on their local government in Brazil. Thompson is the keynote speaker for the Salzburg Global Seminar session on Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy, but it’s not his first time in Salzburg. He has shared his expertise as a resource specialist for several other Salzburg Global Seminar sessions, but his own journey with the organization began over twenty years ago as a participant. On the appeal of the sessions, Thompson says: “You don’t have to play a role here. You have to reflect, think and share: that’s the essence. It’s not a conference – it’s a session, a conversation over beers.” Many things might have changed since the first time Thompson came to Schloss Leopoldskron, but the spirit has remained the same: “The heart of Salzburg Seminar is the same one.”  In fact, it was Session 304 - Non-Profit, NGO Sector: Individuals, Organizations, Democratic Societies - in 1993 that gave Thompson a new direction for his work in philanthropy. Previously, he hadn’t considered his work in philanthropy as a “career”. At the Salzburg Seminar (as the organization was then known), he met representatives of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and caught their interest with his new, disruptive ideas.  “The fact that they invited me to join the Kellogg Foundation, to learn about how a big foundation works and have the opportunity to have the money be on this side of the table… and invest that money for things I considered important – it was a great opportunity,” he says. In addition to his work for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Thompson has worked for the non-profit streetfootballworld, and until July 2017 he held the position of the executive coordinator of the Philanthropy Network for Social Justice in Brazil. Thompson continues his lifelong commitment to philanthropy – “love of humankind” – through his commitments to community projects in Latin America. Almost 25 years on since his first “disruptive” appearance at Salzburg Global Seminar, Session 581 will be a chance for Thompson to explore some further new ideas he has for philanthropy. “I would like to provoke people to think outside the box. In particular, what talent management means for the future of philanthropy. It’s not just about the process of hiring, retaining and firing people, but also about the skills that philanthropy needs, and the kind of future that we’re envisioning for philanthropy. “How can you think about talent management in a different way that is not about administrating or managing people, but helping people potentialize what they are?”  The philanthropic sector will need new skills if it wishes to adapt to the modern world, and Thompson hopes that the session will bring about fresh concepts and ideas. “We are all philanthropists and we all have the capacity to give, in many different ways… Love of human kind is what mobilizes people to do philanthropy.” The Salzburg Global program Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy is part of Salzburg Global’s longstanding series Optimizing Institutional Philanthropy. It is being held in partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Zeshan Foundation. More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSphil.
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Driving the Change - Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Driving the Change - Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Salzburg Global Seminar 
In a period of mistrust of our institutions, and crisis in our governance and corporate systems, the philanthropic sector is playing an important role in bridging divides, re-establishing trust, and addressing the need for a new civic imagination that is inclusive of all people in a globalized connected world. While significant attention is paid to the financial resources at stake in philanthropy, less focus is given to the skills which make grantmaking for the public good possible.  In philanthropies, human resources can often be viewed simply as an administration function responsible for payroll, benefits administration and logistical aspects of recruitment. In the business world, however, there are signs it can be utilized for other positive purposes.  The global corporate sector has myriad examples of human resource operations prioritizing the recruitment, development and engagement of talented employees. Businesses invest their time in forward planning and carefully-executed policies for employee engagement, training and evaluation to optimize organisational resilience and performance. As the global philanthropic sector continues to expand, there will be a greater need for philanthropic institutions to recognize the importance of human resources in attracting, recruiting, and engaging talented staff who can help take their organisations forward. From Sunday, 30 human resources professionals and executive directors of foundations will convene at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, for Session 581 - Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. Together they will discuss the challenges surrounding talent management, and the practices which can be implemented to achieve better results. The session, which will reach a conclusion on Wednesday, will see participants share insights from various regions and aggregate perspectives and experiences from specific areas of expertise within human resources. They will attend lectures, take part in group discussions, and focus on developing ways to improve perceptions of talent management in philanthropies. Smaller group conversations will highlight new and ongoing challenges to talent management, identify specific skill and leadership training opportunities, and expand the network of talent management professionals in the philanthropic sector. Looking ahead to 2030, participants will consider the key trends for the philanthropic sector and how they might vary between major global regions. They will also be asked to assess what kind of talent and skills foundations will need now and in the future and how the recruitment process can be designed to meet this. Special attention will also be paid to the most innovative practices in talent management and how these can be applied to the philanthropic sector. By the end of the program, participants will produce a concise set of recommendations for dissemination to the global philanthropic sector.  This session is part of Salzburg Global’s longstanding series Optimizing Institutional Philanthropy, and also builds on the first meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center in 2013.   Andrew Ho, US development director at Salzburg Global Seminar, said, “This is a wonderful opportunity to expand the conversation on the important role of talent management in enabling philanthropy to be more effective, courageous, and impactful for society globally. We are grateful to be hosting this group, and look forward to inspiring collaborative solutions and creating lasting networks among the participants." The Salzburg Global program Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy is part of Salzburg Global’s longstanding series Optimizing Institutional Philanthropy. It is being held in partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Zeshan Foundation. More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSphil.
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South African Salzburg Global Fellow Bhekinkosi Moyo wins fourth Olga Alexeeva Memorial Prize
South African Salzburg Global Fellow Bhekinkosi Moyo wins fourth Olga Alexeeva Memorial Prize
Maria Chertok, Caroline Hartnell and Jenny Hodgson 
This article was originally published by Alliance magazine: http://www.alliancemagazine.org/news/south-africas-bhekinkosi-moyo-wins-fourth-olga-alexeeva-memorial-prize Salzburg Global Fellows can receive a discount on subscriptions to Alliance. Contact Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke for more information. In a continent where philanthropy has long been marginalized, where very little infrastructure exists to support its development and there is little understanding of its role, Bheki Moyo has consistently promoted African philanthropy locally and globally. He has led and supported efforts on both the practical and theoretical aspects of it. Most recently, he was instrumental in setting up a Chair in African Philanthropy at South Africa’s Witwatersrand Business School. In choosing Bheki Moyo, the judges commented on ‘his broad and long-term contribution to African philanthropy, playing different roles and critically contributing to building African institutions and networks … dedicated to strengthening philanthropy in Africa and helping to create the potential to achieve progressive social change in a sustained manner’. Awarding the Olga Prize to Bheki Moyo is also a recognition that philanthropy should not be limited to the mobilization of private money, say the judges. Bheki has contributed greatly to building stronger participation and more horizontal processes around philanthropic efforts in Africa, both through his direct interventions and through his academic and knowledge achievements. This was not an easy decision, however. ‘The process for choosing a winner was particularly challenging given the diversity of candidates, experiences and approaches to philanthropy,’ said Andre Degenszajn, chair of the judges. The judges made clear how impressed they were by the commitment and remarkable records of all the finalists in their own fields and contexts. The other finalists were: • Neville Gabriel, Salzburg Global Fellow, executive director of the Other Foundation, and founding director of the Southern Africa Trust• Paul Bacher, founder of ORTJET and of the National Mentorship Movement, South Africa• Artemisa Castro, executive director of the Fund for Solidarity in Action, Mexico• Audrey Elster, executive director of South Africa’s RAITH Foundation, where she established the Social Justice Initiative• Laurence Lien, co-founder and CEO of the Asia Philanthropy Circle and former CEO of Singapore’s National Volunteer & Philanthropy Centre• Maria Amalia Souza, founder and director of CASA Socio-Environmental Fund, Brazil We too would like to congratulate Bheki Moyo and the other finalists. Each one of them would have made a wonderful winner. If you haven’t already done so, you can read all about their achievements in a special Alliance supplement. The prize will be presented at the Global Summit for Community Philanthropy, to be held 1-2 December in Johannesburg, South Africa, hosted by the Global Fund for Community Foundations. The prize winner and all the other finalists will be attending the Summit. Finally, we’d like to thank our judges for their dedication and hard work:• Atallah Kuttab, Salzburg Global fellow and SAANED for Philanthropy Advisory Services, Arab region• Janet Mawiyoo, Salzburg Global Fellow and of the Kenya Community Development Foundation• Amitabh Behar, National Foundation for India• Andre Degenszajn, GIFE, Brazil (chair)• Larisa Zelkova, Potanin Foundation, Russia Maria Chertok is director at CAF Russia, Caroline Hartnell is a consultant to Alliance, and Jenny Hodgson is executive director of Global Fund for Community Foundations.
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Beyond the Schloss Gates
Beyond the Schloss Gates
Patrick Wilson 
Salzburg Global Seminar challenges current and future leaders to solve problems of global concern. Our dedicated team at Salzburg Global share in this mission, not only by leading programs in Salzburg, but also by partnering with other globally-conscious organizations and facilitating events across the world. Singapore Founded by three young Harvard men as place for fresh intellectual exchange, Salzburg Global Seminar has long been engaged in issues surrounding the future of education. In this vein, President Stephen L. Salyer visited Singapore for the first International Liberal Education Symposium, hosted by Yale-NUS College at its new permanent campus in the city-state. The event brought together more than 30 global education leaders to discuss the future of international higher education and dialogue on obstacles and trends in education in an increasingly interconnected world. Hong Kong Salzburg Global’s long-running program Philanthropy and Social Investment entered a new phase in 2015 in anticipation of the adoption of new climate change goals, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the funding needed to support these new initiatives. Marking the start of this new phase, Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine together with US Development Director Andrew Ho travelled to Hong Kong for the session Philanthropy in the Global Age.  The session was co-convened with The Global Friends, a consortium of global philanthropists leading values-driven social innovation, and focused on the philanthropic innovation needed to support transition to a climate-balanced economy and foster US-China collaboration to this end. Gwangju and Seoul, Korea Building on our work with the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI Forum), Program Director for Culture and the Arts Susanna Seidl-Fox travelled to Gwangju, Korea for the Asia-Europe Foundation’s conference Cities: Labs for Culture? Seidl-Fox, who has been leading programs on culture and the arts at Salzburg Global for almost 20 years, moderated a panel focusing on leadership in the cultural sector. She also met with creatives and cultural leaders in Seoul at the World Culture Open, a network which invites people to engage in intercultural exchange and collaboration. While in the capital, Seidl-Fox was also able to attend a gathering of local YCI Fellows from the Seoul hub. Florence, Italy Intercultural exchange and conflict transformation were also key themes for Susanna Seidl-Fox when she traveled to Florence, Italy, to discuss the pressing need for Western societies and global Muslim communities to build comprehension and communication. New York University’s John Brademas Center for the Study of Congress brought together 20 artists, conveners, practitioners, and funders to identify opportunities for positive action and collaboration. Seidl-Fox brought insights from the 2014 session Conflict Transformation Through Culture: Peace-Building and the Arts and discussed the need to promote capacity-building in the Middle East-North Africa region. Minsk, Belarus Program Director Charles E. Ehrlich furthered Salzburg Global’s conflict transformation work when he traveled to Belarus to speak at the International University on Conflict Transformation in Minsk – an apt location, as the city had recently hosted the OSCE-led Russian-Ukrainian peace talks. Ehrlich presented two topics drawn from his own professional experiences in Kosovo and Catalonia, examining the causes of disputes, reconciliation, and lessons learned for peaceful transformation. The program brought together young professionals from Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, and Georgia, including Russian-occupied territories (Abkhazia and South Ossetia), to look beyond regional conflicts and frame constructive dialogue for exchanging new ideas. Berlin, Germany Drawing on her own professional background in biodiversity and climate and water issues, as well as Salzburg Global’s own extensive work in the fields of international trade, governance, transboundary cooperation, and conflict prevention, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine moderated a discussion entitled (Mis)understanding of Climate – China, India, and the EU at the Public Diplomacy Forum in Berlin, Germany. The event was hosted by the Charhar Institute, Clingendael Institute, and ifa, and supported by Robert Bosch Stiftung.  Cape Town, South Africa Red Bull’s Amaphiko project is a founding partner of the YCI Forum. Through this partnership, Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine was invited to Cape Town, South Africa to speak at the Red Bull Amaphiko Academy, a launch-pad event for grassroots social innovators and entrepreneurs who are making a positive difference in their community. As well as strengthening the Red Bull Amaphiko partnership, Shine also acted as a talent scout, meeting STEM education innovator Varaidzo Mureriwa and inviting her to participate in Untapped Talent: Can Better Testing and Data Accelerate Creativity in Learning and Societies? WANT TO HOST A SALZBURG GLOBAL FELLOWSHIP EVENT IN YOUR CITY? To find out when Salzburg Global Seminar staff might be in your city and to inquire about hosting a local Salzburg Global Fellowship event, contact Salzburg Global Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke: fellowship@SalzburgGlobal.org 
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