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Sciana Wins German Design Award
The brand for Sciana was developed by fg branddesign, an agency for identity-driven brand communication
Sciana Wins German Design Award
Salzburg Global Seminar 

A European health leaders network held in collaboration with Salzburg Global Seminar has received a prestigious award for its corporate design.

Sciana: The Health Leaders Network has received a German Design Award for its excellent communications design (and) corporate identity.

The network is supported by a partnership between the Health Foundation, Careum Stiftung, and the Robert Bosch Stiftung.

The inaugural meeting took place earlier this year in April and brought together its first cohort of outstanding leaders in health and health care policy and innovation.

Members attend four four-day gatherings in Salzburg over a two-year period. Salzburg Global is responsible for the program delivery and supports members throughout their time on the program via an online platform.

The 2017 Sciana group will meet at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria, for their second meeting starting on November 9.

The brand for Sciana was developed by fg branddesign, an agency for identity-driven brand communication.

Referring to Sciana’s corporate design, a description provided by the German Design Award says, "The corporate design is bold, clear and variable. The self-confidence of the design, photography and typography articulates the innovative strength with which the network propels the development of groundbreaking solutions."

The German Design Award is given to projects that “truly represent pioneering contributions to the German and international design landscape.”

The Award is bestowed by the German Design Council, one of the world’s leading competence centers for communication and brand management in the field of design.

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Salzburg Global Fellow Bright Simons Awarded 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize
Salzburg Global Fellow Bright Simons Awarded 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize
Tomás De la Rosa 

Salzburg Global Fellow Bright Simons has been named as one of four winners of the 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize.

The award, also known as the Jan Eliasson Prize, is given annually by the Tällberg Foundation to outstanding leaders regardless of country and discipline, whose work is applicable at a global scale, innovative, courageous and rooted in universal values.

Simons, president of mPedigree Network, is a Ghana-based technology innovator, development activist, and social entrepreneur.

He attended Salzburg Global Seminar in 2011 for Session 481 - Health and Healthcare Series III, Innovating for Value in Health Care Delivery: Better Cross-Border Learning, Smarter Adaptation and Adoption.

With mPedigree Network, Simons pioneered a system that enables consumers to instantly authenticate the safety of pharmaceuticals at the point of purchase by sending a free text message via their cell phone.

Simons thinks of himself as part innovator, part entrepreneur and mPedigree as part IT enterprise, part social activist organization. Following his Salzburg experience and the global connections it afforded, Simons and mPedigree have since expanded their focus from Africa to Asia.

The three other winners of the 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize are Instituto Elos co-founder Rodrigo Rubido Alonso, International Refugee Assistance Project co-founder Rebecca Heller, and Fiorenzo Omenetto, who is the Frank C. Doble Professor of Engineering and a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts University.

Alan Stoga, chairman of the Tällberg Foundation, said, "These four amazing leaders are global in their reach, tireless in their efforts, innovative in their approaches, and operate in concert with universal values. They prove that great leaders are rising to the challenges of our times. Our goal in honoring them is not only to draw attention to their work, but also to provoke a conversation about the kinds of leaders needed today.”

All four winners will take part in a public discussion at Columbia University on November 28 as part of the Foundation’s Global Leaders Forum. They will be honored at the Paley Center for Media on November 29.

WATCH: Salzburg Global Fellow Profile - Bright Simons

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Young Cultural Innovator Includes Max Reinhardt Mirror in Art Installation
The Coming to See exhibition is taking place at the Salzburger Kunstverein until November 26 (Picture: Annelies Senfter)
Young Cultural Innovator Includes Max Reinhardt Mirror in Art Installation
Salzburg Global Seminar 

Salzburg Global Fellow Annelies Senfter included a mirror that once belonged to Max Reinhardt in her first art installation.

The antique, recently acquired by Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron and Salzburg Global Seminar, was loaned to Senfter to be used in her Coming to See exhibition, which took place at the Salzburger Kunstverein between October 13 and November 26.

The installation included a collection of acorns from Schloss Leopoldskron, which were spread out in the Kabinett space. Completing the display was a photo of another antique mirror once owned by Reinhardt.

Senfter, a visual artist who lives and works in Salzburg, attended the third meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators last year.

Describing Senfter’s work, the Salzburger Kunstverein said, “Annelies Senfter’s work is situated between photography, research, and poetic investigation, and investigating notions of memory and trauma. Her work resonates with an urge to uncover repressed subjects without stirring up negative sentiments.

“Thus this exhibition brings together these few elements, including the artist’s photographic work, to take a glance back 100 years and weigh upon not only the time caught between that moment and ours but also to weigh upon the immediacy of our collective present. Surviving through all that time is art, the great and pure mirror upon which we as a people may gaze. And if we choose not to gaze at this reflection, the reflection is still produced for others to see, nonetheless.”

Speaking to Salzburg Global, Senfter said, “This project belongs to another bigger project I started in 2014. I did a lot of research on sites in Salzburg the Nazis took away during World War Two, such as parks and gardens. I started with Schloss Leopoldskron.

“I started collecting leaves from elder trees, trees which were planted before World War Two happened – like all the trees here at Schloss Leopoldskron. I collected the leaves and then made a botanical collection…. I combined it with the story of the building.”

These stories and leaves appeared in Senfter’s Asking the Trees project, which also included leaves collected from Villa Zweig and Villa Trapp.

While continuing with this project, Senfter received an invitation from the Salzburger Kunstverein to put on an exhibition. She said, “I thought, ‘Okay, if the name of this exhibition (room) is Kabinett, maybe I should do something with a mirror. I did photographs of mirrors here because to Max Reinhardt, of course, mirrors were important. He was a theater man. Mirrors are important to create certain atmospheres.”

Ahead of the exhibition, Senfter returned to Schloss Leopoldskron to view Reinhardt’s mirrors in the Venetian Room and his former office. It was during this visit she was offered the chance to use one of Reinhardt’s former mirrors that had been recently acquired from the hotel.

The mirror is an original piece, crafted by a Berlin carpenter around the beginning of the 20th century. It previously hung at the palace nearly one hundred years ago. Carved out of coniferous, the mirror is silver- and gold-plated.

Senfter said, “I’m really thankful that the Schloss was so supportive with the mirror because I know that they just bought it this summer, and I’m taking it away for six weeks. I really appreciate that, and I’m thankful for it.”

Fellows from the fourth meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators surprised Senfter by coming to the exhibition’s opening.

Having attended the Forum in 2016, Senfter described the experience as “breathtaking” and something which had helped her with her projects.

She said, “Very often I’ve heard of things we were talking about, like being brave, going forward, going to places you’ve never been before, doing something new – something you don’t know if it will out or not.

“Take the risk that if something is not working out, you will survive. If you never try, you will never know. This was very, very helpful if you’re working in the arts because it’s always something new. You never know what’s going to happen or you never know if it will work out. You can just say, ‘Okay, if I’m lucky, it will work out. If not, okay. This is what it is. I will do the next thing.’” 

WATCH: Annelies Senfter speaking in 2016 on developing projects in an intuitive way


Annelies Senfter took part in The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016. The list of our partners for this session and further information can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/569

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The Asia We Want - Building Community Through Regional Cooperation - A Clean and Green Asia
Participants will be able to develop joint projects for future implementation and benefit from ongoing collaborations
The Asia We Want - Building Community Through Regional Cooperation - A Clean and Green Asia
Tomás De la Rosa 

In a recent report published by the Guardian, the headline read: “From Miami to Shanghai: 3C of warming will leave world cities below sea level.” Data from Climate Central suggested such a temperature rise would “lock in sea-level rises that would redraw many coastlines.” Climate change is everyone’s concern, but what this report highlighted, in particular, was the significance of its threat to Asian coastal megacities, including Shanghai, Shenzhen, Bangkok, and Tokyo. While these coastlines have yet to be redrawn, millions of people in Asia have already begun to feel the effects of climate-influenced extreme weather events, air pollution, water insecurity, and other threats.

From Monday, 30 participants from 14 countries will address several key questions centered around sustainable development and ensuring a low-carbon future when they convene at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria. They will take part in the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation - The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation – A Clean and Green Asia.

The majority of participants attending are rising leaders from ASEAN+3* member states and India. They will be joined by Asia experts from other parts of the world to provide comparative insights.

Ahead of the session, several participants have already begun to outline their vision for the Asia they would like to see when it comes to matters concerning the environment. Among others, these individual testimonials include calls for greater compliance and transparency, equitable growth, unity, a clean energy transition, and a "business as unusual" approach to support the global demand for sustainable development.

The four-day meeting will see participants look into various issues pertaining to sustainability in Asia, such as how communities can coordinate sustainable urban development and the practices leaders can look into to ensure collaboration toward a low-carbon, clean energy future. They will also examine local partnerships as tools for sustainable innovation, regional frameworks being used for environmental cooperation, and what efforts Asian countries can make to establish collaborations and the positive effects these could bring.

Participants, based on their experiences and shared insight, will also discuss case studies of communal cooperation internationally, and in Asia, to identify potential opportunities to adapt strategies for their contexts and to foster international collaboration. They will work together to develop pilot projects that contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals and bring environmental benefits.

This session is the first of the new multi-year series, The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation. The series aims to establish a shared vision and commitment to Asian community development, to build a reputable cohort of rising leaders and provide a comprehensive analysis of collaboration opportunities. It also seeks to develop the participants' skills to identify systemic barriers that impede regional cooperation and generate practical cross-border projects and community initiatives.

Salzburg Global Program Director Tatsiana Lintouskaya said, “Rising leaders in Asia are aware of their responsibility to steer transition to sustainable and climate resilient economies and are strongly committed to Asian community development inspired by cooperation at local and global levels. The Asia We Want: Building Sustainable Communities Through Regional Cooperation is there to support and empower young leaders working to advance inclusive low-carbon development in their communities. We aim to expand this program in the coming years and build a dynamic cross-border network for practical collaboration and lasting results in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.”

*Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, plus China, Japan, and South Korea.


Session 591 - The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia- is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the Session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.

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Qingchan Yu – “A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical”
Yu says financial cooperation is a policy priority to help poor member countries to embark upon renewable energy development
Qingchan Yu – “A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical”
Qingchan Yu 

Yu will be a participant at the upcoming session in the series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation. All participants were invited to share their own vision for “the Asia we want.”

The Great Mekong Sub-region (GMS) – Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and Vietnam, has a big population of 235 million in total – two-thirds of the US population. So far the region has an average energy consumption per capita of 1,268 kWh/person/year, which is half of the world’s average level. Rural electrification rates are still quite low, at 24 percent and 20 percent in Cambodia and Myanmar respectively. However, rapid economic growth in the GMS has meant rapid growth in the demand for energy.

As one the fastest growing regions in the world, the electricity consumption and electricity peak demand have experienced very high growth rates – a trend that the governments of the GMS countries expect to be sustained for at least the next five to 10 years. A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical. The GMS countries are still at an early stage in developing their renewable energy (RE) resources.

To make the GMS countries less dependent on imported fossil energy, notably oil and gas, and to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the Thai government plans to increase the use of alternative energy sources (solar, wind, biomass, and mini-hydropower) from 12 percent currently to 25 percent by 2021.

The government of Cambodia sets a long-term target of producing biodiesel and bio-ethanol to displace 10 percent of diesel consumption and 20 percent of gas consumption by 2030. By 2025, the share of RE sources in total energy consumption is projected to increase to 30 percent by the government of Lao PDR, with mini-hydro projects and biofuels expected to be the main sources of RE.

Myanmar’s government plans to use domestically produced biodiesel and bio-ethanol as substitutes for 10 percent of imported oil and gasoline by 2020. Renewable energy sources are still at a preliminary stage of development in Vietnam. The government plans to increase the share of renewable power generation, from 3.5 percent in 2010 to 4.5 percent by 2020, and possibly to 6 percent by 2030.

For the purpose of bridging the developmental gap and accelerating the role of RE in GMS countries, a mechanism should be set up for the technical transfer, cooperation, and the best practices for sharing to promote RE deployment in the region. Capacity building should be at the center of cooperation in the region.

Given the fact that financing is the most crucial challenge, financial cooperation is a policy priority to help poor member countries to embark upon RE development. Therefore, field research, pilot projects, and policy improvement should be conducted with intimate collaboration between international partners and multi-level stakeholders in Asian countries and the world.

Qingchan Yu is the program manager of the Energy and Climate program at GEI. Since joining in 2009, she has led the team’s work on sustainable development, US-China bilateral climate cooperation, and international climate agreements across the state and private sectors.


Session 591 - The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia- is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the Session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.

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Trinnawat Suwanprik – We must know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future
Suwanprik says Asia has to come together as one with strategies and commitments to consolidate different development visions
Trinnawat Suwanprik – We must know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future
Trinnawat Suwanprik 

Suwanprik will be a participant at the upcoming session in the series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation. All participants were invited to share their own vision for “the Asia we want.”

In the 21st century, the global balance of power will shift from West to East – to Asia. Processes affecting economic and social development will be bigger, faster, and more complicated. Nonetheless, for Asia to aspire to its full potential, we must, more than ever, know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future – a future that we want. Asia has to come together as one, with strategies and commitments to consolidate different development visions and stay on top of trends.

Asia will most likely face profound changes in all its dimensions, whether it be political concerns, socio-economic challenges and opportunities, environmental protection or energy security, as well as culture and conflicts. The lives of the people in Asia will be impacted by these topics in one way or another. Changes in Asia will undoubtedly influence the global scene. The world’s economic powers and businesses, for example, have been reconfiguring themselves to try to enter Asia, perhaps drawn by the region’s growth – something that is reflected in the increasingly larger share of the world’s GDP.

At the regional level, changes in Asia will particularly impact the shaping of infrastructure projects in newly developed economies such as Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Myanmar. Investors will participate directly in their economic development, beginning with those with low barriers to entry, which will make the Asia region better networked. On the ground, the changes and new economic developments will translate into urbanization; with huge and seemingly inexorable flows of people all around the region.

A Clean and Green Asia

As Asia develops, its energy consumption also rises. Fortunately, clean energy is becoming increasingly viable – and this trend has become too significant for the oil and gas industry to ignore. As the trend goes up, consumption of fossil fuel goes down. By 2035, it is expected that fossil fuel will no longer be the dominant source of energy. Hence, in the future for Asia that we envision, more households will have solar power panels, and the cities will be greener. However, the progress in the greening of the city will depend particularly on climate change, depletion of natural resources, and environment protection.

Moreover, in the bigger scheme of things, it should be noted that:

  1. China will rise to become the most powerful country in the world. Faced with this implication, other countries in Asia are left with two options: Accept partnership with China or make conflict with China to contain its power.
  2. The United State will still play a big role in Asia and the Pacific region. The underlying aim of their engagement and partnership with Asia and Pacific is probably to contain the influence of China. However, rapid expansion of many countries in the Asia and Pacific region will render the containment strategy less effective.
  3. India will become the third most powerful country, largely due to the size of its economy and its population. Although India is equipped with talent and technology, there is a power disparity compared to China. Thus it is no surprise that India has been building partnerships with the United States, Japan, and other powers in the Asia-Pacific to counterbalance China as it rises to power.

Numerous actors in Asia will try to steer themselves through the complex currents of change to achieve the glory of economic development. The price of success, however, inevitably leads to more consumption of energy, faster depletion of natural resources, and a greater chance of unintended or negative impact in the region. These are the challenges that Asia has to face. But the real challenge is: How can each country in Asia address and adapt to these challenges in a way that benefits all?

Trinnawat Suwanprik is a government officer serving as sanitary researcher at Chiang Mai municipality, Chiang Mai Thailand.


Session 591 - The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia- is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the Session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.

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Minh Nguyet Pham – “Air pollution is a spider web of overlapping responsibilities and policies that no single entity is willing to take up the task to solve it”
Pham says Ho Chi Minh City (pictured) consumes a total of four million liters of fuel a day
Minh Nguyet Pham – “Air pollution is a spider web of overlapping responsibilities and policies that no single entity is willing to take up the task to solve it”
Minh Nguyet Pham 

Pham will be a participant at the upcoming session in the series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation. All participants were invited to share their own vision for “the Asia we want.”

One morning I woke up and couldn’t see the building opposite my apartment. Everything was blanketed in a grey and thick air. I didn’t know what it was. My mom used to say that it was because of the weather (indeed, Vietnamese usually make “the weather” accountable for changes in the environment that affect them but outside of their control). Then I took a 40 minute-ride to the office and felt totally dizzy and exhausted. I didn’t know what kind of “weather” that was. Soon enough I realized it was the smoke, the dust, and everything else in the air.

The Environmental Performance Index (EPI) conducted by Yale University in 2016 ranked Vietnam 79th out of 132 nations in environmental quality. Moreover, air quality in Vietnam is ranked among the worst in the world, number 123rd. The sources of emission are mainly from coal-fired power plants, transportation, industrial emission, construction activities, waste incineration, household emission and transboundary pollution. In the city, transportation contributes a major share. Ho Chi Minh City alone has 7.3 million motorbikes (the highest number of motorbikes in the world) and more than 600,000 cars, consuming a total of four million liters of fuel a day. In the north, Hanoi is surrounded by factories and coal-fired power plants. When there is no rain or little wind, we all get a share of the manufacturing.

Air pollution is not a single problem. It is the result of a complex system failure that can’t be solved with a single answer. In Vietnam, air pollution is a spider web of overlapping responsibilities and policies that no single entity is willing to take up the task to solve it. The Ministry of Transportation, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, the Ministry of Industry and Trade, the City’s People’s Committee and its Department, and the Provincial People’s Committee and its Department are all responsible to monitor air quality. Yet, none has done it. Since it’s in everyone’s mandate, it becomes a common good, and no one is willing to take the lead. As a result, millions of adult and children, including myself, suffer from respiratory diseases that are all because of “the weather.” After the forests, agriculture land, and water, is Vietnam selling its last resources for economic gains?

As the air has thickened over the years, the future looks bleak. We might not be able to reverse what we’ve done, but it’s not too late to bring back what we lost. Vietnam needs to recognize the side effects of its 20 years of economic development and give priority to clear up the consequences of the past. Air pollution is one of them.

Vietnam should set up an independent committee to monitor air pollution and investigate the sources of emission. Entities that do not follow environmental regulations should be punished, and those who do should be rewarded. Further, it needs to put in place strict regulations on private vehicles and provides appropriate incentives for enforcement. More importantly, Vietnam needs to give investment priorities to public transportation and take advantage of technology to ensure their effectiveness and efficiency.

Only when policy is green and policy implementation is adequate, does change happen in a way that we can all appreciate.

Minh Nguyet Pham is a program officer at the Global Green Growth Institute in Vietnam.


Session 591 - The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia- is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the Session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.

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