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Minneapolis communities given a "Warm Welcome" by YCI Hub project
Minneapolis communities given a "Warm Welcome" by YCI Hub project
Salzburg Global Seminar 

A YCI Hub project designed to give residents in Minneapolis an authentic cross cultural experience has been hailed a success.

Warm Welcome, a one-night pop-up cafe in a Minneapolis park ice skating warming house, recently brought together new and established Minnesota cultures in a friendly exchange.

The project was co-directed by YCI alumna Amanda Lovelee, a member of the Minnesota YCI Hub. She worked alongside Emily Stover as part of their collaborative group Plus/And. 

The group worked with the Somali Museum of Minnesota and the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board to host the event.

Visitors were given a cup of Somali milky tea after they contributed to a tapestry combining maps of Somalia and Minnesota - an interwoven representation of the shared community.

Outside the warming house, four Somali grandmothers sang, laughed, and shared stories around a campfire much like the nomadic traditions of their childhood. 

The grant for the project was administered by Salzburg Global Seminar as part of funding received from The McKnight Foundation. Lovelee was one of several beneficiaries to receive a regional grant to undertake follow-on activities after attending Session 569 - Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III.

Discussing the project, Lovelee said, "As artists, we hoped that Warm Welcome would be an experience where new and old Minnesota communities could meet, listen, learn, and recognize how much we all have to offer if we can all be open to receiving.

"Our intention was to deepen a sense of empathy for our immigrant neighbors through their food and their stories, while assuring those who might feel afraid that their presence is not merely tolerated, but desired. This traditional Minnesotan space, the ice skating warming house, was temporarily transformed into a place for mutual welcoming to the community we share."

Lovelee admitted organizers were unsure how many people would turn up for the event, which took place in February, but developments in the news cycle helped generate further interest.

She said, "Our invitation was released on social media the day of the travel ban, affecting Somali nationals and even Americans of Somali descent, was first instated, and the overwhelming response indicated many people felt the need to show up.

"We were offering an opportunity to neither hide nor protest, but to gather and celebrate the diverse culture that we’ve built together. Overall our team hosted around 150 people of different ages and ethnicities, including many passers-by who happened upon Warm Welcome as they enjoyed the unseasonably warm night.

"We had tea and mulawah left at the end of the night, and felt like our first Warm Welcome event accomplished what we’d set out to do, and was a small moment of hopeful exchange for many who attended."

The tapestry weaved throughout the evening by visitors represented a symbolic map of Minnesota and Somalia. At the end of the event, guests could see the blended borders of two distant and distinct places, so far apart in distance and in culture, becoming one. The final map was framed and given for display at the Somali Museum of Minnesota.

Moving forward, Plus/And is approaching Minneapolis Parks to consider alternative ways of making use of their warming houses. They also hope to design a series of mobile structures which can serve different functions all year round.

Lovelee said, "We hope that Warm Welcome can be an example of how these structures could be used to further the board’s mission. We are pursuing an opportunity to create a similar space for two weeks in January 2018, and intend to work with other immigrant community partners to share their cultural hot drinks, stories, and understanding.

"Overall we believe that Warm Welcome is an inviting space, bringing people together to share what makes us each unique in our state’s coldest season, and to bring some warmth to a cold time in our country’s history."

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From the Archives - Author Saul Bellow writes in 1951
Saul Bellow
From the Archives - Author Saul Bellow writes in 1951
Chelsea Gunn 

One of the greatest aspects of working with the archives at Salzburg Global Seminar is the element of surprise that accompanies the opening of each archival box. When an organization has held sessions on such a diverse range of topics, and hosted distinguished faculty and students from so many fields, it is difficult not to stumble upon a few hidden gems. Case in point: the below letter from Saul Bellow to John McCormick, former Dean of the Salzburg Seminar. 

66-08 102nd 

St Forest Hills, L.I.N.Y. 

Dec 5, 1951

Dear Mr McCormick:

From what you tell me of your lectures I don't think we shall be covering the same ground. I am going to try to develop some of the notions about the artists in an industrial democracy, the relations of the individual and crowd, the dwindling in the stature of heroes, the constant effort of writers to strike a reliable definition of human nature, und so weither. There will probably be some duplication, but I don't suppose that we will have identitcal views.

I really don't know how much skiing time there will be for me. I have set myself the goal of winding up my book in Salzburg, and if I write in the morning and teach in the afternoon, socialize in the evening and read at night, I shall have to ski in the dawn hours.

I plan to leave Paris on New Year's Day. Between Christmas and New Year's I can be reached at Chez Kaplan, 132 Bd. du Montparnasse, Paris.

Sincerely,

Saul Bellow

Bellow visited the Seminar as a faculty member for Session 17 - American Poetry and Prose - in January 1952. At that time, Bellow was teaching at New York University and had written two books: Dangling Man, published in 1944, and The Victim, published in 1947. His lectures at the Seminar, “The Novel from Hawthorne to the Present,” dealt with works by Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner. His seminar topics included technical innovations in American fiction and the American influence on contemporary European writers.

In his letter to McCormick, Bellow alludes to his goal to finish writing a book during his stay at Schloss Leopoldskron. Considering his novels chronologically, one might guess that the book in question was The Adventures of Augie March, published in 1953. In a 2003 essay for The Tablet, Bellow wrote: “One chapter of Augie—I then had the notion of calling it “Life Among the Machiavellians”—was written at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, the late Max Reinhardt’s baroque castle, while I was teaching in the American Seminar.”

The Adventures of Augie March is considered by many to be the work that established Bellow as an important figure in the American literary canon. It begins with the famous paragraphs:

“I am an American, Chicago born – Chicago, that somber city – and go at things as I have taught myself, free-style, and will make the record in my own way: first to knock, first admitted; sometimes an innocent knock, sometimes a not so innocent. But a man’s character is his fate, says Heraclitus, and in the end there isn’t any way to disguise the nature of the knocks by acoustical work on the door or gloving the knuckles.

“Everybody knows there is no fineness or accuracy of suppression; if you hold down one thing you hold down the adjoining.”

The novel is a picaresque narrative: a satirical but realistic tale of a low social class protagonist. These stories are generally told in the first person, in an autobiographical style, and address issues of society as well as of personal relationships. Augie March is often said to be something of an Everyman character, reflecting, in particular, the struggles of the modern American.

This work is often compared to Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and occasionally to J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, two other popular modern picaresque novels. In 1954, The Adventures of Augie March received the National Book Award, and in 1976, Bellow was awarded both the Nobel Prize in Literature and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Although Session 17 was the only session which Bellow attended in person, his work has come up in sessions devoted to literature and the arts ever since.

Faculty and fellows visiting Salzburg Global in the future may choose to pass some of their time at Schloss Leopoldskron reading a copy of The Adventures of Augie March in the very place in which a portion of it was originally penned.

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Twitter reacts to Salzburg Question series on end of life care
Twitter reacts to Salzburg Question series on end of life care
Salzburg Global Seminar 

An online discussion on issues affecting care toward the end of life has caused a buzz on social media.

Conversations have been taking place on Twitter throughout the year as part of the Salzburg Questions series, which launched on February 20.

To keep track of the discussions and connect people from all around the world, those participating have been using the #allmylifeQs hashtag.

Between February 20 and August 19, the hashtag received 8.962 million impressions on Twitter. More than 500 participants have posted a combined total of 2,661 tweets. 

The Salzburg Questions series contains nine questions on matters involving palliative care, six of which have been launched to date. 

Each month, different individuals and institutions at the heart of the debate have shared a different question coinciding with an international day.

These individuals and institutions were involved in a Salzburg Global session in December: Rethinking Care: Toward the End of Life

Salzburg Global Fellows who have led discussions include: Agnes Binagwaho, Lynna Chandra, Suresh Kumar, Sheila Payne, Emmanuel Luyirika, and Richard Harding. 

Participants have already considered:

  • Why aren’t countries accountable to commitment on end of life care for vulnerable people?
  • Is dying well as important as living well?
  • How have you prepared for your death?
  • Will caring for your dying loved one bankrupt you emotionally and financially?
  • 145 countries signed the 1951 Refugee Convention [so] why do refugees have limited access to quality health care and end of life care?
  • How and what do you measure to ensure quality palliative and end of life care?

The questions have attracted various comments on the state of palliative care in different countries and how it can be improved.

Read a selection of the comments below:

The next question will be put forward on September 28, which coincides with International Right to Know Day.

Bruce Chernof, President and CEO of The SCAN Foundation, will ask: Doctors, Nurses, do you want to die the way your patients die?

Salzburg Global Fellows are encouraged to take part in the conversation on Twitter beforehand, on the day, and afterward. They can also take part by sharing blog posts around each question.

Blog platforms could include ehospice, the EAPC blog, Palliverse, and the IAHPC Newsletter.

So far, participants on Twitter have linked to research, podcasts and papers during their discussions.

If you hold a debate, workshop or Q&A event on a Salzburg Question, please film it so it can be uploaded to a dedicated YouTube channel. Send your video to katie.witcombe@kcl.ac.uk

A Twitter list of Salzburg Global Health Fellows has been created. If you would like to be added to this list, please let us know by subscribing or contacting us on Twitter at @SalzburgGlobal.

List of dates, questions, and people leading discussions

20 February 2017 - World Day of Social Justice - Why aren't countries accountable to commitment on #EOL care for vulnerable people? - Agnes Binagwaho

20 March 2017 - World Happiness Day - Is dying well as important as living well? - Lynna Chandra

07 April 2017 - World Health Day - How have you prepared for your death? - Suresh Kumar

15 May 2017 - World Family Day - Will caring for your dying loved one bankrupt you emotionally and financially? - Sheila Payne

20 June 2017 - World Refugee Day - 145 countries signed bit.ly/2ah31bH why do refugees have limited access to quality health care and #EOL care? - Emmanuel Luyirika

11 July 2017 - World Population Day - How and what do you measure to ensure quality palliative & EOL care? - Richard Harding

28 September 2017 - International Right to Know Day - Doctors, Nurses, do you want to die the way your patients die? - Bruce Chernof

13 October 2017 - World Hospice and Palliative Care Day* - Do you know how to access #palliative care when you need it? - Stephen Connor

10 November 2017 - World Science Day for Peace and Development - What future research is needed to improve care for people w advanced illness & towards the end of life? - Irene Higginson  

*This year's World Hospice and Palliative Care Day is taking place on Saturday, October 14. We will launch the question the day before to generate more discussion.

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This is why people enjoyed the 11th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change
This is why people enjoyed the 11th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Participants who attended the 11th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change have revealed what the experience meant to them as part of a reflection exercise. The Academy came to a successful conclusion last month after 83 students worked together to develop a DIY playbook to build a better world: reaction.community. This year's session - Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism - included students from Argentina, Austria, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Egypt, Finland, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Singapore, Slovakia, Syria, the UK, the United States, and Venezuela. The three-week program led to students creating a series of interactive exercises to educate others about global populism and extremism. Before the Academy ended, Salzburg Global asked 20 students, each representing a different school from around the world, to summarize their time at Schloss Leopoldskron in a few sentences. You can read their answers below. JD Alexander Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in advertising with a minor in business at the University of Texas at Austin “Having the opportunity to share such a diverse space and hear stories of people from around the world has been so valuable to me. We’ve laughed, cried, and poured our hearts out for the past three weeks and have matured so much in how we see ourselves creating global change.” Laila Al-Kloub Student pursuing a master’s degree in journalism and new media at the Jordan Media Institute “I will never forget how I thought it was impossible, but then it became a reality. This experience charged my hope, dreams, and power. It has given me confidence, and strength. From now on, if I fall, I will remember how I made it to Salzburg Global Seminar and how 83 students with different perspectives worked towards a target and achieved it. I have faith in myself and my power to change, I believe WE can change the world.” Sarah Al-Nemr Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree at the Lebanese American University in television and film with a minor in advertising and public relations “I’ve been waiting for this experience for over a year, and I’m so glad that it finally happened. This was the first time I’ve been so academically involved and invested, and I’ve learned so much about myself and the world. It was a very eye opening experience, and I’m endlessly grateful that I got to take part in it.” Lauren Bailey Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in communications at Nevada State College “My favorite thing from the Academy, aside from meeting the other students and the good food, was definitely the faculty. I can't even fathom all of the work these people with jobs, families, and other hobbies, put into the Academy to make sure there is a future they can believe in. But above all I think the greatest art was the process of us coming together from strangers to acquaintances, to friends, and now family. I’m excited to see where we all go from here and from the bottom of my heart I will be cheering on my Salzburg Global family.” Connor Bean Student pursuing a bachelor's degree in communication and media at Bournemouth University “Seeing how people from different parts of the world can come together and allow their perceptions to collide rather than clash has been the highlight of my time at the Salzburg Academy. The motivation and drive in certain people inspired me to make a change in my community and allowed me to have a whole new view on the world.” Artina Dawkins Ph.D. student in leadership studies at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University “Participating in the 11th Salzburg Academy has been one of the highlights of 2017! Nestled in the heart of the quaint little town of Salzburg, Austria, the Academy has opened up a new world about how different forms of media (broadcast news, podcasts, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, etc.,) have the power to change our perspectives, provoke our empathy or anger, and convince us that false information is in fact true – often without our knowledge. During these past weeks, I have been challenged to think more critically about the different types of media, to be careful that the information I transmit is not ‘fake news’, to reach across national and international lines to work collaboratively toward a common goal, and was reminded to seize the opportunities that are right in front of me!” Michael Furnari Student pursuing a master’s degree in peace and conflict studies at UMass Lowell “As a student from UMass Lowell I didn't know exactly what to expect when I came here. But now that my time is up here I can say that I learned so much more than I would have had I stayed in the United States. Not just academically but professionally I feel as though I've grown in the short time that I’ve been here.” Rachel Hanebutt Graduate student at Emerson College pursuing a master's degree in civic media: art and practice “Making connections on multiple continents, I left the Salzburg Academy feeling re-energized and ready to use my media and communication skills to make positive change in not only my community, but in the world. Before Salzburg, I didn’t realize how truly powerful media can be in shaping societies and changing perspectives; whether it is populism or climate change, I now know that I want to be a part in creating more just and equitable political systems, through media. More than anything, this Academy allowed me the time and space to focus in on what is truly important to me, which inadvertently helped me to more deeply understand I want to accomplish in the short term, as well as in my long term goals.” Sofie Hoertler Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in media management at the University of St. Pölten “Before coming here, I received a booklet with the participants’ pictures and bios. And as I read through it, I fell in the dehumanization trap and saw them as faces on paper. After living, eating and working with them for three weeks, I realized that I shouldn’t have dehumanized them. They’re not faces on paper, but rather real people with real life stories, and actually some of the brightest human beings I’ve ever met. I’m glad that there are selfless people who care about the world and that I got to meet some of them. Their positive energy is infectious, and I’m so excited to be taking it back home.” Jacqueline Hyman Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in English and journalism at the University of Maryland – College Park “The Salzburg Academy has been extremely life changing. I can’t believe I lived in such a beautiful place, studying important topics, and meeting such a diverse group of people. I’ve learned so much about the world just from these people and I know I’ve made some long-lasting friendships. The Academy is different than I expected; it’s not just a typical classroom experience with the same topics every day. It’s more than that; interactive, innovative, and inspirational. I’ll truly never forget these three weeks.” Lauren Kett Graduate candidate pursuing a master's degree at the University of Miami in interactive media and specializing in user experience design “My favorite part of this program was being around people who care. We came together from over 20 countries and shared a true cultural exchange of ideas and perspectives. This led to friendships. From here we have infinite opportunities for meaningful collaboration for change.” Dani Mateos Student who recently completed a bachelor’s degree in communications at Universidad Iberoamericana “This has been the best academic experience thus far, and the cherry on top of my last year of college. This experience helped me realize who I want to be in the future – a change-maker – and my future starts today. At the Academy, I found a new meaning for identity and inspiration. I want the world to change, and I want to change with it.” Eric Moy Ph.D. student in mass communication at the University of Iowa “Problem solving seems easy, but is actually more complicated thank you think as it has many layers. Working with students from different cultural understandings towards solving a major problem like extremism or populism helped me learn how to manage dynamics between people who are different from me. It also taught me not to assume things, but rather ask questions and aim for creating human dialogue.” Kamila Navrátilová Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in marketing and advertising at the University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius “The Media Academy was a life changing experience. I met a lot of amazing people and I had a chance to work with them on something meaningful. I realized how much we share in common even though we come from different parts of the world. These three weeks were eye-opening. I started to believe that we can truly face the many challenges that come our way. Also, I am now inspired to travel more often to learn new languages and get to know different cultures.” Ryan O’Connell Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in systems engineering at the United States Military Academy at West Point “The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change was a once in a lifetime opportunity for me to work with other students and faculty from around the world. It was so rewarding to work closely with students from places like Hong Kong, Beirut, and Mexico City. I learned so much about group work, other cultures, and myself that I'll take back with me to West Point.” Tom Olang' Postgraduate student pursuing a master’s degree in communications at Daystar University "After experiencing the program, I can confess that I made the best choice in my academic life. I have been able to network with faculty and students from diverse cultures; made friends and useful contacts and learnt a lot in the process. I am now really media literate! My cultural fluency has also soared considerably.” Agustina Parise Student pursuing a bachelor's degree in journalism and communication at Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina “Being part of the Salzburg Academy was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. Not only do you learn from the lectures, but you also learn from your fellow students about the countries they live in. It opens your mind.” Bingjun Shi Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in financial journalism at Hong Kong Baptist University “This experience pushed me out of my comfort zone, and I’m so grateful for it. I met amazing people from different cultures and became more receptive to diverse opinions and perspectives. I also learned how important it is to speak my mind and turn my dreams of changing the world into action. Maybe if I speak up, I could inspire others to do the same back home. Silence isn’t the solution. Our voices can move mountains!” Jack Lipei Tang Student pursuing a bachelor’s degree in journalism and communication at the Chinese University of Hong Kong “One of the most valuable lessons I learned here at the Salzburg Media Academy with so many amazing people is that social contact with individuals is the only way we can resist vague, manipulating and stagnant macro-narratives full of hatred, misunderstanding and prejudice.” Therese Woozley Graduate teaching assistant pursuing a master's degree in communication with an emphasis in media studies at Boise State University “I came to Salzburg with the purpose of learning new information and sharing the newfound knowledge upon my return. However, sharing content is ultimately short sighted... the wide range of faculty expertise, diversity of students, and palace atmosphere has created an overall experience which is impossible to put into words. I hold a humbling sense of gratitude for the Academy; it has forever changed my world view and my life will never be the same.”
Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running multi-year program, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/sac11.
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Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Aceel Kibbi 
More than 80 students have come together as part of a three-week program to create a series of interactive exercises to educate others about global populism and extremism.

Participants at this year’s Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change – entitled Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism – included students from Argentina, Austria, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Egypt, Finland, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Singapore, Slovakia, Syria, the UK, the United States, and Venezuela. Together they produced projects for an online DIY playbook: reaction.community.

The online publication aims to identify how populism and extremism operates and affects people of different ages, backgrounds and ethnicities around the world. Students were organized into groups where they brainstormed, conducted research, and identified case studies related to populism and extremism. The ideas were then transformed into “playable problems.”

Some of the themes explored in this year’s publication are children’s rights, climate change, reporting on extremism, the protection of journalists, the power of photo manipulation, the history and future of populism, violence against women, and freedom of information. The projects aim to facilitate dialogue and promote engagement through a product-based approach. They also invite the audience to develop a sense of solidarity and harness the right tools to stand in the face of oppression in all of its forms. Multimedia elements including videos, infographics, music playlists, interactive maps, text-based games, e-zines, comics, and data visualizations make up a number of the projects.

Paul Mihailidis, program director of the Salzburg Academy and associate professor at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “The 83 students, 13 faculty and 15 visiting experts came together to create a meaningful civic media intervention that provides creative media solutions for responding to harmful populist rhetoric. Their work emerged out of a commitment to themselves, and each other, to be open, honest, and creative, and open to new ideas. Only then can they create creative media that is by them, for their peers, and focused on social impact at local and global levels.”

Students’ ideas were inspired by conversations which took place throughout the Academy. Throughout the three weeks, students explored how media are framed by design choices, algorithmic bias, data manipulation, and commoditized content. To expand their international outlook on media and politics, they took part in plenary sessions, workshops, reading groups and hands-on exercises that challenged their creativity and transformed their thoughts into action. Topics covered included critical media making, the intersection of civic imagination and civic media, bridging cultural divides, challenging social gaps, journalism ethics and media literacy. Guest speakers at this year’s Academy included US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy and acclaimed journalist Robin Wright, a contributing writer for The New Yorker.

This year’s students, who hailed from five different continents, put their differences aside to discuss one of the world’s most pressing problems. Not only did the Salzburg Academy serve as a safe space for healthy debate and dialogue, it also acted as a “brave space” – where participants reaped the benefits of challenging their perspectives and beliefs.

In among the discussions and work, students were taken on cultural and poignant trips into the Alps and to the Mauthausen Memorial Site. Students also took part in a “Seeing Media” image contest, which provided a mosaic of visual art which shows how the Academy visualized global issues today.

Connor Bean from Bournemouth University, UK, said: “Seeing how people from different parts of the world can come together and allow their perceptions to collide rather than clash has been the highlight of my time at the Salzburg Academy. The motivation and drive in certain people inspired me to make a change in my community and allowed me to have a whole new view on the world.”

Rachel Hanebutt, a graduate student at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “Making connections on multiple continents, I left the Salzburg Academy feeling re-energized and ready to use my media and communication skills to make positive change in not only my community, but in the world. Before Salzburg, I didn’t realize how truly powerful media can be in shaping societies and changing perspectives; whether it is populism or climate change, I now know that I want to be a part in creating more just and equitable political systems, through media. More than anything, this Academy allowed me the time and space to focus in on what is truly important to me, which inadvertently helped me to more deeply understand I want to accomplish in the short term, as well as in my long term goals.”

The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change was launched by the international non-profit organization, Salzburg Global Seminar in 2007 in partnership with leading universities on five continents. Over its 11 years, more than 700 alumni have taken part in the three-week program at its home, the palace Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria. The Academy has taken a pioneering lead in media education, tackling issues of global concern with a focus on media literacy and civic engagement. Academy alumni have been inspired to become change-makers and leaders, taking pro-active positions in education, media, technology and politics.
Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running multi-year program, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/sac11.
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Apply to be part of the 2018 Sciana cohort
Apply to be part of the 2018 Sciana cohort
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Leaders in health and health care are being encouraged to become part of the second cohort of a groundbreaking international initiative. Sciana – The Health Leaders Network – is inviting new members to join the next cohort, who will begin their work in June next year. The network brings together professionals from the UK, Germany, and Switzerland to improve health and health care across Europe and further afield. The initiative, facilitated by Salzburg Global Seminar, is the brainchild of three organizing partners: The Health Foundation (UK), Careum Stiftung (Switzerland), and the Robert Bosch Stiftung (Germany).  Each cohort consists of 18 leaders and emerging leaders, six each from Germany, Switzerland, and the UK. They attend four four-day gatherings over a two-year period.  What are the selection criteria?
  • Sciana members are leaders in health or health care and have a proven outstanding record of achievement. They are already well established in their chosen career, which they are anticipated to continue developing, regularly exceeding expectations and influencing peers and diverse organisations.
  • Sciana members are entrepreneurial and strategic thinkers, who understand the scale and complexity of key challenges facing health and health care systems and how to manage the tensions between long-term policy goals and short-term political pressures.
  • Sciana members have a demonstrated interest in collaboration and innovation across sectoral boundaries, both nationally and internationally.
  • Energetic and curious, members are not afraid to ask uncomfortable questions and are able to motivate others to implement unconventional measures.
  • Sciana members have excellent English (further languages are an advantage) and superb communication skills.
  • Sciana members include health policymakers and practitioners, as well as academics, journalists, elected officials, other public sector leaders or from business who are primarily living and working in one of the three countries of the founding partners (UK, Switzerland and Germany). Exceptional applications from other countries which exceed the selection criteria will be considered on a rolling basis.
What are the dates?
  • Meeting 1 | 10 - 13.06.2018
  • Meeting 2 | 24 - 27.11.2018
  • Meeting 3 | 13 - 16.05.2019
  • Meeting 4 | 24 - 27.11.2019
Where are we meeting? Meetings take place at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria. Meetings begin around lunchtime on day one and end early afternoon on day four. All Sciana members must be committed to attending all four days of each of the four meetings. This is non-negotiable and a prerequisite for any application. How do I apply? If you would like to apply for the second cohort, please email akoblmueller@salzburgglobal.org your CV, along with a  letter of motivation which includes:
  • Why you wish to join the network
  • What you would bring to the network and what you would aim to get out of it
  • A brief outline (up to 500 words) of a recent health policy initiative or innovation, drawing on your own experience or which you know well, and which you think would be of interest to other Sciana members
  • Confirmation that you are available for all four meetings
The second cohort is open for application until September 29 2017. If you meet the criteria for pre-selection, John Lotherington at Salzburg Global Seminar will contact you to outline the next steps. For further information and answers to FAQs, please click here. The first cohort met in April earlier this year. On the final day of the program, members focused on what they would do after leaving Salzburg. They outlined three projects at varying stages of development. Watch the video below for highlights from the first cohort's meeting in April.
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