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Getting Tranisition Right in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen
Getting Tranisition Right in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen
Oscar Tollast 
Recent political transitions in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region have shown how exclusion from decision-making processes leads people to create new channels to proclaim their rights. As countries across the MENA region tackle the challenges of their nascent democracies, a session that looks to identify strategic directions for improved diversity in the Middle East got underway today at Salzburg Global Seminar. The program, which takes place from today until November 6, is entitled ‘Getting Transition Right: A rights-based approach towards Diversity and Inclusivity’. It is being hosted by Salzburg Global Seminar and the Arab Human Rights Fund and will focus in particular on four key countries in the midst of transitions that can pilot new approaches to diversity management: Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, and Yemen. Countries in the MENA region are very diverse, yet people have come together ignoring many of these distinctions to call for more open and equal governance systems. Effective diversity management helps to instil greater acceptance of plurality and provides the foundations for social and economic progress. The session will enable intra- and inter-country analysis of effective approaches to diversity management, to craft policy guidelines and recommendations to help ensure the realization of basic rights, and support the translation of policies into action. Speakers at the session include Fateh Azzam, chairman of the Arab Human Rights Fund, and Amal Basha, described as Yemen’s most prominent advocate for human rights and chairperson of the Sisters’ Arab Forum for Human Rights. Ann Elizabeth Mayer, author of Islam and Human Rights: Tradition and Politics, and associate professor of legal studies and business ethics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, will also be speaking. Participants will engage in a highly interactive process of presentations, discussions and working groups to tackle and unravel some of the biggest questions surrounding this topic. Working groups will present their recommendations at the end of the session before the group as a whole outlines the next steps going forward.
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Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program set to hold second seminar
Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program set to hold second seminar
Oscar Tollast 
Over 40 of the USA’s top law students will convene on Friday for the second seminar of the Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program being held in Washington, D.C. The two-day session, entitled, ‘The Future of Public and Private International Law’, is being attended by students from nine of the top US law schools and will take place at the United States Institute of Peace. The session will be chaired by Salzburg Global Fellow William Burke-White, Deputy Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School. Participants will present their own research and scholarship on leading edge topics, refine their concepts based on constructive criticism from international experts, and build global networks with fellow peers and practitioners. The program will begin with a lecture from Salzburg Global Fellow James Bacchus, Chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Governance for Sustainability, and Chair of the Global Practice, Greenberg Traurig. After morning breakout sessions take place, this will be then followed with a keynote address from another Salzburg Global Fellow: Leonard McCarthy, Vice President for Integrity at The World Bank. Over the course of the two days, faculty and panel discussions will take place on topics involving contemporary challenges to international human rights, and media and the law. Saturday’s panel discussion on media and the law will feature Adam Liptak, the New York Times’ Supreme Court correspondent, and Salzburg Global Fellow Will Dobson, Politics and Foreign Affairs Editor at Slate. This year’s session follows on from last year’s inaugural event which featured Justice Richard Goldstone delivering the luncheon keynote address. Justice Goldstone, a member of the Salzburg Global Seminar Board of Director, served on the Transvaal Supreme Court and the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of South Africa. He shared several stories about his own private and public law career and discussed his work as chief prosecutor of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals. The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program is named in honor of Lloyd N. Cutler, who served the Salzburg Global Seminar for more than two decades as Board Chair, faculty leader and mentor. It annually brings together 45 students nominated by their law schools with leading judges and practitioners for interactive exploration of public and private international law. Participating law schools at this year’s seminar include: Columbia Law School, Georgetown University Law Center, Harvard Law School, Duke University School of Law, Stanford Law School, University of Chicago Law School, University of Pennsylvania Law School; University of Virginia School of Law, and Yale Law School. The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Program aims to encourage the careers of exceptional young lawyers – men and women who will shape the future course of international law and legal institutions.
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Delivering Truly Sustainable and High Value Health Care
Delivering Truly Sustainable and High Value Health Care
Louise Hallman 
Every health care economy in the world is resource constrained – whether in the context of a lower income country marshalling whatever resources are available; an emerging economy struggling to keep up with economic transformation and popular expectations; or a country such as the United States with health care costs now at about 18% of GDP and likely to continue rising at 1.5% the rate of GDP growth. The search is on everywhere to sustain and improve quality of health care within existing parameters, to ensure that capacity is tied to what patients need and want rather than being supply driven, to reduce unwarranted practice variation, and to innovate to achieve greater value. Cross-border learning in how best to pursue these goals can achieve more than is possible in one country alone. Since 2010, over the course of its five-session series, Salzburg Global Seminar has brought together over 270 experts from 65 countries working in the field of health and health care innovation – the perfect grouping to share such cross-border learning. On Wednesday, October 30, 22 of these Fellows, together with 21 other health care professionals, will come together at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA to share their expert knowledge and experiences, and ultimately maximize the potential of cross-border learning. Over the course of the full-day program, organized by Salzburg Global Program Director John Lotherington in collaboration with MGH, the 43 Fellows will tackle a number of questions:
  • How do we maintain momentum when we hit the 'flat of the curve' when extra resources apparently yield little improvement?
  • How do we get to the next level of quality improvement in low and middle income countries?
  • How can cross-border learning maximize real value and innovation in health care delivery?
  • How can we engage vulnerable communities?
  • What is the significance of the global 'right to health' discussion for the USA?
  • How can we be innovative in resource constrained contexts?
  • What is the role of quality improvement in strengthening health systems?
  • Can we collectively improve the science?
Speakers for the program include Katrina Armstrong, Physician-in-Chief in the Department of Medicine, at MGH and her colleague Timothy Ferris, Medical Director, Mass General Physicians; as well as returning Salzburg faculty Maria-Luisa Escobar and Roberto Iunes from the World Bank Institute; Jaime Bayona, Public Health Advisor with the World Bank; M. Rashad Massoud, Director of the USAID Health Care Improvement Project (HCI) at URC-CHS, who was chair of the 2012 Salzburg Global session ‘Making Health Care Better in Low and Middle Income Economies: What are the next steps and how do we get there?’; and Albert Mulley, Director, Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science and co-chair of Salzburg Global’s most recent Health and Health Care Innovation Series session ‘Realizing the Right to Health: How can a rights-based approach best contribute to the strengthening, sustainability and equity of access to medicines and health systems?’ A full list of all speakers can be found on the session page. Salzburg Global’s “Fourth Founder”, Herb Gleason will also be speaking at the event. Gleason was formerly Chairman of the Board of Health and Hospitals of the City of Boston, and served as faculty on Salzburg Global’s first ever health care focused session ‘Health Care: Allocating Resources in Urban Societies’ in 1979, as well as multiple other health care sessions since. A reception will be held after the full-day program at the
Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation at MGH. The sixth session in the Health and Health Care Innovation series will be held in December 2013. Registration is currently still open for ‘The Drive for Universal Health Coverage: Health Care Delivery Science and the Right to High-Value Health Care’.
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Justice Stephen Breyer to give this year’s Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture
Justice Stephen Breyer to give this year’s Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Seminar is set to honor the life of presidential advisor and Washington ‘super-lawyer’ Lloyd N. Cutler for a fourth consecutive year. This year’s Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture will be given by Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. A conversation will follow, moderated by Adam Liptak, Supreme Court correspondent at The New York Times. The event, hosted by Justice Sandra Day O’Conner (ret.), will be held at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C on Monday. In addition to the lecture and reception, guests will be invited to view the Van Gogh: Repetitions exhibition. At last year’s lecture, an audience of over 120 gathered at the US Supreme Court to listen to a stimulating conversation between Baroness Helena Kennedy, leading barrister and expert in human rights law, and Professor Anne-Marie Slaughter, former Director of Policy Planning at the US State Department. The evening’s main topic of discussion was the use of drones as a means to national security. Baroness Kennedy and Professor Slaughter also addressed the issue of Guantanamo Bay’s existence. Mr Cutler inspired and mentored Salzburg Global Fellows for more than twenty years. He served for more than a decade as Chairman of the Salzburg Global Seminar. He also founded the Washington, D.C, law firm, Wilmer Cutler & Pickering and was White House Counsel to two US presidents. As a lasting tribute to the Cutler legacy, the Salzburg Global Seminar established the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law in 2009. The center aims to seek solutions to global problems in areas where the law is inadequate or evolving. It also aims to advance the role of independent judiciaries globally and to promote universal access to justice. It wishes to employ innovate methods to engage new audiences and raise awareness of legal principles and why they matter.
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Kristalina Georgieva: "Salzburg defines who I am"
Kristalina Georgieva: "Salzburg defines who I am"
Oscar Tollast 
Kristalina Georgieva, European Commissioner for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response has credited Salzburg Global for changing her life. The Bulgarian economist and politician attended the seminar as a participant in 1990 on ‘Negotiation Theory and Practice: Environmental Disputes’. Speaking to Salzburg Global about her first visit, she said: “That was my first exposure to the big world, [which was] extremely enriching on its own, but it also triggered a huge change in my professional life. “This is where I met a professor from MIT who later invited me to join his team as a Fulbright scholar. There, I found my calling.” Commissioner Georgieva took an interest in environmental policy. This led to a career working for the World Bank that lasted for nearly 20 years. She arrived in 1993 as an environmental economist before rising to vice president and corporate secretary of the World Bank Group in 2008. During her time at the World Bank, Commissioner Georgieva also served as sector manager on Environment for the East Asia and Pacific Region, director in charge of World Bank environmental strategy, policies and lending, World Bank director for the Russian Federation and later, director for Sustainable Development. She assumed her role as Commissioner in February 2010, a position she felt readily prepared for following her journey from Salzburg Global. “I came back to be EU Commissioner for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response so much [more] prepared for the job from all my work with the developing world and on climate change, one of the biggest risks to cause economic and humanitarian crises today. “All in all, Salzburg defines who I am.” Commissioner Georgieva said that attending the seminar helped her to understand the difficulties of finding solutions where competing parties had separate interests. “Our session was a simulation of climate change negotiations. We in our attempts failed and so did the world later on, but we never should lose hope that when we talk to each other in an inclusive, open and democratic world [that] a pathway to solutions is possible.” In her role as Commissioner, she has been fighting the hunger crisis in the Sahel and has helped coordinate the European Union’s relief contributions to Japan after the earthquake and subsequent nuclear disaster in Fukushima. “I have the best and the worst job in the European Commission. It is the best because what I do is to mobilize help for people affected by conflicts and disasters in their most difficult moments in life. “It is also the worst because what I see is that fragility in the world is increasing, climate change leads to more devastating disasters and conflicts are becoming more complex, not less.” In May 2013, in response to the humanitarian crisis in Syria, Commissioner Georgieva visited refugee camps in Jordan and Lebanon, announcing the allocation of €65 million in humanitarian aid from the European Commission. A month later, she returned to Salzburg Global to speak at the Board of Directors Weekend. Commissioner Georgieva said: “It was an enormous honor to be invited to come back and speak on what has been the experience of the years since 1990 in my life, in a sense, to give back to the Salzburg Global Seminar what I got from it at the very beginning – a perspective of how the world can be a better place.” She revealed to Salzburg Global that the seminar was an important platform for bringing people together with different perspectives, and the need for that platform has only increased. “I strongly believe that Salzburg Global Seminar has taken on reflections on how the world is changing and it’s [in a] position to bring people together on the new issues that we all face from climate change adaptation to peace and security, from how the world evolves in terms of census of power to how we can help the most fragile countries cope with their fragility.” In her role, Commissioner Georgieva outlined three objectives she wanted to see accomplished by the time her mandate ends. She would like to see the European Union to continue leaning forward in the face of the most dramatic humanitarian emergencies, to work harder on preparedness and prevention and have legislation in the European Union for it. She said: “With needs going up and resources not following it is absolutely crucial to reduce risks and that means understand where the risks are and help communities and countries to be better equipped to withstand recurring shocks. “We are on our way to adopt a new legislation for civil protection of Europe for making Europe itself stronger in the face of climate change, in the face of more frequent and devastating disasters.” Commissioner Georgieva defined the European Union as a global leader in the area of humanitarian aid. “I see any place I go – from the Sahel to the Horn of Africa, to the Central African Republic to Japan – dedicated Europeans who bring help and hope, who risk their lives to save the lives of others. “In my activities, I’m determined to not only do more good but to get this good to be better known where it originates from in the European Union.”
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Belisa Rodrigues: “We are very open to engaging with our partners”
Belisa Rodrigues: “We are very open to engaging with our partners”
Oscar Tollast 
The manager of a pan-African arts association has said she is open to exposing its networks to Salzburg Global. Belisa Rodrigues manages the day-to-day operations of the Arterial Network and is the general manager of the African Arts Institute based in Cape Town, South Africa. The Arterial Network is a pan-African association of artists, cultural activists, creative entrepreneurs and cultural policy experts represented in 40 African countries. Ms Rodrigues said: “We’re looking for sustainability strategies in order to show that these networks flourish and are strengthened. “If the idea is around cultural hubs, rotating seminars or getting the conversation to move around – if we can help in that – whether it be online or whether it be a physical space, we are very open to engaging with our partners and making that possible.” Ms Rodrigues was speaking to Salzburg Global during the recent strategy session on ‘Promoting the Next Generation of Cultural Entrepreneurs: Planning for Success.’ Participants convened at Schloss Leopoldskron to discuss ways in which the 2012 Young Cultural Leaders Forum could evolve into a 10-year program, a session which Ms Rodrigues attended last year. She said her invitation to last year’s forum was a great opportunity to be in a global environment. “Often in our context when it comes to African representation in international forums, there’s normally one or two representatives and their voices get lost amidst the other international players. “This was a very strategic opportunity for us to represent the continent through our networks and through my representation for Africa.” Participants at this year’s strategy session focused on how the 2012 Young Cultural Leaders Forum was organized, as well as assessing its methodology and teaching styles. Ms Rodrigues said: “We’ve managed to break it down and analyze it and put forward some recommendations that will be useful for the next session and for the next 10 years in terms of how entrepreneurship is taught in the cultural field. “The biggest takeaway for me was involving the participants themselves more intimately in the teaching methodology – using participants as live case studies.” She praised Salzburg Global for picking out themes that were relevant to the cultural sector, including the role of arts organizations in society. “I think for the next seminar series in terms of entrepreneurship, it’s very important to be able to understand the geopolitical and economic context in which we are operating in. “That’s a unique role that the Salzburg Global Seminar can present because it’s about getting big picture thinking and then finding how to navigate in this global environment.” During the session, Ms Rodrigues spoke at a fireside discussion about the geopolitical and economic context of Africa and the creative economy. She said: “I was able to provide some examples of cultural entrepreneurs who are doing it despite the constraints on the continent and in their countries.” The strategy session followed on from this year’s African Creative Economy Conference, held in Cape Town, which inspired Ms Rodrigues’ lecture. “My talk was basically trying to take some of [the conference’s] recommendations and some of the thinking around this topic into this international platform which is exactly what the Salzburg Global Seminar series should be doing, which is capitalizing on the knowledge of its participants.” Ms Rodrigues has a passion for the development and sustainability of the creative and cultural sector on the African continent and its ability to effect change in society. Prior to her work at the African Arts Institute, she worked in the private sector for a number of years as Operations Manager for a global FMGG brand, and has also been involved in various freelance arts projects. She describes herself at a “middle-management level” in her career, helping to support her manager to do more representative work. However, Ms Rodrigues suggested she was beginning to enter a new phase of influence. “I see myself now transitioning in that area where I’m presenting more in terms of personal career development [and] personal goals. I’m stepping more into those spaces. “Even though I’m an administrator, I’ve now become more aware of policy development and actually influencing the field.” Ms Rodrigues recognized the significance of being involved and connected with global thinkers at Salzburg Global. “Being invited back is testimony to the fact that we have a unique role to play on the African continent, but recognizing we’re not operating in isolation. “I think if we can insert or influence agenda, I think that is a really relevant and particular role I can see for the seminar.”
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Felipe Buitrago: “We are in an age of innovation”
Felipe Buitrago: “We are in an age of innovation”
Oscar Tollast 
Sitting in the finely decorated Chinese Room at Schloss Leopoldskron, Felipe Buitrago’s reason for being at Salzburg Global is simple. “I am at the Salzburg Global Seminar because I want to make the world economy a more creative economy.” Mr Buitrago is consultant of the Division of Cultural Affairs, Solidarity and Creativity at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, D.C, where he leads the Cultural and Creative Economy Lab. He found himself, among other leading thinkers, at Salzburg Global earlier this month for a strategy session entitled ‘Promoting the Next Generation of Cultural Entrepreneurs: Planning for Success’. The aim of the session was to help evolve the 2012 Young Cultural Leaders Forum into a 10-year program. “There’s a partnership that is starting to make an innovative approach, which at the same time returns to its roots,” said Mr Buitrago, describing the significance of the session. “The cultural sector in particular is way behind in many of the strategic discussions at a global level. It’s very important that it’s included here now and focused on young cultural entrepreneurs. “We are in an age of innovation and the fact that [cultural entrepreneurs] are taking the risk to try new formats [and] involve people in a different way is very important.” For over 11 years, Mr Buitrago has worked in creative economy development on behalf of the Colombian Ministry of Culture, the British Council, the Ibero-American Observatory of Copyright (ODAI), and separately as an independent consultant and university professor. He described the strategy session’s topic as very important and relevant to the work being conducted at the Inter-American Development Bank. The bank is aiming to improve the communication tools for cultural entrepreneurs in the Latin American and Caribbean region. It aims to reaffirm the relevance of the creative and cultural industries for regional economic development. Speaking during the session, Mr Buitrago said, “Being here, meeting these very interesting people from all over the world helps me understand better what I’m doing. With that I can actually improve my ability to communicate and reach out for the similar leaders across the region.” Mr Buitrago would like to see more opportunities given to young people, to help develop their skills and provide employment. However, he suggested the world was in the middle of a large economic transition. Past economic disruptions have been caused by developments in agriculture and the industrial revolution. Mr Buitrago suggested the latest disturbance was being caused by digitization. “The new generation is coming through with new skills [and] has a different relationship with technology, but the people managing the economies are not aware how it works. “It’s our job to try and help people, especially the people in charge right now to understand what’s coming next so they can start preparing the ground for them.” Mr Buitrago has experience in research, international negotiations, design and evaluation of policy and development programs in more than a dozen countries around the world. He has collaborated on a number of publications, including ‘Creative Lebanon’ and ‘A Tanzania for the Creatives,’ both published in 2009. His latest publication is entitled, ‘The Orange Economy’. On the first evening of the strategy session, Mr Buitrago attempted to convey his latest book’s main arguments to the rest of the participants. “In this book, we are trying to communicate the statistics behind the creative economy, in particular to help the policymakers make decisions about it. “We provide some tools to understand the nature of this: how this ecology works; how there’s one supply side and a demand side but also an institutional side; and how you have to look at this in a multidimensional way in order to cover it.” In order to provide for this multidimensional approach, Mr Buitrago said his team had come up with "the seven Is” for the development of the Orange Economy. These include: information, institutions, industry, infrastructure, integration, inclusion, and inspiration. Mr Buitrago argued information is needed in order to make informed decisions, adding institutions and industry needed to be developed to combine creative talent with entrepreneurial spirit and risk-taking capitalists. This can be improved by providing greater access for cultural artists through infrastructure. The experienced consultant suggested creative activities played a significant role in terms of inclusion. “Creative activities have shown an incredible potential to help solve the social, economic, political and inclusion gaps in terms of diversity of gender, sexual orientation and political differences.” But for progress to be made, Mr Buitrago said one factor could not be prioritized over another. In his eyes, it’s a process that starts and ends with the individual. He concluded the interview by saying, “It has to be all worked together and integrated in order to be effective."
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