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Young Cultural Innovators to convene in Salzburg for fourth YCI Forum
Fifty of the world's most talented young innovators will take part in a six-day program at Salzburg Global (Picture: Michal Jarmoluk)
Young Cultural Innovators to convene in Salzburg for fourth YCI Forum
Salzburg Global Seminar 

More than 50 of the brightest creative minds catalyzing urban and social transformation in their communities will convene at Salzburg Global this weekend.

Young artists and cultural leaders representing more than 30 cities and regions will take part in the fourth session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI).

The six-day program, which begins on Saturday, will take place at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria.

Participants will develop their vision, entrepreneurial skills, and global networks which will allow them, their organizations, and their causes to thrive in new ways.

They will do this through a series of capacity building sessions focusing on storytelling, entrepreneurial thinking, human-centered design, and comparative styles of leadership.

YCI alumni will return as facilitators and resource specialists to assist this year’s participants, providing continuity and exchange of best practice.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators is a 10-year project which aims to build collaborative networks for human capital and leadership development within the cultural sector.

Most participants come from YCI hubs that Salzburg Global has developed with partners in cities all around the world. These hubs form the core of the YCI multi-year program.

YCI hubs convene mini-sessions, workshops and public events and act as a local resource for emerging innovators.

In previous years, the disciplines represented by participants at these sessions have ranged from the visual and performing arts, literature, and cultural heritage, to foods, fashion, architecture, and design.

This year’s participants are arriving from Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Bangalore, Buenos Aires, Bristol, Cairo, Canmore, Chicago, Copenhagen, Detroit, Hanoi, Cape Town, London, Manila, Memphis, Montreal, Nairobi, New Orleans, New York, New Delhi, Ontario, Siem Riep, Salzburg, Seoul, Skidegate, Tirana, Tokyo, Toronto, Valetta, and Vientiane.

Salzburg Global Program Director Susanna Seidl-Fox said, “With the fourth Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators coming up soon, membership in our YCI network will grow to more than 200 creative change-makers across all continents. We are particularly excited to be welcoming new Forum partners from Canada, Malta, and Kenya this year.  

“The YCI Forum connects and supports cultural leaders working at the intersection of the arts, civic innovation, and social transformation. Our world needs the creativity, energy, vision, and passion that these young leaders bring to their communities now more than ever. And they, in turn, can benefit greatly from the ongoing support, encouragement, and network that the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators provides.”


The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators VI is part of a ten-year multi-year series. This year's program is supported by the Albanian-American Development Foundation, American Express, Arts Council Malta, Cambodian Living Arts, Canada Council for the Arts, Edward T. Cone Foundation, Fulbright Greece, Japan Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, Adena and David Testa, and the U.S. Embassy Valetta, Malta. More information on the session can be found here. More information on the series can be found here. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtag #SGSyci.

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Salzburg Global Fellow Randal K Quarles confirmed as member of US Federal Reserve board
Salzburg Global Fellow Randal K Quarles confirmed as member of US Federal Reserve board
Oscar Tollast 

Salzburg Global Fellow Randal K. Quarles has been confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a member of the Federal Reserve board.

Quarles, 60, was nominated by President Donald Trump in July to serve as the Federal Reserve's vice chairman for supervision.

Last week he won confirmation by a 65-32 vote in the Senate and became Trump's first confirmed Fed nominee.

Quarles is also the first person to serve in the role and become part of a new approach to financial regulation, as highlighted by The Economist.

Mr. Quarles previously worked in the Treasury Department under President George W. Bush between 2002 and 2006, serving first as assistant secretary for international affairs and then as under secretary for domestic finance.

In 2014, he helped establish the Cynosure Group, a Salt Lake City-based company which makes long-term equity investments in private companies across a range of industries.

Mr. Quarles has taken part in several programs at Salzburg Global. He first attended Schloss Leopoldskron in 2013 for Session 516 - Out of the Shadows: Regulation for the Non-Banking Financial Sector.

The following year, he was a participant at Session 546 - The Future of Banking: Is There a Sustainable Business Model for Banks? He took part in his third Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World in 2015 when he attended Session 552 - The Future of Financial Intermediation: Banking, Securities Markets, or Something New?

His most recent appearance at the Forum, and Salzburg Global was in 2016 when he attended Session 563 - Financing the Global Economy: How Can Traditional and Non-Traditional Sources Be Integrated?

The Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World is an annual high-level program convened by Salzburg Global which addresses issues critical to the future of financial markets and global economy in the context of key global trends. 

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Urgency, Trust and Complexity - Key Concerns for Public Service
Urgency, Trust and Complexity - Key Concerns for Public Service
Salzburg Global Seminar 

Rapid global transformations place governments under intense pressure to perform to ever-higher expectations at a time of shrinking public budgets. Populations are aging, countries are urbanizing, and technology is transforming the future of work. Many citizens have lost trust in the ability of public officials to cope – let alone to excel – under these changing dynamics and constant media scrutiny.

How can governments transform their culture and operations to address such challenges and disruptions? What radical changes lie ahead for the design, delivery and funding of core public services? What is the role of government in helping to change mindsets and prepare citizens for the “new normal”?

It was these questions and more that a high-level group of politicians, civil servants, and private sector experts came together in Salzburg to answer at the sixth meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Round Table. The report from this session - In the Spotlight: How Can the Public Sector Excel Under Changing Dynamics? - is now available to read, download and share. 

The report addresses three key concerns raised by the participants:

Urgency

The dramatic pace of change and the growing number of disruptive influences are creating a situation wherein governments need to be prepared for challenges they do not yet understand or even know will exist. Three particular areas of unknowns with which governments are grappling are future-proofing societies for changes to jobs and skills; harnessing advances in technology to deliver public services more effectively; and increasing tax revenues from new forms of economic activity.

Trust

Levels of trust in government institutions and elected officials have dropped to unprecedented lows, restricting the public sector’s ability to innovate and take risks with new approaches. A shrinking tax base, combined with rising expectations from citizens and the need to balance demands for greater transparency with effective communication techniques are putting on a strain on states’ ability to uphold their end of the social contract.

Complexity

Finally, the public sector must employ a complex array of responses and strategies to cope with this environment, whether through adapting internal structures, undertaking large-scale efficiency reviews, establishing new external partnerships or experimenting with new policy intervention approaches. 

Interviews

The report also includes several interview features, offering participants' insights on private sector innovation and risk-taking in the public sector, e-governance in Estonia, peace-building priorities in Colombia, and the need to "humanize" governments. All these interviews and more can also all be read on the session page.

Looking ahead

The intensive two-day session concluded with an agreement to transform the Round Table into a more formalized Public Sector Strategy Network. The Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, Salzburg Global Seminar, apolitical, and other partners are now taking the next steps to develop the terms of reference for the Network. You can read more about the plans for this new Network in the report. 

Inquiries about how to become a member of this new Public Sector Strategy Network should be directed to Salzburg Global Program Director, Charles E. Ehrlich: cehrlich[at]SalzburgGlobal.org

Read the report online.

Download the Report as a PDF.

Order a print copy: press[at]SalzburgGlobal.org


Salzburg Global Seminar convened the sixth meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Round Table – “In the Spotlight: How Can the Public Sector Excel Under Changing Dynamics?” - in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and apolitical, and with the support of Chatham House. More information on the session can be found here.

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Third Salzburg Global session on corporate governance reflects on the need for courage
Participants of Session 582 - The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?
Third Salzburg Global session on corporate governance reflects on the need for courage
Mirva Villa 

What does it take to be a courageous director? That’s the question participants of the third Salzburg Global session on corporate governance sought to answer earlier this week.

Around 40 corporate leaders and executives convened at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, to take part in Session 582 – The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?

In a series of plenary discussions, participants explored topics such as the corporation as a good citizen and the role of shareholders. Smaller break-out groups saw participants discuss their views in further detail.

Navigating between long-term and short-term goals, meeting shareholders’ expectations, and maintaining corporate responsibility requires certain attributes from directors: the courage to ask difficult questions, a high level of alertness, and the confidence to tackle issues head-on.

During discussions, participants reflected on issues such as sustainability and diversity and agreed both were important constituents in their own right. Some argued corporations inherently hold an ethical responsibility, which sometimes means risks have to be taken. 

One participant highlighted electric car manufacturer Tesla as a shining example of a risk-taker which has shown signs of success despite initial uncertainty around the venture.

Ahead of the session, participants were divided into groups to research three timely case studies: The Volkswagen emissions scandal, the fake accounts scandal at Wells Fargo, and the Google anti-diversity memo.

During the three-day program, break-out sessions took place for each case study to be reviewed.

The group discussing the case of fake client accounts at Wells Fargo concluded there were no proper control functions in the company.

While the board may not have been aware of what was happening, participants thought they should have been responsible for requesting adequate and transparent reporting on the sales results.

The board should understand why a certain product is doing well. “If you’re outperforming your competitors, it should be a yellow flag (if not red),” one of the participants commented.

The group discussing Volkswagen’s falsified emission results drew similarities between their case and the Wells Fargo case study.

Participants suggested Volkswagen’s “authoritarian culture” –  with a very heavy sales pressure on low-level employees –  resulted in a lack of trust in verification and ethics. Participants suggested this materialized in the attempt to sell in the U.S. at any cost.

The group said Volkswagen needed a culture of compliance, one that started from the top down in order for change to happen as it is boards rather than people at the bottom who hold the cards.

Rules and regulations are in place for a reason, but there must be a willingness to apply them.

The final case study participants explored concerned the Google anti-diversity memo and asked participants how they would have responded to the memo.

The break-out group who looked at the incident said there was a “missed opportunity” for Google to talk about the value of free expression but also the importance of diversity and why the memo was not well reasoned.

During the group’s discussions, one participant suggested Google’s response and the manner in which the incident was handled had failed to reassure anyone.

On the final day of the three-day program, participants made suggestions for topics to be covered in future sessions.

A wider discussion on the best practices for a board, including bringing in positive role models to talk about their experience, were seen as important steps moving forward.

The impact of technological transformation and effective ways for corporations to be “good citizens” and carry their social responsibility in a globalizing world were also seen as useful discussion topics.

One participant suggested markets aren’t created to be fair, so it can’t be left to the markets to create fairness. Corporate governance will continue to require business leaders to adapt to new challenges. The next generation of directors will need the courage to learn, question, and innovate in the face of obstacles that come their way.


The Salzburg Global program The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit? is part of the multi-year series, the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance. The session is being supported by Shearman & Sterling LLP, BNY Mellon, UBS, Barclays, CLP Group, Goldman Sachs, and Teledyne Technologies. More information on the session can be found here.

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Political scientist Roman Gerodimos to return to Salzburg Global as Visiting Fellow
Roman Gerodimos in the Max Reinhardt Library at Schloss Leopoldskron
Political scientist Roman Gerodimos to return to Salzburg Global as Visiting Fellow
Salzburg Global Seminar 

Salzburg Global is pleased to announce long-standing Salzburg Global Media Academy faculty member Roman Gerodimos will return to Schloss Leopoldskron later this fall.

The political scientist, writer and academic will be a Visiting Fellow between November 18 and December 3.

During his stay, Gerodimos, a principal lecturer in global current affairs at Bournemouth University, will give an evening talk on "The New World Disorder: Globalization, Technology and Democracy in the 21st Century."

He will also spend part of his stay carrying out research at the Max Reinhardt Library and writing a feature on the history of Schloss Leopoldskron.

Gerodimos' research focuses on civic and digital engagement, the challenges facing democratic governance due to globalization and digitization, and the role of public space and civic media in facilitating urban coexistence.

He is currently producing his third short film - Essence. This film is based on an essay written in 1967 by Austrian pianist Paul Badura-Skoda entitled "Look to the Guiding Stars!"

Gerodimos has already launched a teaser trailer for the film and has started an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to cover expenses.

Last month, Gerodimos was one of several Salzburg Global Fellows to speak at the Pune International Literary Festival. He also had the chance to screen his first film At the Edge of the Present.

For more information on Gerodimos' work, please visit romangerodimos.com.

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The Courageous Director - Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?
The Courageous Director - Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?
Tomas De La Rosa 

Arguably one of the mechanisms that keeps the world running, the private sector has spear-headed global economic development since its induction, exhibiting a non-stop growth that, in the past, led many corporations to assume a posture focused on their freedom of action. This freedom, however, has often resulted in social principles being neglected in order to maximize profit.

Nowadays, due to the rise of corporate justice movements, and the ever-growing development of politicians’ and everyday citizens’ socio-political consciences, corporations must carefully assess their impact on society and be perceived as positive influencers – avoiding boycotts, disasters or scandals.

Good corporate governance can drive this assessment, offering a control system that ensures ethical leadership through accurate reporting, sustainable finances, delivering long-term strategic goals, good relationship with consumers, regulators, and stakeholders, and a safe and functional work environment.

For corporations, this represents an opportunity to be socially responsible, reconnect with communities and popular opinion, and be seen by clients as organizations that listen to their concerns. For directors, this represents the potential to demonstrate how their prominent influences and responsibilities enable them to be more courageous.

From Thursday, 40 corporate leaders and executives will convene at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria, for Session 582 – The  Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?

The three-day program will see participants address issues relating to how corporations can act as good citizens, the impact of corporate behavior, the influence of shareholders on corporate governance, and how boards can be effective and steer corporations in its optimal direction.

Participants, drawing on their internationally diverse business, legal and academic backgrounds, will explore case studies such as Volkswagen’s emissions scandal, Wells Fargo’s fake accounts, and the Google anti-diversity memo.

This session is part of multi-year series, the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance. First held in 2015, the Forum facilitates critical thinking on changing regulatory and economic environments, comparative practices, and the roles and duties of directors.

Salzburg Global Program Director Charles Ehrlich, said, “We will explore how directors of multinational corporations can better serve as global influencers through ethical leadership.  Corporate scandals are bad for business – understanding risks and opportunities, and being able to communicate objectives effectively to staff and to the public, can enable corporations to maximize their bottom line while also doing the right thing for the global community.”


The Salzburg Global program The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit? is part of the multi-year series, the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance. The session is being supported by Shearman & Sterling LLP, BNY Mellon, UBS, Barclays, CLP Group, Goldman Sachs, and Teledyne Technologies. More information on the session can be found here.

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Samantha Gilbert - “Organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people - at all levels”
Samantha Gilbert opens the Salzburg Global Seminar session Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Samantha Gilbert - “Organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people - at all levels”
Mirva Villa 

With hundreds of staff in dozens of offices around the world, managing all their staff and ensuring they hire the most enthusiastic, engaged and efficient employees is important to the Ford Foundation. At the conclusion of the recent Salzburg Global Seminar session, Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy, Samantha Gilbert, vice president for talent and human resources at the Ford Foundation, answered questions from Salzburg Global Seminar’s communications intern, Mirva Villa. 

Salzburg Global Seminar’s Mirva Villa: What drew you personally to work in philanthropy? 

Samantha Gilbert: I started my career fresh out of university as a social worker and over time moved into human resources management and leadership roles, the first ten years or so working in the government and not-for-profit sectors. I then worked for a decade in a global leadership role in a for-profit international knowledge-based business – a professional services arts business – which taught me a great deal and fulfilled my desire to work internationally and in a dynamic environment. Over time I realized that I needed to be doing my work back in a mission-driven environment – that’s where my values come through strongly, as I experienced earlier in my career. I was eager to take all the rich learning I gained from the private sector and contribute my experience and skills in an environment that was aiming to make a positive impact in the world. Philanthropy allowed me to continue to work internationally, fulfilling my interests in diverse cultures and experiences, and matching my deep-rooted values about work that enables the well-being of people.

With your work in talent and human resources at the Ford Foundation, you clearly believe in the importance of the staff development. Why do you believe this is so important?

I truly believe that organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people. At all levels. And I believe all individuals carry unique talents, and when nurtured in the workplace, great outcomes occur. At all levels. Organizational development is all about people development – creating a work environment where people feel inspired to do their best work. This is why I believe human resources functions have a critical role in organizational development – to understand the unique aspects of the organization’s culture, nurture the best of it, and put into place the support, systems, policies and practices that enable employees to give their best. That’s a “win” for the organization and a “win” for employees because they learn, grow and develop a sense of pride, purpose and confidence in the contributions they make.

What are the biggest challenges the philanthropy sector faces in acquiring talent? 

The world offers a rich diversity of people and abilities and it will take all of them to solve the problems of today’s complex world. Sometimes I think we do not look broadly enough for talented people to work within our organizations. We are often too risk-averse to consider someone from another sector. We are often not strong enough in our onboarding practices to enable diverse talent to effectively acclimate in our world of philanthropy. We are strong on knowledge-mentorship as manager but not as strong on career coach as manager. These are some good skills we could learn from the private sector.

What did you hope to gain by attending this session? What will you go back with? 

I created this session in many ways over four years ago at a first of its kind forum at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center for learning. This is the second follow-up, but with a larger number of philanthropic organizations joining this time, and with broader co-sponsorship. I hoped that we would have a rich discussion about the landscape of our field of mission-driven work, and what it means for our talent needs and practices. I hoped to build a network of global leaders who think about our work through the lens of people, and therefore share and exchange ideas about how to make our sector stronger and more impactful. I believe we have all walked away with some new insights and understanding, and a commitment and bond with each other, and I can say I have also walked away with some new tangible ideas.

How was this session different to the one held in Bellaggio 2013?

It was not different in spirit and goals, but this time it was larger in size (an additional ten organizations) and therefore more diverse, which brought an even greater richness and opportunity for learning. It also benefited significantly from the programming and facilitation support from Salzburg Global Seminar. Thanks to Salzburg Global we moved a few notches up in content design and delivery. Other than that….it rained on Lake Como when we were there in 2013, and it rained in Salzburg this week, and both lakes and the rain offered a special quiet for reflection and learning.

What were the reasons for the Ford Foundation for joining in partnership with Salzburg Global to create this session? What are the benefits of events like this? 

The Ford Foundation’s President, Darren Walker, my boss, believes deeply in continuous learning and the value of collaboration and network building to achieving impact. He leads in a people-focused way and Ford has a long history in supporting institutions, individuals and ideas. Our co-sponsors – Carnegie Corporation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the ZeShan Foundation – share these values. So together we knew that Salzburg Global would be the perfect partner to carry forward this seminar given their similar ideals and rich history of supporting these dialogues and developments.

What change do you wish to see in the field of philanthropy? 

I hope we will continue to be brave and innovative.


Samantha Gilbert was a participant of the session, Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. You can read more about the session on the website: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/581

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