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Surin Pitsuwan – Asia must develop a common sense of urgency toward environmental issues
Surin Pitsuwan – Asia must develop a common sense of urgency toward environmental issues
The Asia We Want - Building Community Through Regional Cooperation - A Clean and Green Asia
The Asia We Want - Building Community Through Regional Cooperation - A Clean and Green Asia
Qingchan Yu – “A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical”
Qingchan Yu – “A credible alternative to fossil fuels is critical”
Trinnawat Suwanprik – We must know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future
Trinnawat Suwanprik – We must know the past, understand the present, and plan for the future
Minh Nguyet Pham – “Air pollution is a spider web of overlapping responsibilities and policies that no single entity is willing to take up the task to solve it”
Minh Nguyet Pham – “Air pollution is a spider web of overlapping responsibilities and policies that no single entity is willing to take up the task to solve it”
Niall O’Connor – We need to take a “business as unusual” approach
Niall O’Connor – We need to take a “business as unusual” approach
Tari Lestari – A clean energy transition is the only way to create a better future for Asia
Tari Lestari – A clean energy transition is the only way to create a better future for Asia
Roli Mahajan – Making the case for mandatory environmental service
Roli Mahajan – Making the case for mandatory environmental service
Abner Lawangen – Asia can truly be a resilient towering continent if all countries pull together to combat climate change
Abner Lawangen – Asia can truly be a resilient towering continent if all countries pull together to combat climate change
The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia

SESSION

591

The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia
Chochoe Devaporihartakula – A clean and green Asia needs compliance and transparency
Chochoe Devaporihartakula – A clean and green Asia needs compliance and transparency
Sandeep Choudhury – “The Asia we want should be one based on equitable growth and not the disparity we see today between the rich and the poor”
Sandeep Choudhury – “The Asia we want should be one based on equitable growth and not the disparity we see today between the rich and the poor”
Xixi Chen – We need integrated, collaborative and bottom-up leadership to build a cleaner and greener Asia
Xixi Chen – We need integrated, collaborative and bottom-up leadership to build a cleaner and greener Asia
Wilson John Barbon – Disasters are not natural phenomena but are the result of human and social conditions
Wilson John Barbon – Disasters are not natural phenomena but are the result of human and social conditions
Marifrance Avila – “For us to achieve the Asia that we want, we need to start with achieving the country that we want”
Marifrance Avila – “For us to achieve the Asia that we want, we need to start with achieving the country that we want”
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FELLOW OP-ED

Salinee Hurley - Replacing kerosene with solar power - an incomparable way to mitigate climate change

Renewable energy engineer and social entrepreneur offers her vision for a clean and green Asia

Hurley says kerosene lamps provide only one percent of global lighting, yet are responsible for 20 percent of lighting related CO2 emissions

Hurley says kerosene lamps provide only one percent of global lighting, yet are responsible for 20 percent of lighting related CO2 emissions

Salinee Hurley | 03.11.2017

Hurley will be a participant at the upcoming session in the series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation. All participants were invited to share their own vision for “the Asia we want.”

Energy is the backbone of development, yet thousands of communities in Southeast Asia, including a large proportion of ethnic communities settled on the Thailand-Myanmar border, do not have access to basic grid-connected electricity.

Lack of access to a reliable source of electricity creates both short and long-term health and safety risks. During the evening hours, villagers depend on light from candles and kerosene lamps that are unreliable, expensive and accompanied by very serious fire risks. A safer but more expensive substitute is utilizing car batteries, which requires frequent trips to diesel generator charging stations.

Both kerosene lamps and candles pose fire hazards and only inefficiently provide light. In fact, kerosene lamps provide only one percent of global lighting, yet are responsible for 20 percent of lighting related CO2 emissions. Worse yet, household use of kerosene and to a smaller extent diesel contributes black carbon to the atmosphere – the most absorbent form of particulate matter by mass. Thus, one kilogram of black carbon absorbs as much solar light in two weeks as 700 kilograms of carbon dioxide circulating in the atmosphere for 100 years. The daily indoor usage of kerosene can also be considered equally harmful to smoking around 40 cigarettes per day and thus represents a major cause of deadly respiratory diseases.

As particles stay in the atmosphere for no more than 14 days, replacing kerosene lamps represents a hard and fast way to mitigate climate change with immediate localized environmental benefits beyond compare in the climate world.

Our social enterprise expresses these issues by introducing affordable, reliable solar energy products and services to these rural communities. The business model is based on introducing a new – and desperately needed – product and service into multiple isolated regions in a sustainable manner that directly benefits marginalized and impoverished rural populations. The strategy and activities link unmet needs with unused resources while simultaneously providing employment and capacity development opportunities for local people.

The introduction of renewable energy sources to our target communities permanently and positively alters the development trajectory of the families that choose to participate in our program and purchase our products. Their health improved, their productivity enhanced, and the risk of destructive fires reduced.

The project also indirectly benefits the environment and empower women and young girls, as it reduces the need to collect wood for fuel firelight, thus slowing deforestation, and in some cases providing electricity for improved water and sanitation systems.

Salinee Tavaranan Hurley is an engineer and a social entrepreneur. Since 2005 she has been the director of the Border Green Energy Team, which provides renewable energy technology to underprivileged communities along the Thailand-Burma border.


Session 591 - The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia- is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. For more information on the Session, please click here. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session on social media, follow #SGSasia.

03.11.2017 Category: SALZBURG IN THE WORLD, SALZBURG UPDATES, SUSTAINABILITY
Salinee Hurley