Home » Topics

Topics

Related Content

Report now online - Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills
Report now online - Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills
Graham Robb – “You’re giving a language to children to think about constructive ways to manage their conflicts or turmoil.”
Graham Robb – “You’re giving a language to children to think about constructive ways to manage their conflicts or turmoil.”
Getting Smart – Day 4 – “Make schools great again!”
Getting Smart – Day 4 – “Make schools great again!”
Suicide and sinking tragedy show why social and emotional skills are so important for students
Suicide and sinking tragedy show why social and emotional skills are so important for students
Ayelet Giladi - SEL is important for everyone, from children and parents, to soldiers and refugees
Ayelet Giladi - SEL is important for everyone, from children and parents, to soldiers and refugees
Should SEL be measured and assessed? If so, how?
Should SEL be measured and assessed? If so, how?
Getting Smart – Day 3 – Measuring Social and Emotional Learning
Getting Smart – Day 3 – Measuring Social and Emotional Learning
Who should take the lead and be responsible for children's SEL development?
Who should take the lead and be responsible for children's SEL development?
Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills

SESSION

566

Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills
Getting Smart - Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills
Getting Smart - Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills
Michael Nettles - Why the ‘Whole Child’ Matters
Michael Nettles - Why the ‘Whole Child’ Matters
What is ‘Social and Emotional Learning’ and from what age should it be developed?
What is ‘Social and Emotional Learning’ and from what age should it be developed?
Topics

DAILY RECAP

Getting Smart – Day 1 – Social and Emotional Investment

Opening conversation sets the tone for the session Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills

Louise Hallman | 05.12.2016

“Investing in social and emotional learning is just as important as investing in cognitive skills,” declared Koji Miyamoto, senior economist at the World Bank’s Education Global Practice, at the opening of the session Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills.

With emotional intelligence considered by the World Economic Forum to be one of the top ten most desirable skills for jobs in 2020, Miyamoto’s statement will likely be adopted by many more people.

Improving students’ SEL skills positively impacts not only the students’ development but also society-at-large. As Michael T. Nettles, senior vice president of ETS stated in his opening remarks [see overleaf for remarks in full], “Being a good, empathic, thoughtful, even-tempered person able to work with others will make you happier, healthier, and more productive.” (He followed up with the American expression “Duh!”)

Research shows that SEL contributes to better self-esteem, mental health and stress management; better classroom behavior; greater success throughout schooling, from pre-K to graduate school; and even reducing crime rates. 

SEL might not be a topic that makes the headlines, but poor SEL influences many global issues from prejudice towards migrants and refugees to international conflicts. 

Given the benefits of SEL, educators are now considering how best to assess and improve these skills, but as one Fellow put it: “There’s a reason why these skills are known as ‘hard to measure skills.’” As schools and students start to suffer from “assessment fatigue,” policymakers will have a tough job convincing them to carry out yet more testing. 

In formulating these assessments, contextual differences, such as diversity in cultural or socioeconomic backgrounds, will need to be carefully considered and addressed. “The science has to be equitable,” added Nettles. 

Improving SEL necessitates inter-sectoral, interdisciplinary, and even international collaboration, drawing on expertise from not only education, but also psychology and neuroscience, among others. Over the course of five days, an eclectic cohort of 40 Fellows from 19 countries will now consider the importance of social and emotional learning (SEL), the possibilities of how to measure and improve it, and how to move it up global policy agendas. 

Download the newsletter from Day 1


The Salzburg Global Session Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills is part of the Salzburg Global series Education for Tomorrow's World, hosted partnership with ETS. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/566 You can follow the discussion on Twitter with the hashtag: #SGSedu

05.12.2016 Category: SALZBURG UPDATES, IMAGINATION, EDUCATION
Louise Hallman