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Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Salzburg Global Fellow Nigel Osborne presented with the British Composer Award for Inspiration
Salzburg Global Fellow Nigel Osborne presented with the British Composer Award for Inspiration
Tomas De La Rosa 
Salzburg Global Fellow Nigel Osborne MBE has been presented with the British Composer Award for Inspiration in association with the Music Publishers Association. The award is given annually as part of the British Composer Awards, in recognition of those who have provided "innovation in new music and influence and inspirational careers." A London-based composer, Osborne has pioneered methods of using music and the creative arts to support children affected by conflict. His approach was developed during the 1992-1995 Bosnian War, and has since been implemented throughout Eastern Europe, Africa, India, and Syria. He has attended Salzburg Global Seminar on two occasions; in 2014 for Session 532 - Conflict Transformation through Culture: Peace-Building and the Arts, and in 2015 for Session 547 -  The Neuroscience of Art: What are the Sources of Creativity and Innovation? Osborne is currently working with Lebanese non-profit organization SAWA For Development & Aid as a fieldworker assisting with their program for refugees in Lebanon and Syria. Crispin Hunt, Chairman of the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers, and Authors, said: “The composers honored this evening are testament to the UK’s thriving and vibrant new music community. Their creations challenge the status quo, push boundaries, celebrate our rich and diverse history, inspire and innovate at every turn. They demonstrate the positive impact of music on all our lives and it is an honor for BASCA to celebrate their achievements this evening.” On Osborne’s remarkable achievement, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine, said “This award is so richly deserved. Nigel combines huge creative talent with personal courage and determination to serve the most vulnerable people across the globe. His therapeutic work with music has broken new ground in violent and post-conflict settings. We congratulate Nigel warmly and look forward to continuing to work together on conflict transformation through culture”.  The premiere performance of Osborne's new opera, entitled Naciketa, with text by Ariel Dorfman, is due to take place at London's Queen Elizabeth Hall in the coming year. The work will be supported by Opera Circus, Bournemouth University's Animation and Computer Sciences Departments, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, the Lighthouse Arts Centre Poole, and the Southbank Centre.
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Salzburg Global President Meets Up with Former Salzburg Global Interns in Seoul
Salzburg Global President Meets Up with Former Salzburg Global Interns in Seoul
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar President Stephen Salyer caught up with five former Salzburg Global interns during his latest business trip to South Korea. Earlier this week, Salyer met with Sungtae Park (Summer 2017), Yae Jung Joo (Fall 2014), Yeji Park (Fall 2016), Hyesu Yoon (Summer 2017), and Ha Ram Hwang (Summer 2016) for drinks in Seoul. Each of them were selected to intern at Salzburg Global after they applied for the Korea Foundation Salzburg Global Seminar Internship Program. This program was first established in 2014 and has enabled many young Korean leaders to come to Schloss Leopoldskron, deepen their knowledge and broaden their networks and future employment horizons. Working alongside other interns from all over the world, KF-Salzburg Global interns have helped conduct institutional research, write program briefs, prepare program materials, locate relevant resources, and generally assist Salzburg Global’s full-time program staff.
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Salzburg Global Seminar mourns the loss of distinguished friend and Fellow Surin Pitsuwan
Salzburg Global Seminar mourns the loss of distinguished friend and Fellow Surin Pitsuwan
Tomás De La Rosa 
Surin Pitsuwan, multi-time Salzburg Global Fellow, has passed away in Bangkok following a heart attack at the age of 68 – just three weeks after he co-chaired a new program at Schloss Leopoldskron. A champion of Asia’s role in the global community, Pitsuwan was committed to sharing the lessons – and challenges – of Asia with the rest of the world. He leaves behind an invaluable legacy at international and regional level, and deeply impressed everyone who met him at Salzburg Global Seminar. Born at Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand, in 1949, Pitsuwan dedicated his life to stability and sustainability in the Asian region. Graduating from Claremont College in California in political science in 1972, and earning a Master’s degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University, he attributed his success to the help others gave him and dedicated himself to work for those who were less fortunate than him. Known for his commitment to democracy and regional identity, Pitsuwan entered politics in 1986 after being elected as a MP for his hometown, a seat he successfully defended for several terms. He went on to serve as Minister of Foreign Affairs of Thailand from 1997 to 2001. Between 2008 and 2012, he served as Secretary General of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), a period that saw a significant improvement in the regional organization’s involvement in global affairs. A participant in multiple Salzburg Global programs, Pitsuwan first became involved in 2013 at our special session on People, Peace and Planet in 2030: Shaping Inclusive and Sustainable Growth, held in Kyoto, Japan. He remained in close and regular contact with Salzburg Global as a speaker at four other sessions. During his participation in the 2016 session on Leadership for Regional Cooperation in Asia for the 21st Century, Pitsuwan reflected on his time as ASEAN Secretary-General, saying, “Asian leadership needs to be transformative, trans-generational and transnational – it’s collective,” as he envisioned “a stronger, more effective, more confident and more unified East Asia.” Most recently, his mission for a green and sustainable Asia became a driving force of Salzburg Global’s new multi-year series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation, which he helped launch in November 2017. During his keynote speech on A Clean and Green Asia, Pitsuwan said, “Asia is supposed to be living close to nature. That’s the wisdom of Buddha; that’s the wisdom of the Hindus; that’s the wisdom of Confucius: be close to nature, live with nature, go along with nature, and conform with nature.” Pitsuwan attributed sharing his knowledge and helping break down barriers as the inspiration behind his work, saying, “You don’t live for yourself and by yourself alone, the worth and the meaning of your existence depends on your human network. Human networking can make you a good man or woman in the context of society, through it you can influence positive change in the lives, and the quality of such, of the people around you.” “The value, and the meaning, of your own existence depends on your contribution, collaboration, and cooperation to make the life of others better. If my experience, inspirations, and knowledge are needed to help anybody, I would be willing to travel far and wide in order to share them. The passion to share with others is what has driven me, the satisfaction to know that I can be helpful and valuable to other people,” he added. Motivated by the help he received in the past, Pitsuwan said, “You need to share what you have received from those who are good to you […] Ultimately, widening the circle of goodwill, to help others, to create opportunities, and support younger generations, is what we all should do as it is a major part of our humanity.” Clare Shine, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Office said of Pitsuwan, “For such a prominent leader, Surin was a rare mix of intellect, enthusiasm and generosity, especially with rising younger talents. He often quoted W.B.Yeats’ famous line from The Second Coming: 'The best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity,' urging people to join forces for a better world. Surin was a wonderful friend to me personally and to Salzburg Global Seminar. We will dearly miss his unique blend of conviction and passionate intensity.”   He leaves his wife Alisa, three sons, and many friends across the world.
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Kimberly Mann – “It’s key to present information to people in a way that allows them to understand the lessons that are to be learned from this tragedy”
Kimberly Mann – “It’s key to present information to people in a way that allows them to understand the lessons that are to be learned from this tragedy”
Louise Hallman and Tomas De La Rosa 
It happened in Europe over 70 years ago, but teaching about and learning from the Holocaust is still vital across the world today, says Kimberly Mann, Salzburg Global Fellow and chief of the Education Outreach Section in the United Nations’ Department of Public Information. Speaking at the session, Learning from the Past: Sharing Experiences across Borders to Combat Extremism, Mann discussed the importance of Holocaust Education: “I think that when we look at Holocaust Education, we have to focus on two things: education and remembrance. It’s key to present this history to young people in a way that they can understand the lessons that are to be learned from this tragedy,” Mann says. In her role with the UN, Mann devised the strategy and outreach program to be used by all 63 field offices of the UN around the world, which each has a mandate to observe the International Holocaust Remembrance Day on January 27 (the anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp). In 2005, the first year of the outreach program, 10 Holocaust education and remembrance activities were held in 10 countries. By 2017, this had grown to 150 events and activities in 50 countries. “To me [that growth] says a lot,” says Mann. “To me it says that the United Nations has taken this subject very seriously and we have been very determined to encourage Holocaust education in countries around the world, in countries that are at risk and in countries that have had absolutely or very little connection to the Holocaust as it occurred at the time.” In April 2017, UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) published Education about the Holocaust and preventing genocide: A policy guide. As Mann explains, the guide “defines what it is about the Holocaust that is universal; why it’s important for educators around the world to introduce education about the Holocaust in their classrooms; the relationship that it has not only with the preventing of genocide but [also] international law; and the role of the international community has in helping to prevent such tragedies from occurring again.” The document, which was contributed to by 10 Salzburg Global Fellows, makes the link between Holocaust education and global citizenship education and the role that all individuals have to help promote peace and sustainable development. The Holocaust and the United Nations Outreach Programme contributed to the document's guidelines. There are challenges in this approach. Mann attended an earlier session in the Salzburg Global Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention Program where she says there were many intellectual debates: “Do we teach about the Holocaust in order to protect human rights? Or do we look at human rights and then consider the Holocaust? There are some great sensitivities.” Mann believes that “the Holocaust is a very important subject in and of itself.” “You don’t teach about the Holocaust to learn about other genocides; you teach about the Holocaust to understand how the Holocaust came about – the specific history, the impact that it had on the Jewish people, and what that meant to the rest of the world.” “Comparative genocide [studies are] important but you can’t compare the suffering of the victims. There is no hierarchy of suffering,” Mann explains. “But you can look at certain warning signs. You can be more aware and take action to prevent these things from happening by looking at case histories like the Holocaust, and what happened in Rwanda or other countries.” For Mann, Holocaust education has an important role in teaching societies about what happens when there is discrimination, hatred and bigotry, and a lack of respect for minorities and diversity, as well as how communities – local, national and international – respond to such atrocities. She highlights the importance of learning how the Holocaust was perpetrated and by whom: “It wasn’t just the Nazis, it was the German people and their collaborators.” Sharing personal experiences such as The Diary of Anne Frank has great value, says Mann, as they can help to make the atrocities feel more “real”: “It’s so important that we continue to listen to the stories of survivors, that this history has been documented.” At a UN event in New York to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the publication of The Diary of Anne Frank, at which the accounts of Anne Frank and other young victims of genocidal violence were presented to an audience of than 500 13 to 18 year olds, Mann remarks that she was “very inspired by [their] reaction.” “The reaction from the young people was to ask: ‘Why? Why do we see people who are different to us as being less than us? Why do we think that people who are different than us don’t deserve to have same treatment, the same quality of life, the same standards of living and protections under the law as we do? Why?!’ …I really think that what I see [now] versus when I was younger in school is that there is a lot of critical thinking that is happening now.” “There is a lot of work to be done but I think the first step is for young people to analyze the information that is being presented to them and then question the assumptions that they have already made themselves or the so-called ‘truths’ that have been presented to them.”    Ultimately, Holocaust education is not only about learning about and from the past. Mann hopes that programs like as hers will “motivate [young people] to take some sort of positive action to defend human rights.” The session, Learning from the Past: Sharing Experiences across Borders to Combat Extremism is part of the multi-year series Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention (HEGP) Program, which is held partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and this year is funded by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Zukunftsfonds der Republik Österreich. Additional support comes from Mr. Ronald Abramson; the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research, and Economy; the Robert Bosch Stiftung; the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation; the HDH Wills 1965 Charitable Trust; the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung; and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. More information can be found on the session here, and you can follow along via the hashtag #SGShol on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram
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“Americans have lost their bedrock of democracy” warns former newspaper executive in Cutler Lecture
Alberto Ibargüen, President, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, delivers the seventh Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law
“Americans have lost their bedrock of democracy” warns former newspaper executive in Cutler Lecture
Sarah Sexton 
Two weeks after Facebook, Google, and Twitter executives testified before US Congress on how Russia used social media to meddle in the 2016 presidential election, Alberto Ibargüen called on the tech titans to acknowledge their role as “publishers” and take responsibility for the authenticity of the content they disseminate.   Speaking on November 14 at the Newseum in Washington, DC, the former newspaper executive and current president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation said, “With the disaggregation of news sources and the rise of technology companies as leading publishers, Americans have lost their bedrock of democracy, which is a shared baseline of facts.”  Ibargüen was joined by Charlie Savage of The New York Times for the Seventh Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law: “Trust, Media and Democracy in the Digital Age” (full text). The lecture series was established by Salzburg Global Seminar in 2009 to honor the life and work of Lloyd N. Cutler, former White House Counsel to Presidents Carter and Clinton and long-time Chairman of Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors. Ibargüen is a former publisher of The Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald. During his tenure, The Miami Herald won three Pulitzer Prizes and El Nuevo Herald won Spain’s Ortega y Gasset Prize for excellence in Spanish language journalism. While technology companies never intended to shoulder responsibility for reporting news, Ibargüen said, Pew Research Center found that in 2017 two-thirds of adults in the US get their news from social media. Many of these tech companies shirk classification as media companies and disavow responsibility for authenticity. But Ibargüen warned that misinformation and “fake news” would prove bad for business if the public loses trust in what they read on Facebook and other social media platforms. Ibargüen and Savage discussed several possible solutions for determining the truth of online content, from Facebook’s efforts to curb “fake news” using a network of fact-checking partners to The Trust Project’s work with newsrooms and technology companies to help algorithms differentiate between news content and fakery.   Ibargüen recounted that 10 years earlier, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, approached the Knight Foundation for funds to work on technology that would determine the truth or falsity of online content. “It didn’t work. The technology wasn’t there,” Ibargüen said of those early efforts, “but I think that’s the future.”  Savage said that while technological advancements and artificial intelligence may contribute to the solution, these solutions would raise critical questions around ethics and governance. The public would need to know who programmed the algorithms – and who financed them, Savage said.  Ibargüen and Savage also shared observations about the changing understanding of what free speech and press mean to Americans. A substantial majority of college students believe “free speech” means censoring speech that would cause psychological harm or exclusion of people or groups, Ibargüen said.  “The increased value of inclusion and protection from this sort of harm is intensified by the common use of social media, with its reinforcement of filter bubbles, of like-minded thinkers, and the ability to block anyone with whom you disagree,” Ibargüen said. “And anonymity, hate speech, and bullying all promote the sort of thinking that values protection over exposure.” Ibargüen noted that the present upheaval around communication technology is only the beginning. “We’re very much in the early days of a new world,” Ibargüen said. “After Gutenberg, society adapted to embrace his disruption and thrived as never before.  Here's hoping history repeats itself.”
View full set on Flickr All photos can be republished with the inclusion of the credit: Salzburg Global Seminar/Stephanie Natoli This lecture was delivered under the auspices of the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law. To learn more about Lloyd N. Cutler and the center, please visit: cutler.salzburgglobal.org Press inquiries can be directed to Thomas Biebl, Director of Marketing & Communications: tbiebl@salzburgglobal.org The full text of the lecture can be read here Download the transcript as a PDF
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Minneapolis YCIs Organize a Skills Sharing Workshop to Address Housing Issues in Low-Income Neighborhoods
Minneapolis YCIs Organize a Skills Sharing Workshop to Address Housing Issues in Low-Income Neighborhoods
Mirva Villa 
Passionate to bring about discussion on the issues related to land use in the city of Minneapolis, Salzburg Global Fellows Chaun Webster and Carla Schleicher set about creating a workshop bringing together local communities. A group of 30 participants from multi-racial and indigenous working class communities came together to develop skills, share knowledge, and produce creative strategies to address the local challenges in housing by creating alternative economic models.North Minneapolis, Webster and Schleicher explain, is a densely-populated historically black neighborhood that has faced decades of divestment. More recently, however, there have been sharp increases in housing costs while wages remain stagnant. This has led to an “extreme number” of evictions. Notably, the rising number of evictions is hitting the low-income neighborhoods in Minneapolis the hardest, with many families either being displaced from their homes or having to spend too much of their income on housing expenses, by the federal standard.Both Webster and Schleicher attended the third meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016, where Webster together with New Orleans YCI Imani Jacqueline Brown facilitated a breakout session to encourage the YCI fellows to think about development in the context of their own backgrounds. Titled “Development Without Displacement,” the breakout session encouraged discussion around how working class communities could be empowered creatively to engage with land use issues affecting them. The discussion was framed by the work of American Studies scholar, Bench Ansfield, on development as an extension of colonial logic.Building on the themes of the breakout session, Webster and Schleicher created a day-long workshop titled ‘Development Without Displacement: Skill Building & Knowledge Share,” held in May 2017. The project was made possible thanks to YCI project funds provided to Salzburg Global Seminar by the McKnight Foundation. Nia Umoja, from a grassroots neighborhood collective called Cooperative Community of New West Jackson, came to lead the session, which saw the participants develop their views on cooperation through discussion and group exercises.A report about this project, authored by Webster and Schleicher said, “These exercises were points of tension and conversation as we thought through the rapid growth Minneapolis is facing and the extreme number of evictions that North Minneapolis has undergone that coincides with the lack of affordability and stagnant wages.”The intense five-hour workshop allowed the group to think about next steps for Minneapolis, with the discussion ranging from just causes for eviction laws to banking accountability and electoral strategy for the municipal elections in November 2017. The report continued: “The feedback that we got was that the space was rich with vision and was an important connecting point. The convening also functioned to do some important work in deepening the relationship between West Jackson and North Minneapolis and we are in the process of envisioning a Mississippi River Connection Network that would enable continued knowledge and skills sharing to take place.”For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
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Fellows Begin Building a Community for the Asia They Want
Fellows of the inaugural session of the new series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation
Fellows Begin Building a Community for the Asia They Want
Tomas De La Rosa 
The first session of new multi-year series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation ended in decisive manner with representatives from 14 countries committing themselves to continue working for a greener and more sustainable Asia. Throughout the four days of the session, A Clean and Green Asia, 30 of the region’s rising leaders in environmental development, green technology, and sustainability policy discussed how to ensure a low-carbon and more sustainable future, which would harmonizes with both nature and the fast-growing urban development the region has experienced in the last 20 years. As part of the session’s final plenary discussion, participants shared how the session has provided them with the tools to face some of the challenges they face at work on a daily basis. One participant said the session had allowed them to be more mindful of the variety of ways in which communities are affected by similar environmental issues. Another said they were going back to work with a renewed sense of commitment to engage with more people with differing points of view. Participants also expressed hope that the network established in Salzburg will keep them connected, with a reunion planned in six months in order to share the various practices that have enabled their respective projects and organizations to be successful. Through this, they hope to establish common goals and frameworks that allowed them to remain on the same page. During the session, the participants took part in skills-building workshops focused on working with policy and decision-makers, how to promote regional collaboration, entrepreneurial thinking, and public engagement. Through these workshops, participants were given tools to become effective agents of change in their respective fields and countries. The four workshops addressed different environmental issues that affect local communities across Asia, and how private and public sectors can collaborate to develop country partnerships in the region. Discussion topics included how to achieve low carbon societies, how small-sized climate projects can gain access to proper financing, how communities can play a more impactful role in ensuring waste management is done responsibly, and how regional collaboration is essential to solve the urgent issue of widespread air pollution. Toward the session’s conclusion, and as part of the efforts to incentivize collaboration, many made open invitations for fellow participants to come visit communities in different countries in Asia that are affected by some of the issues discussed in the session. These visits would allow them to have firsthand experience of these issues, as well as gain new a perspective on the various effects these have across the Asia region. Session co-facilitator Niall O’Connor described the four-day session as a first step for the subject and “a platform to establish relationships.” For him, the fact that four days did not allow for enough in-depth discussion was an advantage for the long-term value of the multi-year program as it encourages participants to remain connected in order to foster cooperation in Asia. The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. 
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