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Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Former Salzburg Global Chair Walter E Massey receives honorary doctorate from Harvard University
Former Salzburg Global Chair Walter E Massey receives honorary doctorate from Harvard University
Oscar Tollast 
Longtime Salzburg Global supporter Walter E. Massey has been presented an honorary Doctor of Laws degree by Harvard University. Massey, who served as Chair of the Board of Directors at Salzburg Global between 2007 and 2010, received the honor on Thursday. He joined nine other honorary degree recipients at Harvard University’s 366th Commencement exercises.  This included Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg; actors James Earl Jones and Dame Judi Dench; composer John Williams; human rights activist Hawa Abdi Dhiblawe; the former chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin Norman R. Augustine; leading feminist literary critic and author Sandra M. Gilbert; theoretical computer scientist Michael Rabin; and founding director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital Huda Y. Zoghbi. Massey has had several spells on Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors dating back to 1995. He has also attended a number of sessions organized by the Seminar, including Session 368 Scientific Development and the Democratic Process. During this session, Massey acted as co-chair and worked with participants to identify ways in which science can be used to optimize the process of democratization and enhance economic development. Massey is the current Chancellor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), having previously served as President of the School from 2010 to 2016. He began his career as a theoretical physicist before taking on several leading administrative roles in academia. He has been Dean at Brown University, Vice President of Research at the University of Chicago, Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs for the University of California system, and President of Morehouse College. In addition to these roles, Massey has served as Director of Argonne National Laboratory, Director of the National Science Foundation, and Board Chair of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization. Massey sits on the board of directors for McDonald’s and has previously served as director and Chairman of the Board of Bank of America.
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Salzburg Global Fellow appointed OECD Deputy Secretary-General
Salzburg Global Fellow appointed OECD Deputy Secretary-General
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Masamichi Kono has been appointed Deputy Secretary-General of the OECD. Kono, who will replace Rintaro Tamaki, will assist the OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría by focusing on the strategic direction of OECD policy. Gurría, also a Salzburg Global Fellow after attending Session 523 - Restoring the Public's Trust: Delivering on Public Policy Goals, praised Kono for his broad experience and knowledge on international issues when announcing his appointment. Kono was a faculty member at Session 546 - The Future of Banking: Is There a Sustainable Business Model for Banks? in 2014. Kono and others met to discuss options and best practices for a sustainable financial architecture to meet the needs of the economy, shareholders, entrepreneurs and the public. Before this, Kono also attended Session 492 - Financial Regulation: Bridging Global Differences in 2012. This session brought together regulators, bankers, economists, lawyers and other experts from around the world to discuss trends in regulatory reforms in the US, Europe and Asia. Kono is a former Vice Minister for International Affairs of Japan’s Financial Services Agency (JFSA). He represented the JFSA on the Financial Stability Board between 2009 and 2016, chairing its Regional Consultative Group for Asia. He was also President of JFSA’s Global Financial Partnership Centre (GLOPAC). He also served as the Chairman of the Technical Committee of the International Organisation of Securities Commissions (IOSCO), and was Chairman of the IOSCO Board until 2013. In addition, he was Secretary of the Committee on Trade in Financial Services of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) between 1995 and 1999. Kono is no stranger to the OECD, having worked for four years in the OECD’s Economics Department at the beginning of his career.
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Salzburg Global Fellow Tonia Casarin wins Global Impact Challenge
Salzburg Global Fellow Tonia Casarin wins Global Impact Challenge
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Tonia Casarin is celebrating after being declared a winner of the Global Impact Challenge in Brazil. The competition, promoted by Singularity University, encouraged entrants to come up with an idea to improve the lives of people in Brazil and beyond. This year’s projects addressed areas such as education access, education for socio-ecomotional skills, project-based education, and education for the environment. Casarin, an educational entrepreneur, submitted a proposal to build a platform to assess, train, certificate and coach teachers in social and emotional learning. Earlier this month, Casarin discovered her project earned her a full sponsorship to attend the Global Solutions Program at Singularity University. The program runs between June 17 and August 17. Singularity University is a global learning and innovation community with a mission to address humanity’s greatest challenges. Casarin, who’s dedicated her career to developing social and emotional learning skills, attended Salzburg Global Seminar in 2016 as a participant of Session 566 - Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills. This was the second international meeting in Salzburg Global's multi-year series on Education for Tomorrow's World. Its aim was to help support collaborative action to advance the United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  During this session, Casarin sat down with Salzburg Global to explain a parent’s role in teaching their children social and emotional learning skills.  Casarin believes the first step in developing 21st-century skills is knowing how to identify feelings. Her book, “I Have Monsters In My Tummy,” is a resource for children to learn to recognize their emotions. Tonia Casarin was a participant at Session 566 - Getting Smart: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Emotional Skills. This session was held in partnership with ETS, with additional support from Robert Bosch Stiftung. It features as part of the multi-year Education for Tomorrow's World. More information for the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/566
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Salzburg Global Fellow to take part in Dara film screening and panel discussion
Salzburg Global Fellow to take part in Dara film screening and panel discussion
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Anwar Akhtar will take part in a panel discussion and Q&A following a screening of the highly applauded Dara later this week. The play, adapted from work by Ajoka Theatre, is a portrayal of the seventeenth century Moghul Royals the Shah Jahan family and addresses debates surrounding religious freedom and practice. Dara was the first Pakistani play to be chosen and adapted by the UK's National Theatre in London. This came to fruition after Akhtar brought a CD of Dara to the theater's attention. On Friday, May 5, a free film screening of the play will take place in Oxford at All Souls College, The Old Library, starting at 6 pm.  Akhtar, having played a key role in Dara's creative team, will take part in a panel discussion and audience Q&A after the screening.Akhtar, director of The Samosa and production consultant to the National Theatre and Ajoka Theatre, is a multi-time Salzburg Global Fellow, and most recently a participant at the December 2016 session, Promoting Pluralism and Countering Extremism. Prior to this, Akhtar also helped facilitate working groups at the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators both in 2014 and 2015, where he premiered the filmed recording of the critically acclaimed play.  The play was praised for its ability to "reach people that political debate cannot" with the central trial scene especially applauded. It created much public debate on culture, history and religious tolerance.  This Friday, in addition to the screening of the play, Akhtar will take part in a discussion with Polly O’Hanlon, Professor of Indian History and Culture at the Oriental Institute, Oxford University. This discussion will be moderated by Salzburg Global senior advisor Edward Mortimer, author of Faith and Power: the Politics of Islam, and former Director of Communications for UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan.To book a ticket for this event, please visit http://form.jotformeu.com/Events_All_Souls/DaraScreeningOxford5MayEntrance is on a first come first serve basis. You must register for the event and arrive at 5.40pm to be seated. The screening will begin at 6 pm. Latecomers may not be able to enter if capacity is reached.
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Lynn Ross - When did you first fall in love with nature?
Lynn Ross - When did you first fall in love with nature?
Lynn Ross 
This post was first published on Lynn Ross' LinkedIn profile. Ross attended Session 574 - The Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play, which is part of the multi-year Parks for the Planet Forum. I first fell in love with nature as a child playing for hours on end in the backyard of my family home where the grass, trees and flowers were animated participants in all my magical backyard adventures. Even as a dedicated city dweller my love affair with nature has continued into adulthood, so I was honored to become a fellow of the Salzburg Global Seminar last month during Session 574, “The Child in the City: Health, Parks, and Play.This session, hosted over 4 days at the amazing Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria, included advocates, researchers and practitioners representing 20 countries. Each participant brought a unique perspective and a wealth of experience. Here are just a few of the interesting initiatives I learned about:     Urban95 is a global initiative of the Bernard van de Leer Foundation that asks what city leaders, designers, and planners what they would do differently if they viewed the city an elevation of 95 cm – the average height of a healthy 3-year-old.    The Laboratorio para la Ciudad in Mexico City is using research to explore play and developing tools for engaging children in government through their Playful City initiative.    Park Rx America is handing out “park prescriptions” to reduce chronic illness by mapping parks and providing info on making the most of the park (including transit tips to get there).    City Health, an initiative of the de Beaumont Foundation, has rated 40 cities on nine evidence-supported policy areas that support community health and well-being.    Natural Neighbors is an international effort designed to promote expanded alliances with museums, schools and universities and parks and conservation areas by linking exhibits, outreach materials and activities across organizations. During the session, I also had the pleasure of leading a discussion on moving from incremental change to transformation. Through case studies from the United Kingdom, the United States and Singapore, the panel shared the following key takeaways which apply not only to kids and nature, but to any community building effort:     Have a big, inclusive vision that people can see themselves in.    Clearly articulate the value proposition and theory of change early in the process.    Build meaningful, inclusive partnerships and are those partners with the tools they need support the work and outreach.    Prioritize crafting and customizing messages for diverse audiences.    Build a culture of learning and plan for evaluation into the effort from the start. There were many more efforts, takeaways and resources shared throughout the session and I encourage you to check out the “Resources” section of the session page.On the final day of the session, we started the process of transforming our collective learning into a set of principles that can be shared broadly. A smaller group of participants is continuing that work post-session. In addition, each participant shared personal commitments to continue the work of the session in their daily practice. It’s no surprise that my experience in Salzburg is already influencing my work on the Reimagining the Civic Commons initiative, but what has been a surprise is how much the experience has me thinking about the role of nature, parks and play as part of housing affordability and equitable community development. So, I’ll leave you where I started but with an addition: when did you first fall in love with nature? And what can you do in your practice to ensure that all children will someday get to answer that same question? Lynn Ross was a participant in the Salzburg Global program The Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play, which is part of the multi-year Parks for the Planet Forum, a series held in partnership with the IUCN. The session was supported by the Huffington Foundation, Parks Canada and Korea National Park and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/574
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Dr Suresh Kumar - Have you prepared for your death?
Dr Suresh Kumar - Have you prepared for your death?
Suresh Kumar 
This article first appeared on the EAPC blog, which will continue to publish more posts on the Salzburg Question series. It refers to the third Salzburg Question: How have you prepared for your death? Dr Suresh Kumar, Director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Community Participation in Palliative Care and Long Term Care & Technical Advisor, Institute of Palliative Medicine, Calicut, Kerala, India, explores the third question in the Salzburg Questions series, that encourages a global discussion about the key issues affecting palliative care. Most people are taken aback by a question about their own death, because death is something that happens to other people!So, reactions to the question ‘Have you prepared for your death?’ posted on social media recently were not totally unexpected. This question was posted on Facebook and Twitter with a hashtag #allmylifeQs by more than 250 people on 7 April as a Salzburg Question. Salzburg Questions are a series of questions to bring attention to issues related to end of life, death and dying. More than 750 people participated in the online discussions that followed the ‘preparations for death’ question. Responses varied, from a calm, calculated yes to a big no in surprise and horror. A few people said they had already thought about this. Most haven’t.Many people have already pointed out that there is a huge difference between the philosophical statement: ‘We all will die one day’ and the awareness of: “I am not going to die in a few months’ time”. Though we all know that we have to die one day, most of us have never reflected on what it would be like to die. And society does not generally encourage such thoughts. Thoughts and words about death are usually considered ‘dark’ and something to be avoided.Why should one think of death much before it comes, when one is busy with life? For one thing, Death is an unpredictable guest. Many of us working in the area of end-of-life care realize that deliberate avoidance of death as a topic of discussion from the social and medical deliberations has resulted in society becoming more and more ‘death denying’ with a lot of negative implications. Though it is very important, it is extremely difficult (and very often insensitive) to take up the topic of preparing for death when someone is on his/her deathbed. Even when possible, it is often too late to address many of the issues raised. The best time to start discussing preparations for death is when we are sure that we are not going to die immediately! Such discussions can help in reflecting on one’s own philosophy of life, in identifying unfinished priorities in life, and in looking at how one wants to face the inevitable final event in life. It is particularly important to make choices since the available technology can prolong the dying process for days or even months.Our experience has been that informal discussions about death and dying will go a long way in helping people to identify and address key issues in their life and death. Because you cannot die well unless you live well!Have you prepared for your death? Tweet your answer to #allmylifeQs 
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Ilona Kickbusch – “A small group really can make a difference”
Ilona Kickbusch – “A small group really can make a difference”
Nicole Bogart 
When confronting the key issues facing health and health care over the next 20 years, Ilona Kickbusch believes demography cannot be discussed without addressing inequality. As significant portions of the population in the UK, Germany, and Switzerland grow older, Kickbusch says addressing the inequalities of aging is vital. “All of our societies are faced with major demographic change; ageing is one of them, migration is another. But the fact is, usually when we talk about the ageing of society, we don’t look at some deeper social factors that are actually a dimension of that demographic development,” Kickbusch, Director of the Global Health Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and a member of the Board of Trustees of Sciana network partner the Careum Foundation says. “Ageing [is] something that is very unequal in our societies. A significant number of people do not have the same amount of healthy life expectancy, so people on the lower social stature will tend to have up to 7 to 10 years less of healthy life expectancy, meaning that they have more chronic disease and disabilities.” The Sciana network is an international collaboration between the Health Foundation, Careum Stiftung and the Robert Bosch Stiftung, facilitated by Salzburg Global Seminar and hosted at Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron. The health leaders network will bring together leaders in health and health care policy over the next two years to find solutions to shared challenges being faced in health care across Europe. Kickbusch explains that while all people are indeed getting older, we are not all living to the same age and with the same level of health thanks to socioeconomic disparities. This challenge of ageing inequity will certainly continue over the next 20 years – making initiatives like the Sciana network invaluable in developing positive change. Reflecting on the international aspect of the collaboration within the Sciana network, Kickbusch, whose key interests have long revolved around health policies and global health, notes: “The interesting thing is that, in the end, very similar issues emerge… I think there is a great opportunity that a group like this can come up with at least a unique framing of some of these issues, or a priority-setting that can be very important and taken forward by the next group. That’s my own experience working in this field for a long time – that a small group really can make a difference.” Although Sciana is in its infancy, Kickbusch says bringing together three European organisations to discuss shared problems in health care, along with a cohort of bright minds, is a very significant step.“If a certain kind of idea, or manifesto emerges from here, it can really have an impact on discussion in Europe, and maybe even around the world,” she says.
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