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Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Inés Sanguinetti -“We should redesign past models of learning”
Inés Sanguinetti -“We should redesign past models of learning”
Andrea Abellan 
The arts have a powerful role to play in enriching education, explained Argentinian dancer-cum-educator Inés Sanguinetti when attending the recent Salzburg Global Seminar program The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal. Sanguinetti made the switch from dancer to educator through Crear Vale la Pena (“Creating is Worth It”), an association that aims to put arts at the core of the learning process. Sanguinetti believes students today are all too often educated in the opposite of bonding, making them isolated and constrained by too many prejudices and too little empathy – and the arts can help change this. Through Art, Wellbeing and Creativity, one of the projects developed by Crear Vale la Pena, Sanguinetti and her team are trying to change this situation.  “We try to develop a kind of new laboratory of teaching and learning between schools and communities,” she explains.  Through the project, “social actors” and “creative agents” – typically community artists coming from a variety of different backgrounds including visual arts, dance, music, and even technology – are brought into schools where they help teachers design their classes. The methodology is based on involving arts in the curriculum and encouraging dialogue between artists, teachers, and the community. Sanguinetti compares this project with what used to occur in Ancient Greece, when going to the gymnasium was routine for students looking to train their body and mind. At that time, exercising was not viewed that far away from other subjects, namely philosophy and poetry. “Now we are taught that everything must be clearly differentiated,” she laments. “I do enjoy mixing different styles even in my choreography, ranging from martial arts to rugby or tango. I trust the power of moving together minds and bodies to explain any kind of topic and this can be very helpful to learn about new subjects,” she explains. Sanguinetti is not a supporter of the education system still being followed in some areas. In her view, traditional teaching methods are not capable of satisfying the needs of the students anymore.  “I see traditional schools as a dying institution. We should redesign past models of learning and teach the students the skills they actually need to survive to the 21st Century.”  Research conducted by the University of San Andrés based in Buenos Aires together with the University of Aberdeen in Scotland has reinforced Sanguinetti’s program. The increase in the students’ motivation, the improvement in the coexistence inside the classroom, and the positive attitude of the community towards the arts as a suitable form of learning and not only as an entertainment were all highlighted as positive outcomes from her programs.  Sanguinetti is now exchanging experiences and collaborating with other associations. These are based in different countries, namely Colombia and Chile. Soon she will start cooperating with organizations outside of Latin America, such as in Germany, where similar programs are being carried out. In her home country of Argentina, Crear Vale la Pena will start receiving support from the government. Thanks to this, the number of schools and associations implementing the program will grow from 20 to more than 150.  Through her experience in Salzburg, Sanguinetti had the opportunity to learn about similar projects conducted in Morocco and Cambodia, presented by Salzburg Global Fellows Karima Kadaoui, co-founder of Tamkeen (“Empowerment”) Community Foundation for Human Development, and Bun Rith Suon, manager of the culture and arts education project at Cambodian Living Arts, respectively. Sanguinetti expects to be able to start working with them too in the near future.  “We are already planning our next meeting to keep working on what arts can do for resilience. We are looking forward to keep exchanging ideas and collaborating between us.”
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Dawn Casey – “Museums usually talk about dead things... Contemporary issues should also fit in these spaces”
Dawn Casey – “Museums usually talk about dead things... Contemporary issues should also fit in these spaces”
Andrea Abellan 
Dawn Casey, currently the chief operating officer for the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), has a solid background across multiple sectors. However, it is her experience within the arts that is especially remarkable. She has been in charge of the direction of three of the largest Australian museums: The National Museum of Australia, Western Australia Museum and the Powerhouse Museum. Unquestionably, one of her bigger achievements has been her contribution to what she calls the “democratization of museums.” Or, in other words, her assistance to “make the arts and museums more stimulating and accessible to bigger audiences.” Raised in Cairns, Australia, Casey comes from the Tagalaka clan. As she explains, her personal experience and professional background has been determined because of her indigenous and female identity. She was denied access to education. “I always wanted to study French but it was not possible for indigenous people to take that course. Also, my parents would have never allowed me to do it,” she remembers. Casey’s story is a tale of hard work and overcoming obstacles. Her persistence had a clear intention. “I know what been discriminated means. My own experience showed me how unfair and wrong the system was.” Being a woman made things even more complicated. “Sometimes I didn’t even have the opportunity to be interviewed,” Casey recognizes. Despite these difficulties, she has not allowed them to stop her having a successful career. Her career and contributions have been acknowledged with a number of awards, such as three Commonwealth Public Service Australia Day Medals. She describes her current role with NACCHO as “going back to her roots” after many years working for the museum sector. At NACCHO she looks at health care policies seeking to promote health for Aboriginal communities. “Indigenous people are much more affected by chronic diseases because of their genetics so we try to help them and improve their situation,” she explains. Remarkably for someone who has worked with so many of Australia’s leading museums, Casey admits that she only stepped into a museum for the first time when she was 30. “It was quite a boring experience,” she admits, but this experience convinced her of the power that these institutions could have to act as effective communicative tools able to make communities understand both their pasts and presents. “Museums usually talk about dead things, explorers and settlers,” says Casey. “They are the place to showcase very well-researched materials that make us aware of our history. These are extremely relevant. But I think that contemporary issues – that can be more accessible and interesting to everyone – should also fit in these spaces,” she adds. Casey has thus worked very hard to this end. While working as a director at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney she helped to organize Muslim cultural exhibitions aiming to attract people from diverse communities to come together, techno-nights looking to engage younger generations, and even Harry Potter exhibitions seeking to capture the attention of children. “I think it is a matter of combining very in-depth researched topics with lighter subjects that can arrive to other types of audiences,” she explains. Casey’s work towards integration does not stop here. She has always followed a strategy to involve professionals from different origins into her teams. “I always wanted to be sure that our job vacancies were advertised on those media easy to access by migrant and indigenous communities.” This is how she has managed to develop greatly multicultural teams. At the Salzburg Global Seminar session in February 2017, The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage, and Renewal, Casey helped to link the challenges affecting indigenous communities with other current issues such as the difficulties that refugees all over the world are facing. “They might look as opposite problems. But in my opinion they are both issues saying a lot about the nature of a country. In both situations, either when we stop a boat and do not allow people to enter our country, or when we do not recognize the rights of certain groups of people in their own land, we are disrespectful with human beings and this says a lot about the nature of a nation,” she states. This was the second time that Casey attended a session at Salzburg Global Seminar. She was a previously a participant in 2011 at the session Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture. She fondly remembers that the session was “a great opportunity to share and exchange ideas – something that does not happen frequently when you are a museum director and it is always you who is supposed to sell things to others. This is one of the reasons why I appreciate being part of this open space again to enjoy the dialogue and be able to exchange ideas.”
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Rethinking care toward the end of life - Outcomes from a Salzburg Global Seminar
Rethinking care toward the end of life - Outcomes from a Salzburg Global Seminar
Julie Ling and Sheila Payne 
This article first appeared on the EAPC blog, which will continue to publish more posts on the Salzburg Question series. Julie Ling, Chief Executive Officer of the European Association for Palliative Care, and Sheila Payne, Emeritus Professor, International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, UK, were in Salzburg, Austria, to attend this global gathering. Here, they set the scene for a new series of posts that we shall be publishing throughout 2017 to encourage a global dialogue and shine a spotlight on the key topics affecting palliative care. Sixty invited international delegates met in December 2016 to consider global opportunities and challenges in palliative care. They gathered at the Schloss Leopoldskron (some scenes from ‘The Sound of Music’ were filmed here) to discuss and debate seven key questions: How do we engage patients and families to ensure that end of life care honours what matters most to them, with respect for culture and for context at the level of the individual and the population?What are the relative contributions of health care and community-based social care in different contexts? How can they best be joined up to maintain function, independence, and agency for people for whom death is near?How can healthcare systems better support families,  caregivers and community members in caring for people of all ages for whom death is near?How are robust processes established and implemented for arriving at decisions when patients can no longer express their own preferences? What role does public engagement and government have in this?Which are the most promising evidence-based and cost-effective innovations in care towards the end of life? What yields the greatest value to patients, especially in low- resource settings?What can we learn from the systems failures in high-income countries with regard to supporting patients, families and caregivers with palliative care?How can palliative care best be undertaken in the context of societal deprivation or conflict? Salzburg Global (SG) was founded in 1947 with the aim of encouraging intellectual dialogue in post-war Europe. SG aims to challenge leaders to help solve important global issues and since its establishment, SG has been a catalyst for global engagement on critical issues in education, health, environment, economics, governance, peace-building and more. SG achieves this by designing, facilitating and hosting international strategic programmes (seminars). Uniquely, Salzburg Global builds connections with and between people from a broad range of expertise, cultures and professional backgrounds. Over the duration of the seminars, government officials, institutions and individuals at all stages of their professional development and from all sectors are asked to rethink their relationships and identify shared interests, goals and outcomes. A key outcome of the session was aimed to be the development of ‘A Salzburg Statement of key principles guiding care towards the end of life’. It was a testament to the freethinking and originality of the participants that for the first time in the history of SG, the outcome was not a statement, but instead, a set of nine questions. The questions are designed to highlight challenges facing the global community and will be linked to international ‘days’. Each of the nine questions will be explained more fully in EAPC blogs over the coming year. There was snow and plenty of hard work, interspersed with some time to socialise and make the most of the beautiful location and, of course, there was schnitzel, Glühwein and a Christmas market. Find out more.... Follow the global dialogue on Twitter. Using the hashtag #allmylifeQs the nine Salzburg Questions will be debated throughout 2017. Follow the EAPC Blog for more posts in the Salzburg series.
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Pierre Schoonraad - “Are we happy with what we’re bringing to the citizens? Are we satisfied?”
Pierre Schoonraad - “Are we happy with what we’re bringing to the citizens? Are we satisfied?”
Chris Hamill-Stewart 
Pierre Schoonraad, Head of Research and Development at South African Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI), has over ten years of experience working to find innovative solutions to problems affecting the public sector. He brought this wealth of experience to the Salzburg Global Session Future of Public Service: Program Strategy Meeting, in which participants from all over the world came together to discuss the future of public service in a changing and increasingly dynamic world. His expertise in coordinating innovation efforts, and bridging the gap between those creating and those in need of solutions introduced a fresh perspective on the issue of innovation in the public sector. Schoonraad asserts in most situations the solutions to problems already exist – accessing them is the problem: “We’ve seen that there are so many examples of solutions, but they’re not well known.” Rather than needing to create a new solution every time a problem arises, Schoonraad and the CPSI focus on coordinating between different sectors. He says, “We link the offerings that the engineers have with the challenges offered by the public sector.”  His work is in making innovation accessible for those in need of solutions. Schoonraad says, “There are so many examples of solutions and things that people can do, so we develop case studies for people to see what other people are doing, and use this as a basis for innovation themselves.” These case studies are simple, easy to read and made widely available, which maximizes the opportunities for those in the public or private sector to identify solutions to disruptions in their work. By producing the document and working with clients on specific issues, their relatively small team is having a significant impact across South Africa. On top of finding and coordinating solutions, Schoonraad advocates preparing for future disruptions. This level of preparation can be particularly difficult to implement in developing countries, such as South Africa, where fundamentally significant challenges such as poverty and gang violence remain. Schoonraad says, "As a developing country, we’re so focused on existing challenges that we don’t always focus on the future of public services.” A lack of awareness of, and planning for, potential disruptions affected South Africa. Changes to laws meant that road accident compensation claims increased substantially in a small time frame, and greater access to legal services led to an increasing number of people claiming malpractice against hospitals when they felt their own or a relative’s care wasn’t adequate. The state was unprepared for both of these disruptions. The state's lack of preparation ended up costing them a lot of money and forced them to rapidly rethink aspects of their services that they hadn’t considered before. These kinds of disruptions are why those people working for CPSI “want to help people rethink the future, and start planning accordingly.”  The problems that the South African public sector has faced provide ample evidence of the importance of planning for future disruptions, or “disrupting yourself, before someone else can,” as is Schoonraad’s philosophy. He believes that, in the public sector, the best way to prepare is by continuously asking, “Are we happy with what we’re bringing to the citizens? Are we satisfied?” By asking these questions, the public sector can continue to provide the best service possible, while remaining resilient to the disruptions that are becoming “more and more frequent.” Future of Public Service: Program Strategy Meeting looked at how public service may change in the 21st century, and one thing has become apparent after the session and speaking with Schoonraad: the innovation is out there, but accessing it, and having the foresight to plan for the future effectively, is an increasingly important skill. The Salzburg Global Session Future of Public Service: Program Strategy Meeting is part of the multi-year series Salzburg Global Forum on the Future of Public Service. The series is being hosted in partnership with Arizona State University. More information on the session can be found here: http://www.salzburgglobal.org/go/568
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Rajan Kotru - “If the Himalayan ecosystem remains intact, there will be people rushing there to pursue their spiritual ideals...”
Rajan Kotru - “If the Himalayan ecosystem remains intact, there will be people rushing there to pursue their spiritual ideals...”
Christopher Hamill-Stewart 
Rajan Kotru, head of the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) program on Transboundary Landscapes, attended the Salzburg Global Seminar session The Next Frontier: Transboundary Conservation for Biodiversity and Peace. His project “Kailash Sacred Landscape” is a transboundary conservation initiative covering an area in the Himalayas where China, India, and Nepal all have territory. The project focuses on the preservation of ecosystems and biodiversity, but with an additional emphasis on cultural conservation – conservation aimed at maintaining the culturally and spiritually significant parts of the landscape. While in Salzburg, Kotru took some time to discuss the importance of integrating spiritual and cultural conservation with more traditional conservation. Despite a range of conservation efforts in the region beginning in 2005, issues of cultural conservation have remained largely ignored. The majority of efforts focused on tangible or measurable issues, such as ensuring the preservation of natural resources. Rajan Kotru wants to change this. Kotru believes “the cultural legacy of the Indian sub-continent is linked to the ecosystems and the geographic assets that we have,” with the most important “sacred asset” being the Himalayas. The degradation of geographic assets can have a similar effect on the area's cultural history and significance. These assets are valuable to the local populations, and they are a large source of income for the region: “people are rushing to the Himalayas to meet Buddhists and to meditate.”  Kotru claims many of the services coming from the Kailash Sacred Landscape are quickly degrading. Nevertheless, there is cause to remain optimistic. Kotru says, "Despite all this degradation that has been happening in the recent years, people are still coming to the Himalayas for spiritual reasons.” The Himalayas clearly still have great value to many individuals from a spiritual perspective, but, because of this rapid degradation of the ecosystems and environment, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to preserve this cultural heritage. The narrow lens of protecting physical resources, like wood and water, is leaving valuable but less tangible assets, like sacred landscapes and important religious sites, to be eroded away. Kotru believes that to change the way we preserve these precious areas, we need to “change the way we think.” The example of the Bhutanese model, which measures the happiness of the nation as an important factor in assessing the effectiveness of government, is one example that Kotru studied when looking at the value of cultural preservation. “Culture and spirituality are pillars of happiness,” he says, and so this model is one that is worth studying. In Bhutan, the preservation of cultural heritage is important to the people and the state, because they measure the nation’s happiness. He concedes, “It would be difficult to emulate Bhutan’s model in other countries,” but the emphasis on “respect for culture and for nature” is a lesson that can be almost universally applied. Kotru makes it clear that “if the Himalayan ecosystem remains intact, there will be people rushing there to pursue their spiritual ideals.” If we change our way of thinking, as Bhutan has, by emphasizing the protection of cultural and spiritual landscapes this will have benefits for biodiversity conservation, for the economic well-being of the areas and its inhabitants, and for the ancient cultures and traditions that are so important in these regions. Rajan Kotru was a participant in the Salzburg Global session The Next Frontier: Transboundary Cooperation for Biodiversity and Peace, which is part of the multi-year Parks for the Planet Forum. This session was hosted in partnership with IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature), MAVA Foundation, Arcus Foundation, Aga Khan Foundation, German cooperation (Deutsche Zusammenarbeit), Huffington Foundation, Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Foundation, and others. More information on the session can be found here.
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Eileen Briggs - "We are definitely in a reactionary mode"
Eileen Briggs spoke to FM4 while she attended The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal
Eileen Briggs - "We are definitely in a reactionary mode"
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Eileen Briggs has revealed how art and creativity is being used to express opposition to the controversial Dakota oil pipeline. Briggs, a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, spoke to Bethany Bell for FM4 while attending Salzburg Global's session The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal. US President Donald Trump has signed an executive order for the construction of the Dakota oil pipeline to be completed.  Protestors from the Standing Rock movement believe the construction of the pipeline will affect the quality of drinking water. Briggs tells FM4 that she's "fiercely" part of the protection of her water and, "We are definitely in a reactionary mode." Prayer and songs have been used to express opposition. While being interviewed, Briggs performs a song that talks about walking on Mother Earth in a gentle way. You can listen to the full interview below. 
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Media Academy Fellow Taylor Gandolfi to appear at SXSW exhibition
Media Academy Fellow Taylor Gandolfi to appear at SXSW exhibition
Oscar Tollast 
An alumna of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change will showcase her work at an SXSW exhibition. Taylor Gandolfi will appear at SXSW Create next month as a result of her project "My Robotic Hand". SXSW Create is the hardware hacking and maker arm of SXSW. Gandolfi will be among drone users, biohackers, users of 3D printers and others who are developing solutions to shape our future. Speaking to Salzburg Global, Gandolfi explained how the project originated. She said: "It was for my capstone project in grad school. I was going through ideas with my professor. "I've always liked Arduino. I wanted to take that to the next level. I thought it would be cool if I had a robot in my portfolio." Gandolfi applied to appear at SXSW Create in December. She found out her application was successful earlier this month. She said: "I was super excited. I've always wanted to go to SXSW. It's the best tech conference around here. "Being in the conference now, I get a badge to go to the whole thing after my exhibition." Last year, Gandolfi attended the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change: Migration, Media and Global Uncertainty. Gandolfi said: "I love to travel. I studied abroad in my under grad and then I saw this project. Sanjeev Chatterjee, he was the professor from my school. I have always been interested in civic media. It's really something good to be involved in.  "It was a really good experience." Gandolfi was one of 70 students exploring the role of media literacy in engaging citizens, journalists, and government bodies in cross-cultural dialogue about migration and its representation in digital culture.  During her time at the Academy, Gandolfi created a Twitter bot to counter against negative tweets about refugees. Each time a negative tweet was detected, the bot would send a tweet in response, tagging the original sender, and informing them of a positive fact to change the sender's opinion.  "My Robotic Hand" has a website which outlines how people can build their own 3D printed robot.  Gandolfi lists the necessary components, plus a how-to guide split into four parts. If users follow this guide correctly, they will end up with a fully functioning robot. SXSW Create takes place in Austin, Texas between March 10 and March 12.  Gandolfi will appear in the Open Source Pavilion. This area, presented by Red Hat, will celebrate the amazing things happening with collaborative engineering, open source hardware, and shared design.
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