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Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Ilona Kickbusch – “A small group really can make a difference”
Ilona Kickbusch – “A small group really can make a difference”
Nicole Bogart 
When confronting the key issues facing health and health care over the next 20 years, Ilona Kickbusch believes demography cannot be discussed without addressing inequality. As significant portions of the population in the UK, Germany, and Switzerland grow older, Kickbusch says addressing the inequalities of aging is vital. “All of our societies are faced with major demographic change; ageing is one of them, migration is another. But the fact is, usually when we talk about the ageing of society, we don’t look at some deeper social factors that are actually a dimension of that demographic development,” Kickbusch, Director of the Global Health Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and a member of the Board of Trustees of Sciana network partner the Careum Foundation says. “Ageing [is] something that is very unequal in our societies. A significant number of people do not have the same amount of healthy life expectancy, so people on the lower social stature will tend to have up to 7 to 10 years less of healthy life expectancy, meaning that they have more chronic disease and disabilities.” The Sciana network is an international collaboration between the Health Foundation, Careum Stiftung and the Robert Bosch Stiftung, facilitated by Salzburg Global Seminar and hosted at Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron. The health leaders network will bring together leaders in health and health care policy over the next two years to find solutions to shared challenges being faced in health care across Europe. Kickbusch explains that while all people are indeed getting older, we are not all living to the same age and with the same level of health thanks to socioeconomic disparities. This challenge of ageing inequity will certainly continue over the next 20 years – making initiatives like the Sciana network invaluable in developing positive change. Reflecting on the international aspect of the collaboration within the Sciana network, Kickbusch, whose key interests have long revolved around health policies and global health, notes: “The interesting thing is that, in the end, very similar issues emerge… I think there is a great opportunity that a group like this can come up with at least a unique framing of some of these issues, or a priority-setting that can be very important and taken forward by the next group. That’s my own experience working in this field for a long time – that a small group really can make a difference.” Although Sciana is in its infancy, Kickbusch says bringing together three European organisations to discuss shared problems in health care, along with a cohort of bright minds, is a very significant step.“If a certain kind of idea, or manifesto emerges from here, it can really have an impact on discussion in Europe, and maybe even around the world,” she says.
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Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators hosts first US offsite event
Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators hosts first US offsite event
Oscar Tollast 
The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators will host its first American offsite meeting later this week.More than 20 YCI Fellows will convene at the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators - Regional Fellows Event: Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans.The event, which takes place between April 27 and 29, will bring together several YCI Fellows from an expanding network of US city hubs. This network includes Memphis, TN, Detroit, MI, and New Orleans, LA. Those in attendance will include authors, cultural organizers, creative directors, strategists, and artists. These participants, among others in the culture and arts sector, are a source of inspiration for new ideas to tackle social improvement and sustainable development around the planet. This event will be building on the participants’ creativity, talent, and energy to drive forward positive action.The three-day event, supported by The Kresge Foundation, will challenge participants to think of ways to accelerate change in cities. They will work on micro-innovation projects linked to the creative economy and social innovation. Facilitators for the upcoming session include Amina Dickerson, president of Dickerson Global Advisors, Peter Jenkinson, an independent cultural broker, and Shelagh Wright, director of ThreeJohnsandShelagh and Mission Models Money. Dickerson has been a skills workshop leader at the YCI Forum in Salzburg for two years, with Jenkinson and Wright co-facilitating the YCI Forum sessions in Salzburg and Fellowship event in Athens since the Forum launched in 2013. During the program, participants will take part in panel discussions, small workshop exercises, and will undertake several site visits. One of the first activities participants have already been tasked with is producing an overview of critical data and examples of good practice in the creative sector in Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans. These briefs are set to be shared in advance of the session and will serve as a basis for discussion.A key outcome expected from the event is a practical toolkit to facilitate more regular convening and engagement activities by Young Cultural Innovators in other city hubs in the Salzburg Global YCI network around the world. The YCI Forum has city hubs in six regions across the planet. City hubs include Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Cape Town, Detroit, Manila, Memphis, Minnesota, New Orleans, Phnom Penh/Mekong Delta, Plovdiv, Rotterdam, Salzburg, Seoul, Slovakia, Tirana, and Tokyo. The Forum also has a dedicated hub for Rhodes Scholars.The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) launched in 2014 as a ten-year project designed to engage fifty of the world’s most dynamic young creative change-makers every year. The Forum is a significant commitment by Salzburg Global Seminar to foster creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide. The hope is to build a more vibrant and resilient arts sector while advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide. The Regional Fellows Event: Detroit, Memphis, and New Orleans is part of the multi-year Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. This session is being supported by The Kresge Foundation. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/577.
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Kolkata mass violence and tolerance conference draws on Salzburg Global expertise
Salzburg Global Fellows Stephanie Rotem and Navras Jaat Aafreedi, with Program Director Charles Ehrlich and Senior Advisor Edward Mortimer
Kolkata mass violence and tolerance conference draws on Salzburg Global expertise
Charles Ehrlich 
Salzburg Global Seminar featured prominently at an international multi-disciplinary conference on “Prevention of Mass Violence and Promotion of Tolerance: Lessons from History” at Presidency University in Kolkata, India, on 27-28 February 2017. Convened by Salzburg Global Fellow Navras Jaat Aafreedi (Fellow of Holocaust and Genocide Education: Sharing Experience Across Borders), this conference brought together scholars from Australia, Austria, Canada, India, Israel, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Participants included Salzburg Global Program Director Charles Ehrlich, Senior Advisor Edward Mortimer, and Fellow Stephanie Rotem (Cultural Institutions without Walls: New Models of Arts-Community Interaction).   The conference took place as part of a high-profile series of events to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the founding of Presidency University, India’s oldest institution of higher education – originally founded as Hindoo College in 1817. The celebrations aim to draw visibility to some of the university’s accomplishments, and this particular conference highlighted a new course on Holocaust and genocide studies established at the university this academic year, the first of its kind in South Asia. Aafreedi established the course in part drawing from his experience participating in the Salzburg Global Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention (HEGP) Program. “History, the way it is being taught, is often a victim of propaganda. Regimes often place their stooges in all the key positions at the premier institutions of the country for the creation of a vicious atmosphere. Political regimes can't succeed in carrying out their evil designs if scholars do not give them the backroom support for petty gains,” Aafreedi told the Times of India, one of India’s leading broadsheets, which featured it with a front page article. Ehrlich, invited as the current director of the HEGP Program, presented a paper on “Holocaust, propaganda, and the distortion of history in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union,” and chaired the final afternoon roundtable discussion.  Mortimer, who founded the HEGP Program in 2010 during his tenure as Chief Program Officer, chaired the introductory panel on “Prevention of Mass Violence” and presented a paper on “Reflections on the Responsibility to Protect.” Rotem’s paper focused on “Holocaust Commemoration in Museums: Teaching Universal or Unique Lessons.” The conference discussions, and in particular the final roundtable chaired by Ehrlich, examined what one participant called “truth as the first victim” of intolerance and whether to regulate or combat hateful or false speech; unhelpful conflicting narratives both of “comparative genocide” as well as definitions of “victimhood”; and whether the role of education should be for the purpose of aiding healing, dialogue, apologies, prevention of future atrocities, or some combination thereof. Although the participants did not necessarily agree across the discussions, the common conclusion emerged that it is important to ensure the next generation has the analytical tools to learn from history in order to combat intolerance. Since 2010, Salzburg Global Seminar has implemented the HEGP Program in partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Through a series of global and regional gatherings, the multi-year series has engaged participants from more than 30 countries, the majority of which are non-Western countries outside the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, and many of which have a recent experience of mass atrocities. The program series has established a network of individuals and NGOs across East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and the former Soviet Union, and strives to deepen and extend their collaborative work, allowing practitioners to identify cross-regional strategies to empower institutions and individuals with tools for ethical education and peaceful conflict resolution. Currently, with support of the United Kingdom’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Salzburg Global Seminar is supporting the implementation of activities in Cambodia, Egypt, Morocco, Pakistan, Rwanda, and South Africa to promote pluralism and combat extremism, using the lessons learned from the Holocaust and other mass atrocities as examples of what can happen when hatred goes unchecked, connecting educators, activists, and others dedicated to preventing mass atrocities and genocide to advance knowledge exchange, test institutional development plans, and design long-term strategies to combat extremism and its consequences.
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Maria Hägglund – “With better tools, better processes, and better ways of letting family carers in, we would have much better and more efficient care”
Maria Hägglund – “With better tools, better processes, and better ways of letting family carers in, we would have much better and more efficient care”
Andrea Abellan and Nicole Bogart 
Family caregivers are an integral part of health care systems around the world. While they often take on the role of being a home nurse, these family carers often take on the role of health care coordinator, balancing appointment schedules, medications, and communication between clinicians and specialists. Maria Hägglund, a senior researcher at the Health Informatics Centre at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, recently attended Salzburg Global Seminar’s session Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. During this session, she discussed her research into patient access to electronic health records and shared a personal story about the impact technology can have on family carers.“From my experience, health care is quite fragmented – you don’t know the different persons involved in your family member’s care, you might not know their names, you might not have their contact details,” Hagglund says. “Having access to that type of information is essential when you’re trying to coordinate things.”Hägglund currently runs a study called PACESS, evaluating the introduction of patients’ online access to their electronic health records in Sweden and has been involved in national eHealth projects for years. However, the researcher says she personally experienced the importance of access to technology when her father became ill with cancer.After running into instances where her father’s health care teams failed to communicate, she took on the role of an information carrier, coordinating communication between clinicians on some occasions. “I think most family members are actually happy to do this job. It’s tiring, it’s exhausting, but you feel like you’re actually helping. And in a situation where you are otherwise quite helpless, it’s actually a good feeling,” she says.Hägglund believes providing access to information will help repair relations between family carers and clinicians; a relationship often strained by the stress of caring for a loved one.“By not being allowed, or given the right tools to participate and to help, that willingness to help is turned into a frustration and an anger,” she says. “I think that is why many family members are perceived as difficult. I think with better tools, better processes, and better ways of letting family carers in, we would have a much better and more efficient care.”Hägglund believes technology will play an increasingly important role in health care moving forward, especially for carers seeking support systems. While caring for her father, Hägglund turned to online groups not only for emotional support but also for additional information about clinical trials and medications.“When my father was offered to join a clinical trial, of course, I could read all the materials about the trial, but I could also go onto this forum and ask, ‘Has anyone heard about this new medication? Maybe somebody is already on it; what are your experiences?’ And I quickly got a lot of excellent feedback,” she says. “Of course patients have a much greater interest – it’s a matter of life and death if you are a patient or family carer, so the willingness to share and help each other is also very great.”Despite being an advocate for the importance of data sharing in health care, Hägglund says clinicians must remember patients own their data, and shouldn't be looked at as merely a data source; an issue she says happens quite frequently in clinical research.Hägglund says she is grateful to have gained an international perspective on eHealth and patient-clinician relationships as a participant at Salzburg Global. “To see that the problems and challenges we are experience are experienced all over the world,” she says. “We are all sort of in the same house – the same Schloss – working towards mutual goals.” Maria Hägglund attended the Salzburg Global program Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. This program is part of the multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. The session was supported by OpenNotes. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburglobal.org/go/553.
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Sara Riggare - “Even without being actively supported by health care, patients can do a lot for themselves”
Sara Riggare - “Even without being actively supported by health care, patients can do a lot for themselves”
Oscar Tollast 
From time to time, extraordinary people walk through the grounds of Schloss Leopoldskron. Sara Riggare, an engineer and health informatics researcher, is one of those people, acting as a source of inspiration each time she’s attended Salzburg Global Seminar. Riggare, who’s currently pursuing her doctorate at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, is challenging the traditional role of patients in managing their health through technological innovation and data collection.Riggare, diagnosed with early onset Parkinson’s disease, practices self-tracking to help manage her medications, and other aspects. She returned to Salzburg Global in March to attend Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. Once again, Riggare was able to provide a unique perspective as a patient and researcher to a mix of health professionals. She said, “This session is about empowering patients in their collaborations with their physicians, and that’s basically what I do, both in my life and in my work, [and] in my research. So, it was irresistible to me.”During the session, Riggare gave her fellow participants a presentation on her experiences managing her Parkinson’s disease, which she’s lived with for more than 30 years. She explained how she used her data and observations to understand her disease better and communicate what she learned with health care professionals. Riggare says her presentations “show the power of data and how even without being actively supported by health care, patients can do a lot for themselves.”Riggare highlighted the “many interesting discussions” which took place during her latest session and the benefit of having more patients in these conversations. She said, “There’s power in numbers and to hear the stories of other patients over lunch, over coffee, and at the sessions makes me understand even more about what we need to do to see this through and make the world see a new kind of health care system.” A new form of health care system will involve different approaches to recording patients’ journeys. Riggare helped inspire one of these new methods, which was presented to her and others on the final day of Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. A group focusing on person-centered health care came up with the concept Self-Actualized Realization and Autonomy, also known as SARA. In this model, a user is a person, not a patient, who collects their data and uses it as a citizen scientist.Riggare first attended Salzburg Global in 2015 for Session 548 The Promise of Data: Will this Bring a Revolution in Health Care? Following this, she returned to Sweden with a refreshed perspective. Riggare created an app and took on new research projects. She said, “This place is just amazing. It brings together great minds, great thinkers [and] great people with amazing experiences and stories to share - from all over the globe to a place that’s probably more like paradise than anything else on earth.” Sara Riggare attended the Salzburg Global program Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. This program is part of the multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. The session was supported by OpenNotes. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburglobal.org/go/553.
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Cecilia Rodriguez - Patients should be the head of their health care team, not the doctor
Cecilia Rodriguez - Patients should be the head of their health care team, not the doctor
Oscar Tollast and Nicole Bogart 
Cecilia Rodriguez, a social communicator with studies in public health, believes by improving the relationship between clinicians and patients, great improvements can be made in people's health. With that idea in mind, Rodriguez runs a patient-led organization in Chile for those with rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic condition she was diagnosed with six years ago. Rodriguez attended Salzburg Global Seminar's session Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship to share her insights on the importance of having a good relationship between patient and clinician. As a patient, Rodriguez says having a good relationship with the team of doctors, clinicians and medical practitioners who treat her condition has left a lasting impact on her health journey, describing a lack of patient-clinician relationship as a "world problem." But Rodriguez notes it is important clinicians take the time to understand their patients, their needs, and concerns to foster trust between doctors and patients. "My story and my beliefs, my values, [and] what I want from life, it is important for me that my clinicians know and if they don't care about that, it can become a trust issue," she says. "If I feel like he's not giving me the whole picture, that can also make a trust issue. [I need] everybody on the team to be clearer, to give me all of the information, and listen to what I think, I believe, and my needs." To help increase the level of trust in this relationship, Rodriguez argues patients should be the heard of their health care teams - not the doctor. "Once a doctor told me that I was a very collaborative patient and I was like, 'Sorry, doctor, but you are collaborating with me. It's my illness. I have lost so many things, when I got sick, at least let me keep my illness." Though Rodriguez notes patients should not assume to know more than their doctors, she believes it is important for patients to have a vision of where they'd like to be in the health care journey. Allowing patients to see notes and treatment options laid out by clinicians, through a platform like OpenNotes, allows people to make informed decisions about whether they would like to follow that treatment path. "Maybe someday I will say, 'You just tell me what to do.' Maybe that's my choice, and it's a good choice, but another day I want to make a decision, I want to think about it, and maybe I want to share it with my family or significant others and I want to get them involved, but all of those are decisions that, if I have the notes, I can make," she says. Rodriguez says her involvement in the Salzburg Global session has presented a unique networking opportunity, opening her eyes to similar work people from other countries are doing. In her home country of Chile, she says there needs to be a bigger focus on what patients can give. "We are still on a very paternalistic model. I'm glad more people from my country came, and we're making great teamwork, so we can make more for my country." She hopes to return to Chile and incorporate some of the knowledge she obtained during the session. Cecilia Rodriguez attended the Salzburg Global program Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. This program is part of the multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. The session was supported by OpenNotes. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburglobal.org/go/553.
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Maho Isono - Patients should make themselves the center of consultations
Maho Isono - Patients should make themselves the center of consultations
Oscar Tollast and Nicole Bogart 
Maho Isono teaches medical anthropology at the International University of Health and Welfare in Tokyo, Japan, and is currently conducting fieldwork regarding traditional Japanese Kampo medicine, specifically regarding the relationships between doctors and patients in this system. Isono attended Salzburg Global Seminar's session Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship and spoke about how the hierarchy of traditional Japanese medicine may impede patient-doctor relationships. "In Japan, doctors have [a] very strong power. It's very difficult for patients to deconstruct that hierarchy," Isono says, noting that carrying the title of Sensei is highly respected in Japanese society. "So, while you call someone Sensei, we tend to hold back, and we should be humble in front of that person. In that sense, it is kind of difficult for patients to articulate all kinds of theories and opinions to doctors." Through speaking with session participants at Salzburg Global, Isono says she is interested in exploring how these barriers between patients and clinicians could be broken down in traditional medicine, teaching patients to become more involved in their consultations. "I think we should tell patients how to put themselves in the center of their consultations and their right to be in that position," she says. Isono hoped to share research into the OpenNotes platform with peers and students upon her return to Japan, introducing the idea of enriching the patient-clinician relationship to Japanese doctors. "Because I'm a cultural anthropologist, I'd like to combine the anthropological perspectives into OpenNotes and make one class," she says. As a first time participant at Salzburg Global, Isono says she has been overwhelmed by the amount of information she has gathered from other participants, all from different backgrounds. "My experience in Salzburg is refreshing my experience in my life," she says. Maho Isono was a participant of the Salzburg Global program Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. This program is part of the multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. The session was supported by OpenNotes. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburglobal.org/go/553.
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