Home » What We Do » Salzburg Global Fellowship » Fellow News
Fellow News

Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Aceel Kibbi 
More than 80 students have come together as part of a three-week program to create a series of interactive exercises to educate others about global populism and extremism.Participants at this year’s Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change – entitled Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism – included students from Argentina, Austria, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Egypt, Finland, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Singapore, Slovakia, Syria, the UK, the United States, and Venezuela. Together they produced projects for an online DIY playbook: reaction.community.The online publication aims to identify how populism and extremism operates and affects people of different ages, backgrounds and ethnicities around the world. Students were organized into groups where they brainstormed, conducted research, and identified case studies related to populism and extremism. The ideas were then transformed into “playable problems.”Some of the themes explored in this year’s publication are children’s rights, climate change, reporting on extremism, the protection of journalists, the power of photo manipulation, the history and future of populism, violence against women, and freedom of information. The projects aim to facilitate dialogue and promote engagement through a product-based approach. They also invite the audience to develop a sense of solidarity and harness the right tools to stand in the face of oppression in all of its forms. Multimedia elements including videos, infographics, music playlists, interactive maps, text-based games, e-zines, comics, and data visualizations make up a number of the projects. Paul Mihailidis, program director of the Salzburg Academy and associate professor at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “The 83 students, 13 faculty and 15 visiting experts came together to create a meaningful civic media intervention that provides creative media solutions for responding to harmful populist rhetoric. Their work emerged out of a commitment to themselves, and each other, to be open, honest, and creative, and open to new ideas. Only then can they create creative media that is by them, for their peers, and focused on social impact at local and global levels.”Students’ ideas were inspired by conversations which took place throughout the Academy. Throughout the three weeks, students explored how media are framed by design choices, algorithmic bias, data manipulation, and commoditized content. To expand their international outlook on media and politics, they took part in plenary sessions, workshops, reading groups and hands-on exercises that challenged their creativity and transformed their thoughts into action. Topics covered included critical media making, the intersection of civic imagination and civic media, bridging cultural divides, challenging social gaps, journalism ethics and media literacy. Guest speakers at this year’s Academy included US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy and acclaimed journalist Robin Wright, a contributing writer for The New Yorker.This year’s students, who hailed from five different continents, put their differences aside to discuss one of the world’s most pressing problems. Not only did the Salzburg Academy serve as a safe space for healthy debate and dialogue, it also acted as a “brave space” – where participants reaped the benefits of challenging their perspectives and beliefs.In among the discussions and work, students were taken on cultural and poignant trips into the Alps and to the Mauthausen Memorial Site. Students also took part in a “Seeing Media” image contest, which provided a mosaic of visual art which shows how the Academy visualized global issues today.Connor Bean from Bournemouth University, UK, said: “Seeing how people from different parts of the world can come together and allow their perceptions to collide rather than clash has been the highlight of my time at the Salzburg Academy. The motivation and drive in certain people inspired me to make a change in my community and allowed me to have a whole new view on the world.”Rachel Hanebutt, a graduate student at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “Making connections on multiple continents, I left the Salzburg Academy feeling re-energized and ready to use my media and communication skills to make positive change in not only my community, but in the world. Before Salzburg, I didn’t realize how truly powerful media can be in shaping societies and changing perspectives; whether it is populism or climate change, I now know that I want to be a part in creating more just and equitable political systems, through media. More than anything, this Academy allowed me the time and space to focus in on what is truly important to me, which inadvertently helped me to more deeply understand I want to accomplish in the short term, as well as in my long term goals.”The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change was launched by the international non-profit organization, Salzburg Global Seminar in 2007 in partnership with leading universities on five continents. Over its 11 years, more than 700 alumni have taken part in the three-week program at its home, the palace Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria. The Academy has taken a pioneering lead in media education, tackling issues of global concern with a focus on media literacy and civic engagement. Academy alumni have been inspired to become change-makers and leaders, taking pro-active positions in education, media, technology and politics. Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running multi-year program, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/sac11.
READ MORE...
Franco Dellepiane - "It was an unforgettable experience - not only academically but also on a human level"
Franco Dellepiane - "It was an unforgettable experience - not only academically but also on a human level"
Franco Dellepiane 
Ahead of Salzburg Global Day, Fellows were asked to get in touch and share their memories of their time at Schloss Leopoldskron. Franco Dellepiane attended Session 37 - Intellectual and Social Background of American Politics - in 1955. For his 90th birthday, he published the story of his life and shared it with Salzburg Global. Below is a translated extract from his book dedicated to his time at the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies.  The Discovery of America - The Salzburg Seminar in American Studies Then occurred the unexpected event that completely and positively changed how I was seen by my superiors and led me to consider new ways to advance my career. It was in 1954; I was spending most of my time on my political career. Through it I met Russell Harris, the person in charge of the cultural programs at the American Consulate. He was a bit older than me and he was following closely the activity of the democratic parties, in particular the activities of the younger members. I believe that this was part of his job, but he did it unobtrusively. One day he said to me: “Robert Mead, the Assistant Dean of American Studies of the Salzburg Seminar is coming to Genoa. I will introduce you to him.” I didn’t know what the Salzburg Seminar was, but I said I didn’t see any problem with meeting Mr. Mead.  Here’s what I learned. In 1947, Harvard and other American universities realized that the conflict, and before then the existence of two European dictatorships, had created a cultural gap between the two continents. They decided to create an institution that would create courses for students coming from all parts of Europe (on both sides of the Iron Curtain)—not with the goal of spreading the principles of American institutions but to create an opportunity for cultural exchange between American scholars and young Europeans. I suppose that there must have been governmental participation by about 20 American universities. Harvard, Yale, Colby College and Stanford were among those to get together to found the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies. Austria was under Allied occupation and divided into four areas. Salzburg was in the American part. Schloss Leopoldskron, which had belonged to the Archbishop-Prince of Salzburg, became the headquarters of the Seminar and remains so to this day.  Mr. Mead and another vice-chancellor traveled around Europe to select candidates for the courses, of which there was a great variety. There were courses in economics, law, literature, urban planning, science, teaching, etc. and each generally lasted six or eight weeks. Four professors of one of the universities, taking turns, would take “sabbatical leave” and come to Salzburg to teach the courses.  Mead interviewed me and thought that I was a good candidate. I mentioned that I had work commitments that could prevent my attendance but Russell Harris (the person in charge of the cultural programs) told me not to worry, and he would think about how to make it work. Mead gave me a book in English about the Kibbutz movement in Israel and he asked me to write a paper on that and send it to him. I was able to do that and after a few weeks I received a letter informing me that I had been admitted to the Salzburg session on the Intellectual and Social Background of American Politics to take place the following year, in February 1955. One of the subjects of the session was the solution found to the 1929 market crash; I never thought that after 60 years it would still be so relevant!  I was very interested but I couldn’t leave my job for two months and it was not feasible to resign and look for another job. The '50s were still hard years in Italy and I had to support my mother who couldn’t work anymore. My sister had found a job as a saleswoman in a shop but she couldn’t support the family. Russell Harris sent a letter to my executive director explaining what the Seminar was and then he said something along the lines of, “Your employee has been selected to take part in one of the Seminars; we recruit the cream of the crop from all of Europe and I beg you to do anything possible to give him the time necessary to participate."  Such a letter from a diplomatic representative of the Unites States could not be ignored. I didn’t even know my executive director, but he called me and though he was a bit annoyed by this foreign intervention. He asked me to take all my holidays at once and he allowed me to take some extra time, too. This was not the only support from the American in charge of cultural programs; he also arranged for me to get Fulbright funds to pay my tuition fee. So in the spring of the year 1955, I found myself in an experience that changed my life.  Salzburg I arrived in Salzburg from Genoa traveling by train in third class. It was a long and uncomfortable trip but I was so excited at the idea of what was waiting for me. The Schloss was impressive - it was the residence of the Archbishop Price of Salzburg - but it had not been completely restored. The war had ended recently and it was evident that just getting the school to function properly was a challenge. We were a group of 54 “students” from fourteen different countries. We were hosted in dormitories with seven beds in each room/space and the beds were former military cots. There were seven Italians but the school made sure that in every room there were participants from different nationalities. I found myself with Scandinavians, a Dutchman and with a Belgian with whom I made great friends.  We were then shown the program for the seminar, and as I said, there were four professors on sabbatical leading the program. Each took one of the topics and took turns teaching in the morning. We had to choose one of the areas of study and we had to write a paper on that subject. The relevant professor would then have spent the afternoon with the group of students working on that subject.  The evening was free time and we would end up in a “stube”, a picturesque beer pub that was completely decorated with wood, still with the professors. Schloss Leopoldskron is located a bit outside of the city so we would usually find a close by “stube” where we would either keep conversing about the subjects discussed during the morning or we would try to engage on the hard issues with the professors. Flashing forward to 2009 and its aftermath, one professor specialized in the Roosevelt era and spoke about the recovery of the United States from the 1929 crash. Equally relevant to today! I remember his saying the most important innovation was the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) which represented the first intervention of a federal entity on a vast territory that belonged to several states. It was an unforgettable experience - not only academically but also on a human level. The fact that I could exchange opinions with other young people from across Europe and so soon after the war, which of course had interrupted regular international relationships, contributed to me being more informed and more open minded. I had an especially close relationship with two other young men, a Belgian and a Dutchman, Jean Paul Van Bellinghen and Frank Boreel. Both had graduated in law and were at the beginning of their diplomatic careers. The latter had come with his car, a Fiat ‘500 “Topolino”. I had brought with me a pair of skis and boots which was all the sports equipment that I owned. Three of us (taking turns in the Fiat’s little back seat) would go skiing during the weekend. Weekends were free time since this was an American university. Saalbach, Kitzbuehel, Berchtesgaden (Hitler’s mountain retreat) were our destinations. Austria and Germany after the war were very cheap. For 1000 lira you could stay at a hotel for one night! It was a wonderful period also because of the discoveries that I made almost daily. I remember one day I saw Frank holding a book with the title, “University of Utrecht – Principles of Economics” and I was amazed by the fact that the Dutch university would print books in English (in 1955). Frank, in a very calm way, replied by saying: “Of course, they would have very few readers if the book had been written in Dutch!” A sign that in the Netherlands all the students were familiar with the English language. It was very normal for him but not for an Italian.   I had casually mentioned that the following day, the 2nd of April, was my name-day. That evening at the end of the dinner, in the huge hall, with frescos covering the ceiling, where we would usually have our meals at different tables, I saw everybody getting up and starting to sing: “Because he is a jolly good fellow, and so say all of us.” One of them put in my hand a souvenir book of Salzburg with the signatures of all the participants. I was the jolly good fellow! With tears in my eyes I said a few words to thank everybody. I couldn’t do any more than that! One day we opened the windows of the room and looked out on the lake, where usually we saw people on sleds and dogs running, and saw that the ice had thawed. The course was nearing an end, unfortunately! I wrote my dissertation on the economic-political system of the United States, which was received with approval by my professor. I remember being very impressed by my discovery of “lobbying” (I was so naïve…) and the fact that the head of the president’s election campaign (if successful) would become the head of the Post Office where he could reward the party workers—the so-called “spoils system”.  I have not seen many of my fellow students in later years. Frank and Jean were assigned to diplomatic offices in countries far away. I met a Norwegian guy when I started travelling for work. He had become the head of a labor union in Oslo. He invited me to dinner and went by taxi. He explained to me that he could not drive after drinking. At that time, we did not think about such things! I had later contacts with two Italians: Giovanni de Luca, a Neapolitan and Demetrio Volcic who worked at Radio Trieste and who later became an anchorman on TV. As time passed, I lost touch with all of them but I was left with a great memory of that period and of what it represented for me. 
READ MORE...
Lauren Kennedy and Rachel Knox highlighted in list of Memphis’ most interesting and influential people
Lauren Kennedy and Rachel Knox highlighted in list of Memphis’ most interesting and influential people
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellows Lauren Kennedy and Rachel Knox have been included in a new publication showcasing Memphis’ most interesting and influential people. The ii 100 features Kennedy and Knox in its inaugural 2017 issue with 98 other people from the Memphis area. Both Kennedy and Knox attended the third Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) in 2016.  Kennedy is the executive director for the Urban Art Commission, having previously worked for Ballet Memphis, and the Dallas Art Fair. Knox, meanwhile, is a program officer for Hyde Family Foundations and sits on the boards of: The Urban Arts Commission, Voices of the South Theatre Company, and Our Fallen Heroes Foundation.  Every year, the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) brings 50 of the world’s most talented young innovators from the culture and arts sector together at Schloss Leopoldskron. Salzburg Global supports participants to develop their vision, entrepreneurial skills, and networks, to enable them and their causes to continue to thrive. Most participants are drawn from several YCI Hubs in various cities around the world. As members of the Memphis Hub, Knox and Kennedy attended the first major offsite meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in Detroit, MI earlier this year. They were joined by participants from hubs in Detroit, MI and New Orleans, LA. Participants worked on collaborative micro-innovation projects tied to the creative economy and social innovation. Speaking ahead of this year’s Salzburg Global Day, Knox heaped praise on the YCI Forum. In a Facebook post she said, “My attendance to the Young Cultural Innovators Forum came at a time of transition in my career, so I felt a bit lost when I arrived. However, I quickly learned that although I was surrounded by creatives, my interest and passions about politics and policy were met with equal measure and enthusiasm from some of the most brilliant minds I've encountered.  “As a textbook know-it-all, I learned that you don’t have to know all of the answers and that “I don’t know” isn’t a cop-out but an extraordinary opportunity to explore the possibilities ahead of you. It renewed my love of learning and not just knowing. “I got the chance to travel out of the country for the first time in my life and explore one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been with the sweetest air I’ve ever smelled. I won’t ever forget the experience or take it for granted. And I’m so excited and thankful for the new group of fellows attending the YCI forum in the Fall. I can’t wait for them to join our incredible and scrappy American team from Memphis, and Detroit, and New Orleans and see what new energy they bring.”
READ MORE...
Fellows around the world celebrate first-ever Salzburg Global Day
Fellows around the world celebrate first-ever Salzburg Global Day
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global took a trip back in time on Saturday as it celebrated the first-ever Salzburg Global Day. Fellows from throughout the ages got in touch with Salzburg Global to share memories, anecdotes, photos, and videos of their time at Schloss Leopoldskron. The inaugural celebration took place on the 70th anniversary of the first day of Session 1. At that time, in 1947, Salzburg Global was called the Salzburg Seminar in American Civilization.  Ahead of this year's Salzburg Global Day, Fellows were encouraged to publicly share their experiences at Schloss Leopoldskron on social media using the hashtag #ShareWithSGS. More than 600 posts have since been shared on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Many people who are not on social media have also gotten in touch to have their moments highlighted.  This includes Ann Elter (née Bradshaw), who attended the first session in 1947 as a 20-year-old student from England. She said, "After six years of isolation in England during World War Two it was an incredibly enriching experience to travel to Salzburg in July 1947 and meet my fellow participants. There were not only my former enemies from Germany and Austria but neutral friends from Sweden and many bewildered Displaced Persons who had fled from the Balkan countries to Austria as the Russian Army had advanced into their homelands. “Then there were the American scholars and lecturers already partly known to us from their works but not heard before in person and the student helpers from Harvard who did all they could to enable us to live comfortably together. "Outside the Schloss, there was the magical city of Salzburg itself and the concerts and operas to which we mysteriously seemed to be given tickets, if only to sit on the steps leading down to the arena! All in all, it was an unforgettable six weeks which strengthened my resolve to work in the international field as soon as I possibly could and to keep in touch with my many new friends, sadly now mostly departed.” Moving forward in time, Jodie Boyce, a participant at the 10th Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change in 2016, shared photos and thoughts on Facebook. She said, “With so much toxicity and hatred in the world, Salzburg is somewhere I hold sacred. The Schloss is a place I will never forget in my life, and the experience is one that will stay with me until the day I die. The city is a fairy tale, the people are the future leaders of the world, and the faculty are the most inspirational people I have ever met in my life.” Posts have been amalgamated into one social media feed, which can be seen on Salzburg Global’s 70th-anniversary website. This feed includes group photos, scenic shots of Schloss Leopoldskron, and firsthand accounts of how people have used their Salzburg Global experience to their advantage. Salzburg Global Fellows were also encouraged to meet up to reunite, reflect and reminisce on their time together. YCI Fellows from the Salzburg Hub met for a drink the day before Salzburg Global Day to celebrate the occasion, while other Salzburg Global Fellows such as Adam Molyneux-Berry, C. Harvey, and Samuel Hoi also took the time to catch-up at the Maryland Institute College of Art. While the day is over, Fellows are still being asked to share their memories using the #ShareWithSGS hashtag. To make your post visible to other Salzburg Global Fellows, please make your individual posts public rather than sharing only with your friends.
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global and Georgetown University present global family business program
Salzburg Global and Georgetown University present global family business program
Oscar Tollast 
A Georgetown University program designed to address the needs of leaders of global family-owned businesses will work in partnership with Salzburg Global Seminar. Salzburg Global is collaborating with Georgetown's McDonough School of Business to co-host the Leading Global Family Business program later this year. This premier two-module program begins at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, from September 14 to 16, and culminates at Georgetown from November 9 and 11.  Using a variety of learning approaches, participants will explore global leadership strategies, the intersection of policy and family business, family governance, corporate governance, and board leadership. During each three-day module, there will also be time for networking and peer-to-peer coaching opportunities. Other program elements will enhance and extend the classroom discussions and will provide participants a rich cultural experience in both Salzburg and Washington, D.C. Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Finance Officer Pia Valdivia received an Executive Master's in Leadership at Georgetown's McDonough School of Business in 2007. Earlier this year, she took part in a Q&A to discuss Salzburg, her Georgetown experience, and the Leading Global Family Business program. Discussing the program in this interview, Valdivia said, "The program focuses on issues that emerge as family-owned companies develop and grow, which critically impacts their sustainability. The need is to develop global leaders for the future of the enterprise and to sustain wealth into the next generation and beyond. "Georgetown McDonough and Salzburg Global Seminar have crafted a program that discusses the specific challenges family businesses face managing globally. The goal is to foster high-level discussions and networking with executives from diverse industries and geographies and to provide insights that attendees can apply at their businesses." To learn more about the Leading Global Family Business program, please click here. If you'd like to reserve a spot, please click here.  
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Fellow Randal K Quarles nominated for Federal Reserve's top regulatory post
Salzburg Global Fellow Randal K Quarles nominated for Federal Reserve's top regulatory post
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Randal K. Quarles has been nominated by President Donald Trump to serve as the Federal Reserve's vice chairman for supervision. If confirmed by the Senate, Mr. Quarles, 59, will be the first person to serve in the role and part of a new approach to financial regulation, as highlighted by The Economist. Mr. Quarles previously worked in the Treasury Department under President George W. Bush between 2002 and 2006, serving first as assistant secretary for international affairs and then as under secretary for domestic finance. In 2014, he helped establish the Cynosure Group, a Salt Lake City-based company which makes long-term equity investments in private companies across a range of industries. Mr. Quarles has taken part in several programs at Salzburg Global. He first attended Schloss Leopoldskron in 2013 for Session 516 - Out of the Shadows: Regulation for the Non-Banking Financial Sector. The following year, he was a participant at Session 546 - The Future of Banking: Is There a Sustainable Business Model for Banks? He took part in his third Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World in 2015 when he attended Session 552 - The Future of Financial Intermediation: Banking, Securities Markets, or Something New? His most recent appearance at the Forum, and Salzburg Global was in 2016 when he attended Session 563 - Financing the Global Economy: How Can Traditional and Non-Traditional Sources Be Integrated? Quarles is a member of the Forum's advisory board alongside other leading banking figures such Douglas Flint, group chairman of HSBC and Sandra O'Connor, chief regulatory affairs officer at JPMorgan Chase & Co. The Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World is an annual high-level program convened by Salzburg Global which addresses issues critical to the future of financial markets and global economy in the context of key global trends. 
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Fellow Ben Folds improvises live piece of music with National Symphony Orchestra
Salzburg Global Fellow Ben Folds improvises live piece of music with National Symphony Orchestra
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Ben Folds has created a buzz on social media after improvising a live piece of music while on stage with the National Symphony Orchestra. Folds, an acclaimed singer-songwriter and record producer, performed the piece during #SoundHealth in Concert: Music and the Mind, held at The Kennedy Center, in Washington, D.C., earlier this month.  At the time of writing, a clip of the performance has received more than eight million views on Facebook and has been shared more than 96,000 times.  Before attempting the challenge, Folds was introduced on stage by Dr. Charles Limb, another Salzburg Global Fellow. In the segment, Dr. Limb, a renowned surgeon, neuroscientist, and musician, asks the audience for a key, tempo, and "interesting sentence" for Folds to work with. Once these ingredients are noted down, Folds takes just 10 minutes to improvise a new piece of music with the National Symphony Orchestra and conductor Edwin Outwater. Both Folds and Dr. Limb attended Salzburg Global in 2015 for Session 547 - The Neuroscience of Art: What are the Sources of Creativity and Innovation? Folds was a participant while Dr. Limb co-chaired the session. The session brought together an inspiring and unusual mix of 50 artists, scientists, physicians, psychologists, sociologists - and more - to explore the field of neurology of art and to create a collaborative international platform to identify and address emerging issues at the creative intersection of neuroscience and art. Watch Folds' performance below.  
READ MORE...
Displaying results ###SPAN_BEGIN###%s to %s out of ###SPAN_BEGIN###%s
<< First < Previous 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28 29-35 36-42 43-49 Next > Last >>