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Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Salzburg Global Fellow Aiko Doden acknowledged as one of Japan's most influential women
Salzburg Global Fellow Aiko Doden acknowledged as one of Japan's most influential women
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Aiko Doden has been acknowledged as one of Japan's most influential women. Ms. Doden, a senior commentator on international affairs and a producer of Asian Voices, was highlighted as one of seven inspiring women in Japan in an article by one of the Council on Foreign Relations' experts. Asian Voices is an NHK news program which introduces its audience to the leaders and citizens of Asia. Ms. Doden has previously interviewed Malala Yousafzai, Professor Muhammad Yunus, World Bank President Dr. Jim Yong Kim, Myanmar President Thein Sein, and co-founder of Microsoft Bill Gates. In a post by Sheila A. Smith, Senior Fellow for Japan Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, Ms. Doden was highlighted as an active advocate for changing the working culture for women in Japan, and globally. Ms. Doden, a co-chair of Salzburg Global's Japan Advisory Committee, spoke to Salzburg Global after finding out she had been included. She said, "I think this is an encouragement to keep up my work, both in my professional and in my personal capacity. It is gratifying that they saw a theme in what I do. "It is also gratifying to be acknowledged as 'salary-man (salary-woman)' because organizations, systems, communities and Japan itself, all need to bring about change within too." In 2008, Ms. Doden was a participant at Session 455 - Peace-Making and Peace-Building: Securing the Contributions of Women and Civil Society. Ms. Doden said, "I don't think it was a coincidence that the first session I attended at Salzburg Global Seminar was Peace Building and the Role of Women.  "Salzburg Global Seminar is always a little ahead of time in identifying the issues that matter."
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Cristian Montenegro - Transparency and the clinical efficacy of ignorance
Cristian Montenegro - Transparency and the clinical efficacy of ignorance
Cristian Montenegro 
Cristian Montenegro is a Fellow of Session 553 - Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship. He is a sociologist, currently pursuing doctoral studies at the London School of Economics' Department of Methodology. He specializes in qualitative social research on health policy and services. This post was first published on Cristian Montenegro's Tumblr page. One would think that sharing information with the user (sorry but I think the word “patient” is part of the problem) and make him fully aware of what’s going on with his health is kind of obvious. As long as there’s information being produced about the health status of a person, then why don’t share that information in every available format with that person? If people regularly appeals to transparency laws in order to get access to this kind of information (that’s the case in Chile), why don’t we just give it to them in the first place? During these days I’ve been participating at the Salzburg Global Seminar session 553  called “Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship,” tackling this and other issues. The week-long seminar involves a fascinating cross section of users, health professionals, communication, and technology experts, coming from Brazil, Japan, India, Australia, Canada, the USA, and Chile.  And again, why do we actually need to discuss something that should be obvious? Well, as usual, it is only when you engage in dialogue with others that you realize how non-obvious things can be, how many different perspectives there are and how ‘opaque’ is ‘transparency’ as a theme of discussion. On top of that diversity, doctors, and clinicians, in general, do have concerns with full transparency. They have a lot to say about it, strong opinions on how positive it is, but at the same time about the risks it entails. In a sense, there’s still something complex about this apparent simplicity of transparency: there’s something about information that’s not simply information. About two or three years ago, the BBC showed a brilliant documentary series called “The Power of Placebo.” It revealed how placebos had a measurable therapeutic impact and how they indeed produced real changes in people’s bodies, to the point where even the color of the pills used as placebos make a difference in how ‘effective’ they are: Blue pills were less efficacious than red pills, for example. Of course, the show then moved into explaining this situation in purely biochemical terms. But the stubborn sociologist in me explored an alternative explanation based on culture (broadly drawing on this influential text by French anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss):  Placebos actually work because they are given by a clinician, and the clinician is not just a person, he’s an authorized representative of a socially valued institution called medicine. The healing power responded to the place that medicine has in society, a place of authority and certainty, and “the body,” cultural itself, also responded to this.   In this sense, while the use of placebos is circumscribed to scientific research, what the documentary reveals has implications beyond the realm of science, implications involving the societal meaning of medicine. How can this be relevant to a discussion on transparency and information? Well, the efficacy of placebos depends on me (a ‘patient’) ignoring something, ignoring that that pill is, in fact, nothing more than sugar. Its healing power, therefore, depends on a carefully controlled economy of ignorance, of knowing and not-knowing, based on the deeply ingrained respect for medicine as an institution. What you know/not know about the real effect of the pill is the foundation of its effect. And on this basis, my point is that whether they do it consciously or not, doctors use the power of what’s known and not known by its patients as a clinical tool, as a mechanism to produce health and improve diagnostic results. They know, at a level of practice, that what you say to a patient (and especially what you don’t say) carries a therapeutic potential. Maybe to rephrase it, information, in a clinical sense, is not “just” information. Is not something that can be moved from one “mind” to another. And the mediation or translation between what the clinician knows and what the user knows is not just a matter of simplification. Clinicians and patients are not simply located in different positions across a continuum of more or less knowledge. There is a culturally sanctioned discontinuity between them upon which the power of medicine is partly based.  Can we have a discussion on transparency and openness that takes this into account? In my view, we can only move the discussion on transparency forward if we’re willing to problematise the social place of medicine as a whole. And when culture and cultural representations of medicine are brought into the conversation, new signs of hope and new paths towards action can be charted. One representative from Sweden, probably one of the most advanced countries in the implementation of shared medical records told us, very bluntly: “In Sweden, the people owns the health system.” And that means that, of course, they own their medical information. Therefore, and this is important, regardless of the clinical use or the clinical consequences of sharing records, patients already own those records. There is a different relation of ownership and therefore a different cultural approximation towards medicine. I think we need to look carefully at their example, to approach transparency not only in its clinical value but in its cultural roots, as a value in itself. The Salzburg Global program Toward a Shared Culture of Health: Enriching and Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship is part of the multi-year series Health and Health Care Innovation in the 21st Century. The session is being supported by OpenNotes. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburglobal.org/go/553. You can follow all the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGShealth
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Jared Genser - "Failure is not an option"
Jared Genser, human rights lawyer and founder of Freedom Now speaking at the fifth annual Cutler Fellows Law Program
Jared Genser - "Failure is not an option"
Salzburg Global Seminar 
During the fifth annual Salzburg Cutler Law Fellows Program, Salzburg Global Seminar President Stephen L. Salyer sat down with guest speaker Jared Genser, human rights lawyer and founder of Freedom Now, for a one-on-one interview. Genser spoke about his organization, his advice for young lawyers, and how he comes to terms with the different challenges he faces. This year's Salzburg Cutler Laws Fellow Program, Future of Public and Private International Law, included 56 representatives from 26 countries - the most diverse group the program has had so far. During the two-day program held in February, Cutler Fellows and practitioners explored cutting edge issues in international law. In addition to Genser, Cutler Fellows also heard from Kristalina Georgieva, Salzburg Global Fellow and newly-appointed Chief Executive Officer at the World Bank. Read what Genser had to say in a condensed transcript below. Alternatively, listen to the full interview on Soundcloud. This transcript has been edited for length. Stephen: Hello. I’m Stephen Salyer, President of the Salzburg Global Seminar. I’m here with Jared Genser who is a well-known human rights lawyer and the founder of Freedom Now. Jared has been talking with the Salzburg Cutler Fellows, a group of about 55 law students from top US law schools interested in careers in public and international law and also public service. Jared in founding Freedom Now, what set it apart from some of the other human rights organizations? Jared: I founded Freedom Now coming from an experience I had helping to, as a law student, free James Mawdsley, a British national who had gotten a 17-year prison sentence and solitary confinement in Burma for handing out pro-democracy leaflets. And in founding Freedom Now, we’re different from other human rights groups in a couple of key ways. The first is, we represent our clients as lawyers, and that puts you at the center of the case and enables you to most effectively advocate on their behalf. Second, we combine political and public relations advocacy efforts that are strategically designed to maximize pressure on the government so that the cost dramatically outweigh the benefits. And lastly, we focus on cases that are representative of broader views around the country and different geographies around the world. We are looking for prisoners of conscience, people who are detained for who they are or what they believe. Stephen: You’re here today with a group of very bright and dedicated young men and women just at the beginning of their careers. If you think back, what do you wish you would have had the chance to learn more of in law school and what’s your advice to young lawyers just starting their careers interested in fields like human rights? Jared: As a law student, you learn about international law and how to apply international law in situations, but you don’t learn a lot of other skills that are necessary for becoming an international human rights lawyer, including the fact that I spend half my time with any of my human rights victim clients really providing personal support and helping them survive what they are going through. You need to be able to engage governments and inter-governmental institutions and persuade them that this is an important enough cause that they should be engaged in and be involved in. And you learn really nothing about engaging the media. To really raise a cause to a government on any human rights issue requires not just merely knowing the law, but being able to speak intelligently to press. Engaging in pro bono work in the field of human rights provides a lot of freedom. But one has to seek out these opportunities proactively. You can’t just sit back and wait for them to come to you. Stephen: There are more prisoners of conscience in the world than you can come to the aid of. One of the students asked you earlier how you make decisions about the selection of your clients. Would you say a bit about that? Jared: We look for a range of different things when adding cases. First, the person has to be a prisoner of conscience, someone who is detained for who they are or what they believe. Then, we are looking for cases that are representative of broader abuses in the country. We are not just looking for a particular case of a person, let’s say, arrested for protesting, but we might look for the leader of that protest. By helping that one person, you help a broader bus of people.  Stephen: As you look to the future, how do you see the client-based approach that you’re taking affecting that broader climate? Do you think that these are the handles that people can grasp to actually have an impact on that broader cross-current of political forces, or is there another whole range of democratic responses that are going to have to be marshaled? Jared: Our take on it with Freedom Now is to represent a cluster of cases that can help transform societies. Cases that I’ve worked on have played an important role in contributing to help transform societies. I spent five years representing Aung San Suu Kyi as her international lawyer in Burma. Her freedom was critical to advance the situation there. I was her only international lawyer. One of the things we were able to do when I was representing her was to get all the current groups in the world together to agree to do a single letter to Ban Ki Moon from former presidents and prime ministers, pressing for him to travel to Burma to seek her freedom. We were able to get 112 former presidents and prime ministers across 50 countries to sign into one letter by having a rising tide lift all above us. Every NGO involved was able to put up a press release on the same day saying they were part of the letter. So we worked collaboratively. Everybody opened up their respective Rolodexes to make this happen, and Ban Ki-moon went a few months later. He didn’t secure her release, but it advanced the campaign in a dramatic way. And ultimately getting her out, which we prevailed in doing, started to move a process forward in the country that has led to her and her party winning a substantial majority in the last elections, and now she is the leader of her country. These kinds of cases can help transform societies, so that’s our small part of the much bigger problem. Stephen: You’ve talked about the dimension of your work, of being there for your clients and sometimes explaining things, but also providing a kind of emotional support in some of the darkest moments that they may face in their lives. How about yourself? When you hit a moment of particular challenge or fatigue or doubt, how do you deal with that in your own terms? Jared: It’s a great question. The work is incredibly hard, and all consuming, and one cannot easily just put up emotional barriers and not feel the pain that one’s clients are going through. So you emotionally are taking your work home with you whether you like it or not. I think for me, every day I am inspired by my clients. Seeing their perseverance, their resilience, disputing the enormous burden on their shoulders, really kind of makes the problems that I might have seem very first world in comparison. Frankly, all these cases that I work on are must-win situations. Failure is not an option. When does one have the luxury of being demoralized or sitting back and taking a break for very long? I think how I help keep perspective is by working with my clients. I know that my struggles and my challenges, they aren’t much relatively speaking to what they’re going to. I aspired to be a human rights lawyer before I went to law school. I had no idea what that was going to be like from an experiential standpoint. It has been so incredibly enriching and fulfilling for me in my career that I couldn’t imagine doing anything else. Stephen: I’ve been talking with Jared Genser, the founder of Freedom Now. A man who has been effective in so many ways across the world. I think the inspiration of “failure is not an option” is something we will all take away from today. Thank you for being with us. The Salzburg Cutler Fellows Law Program is held under the auspices of the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law. The annual program collaborates with eleven of the leading U.S. law schools. This year's program was sponsored by NYU Washington and Arnold & Porter. More information on the session is available here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter by following the #cutlerfellows hashtag.
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Salzburg Global Fellow features in "Top 30 Under 30" list
Salzburg Global Fellow features in "Top 30 Under 30" list
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global Fellow Chúk Odenigbo has been included in the Alberta Council for Global Cooperation’s (ACGC) Top 30 Under 30 Magazine. The ACGC is a coalition of voluntary sector organizations based in Alberta, which work locally and globally to achieve sustainable human development.  The annual magazine highlights the work of 30 outstanding young people whose work is inspiring positive change in Alberta and around the world. This year’s magazine includes a message from the Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau, who describes those included in the magazine as “deserving of our admiration.” Those selected are done so as a result of being nominated. Odenigbo, who found out about his nomination via email, said it was a pleasant surprise.  Speaking to Salzburg Global, he said, “It was very flattering. It’s always really nice when your work is appreciated. You always feel good about it. You don’t get into nature [work] for the glory, but the glory is nice to have.” Originally from Nigeria, Odenigbo said his inclusion in the list made him feel like he had established a home in Alberta. The 24-year-old is passionate about community development and international cooperation.  Examples of his past work include working with the Canadian Parks Council to create “The Nature Playbook.” This document looks at the significance of connecting with nature and reaping the positive health benefits. He has also worked with fashion retailer Club Monaco as an operations manager, where he made significant strides to include nature in the shopping experience.  In 2015, Odenigbo attended the inaugural session of the Parks for the Planet Forum: Nature, Health, and a New Urban Generation. The following year he returned to Schloss Leopoldskron for Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability. Odenigbo returned again to be the rapporteur for the second instalment of the Parks for the Planet Forum: Transboundary Cooperation for Biodiversity and Peace. Odenigbo believes Salzburg Global helps people focus on the issues at hand and it pauses events which are happening in the outside world. He said whenever conflict appeared in discussions, it was a sign of a Fellow’s passion for the topic and how much they cared to make progress. He said, “It is a breakaway from the real world, which allows you to come back to the real world stronger, more inspired, more refreshed, and more Austrian!” Odenigbo is due to return to Salzburg Global for a fourth time later this year when he will reprise his role as rapporteur at the third session of the Parks for the Planet Forum, The Child in the City: Health, Parks, and Play, which takes place later this month.  He is currently undertaking a Master’s degree in Environmental and Occupational Health with a focus on Toxicology, having returned to education after a three-year break. Odenigbo said: “My biggest challenge is trying to ensure I balance everything, so I don’t fail school, and that I don’t put my professional career on hold because of school. That’s been an interesting and fun challenge so far. It’s been exhilarating - I wouldn’t have it any other way.”
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Young Cultural Innovators present their passions
Young Cultural Innovators present their passions at the Third Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators
Young Cultural Innovators present their passions
Chris Hamill-Stewart 
Who are you and what are you passionate about? This was the question put to the Young Cultural Innovators (YCIs) of the third annual Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators. The video responses to this question were produced as part of a communication workshop hosted by Natasha Cica, Director of Kapacity.org. In the dialogue-based workshop, YCIs worked in larger and break out groups to co-create the conversation, share perspectives and ultimately built capacity to “own their own voices.” The workshop challenged and supported the group to experiment with different communication styles and methods, with the ultimate goal of delivering a powerful presentation in their videos. You can watch the videos of the YCIs who have chosen to make their video public in the list below, on both Facebook and YouTube. Dong-Hee Cho, founder of the Well Done Project and creator of an inexpensive educational math book for children in Africa, on her own work, how education can bring us closer together and the Salzburg Global Seminar. Natasha Cica, director of Kapacity.org, talks about her experience of facilitating a communications work shop at Salzburg Global Seminar, and what she's most enjoyed about meeting this group of young innovators. Sebastian Chuffer, filmmaker, director and CEO of Cineastas del Futuro (Future Filmmakers), discusses the importance of storytelling and its role in our personal and civil lives. Yuki Uchida, co-representative of Re:public Inc, on why it's important for citizens to be involved with the design of their own spaces. Shelley Danner, co-founder and program director of Challenge Detroit, discusses what she's enjoyed about attending a Salzburg Global Seminar session. Netta Avineri, assistant professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and co-founder of the MIIS Intercultural Digital Storytelling Project, discusses her interests in storytelling, creative hubs, and moving forwards from the session. Anouza Phothisane, co-founder of Loabangfai, the first Laos-based break dancing crew, discusses what he enjoyed about attending the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators and how he presents his work and country to many other creators. Meryam Bouadjemi, filmmaker and storyteller, describes how her experience at Salzburg global Forum for Young Cultural innovators has helped her in an important time of her life. Taulant Dibra, architect and founder of TD architecture Studio, on why he became an architect and his projects that he considers successful. Joo Im Moon, senior researcher at the World Culture Open Arts & Culture Lab, shares her dream through quotes that inspire her. Steven McMahon, choreographic and associate artistic director with Ballet Memphis, discusses how his experience at The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators has affected his personal growth. Cadeatra Harvey, or C. Harvey, owner of Generation of Dreamers and Baltimore's Gifted, on empowering the youth in Baltimore through their own art and creativity. Samuel Oliver, manager of executive affairs and capital projects for Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, on making his voice heard and his message understood. Edwin Kemp Attrill, founder and artistic director of ActNow Theatre, discusses how artists, creatives and citizens are becoming a force for global change, and how cultural innovation is an integral part of the shift from hierarchies into networks. Maria José Greloni, regional director of communication and online campaigns at Wingu, explains how her time at Salzburg Global Seminar has influenced her ideas for future projects, and made her realize the value of humor in creativity. Chryssa Vlachopoulou, communication, press officer and events manager for BIOS, on her experience attending a Salzburg Global Seminar session and what she'll take away from it. Rachel Knox, program associate for Innovate Memphis, discusses how Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural innovators has helped her realise she's not alone in her struggles and how she's enjoyed meeting such a diverse goroup of people through the program. Carla Schleicher, artistic programs and project coordinator for West Broadway Business and Area Coalition, reads a message addressed to her from one of the people she has helped through her work. Melvin Henley, creative industries strategist, implementer and advocate, discusses his own work in Detroit, and how things are looking up for the city. Arlette Quynh-Anh Tran, writer and curator of Post Vidai, on her own work and how art can be used to build bridges between fractured parts of society. Despina Gerasimidou, creator of Future Libraries, on how the traditional idea of libraries is fading out and being replaced by modern and exciting new centers of experience and learning. Annelies Senfter, visual artist and photographer, on developing her projects in an abstract way and trusting in herself. Alphonse Smith, talks about his own path to where he is now, and how he is working in New Orleans to build on the rich culture that already exists there, and making it more accessible to all residents. Yuki Oka, explains his motivations for doing the work he does, and how this has driven him to try to help others. Joana Stefanova, cultural manager and part of the One Foundation for Culture and Arts, on love. Maia Asshaq, author, publisher and co-founder of the Detroit Art Book fair and DittoDitto Books, on creating an online companion piece to her already existing work. Aaron Davis, Ph.D candidate and expert on cities and their changing role in the 21st centuries, discusses involving citizens in design processes and why this is important in the first place. Amanda Lovelee, visual artist and city artist for City of St Paul, on how important art can be for cities. Kreshnik Merxhani, freelance architect known for his writings and artistic restoration projects, on why he has always wanted to be an artist and the work he does to restore more than just physical objects, but memories, relations and knowledge Brian Gerardo, entrepreneur, dancer and co-founder of the Baltimore Dance Crews Project, discusses how his personal experiences have influenced him to set up his own after-school dance activities. Nicolas Aziz, project coordinator for Converge, on the importance of new cultural experiences, bringing them to youth for their benefit and helping them to exceed what is expected of them. Imani Jacqueline Brown, co-founder of Blights Out and director of programs at Antenna, discusses the crisis of capitalism we're experiencing right now, and especially its effects on arts and culture. Lomorpich Rithy, independent filmmaker and founder of Plerng Kob (meaning campfire), on coming together to share stories, hear other peoples' stories and exercize the right to have your voice heard. Mark Salvatus, contemporary artist exhibited in multiple exhibitions, on defining his life and creating meaning through art. Victor Yankov, festival director of the Open Arts Foundation, on the role of culture in cities and societies. Lauren Kennedy, executive director of the Urban Art Commission, on how her early exposure to art was influenced by her interactions with her father, and how her understanding of public art continues to grow and evolve. Miku Kano, member of ISHINOMAKI 2.0, discusses her work in the post-tsunami town of Ishinomaki, and how they're creating the "most interesting town in the world" by fostering creativity. Nafsika Papadopoulou, External Collaborator and Project Coordinator for Neon Organization, on the transitional stage Athens is going through, and how urban art and creativity may aid in this transition. Wandisile Nqekotho, founder of 18 Gangster Museum, on how he's helping young people to stay away from gangsterism in South Africa. Rebecca 'Bucky' Willis, project manager for Detroit Collaborative Design Center, discusses the concept of Design Superheroes and why they're important. Sacramento Knoxx, multi-discipline performance artist, on the city that he's from. Andrei Nikolai Pamintuan, producer and creative director of Pineapple Lab, on empowering creators and artists by providing them with a platform to share their experiences and stories. Chheangly Yeng, co-founder of the Magic Library and Slap Paka Khmer (Khmer Collaborative Writers), discusses Cambodia's troubled past and how his work in telling stories to children can benefit those children and their futures. Yu Nakamura, who runs 40creations, a group which preserves the recipes of octogenarians, on why she likes wrinkles, meeting a grandma and finding the right way to solve problems or change your situation. Seda Röder, "the piano hacker," on the value of creativity, the 21st century as the century of creative thinking, and concentrating on the core of what makes us humans - creativity. Adam Wiltgen, arts administrator, presenter and technical communicator, on using creativity to overcome community challenges. Cameron Shaw, writer, editor and executive director of Pelican Bomb, discusses her work in empowering artists and providing a platform through which creators can critically examine issues in everyday life. Siviwe Mbinda, founder of the Happy Feet Youth Project, on using dance to attract children to his project, and then positively influencing them through education. Shawn Burnett, co-founder and executive director of Walks of Art, has a message for anyone who doesn't wake up with hope in their hearts. Mirela Kocollari, director of Cultural Heritage and Tourism for the Municipality of Tirana, on being cautious of our limits, knowledge, and abilities in order to bring out the best in ourselves. Michele Anderson, rural program director for Springboard for the Arts, on the importance of rural communities and making sure they are a part of the conversation in the future of our societies and creative thinking. Bora Baboci, architect and visual artist, presents an image introduced to her during her time at Salzburg Global Seminar. Steven Fox, writer, poet and actor from Memphis, Tennessee, discusses being accepted as a creative.   The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators III is part of a ten-year multi-year series, which is generously supported by: Albanian-American Development Foundation; America For Bulgaria Foundation; American Express; Arts South Australia; Asia-Europe Foundation; Cambodian Living Arts; Edward T. Cone Foundation; Lloyd A. Fry Foundation; Korea Foundation; the McKnight Foundation; Red Bull Amaphiko; The Kresge Foundation; Japan Foundation; Stavros Niarchos Foundation; Adena and David Testa; and the Yeltsin Center. More information on the session can be found here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/569 More information on the series can be found here: yci.salzburgglobal.org
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Inés Sanguinetti -“We should redesign past models of learning”
Inés Sanguinetti -“We should redesign past models of learning”
Andrea Abellan 
The arts have a powerful role to play in enriching education, explained Argentinian dancer-cum-educator Inés Sanguinetti when attending the recent Salzburg Global Seminar program The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal. Sanguinetti made the switch from dancer to educator through Crear Vale la Pena (“Creating is Worth It”), an association that aims to put arts at the core of the learning process. Sanguinetti believes students today are all too often educated in the opposite of bonding, making them isolated and constrained by too many prejudices and too little empathy – and the arts can help change this. Through Art, Wellbeing and Creativity, one of the projects developed by Crear Vale la Pena, Sanguinetti and her team are trying to change this situation.  “We try to develop a kind of new laboratory of teaching and learning between schools and communities,” she explains.  Through the project, “social actors” and “creative agents” – typically community artists coming from a variety of different backgrounds including visual arts, dance, music, and even technology – are brought into schools where they help teachers design their classes. The methodology is based on involving arts in the curriculum and encouraging dialogue between artists, teachers, and the community. Sanguinetti compares this project with what used to occur in Ancient Greece, when going to the gymnasium was routine for students looking to train their body and mind. At that time, exercising was not viewed that far away from other subjects, namely philosophy and poetry. “Now we are taught that everything must be clearly differentiated,” she laments. “I do enjoy mixing different styles even in my choreography, ranging from martial arts to rugby or tango. I trust the power of moving together minds and bodies to explain any kind of topic and this can be very helpful to learn about new subjects,” she explains. Sanguinetti is not a supporter of the education system still being followed in some areas. In her view, traditional teaching methods are not capable of satisfying the needs of the students anymore.  “I see traditional schools as a dying institution. We should redesign past models of learning and teach the students the skills they actually need to survive to the 21st Century.”  Research conducted by the University of San Andrés based in Buenos Aires together with the University of Aberdeen in Scotland has reinforced Sanguinetti’s program. The increase in the students’ motivation, the improvement in the coexistence inside the classroom, and the positive attitude of the community towards the arts as a suitable form of learning and not only as an entertainment were all highlighted as positive outcomes from her programs.  Sanguinetti is now exchanging experiences and collaborating with other associations. These are based in different countries, namely Colombia and Chile. Soon she will start cooperating with organizations outside of Latin America, such as in Germany, where similar programs are being carried out. In her home country of Argentina, Crear Vale la Pena will start receiving support from the government. Thanks to this, the number of schools and associations implementing the program will grow from 20 to more than 150.  Through her experience in Salzburg, Sanguinetti had the opportunity to learn about similar projects conducted in Morocco and Cambodia, presented by Salzburg Global Fellows Karima Kadaoui, co-founder of Tamkeen (“Empowerment”) Community Foundation for Human Development, and Bun Rith Suon, manager of the culture and arts education project at Cambodian Living Arts, respectively. Sanguinetti expects to be able to start working with them too in the near future.  “We are already planning our next meeting to keep working on what arts can do for resilience. We are looking forward to keep exchanging ideas and collaborating between us.”
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Dawn Casey – “Museums usually talk about dead things... Contemporary issues should also fit in these spaces”
Dawn Casey – “Museums usually talk about dead things... Contemporary issues should also fit in these spaces”
Andrea Abellan 
Dawn Casey, currently the chief operating officer for the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), has a solid background across multiple sectors. However, it is her experience within the arts that is especially remarkable. She has been in charge of the direction of three of the largest Australian museums: The National Museum of Australia, Western Australia Museum and the Powerhouse Museum. Unquestionably, one of her bigger achievements has been her contribution to what she calls the “democratization of museums.” Or, in other words, her assistance to “make the arts and museums more stimulating and accessible to bigger audiences.” Raised in Cairns, Australia, Casey comes from the Tagalaka clan. As she explains, her personal experience and professional background has been determined because of her indigenous and female identity. She was denied access to education. “I always wanted to study French but it was not possible for indigenous people to take that course. Also, my parents would have never allowed me to do it,” she remembers. Casey’s story is a tale of hard work and overcoming obstacles. Her persistence had a clear intention. “I know what been discriminated means. My own experience showed me how unfair and wrong the system was.” Being a woman made things even more complicated. “Sometimes I didn’t even have the opportunity to be interviewed,” Casey recognizes. Despite these difficulties, she has not allowed them to stop her having a successful career. Her career and contributions have been acknowledged with a number of awards, such as three Commonwealth Public Service Australia Day Medals. She describes her current role with NACCHO as “going back to her roots” after many years working for the museum sector. At NACCHO she looks at health care policies seeking to promote health for Aboriginal communities. “Indigenous people are much more affected by chronic diseases because of their genetics so we try to help them and improve their situation,” she explains. Remarkably for someone who has worked with so many of Australia’s leading museums, Casey admits that she only stepped into a museum for the first time when she was 30. “It was quite a boring experience,” she admits, but this experience convinced her of the power that these institutions could have to act as effective communicative tools able to make communities understand both their pasts and presents. “Museums usually talk about dead things, explorers and settlers,” says Casey. “They are the place to showcase very well-researched materials that make us aware of our history. These are extremely relevant. But I think that contemporary issues – that can be more accessible and interesting to everyone – should also fit in these spaces,” she adds. Casey has thus worked very hard to this end. While working as a director at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney she helped to organize Muslim cultural exhibitions aiming to attract people from diverse communities to come together, techno-nights looking to engage younger generations, and even Harry Potter exhibitions seeking to capture the attention of children. “I think it is a matter of combining very in-depth researched topics with lighter subjects that can arrive to other types of audiences,” she explains. Casey’s work towards integration does not stop here. She has always followed a strategy to involve professionals from different origins into her teams. “I always wanted to be sure that our job vacancies were advertised on those media easy to access by migrant and indigenous communities.” This is how she has managed to develop greatly multicultural teams. At the Salzburg Global Seminar session in February 2017, The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage, and Renewal, Casey helped to link the challenges affecting indigenous communities with other current issues such as the difficulties that refugees all over the world are facing. “They might look as opposite problems. But in my opinion they are both issues saying a lot about the nature of a country. In both situations, either when we stop a boat and do not allow people to enter our country, or when we do not recognize the rights of certain groups of people in their own land, we are disrespectful with human beings and this says a lot about the nature of a nation,” she states. This was the second time that Casey attended a session at Salzburg Global Seminar. She was a previously a participant in 2011 at the session Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture. She fondly remembers that the session was “a great opportunity to share and exchange ideas – something that does not happen frequently when you are a museum director and it is always you who is supposed to sell things to others. This is one of the reasons why I appreciate being part of this open space again to enjoy the dialogue and be able to exchange ideas.”
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