Home » What We Do » Salzburg Global Fellowship » Fellow News
Fellow News

Fellow News

Have you got some news - a new book, a promotion, a call for grant proposals - that you'd like to share with the Salzburg Global Fellowship? Contact Salzburg Global Seminar Fellowship Manager Jan Heinecke via email jheinecke[at]salzburgglobal.org.


Faces of Leadership

Interviews, features, profiles and updates of Salzburg Global Fellows

Report now online Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Report now online Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Louise Hallman 
Since 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has challenged current and future leaders to shape a better world. For seventy years, our Fellows have tackled issues of global concern including education, health, environment, economics, governance, peace-building, the rule of law and protection of human rights.  Since 2013, the advancement of LGBT human rights has joined that list of issues as we seek to shape a better world for everyone – including people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Founded five years ago, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was formed to establish a truly global space to reflect upon and advance LGBT human rights discussions around the world.  Today, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is an international network that connects over 150 Fellows in 70 countries across six continents, spanning multiple sectors, generations, cultures and sexual orientations and gender identities. This new, 200-page publication, Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years, chronicles the first five years of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: the Fellows’ stories that they’ve shared, the wide-ranging issues we’ve addressed, and the impact the Forum has had on individuals, institutions and ideas advancing LGBT human rights around the world. The report was generously supported by the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth.  “Fundamental human rights concern us all. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum brings together queer and straight, representing gender in many expressions, in short: people with overlapping, changing identities. Whether homo-, bi- or heterosexual, cis-, inter- or transgender, our diverse backgrounds and lives are connected by our shared interest to advance LGBT equality globally.” — Dr. Klaus Mueller, Founder and Chair, Salzburg Global LGBT Forum “Throughout Salzburg Global’s history, the rule of law and protection of human rights have played a central role in our programming and impact – as critical elements for personal dignity and wellbeing, equality and social cohesion, successful economies and effective international relations. With this track record, the decision to create the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was a natural and logical, yet bold, step.” — Clare Shine, Vice President and Chief Program Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “I am extremely proud of how the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum has advanced human rights... Public understanding and public policy have advanced considerably, but the challenges across the world remain great. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is a place where they can be addressed.” — Stephen L. Salyer, President and Chief Executive Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “For our ministry, it has been very important to support the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum financially… For us, it is important to make visible these different situations as they exist in Europe and in other parts of the world, and this includes discussing the problems too. We learn from the LGBT Forum how discussions in Germany influence other countries, and how their discussions in other countries influence us in Germany.” — Ralf Kleindiek, German State Secretary for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth Download the report as a PDF
* LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is widely recognized in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as in any way exclusive of other cultures, groups or terms, either historical or contemporary.
READ MORE...
Springboard for Talent - Humanizing Language Learning Through Technology
Microsoft's Mark Sparvell presents at Salzburg Global Seminar session on multilingualism
Springboard for Talent - Humanizing Language Learning Through Technology
Louise Hallman 
“Technology [in the classroom] should humanize learning, not just digitize the curriculum,” insists Mark Sparvell, education leader at tech giant Microsoft. Sparvell offered Fellows a multitude of technological tools to do just this as part of a presentation on “Humanizing language experiences – the promising role of new technologies” at the session, Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World in December. The first tool to wow his audience was the Microsoft Translator app. Via either the website translator.microsoft.com or the smartphone app, Fellows were able to read a translation of Sparvell’s presentation in real time in one of 11 languages. Microsoft currently offers text-to-text translation for 60 languages with more to be added to the speech-to-text service used in Salzburg. Microsoft’s VoIP service, Skype, also offers real-time speech-to-speech translations in eight languages with more than 50 supported text-to-text in instant messaging. While Sparvell readily admits that current digital translation services are by no means “perfect” he rightly points out that “they offer a means of understanding” that might not otherwise be possible. These services can be used to help facilitate cultural exchanges between students across the world (as demonstrated by Microsoft’s annual “Skype-a-Thon” which connected half a million students in 48 hours in 2017), but also aid better understanding with parents from immigrant communities.  As another Fellow shared, her Japanese immigrant mother was intimidated by language barriers when the family moved to English-speaking Canada, hindering her ability to engage with her daughter’s school teachers and resulting in her being mislabeled as a disinterested parent. While many schools cannot afford to hire professional translation services for events such as large-scale parents’ meetings or one-on-one parent-teacher conferences, especially in diverse multilingual communities, where there is not just one dominant foreign language,  using a free tool such as Microsoft’s real-time translator, while imperfect, could help parents overcome such language barriers. Digital translation tools are improving rapidly thanks to artificial intelligence and machine learning. However, as Sparvell points out, “tech is a tool,” much like a fork, a spade or a digger, and tools can enable us to do things at greater scale, but tools still need some human initiation and guidance. But not everyone has access to the same tools. “Is tech breaking down barriers or just putting up more?” one Fellow asked. Software can be given away for free (as was the case for all the tools demonstrated in Salzburg), but if schools do not have reliable hardware, electricity or Internet access that free software is not useful. Recognizing this injustice, many large corporations, including Microsoft, are engaging in philanthropic ventures to offer hardware to schools, improve national electric grid access and stability, and roll out mobile and broadband internet. This is not a purely philanthropic gesture: “Education is everybody’s business.”  Useful links: OneNote in the Foreign Language Classroom Talking with Multilingual Parents with Translator App  Introducing Microsoft Translator [video] Using Translator for parent teacher interviews [video] Live Translate with Skype [video] The session, Springboard for Talent: Language Learning and Integration in a Globalized World is part of Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series  Education for Tomorrow’s World. The session is being held in partnership with ETS, the Qatar Foundation and Microsoft. This project was also supported by The Erste Foundation. To keep up to date with the conversations taking place during the session, follow #SGSedu on Twitter and Instagram.
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of Former Director Robert P Youngman
Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of Former Director Robert P Youngman
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Robert P. Youngman, who served on Salzburg Global Seminar’s Board of Directors (1992-2005) and since a Senior Fellow has passed away at the age of 77 following a long illness. Youngman was an investment advisor, philanthropist, and enthusiast of Asian art. After completing Board service, Youngman continued as a member of the Board Investment Committee until months before his death on January 1, 2018. Salzburg Global President and CEO Stephen Salyer commented, “Bob’s quiet wisdom helped us navigate the storms of the great recession, and steer Salzburg Global toward a safe harbor. He was initially attracted by our long-time connection with Middlebury College but never wavered after we closed our Vermont office several years ago. He was a true friend of the Seminar and will be deeply missed.” After graduating from Middlebury College in 1964 with a B.A. in Political Science, Youngman began his career in finance with the American International Reinsurance Company in Manila, Philippines. In 1976, he founded the investment management firm Granite State Corporation, now known as Griffin Asset Management. Youngman joined the Board of Trustees of Middlebury College in 1980 and served as Chairman of its Board for several years. To learn more about Youngman’s life, please click here.
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of Peter Sutherland
Salzburg Global Seminar Mourns the Death of Peter Sutherland
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Fellow Peter Sutherland has passed away at the age of 71 following an illness. Sutherland, known as the “father of globalization,” died on Sunday, January 7 at a Dublin hospital. He held a distinguished career, serving as director general of the World Trade Organization (WTO), a European Union (EU) commissioner, and Ireland’s attorney general. He also served as chairman for BP and Goldman Sachs International. Sutherland took part in programs at Salzburg Global Seminar on two occasions. He first attended Schloss Leopoldskron as a guest speaker for the June Board of Directors Weekend in 2008. He returned just under four years later to deliver the keynote speech at the session, The Future of the Multilateral Trading System and the World Trade Organization. Sutherland joined government officials, trade negotiators, lawyers, academics, and business sector representatives for the session at a time when the Doha Development Agenda (DDA) had grounded to a halt. Participants assessed how talks in the Doha Round could be resumed and how stumbling blocks could be overcome. They also looked at how the WTO’s functions which had proven to work well could continue if the Doha Round failed. Sutherland, who attended while chairman of Goldman Sachs International, spoke on “Generating Political Support and Leadership.” In an interview with Salzburg Global at the time, Sutherland said, “The key stumbling block is the inadequate global leadership that is being provided. The last time in the Uruguay Round – which was itself a ground-breaking round, not least because it created the WTO – there was a basic, broad consensus, which was real in the leadership of the developed economies and the leading developing economies; they wanted the round concluded. I do not see evidence of any such will this time.” Sutherland said then that new thinking was required on issues like plurilateral agreements within the WTO framework. He added, “We can do a lot of things, I think, to improve the WTO and the way it functions. For an example, we should have annual meetings of ministers; we should raise the political profile also by having every five years a meeting of the heads of government of member states. Leaving the entire discussion at a bureaucratic level in Geneva, which is unnoticed and unremarked in national capitals, is disgraceful.” Sutherland was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1946. He studied at University College Dublin and the Honorable Society of the King’s Inn before practicing as a lawyer at the Irish Bar. In 1981, he was appointed as Ireland’s youngest attorney general. He was reappointed to the same role again between December 1982 and December 1984. After being nominated as Ireland’s EU commissioner in 1985, Sutherland took on responsibility for the competition portfolio at a time when the EU’s single market was coming to fruition. He was the first commissioner to receive the Gold Medal of the European Parliament. In 1995, Sutherland became the first director general of the World Trade Organization, having previously served as director general of its predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) since 1993. While at GATT, Sutherland received plaudits for his handling of the Uruguay round of world trade talks, which led to more than 100 countries reaching an agreement on rules that governed trade in areas concerning agriculture, textiles, services, and intellectual property, and the creation of the WTO. Sutherland stepped down from the WTO in the same year of its creation and became chairman of Goldman Sachs International, a position he would hold until 2015. He also chaired BP between 1997 and 2009. Toward the end of his life, Sutherland served as the UN’s representative for international migration. Between 2006 and 2017, he helped lead initiatives to encourage cooperation on issues such as protecting migrants affected by crises and ensure migration was taken into account in the follow-up to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Speaking after Sutherland’s death, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker paid tribute to his life and career. In a statement, he said, “In every sense of the word Peter Sutherland was a true European. He believed strongly in the work of the European Union and other international organizations and their importance for cooperation and international dialogue. He … was instrumental in shaping our internal market in the early days and competition policy as we know it today.” Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister) Leo Varadkar said, "Peter Sutherland was a statesman in every sense of the word; an Irishman, a committed European and a proud internationalist. He played a very important role in Irish public life throughout the 1980s, first as Attorney General and then as EU commissioner. Among his achievements was the creation of the Erasmus exchange program which allows European students to study in other EU countries and which celebrated its 30th anniversary last year.” Sutherland leaves his wife Maruja and three children.
READ MORE...
Young Cultural Innovators Hub Project Explores How Art Can Be Used to Help Build Healthy Communities
Young Cultural Innovators Hub Project Explores How Art Can Be Used to Help Build Healthy Communities
Oscar Tollast 
A YCI Hub project designed to highlight the importance of healthy, active living through art has reached more than 350 people. The Challenge Detroit YCI Art and Community Health Project led to four different art installations being created and showcased in various parts of Detroit. The project was co-designed and led by Shelley Danner, program director of Challenge Detroit. Danner attended the third meeting of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators in 2016 and is a member of the Detroit YCI Hub. Danner looked at the intersection of art and health, collaborating with Dr. Asha Shajahan from Beaumont Family Medicine, Challenge Detroit Fellows, and other community partners. Challenge Detroit’s mission is “to challenge leaders to learn by doing through a year of meaningful employment and intellectual work with area nonprofits designed to positively impact” a “diverse” and “culturally vibrant” Detroit. It invites 30 of tomorrow’s leaders to live, work, play, give, and lead. The art installations, built by four teams of Challenge Detroit Fellows, included “Let’s Play,” “Elevated Cardio,” “Step into Something,” and “Limitless.” These four pieces of art were showcased at Central City Integrated Health and its Clubhouse, as well as the Butzel Recreation Center and Chandler Park. While on display at the Central City Clubhouse, “Elevated Cardio” allowed members with disabilities to use a set of decorated stairs as part of their physical therapy program. “Step into Something New” highlighted the physical activities that can be undertaken every day, from jumping to dancing. Silhouetted motions on 4 by 8 foot banners, paired with oversized shoes and motivational phrases were created for this installation. “Let’s Play” involved Challenge Detroit Fellows taking photos of themselves in parks based throughout Detroit to show how physical activity can be fun. The Fellows behind this project used refurbished windows from the Architectural Salvage Warehouse in Detroit to frame the photos. “Limitless” saw Challenge Detroit Fellows co-create art using bikes with children from Detroit’s eastside with neighborhood nonprofit Mack Avenue Community Church (MACC) Development. The project featured at the Detroit Institute of Arts’ National Arts and Health Symposium in September and was also included in Detroit’s Open Streets community festival in October.  The design question for the project was: How might we use art as a medium to build healthy communities and create a culture of active living in Detroit? In a report about the project, Danner said, “Through the various presentations and site showcases thus far, we have interacted and raised awareness with over 350 community members and residents, and counting, of the importance of healthy, active living with low-barriers-to-access through these creative art installations.” This project was made possible thanks to YCI project funds provided to Salzburg Global by the Kresge Foundation for follow-on work after last year’s YCI Forum. For more information about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators, please click here.
READ MORE...
Alison Tickell – Salzburg Global is “a very special creature, and I think it needs our thanks”
Alison Tickell – Salzburg Global is “a very special creature, and I think it needs our thanks”
Oscar Tollast 
“I do think Salzburg has been very, very important to my thinking personally,” Alison Tickell says, reflecting on her experiences at Salzburg Global Seminar. “There’s nothing quite like getting out of your comfort zone for a bit… I have hugely appreciated it. I think it’s a very special creature, and I think it needs our thanks.” Tickell, the founder and chief executive officer of Julie’s Bicycle, first attended Salzburg Global Seminar to help examine the arts’ role in advancing sustainability. She was one of 58 change-makers who convened at Schloss Leopoldskron in February 2016 for Beyond Green: The Arts as a Catalyst for Sustainability. Tickell says, “It was an incredibly exciting opportunity to meet with people who had been working in the same field as us but from completely different perspectives. It was a very compelling invitation.” The session concluded with Fellows putting forward proposals for new ways in which the arts could advance sustainability. These ideas ranged from organizing a separate workshop to expand new alliances to producing a “Creative Communication Canvas” tool. “For me, it was very good to see the relationship between culture, climate and social justice very well-exercised,” Tickell says. “We had some great conversations about that, so it widened my perspective very much.” Participants benefited from hearing from others coming at the same set of problems but from different perspectives.” Tickell says, “It was also quite validating to recognize that actually we were doing some pretty unique work and that might be of value to others just as their work might be and has definitely been of value to us.” Julie’s Bicycle was established as a non-profit company in 2007 and set about helping the music industry to reduce its environmental impacts. Julie’s Bicycle has since extended its remit to other art forms and has become a leading organization for bridging sustainability with the arts and culture. In the same year Tickell attended Salzburg Global, she helped launch Julie’s Bicycle’s Creative Climate Leadership Training Program. This program is designed to support and strengthen the emerging cultural movements around climate and the environment. Tickell says, “We’ve run three sessions on it, and it was incredibly useful – Salzburg Global – both for the scale of the ambition, really feeling that there were lots of people out there internationally, but also in terms of format.” Tickell says she was able to take a few lessons from her first experience in Salzburg and focus on the idea of taking people outside of their comfort zone and pose them with leadership questions. She adds, “All of that has been incredibly useful. [The sessions] get better and better every time.” At the beginning of 2017, Tickell had the chance to return to Salzburg Global and help convene her own focus group of change-makers for The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal, which focused on understanding and identifying ways in which artists, cultural workers, and creatives imagine and strengthen the capacities of communities and societies to confront and adapt to the seemingly infinite sources of shock, violence, conflict and disruption. Among those Tickell invited was Nick Nuttall (pictured below), the director of communications and spokesperson at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC). She says, “Although he didn’t attend the whole session, he did attend for enough of it for us to really make the case that climate and the environment needed to have the voice, and the complex and many narratives that culture and the arts provide. His big takeaway promise was to work to promote culture as a key mechanism to communicate climate.” Nuttall delivered on his promise. Alongside Tickell, he helped coordinate a new #Art4Climate series on the UNFCCC’s website. This weekly series provided a spotlight on arts and cultural responses to climate change and global efforts to take action. The series was launched in the run-up to the UN Climate Conference in Bonn in November, 2017. Among others, there have been features on the world’s first sustainable dance floor, art exhibitions, and comic art. Tickell believes it’s just the “tip of the iceberg” and anticipates further collaboration in the future. Tickell says she found both sessions at Salzburg Global really interesting and much more challenging than she initially thought they would be. Commenting on The Art of Resilience: Creativity, Courage and Renewal, she says there was a much broader frame which looked at culture through a wider prism. The session covered topics such as sustainable development, immigration and refugees, post-conflict trauma and reconciliation, indigenous rights, and climate justice. “A lot of my assumptions needed to be prodded and poked and that was one of the great values of Salzburg Global. It’s precisely that. You come away often uncomfortably disturbed and thoughtful, and it takes a while to really process some of that learning and put it into positive practice,” Tickell says. Looking forward, Julie’s Bicycle is doing policy work with the World Cities Culture Forum and C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group. “A lot of that has had a lot to do with Salzburg Global because when I went [and] because I was able to curate a [focus group], they specifically asked me to bring people who could help the policy work. That’s why [the group] that I [convened] was very much focused on that, and we’ve really been able to build that into some super work.” Tickell says Julie’s Bicycle is developing some diagnostic tools for global cities to help bring together climate and cultural policies. She adds, “We’ve written the World Cities Cultural Forum Handbook for City Leaders and will be developing that work in at least six pilot cities [in 2018], so that’s quite exciting.” “We also are publishing this research which is on the seven cultural trends and, again, it’s been hugely informed by [Salzburg Global], which is really identifying what’s going on across the cultural sector globally and how the cultural sector is beginning to drive very positive change. We’ll be publishing that research in early March at an event, but hopefully, that will be the start of another bigger project.”
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Fellow Nigel Osborne presented with the British Composer Award for Inspiration
Salzburg Global Fellow Nigel Osborne presented with the British Composer Award for Inspiration
Tomas De La Rosa 
Salzburg Global Fellow Nigel Osborne MBE has been presented with the British Composer Award for Inspiration in association with the Music Publishers Association. The award is given annually as part of the British Composer Awards, in recognition of those who have provided "innovation in new music and influence and inspirational careers." A London-based composer, Osborne has pioneered methods of using music and the creative arts to support children affected by conflict. His approach was developed during the 1992-1995 Bosnian War, and has since been implemented throughout Eastern Europe, Africa, India, and Syria. He has attended Salzburg Global Seminar on two occasions; in 2014 for Session 532 - Conflict Transformation through Culture: Peace-Building and the Arts, and in 2015 for Session 547 -  The Neuroscience of Art: What are the Sources of Creativity and Innovation? Osborne is currently working with Lebanese non-profit organization SAWA For Development & Aid as a fieldworker assisting with their program for refugees in Lebanon and Syria. Crispin Hunt, Chairman of the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers, and Authors, said: “The composers honored this evening are testament to the UK’s thriving and vibrant new music community. Their creations challenge the status quo, push boundaries, celebrate our rich and diverse history, inspire and innovate at every turn. They demonstrate the positive impact of music on all our lives and it is an honor for BASCA to celebrate their achievements this evening.” On Osborne’s remarkable achievement, Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine, said “This award is so richly deserved. Nigel combines huge creative talent with personal courage and determination to serve the most vulnerable people across the globe. His therapeutic work with music has broken new ground in violent and post-conflict settings. We congratulate Nigel warmly and look forward to continuing to work together on conflict transformation through culture”.  The premiere performance of Osborne's new opera, entitled Naciketa, with text by Ariel Dorfman, is due to take place at London's Queen Elizabeth Hall in the coming year. The work will be supported by Opera Circus, Bournemouth University's Animation and Computer Sciences Departments, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, the Lighthouse Arts Centre Poole, and the Southbank Centre.
READ MORE...
Displaying results 1 to 7 out of 402
<< First < Previous 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28 29-35 36-42 43-49 Next > Last >>