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Dr Stephen Connor - Do you know how to access palliative care when you need it?
As part of the Salzburg Questions Twitter campaign, people were asked, "Do you how to access palliative care when you need it?"
Dr Stephen Connor - Do you know how to access palliative care when you need it?
Stephen Connor 
This article first appeared on the EAPC blog, which will continue to publish more posts on the Salzburg Question series. It refers to the eighth Salzburg Question: Do you know how to access palliative care when you need it? Dr Stephen Connor, Executive Director of the Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance, London England, explores the eighth question in the Salzburg Questions series, that encourages a global discussion about the key issues affecting palliative care. The benefits of palliative care, and particularly early palliative care, for life-limiting illness, have been demonstrated but do most people know how to access palliative care when they need it? The data suggest not. The World Health Organization and WHPCA Global Atlas of Palliative Care at the End of Life reports that while 40 million people need palliative care annually, including 20 million at the end of life, only 14 per cent of that need is being met at the end of life, and less than 10 per cent overall. Less than one per cent of children who need it are receiving palliative care.In only 20 countries is palliative care well integrated into the healthcare system, while 78 per cent of those needing palliative care live in low- and middle-income countries with weak health systems.The theme of this year’s World Hospice and Palliative Care Day is: Universal Health Coverage and Palliative Care: Don’t leave those suffering behind!This draws attention to the fact that palliative care is an essential and needed service and a defining feature of Universal Health Coverage It is impossible to have Universal Health Coverage (UHC) without universal coverage of palliative care.So what exactly does UHC entail? Universal Health Coverage means that: ALL people can use the promotive, preventive, curative, rehabilitative and palliative health services they need, of sufficient quality to be effective, while also ensuring that the use of these services does not expose the user to financial hardship.Food distribution programme by WHPCA partner, the Centre for Palliative Care, in Korail slum, Dhaka, Bangladesh.Central to UHC is a focus on equity: ALL people must be able to access these services. Equally important is the provision that seeking these services must not expose people and families to financial hardship or force them into poverty through paying for expensive treatments, travel to services or through loss of income by the person who is ill or their carers.The sub-themes of World Hospice and Palliative Care Day are: Count, Care and Cost. These speak to the three dimensions that must be taken into account to realise UHC including palliative care: Political and population (count) – Who needs palliative care and who is covered?; Health services (care) – Which services are covered?; and Economics and financial protection (cost) – Who will pay for palliative care as part of UHC and how will they do this?UHC is a target under Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) #3: Good Health and Wellbeing. There is currently great political momentum around the SDGs. It is essential to keep palliative care at the forefront of these discussions so that as UHC is realised, anyone who needs palliative care will know what it is, how it could help, and how they or their loved ones could access it if they need it. Do you know how to access palliative care when you need it? Tweet your answer to #allmylifeQs.
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Urgency, Trust and Complexity - Key Concerns for Public Service
Urgency, Trust and Complexity - Key Concerns for Public Service
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Rapid global transformations place governments under intense pressure to perform to ever-higher expectations at a time of shrinking public budgets. Populations are aging, countries are urbanizing, and technology is transforming the future of work. Many citizens have lost trust in the ability of public officials to cope – let alone to excel – under these changing dynamics and constant media scrutiny. How can governments transform their culture and operations to address such challenges and disruptions? What radical changes lie ahead for the design, delivery and funding of core public services? What is the role of government in helping to change mindsets and prepare citizens for the “new normal”? It was these questions and more that a high-level group of politicians, civil servants, and private sector experts came together in Salzburg to answer at the sixth meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Round Table. The report from this session - In the Spotlight: How Can the Public Sector Excel Under Changing Dynamics? - is now available to read, download and share.  The report addresses three key concerns raised by the participants: Urgency The dramatic pace of change and the growing number of disruptive influences are creating a situation wherein governments need to be prepared for challenges they do not yet understand or even know will exist. Three particular areas of unknowns with which governments are grappling are future-proofing societies for changes to jobs and skills; harnessing advances in technology to deliver public services more effectively; and increasing tax revenues from new forms of economic activity. Trust Levels of trust in government institutions and elected officials have dropped to unprecedented lows, restricting the public sector’s ability to innovate and take risks with new approaches. A shrinking tax base, combined with rising expectations from citizens and the need to balance demands for greater transparency with effective communication techniques are putting on a strain on states’ ability to uphold their end of the social contract. Complexity Finally, the public sector must employ a complex array of responses and strategies to cope with this environment, whether through adapting internal structures, undertaking large-scale efficiency reviews, establishing new external partnerships or experimenting with new policy intervention approaches.  Interviews The report also includes several interview features, offering participants' insights on private sector innovation and risk-taking in the public sector, e-governance in Estonia, peace-building priorities in Colombia, and the need to "humanize" governments. All these interviews and more can also all be read on the session page. Looking ahead The intensive two-day session concluded with an agreement to transform the Round Table into a more formalized Public Sector Strategy Network. The Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court, Salzburg Global Seminar, apolitical, and other partners are now taking the next steps to develop the terms of reference for the Network. You can read more about the plans for this new Network in the report.  Inquiries about how to become a member of this new Public Sector Strategy Network should be directed to Salzburg Global Program Director, Charles E. Ehrlich: cehrlich[at]SalzburgGlobal.org
Read the report online. Download the Report as a PDF. Order a print copy: press[at]SalzburgGlobal.org Salzburg Global Seminar convened the sixth meeting of the Public Sector Strategy Round Table – “In the Spotlight: How Can the Public Sector Excel Under Changing Dynamics?” - in partnership with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court and apolitical, and with the support of Chatham House. More information on the session can be found here.
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Finding good people to do good work for the greater good
Session 581
Finding good people to do good work for the greater good
Louise Hallman 
The corporate sector puts great emphasis on hiring “the best of the best.” With the increasing importance of private philanthropy in the wake of public sector austerity and growing global challenges, how can we attract top talent to the philanthropy sector – one known for its altruism, not huge salaries? The challenge of hiring good people to do good work for the benefit of the greater good is the focus of Session 581 - Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. After a keynote speech, panels and working groups, participants came away with key insights. Identify motivation Etymologically, philanthropy means “love of humankind,” and certainly this seems to be primary motivation for many in the room at Schloss Leopoldskron to have sought (or in some cases, unexpectedly found) careers in the sector. Some have come to the field from elsewhere, having worked in human resources in the corporate or academic sector. Some are drawn to the sector as a whole, others are motivated by specific causes, be that the environment, public health or women’s rights. Understanding motivations for working in our sector can help us be better recruiters. Develop a positive workplace culture Those who share the same motivations and values as their colleagues and the organization as a whole are likely to perform better in their role – a key component in developing a strong workplace culture. Other components of a workplace culture include the organization’s structure, policies and procedures, communications style, technology use, dress code and the physical environment. “A clearly articulated and authentically realized culture will ensure alignment of mission, values, practice and people.” Developing a culture that is both inclusive and diverse can be a challenge, especially in organizations that are multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-location. Get it right though and it can pay dividends – building a positive workplace culture and hiring people who fit into it can help productivity, morale and retention of the best talent. Introduce flexibility One distinct example of work culture that was shared in Salzburg was one of great flexibility: no fixed working hours, no fixed working place, and unlimited annual leave. “Until I worked in a flexible workplace, I never realized how much I would value it. Now I couldn’t imagine working anyway else,” remarked the speaker introducing the idea. This culture “treats employees as adults with lives,” allowing people to work around their lives, in hours that suit them and their families. “We get more out of people who want to give more.” However, this isn’t for everyone, the speaker admitted. Introducing a culture like this without having laid the groundwork by building a high degree of trust between employers and employees would likely fail. Employers need to trust that the work will be done without imposing fixed working hours and employees need to trust that they won’t be so overworked that they will work all the time and never take any annual leave. Assess character, not just skills  “Hire for the characteristics you want, not just the skills,” was one piece of advice. The characteristics desired will be driven in part by the culture and strategy of the organization. In one case study presented in Salzburg, for a Brazilian foundation, which was wanting to expand ambitiously and rapidly, hiring young people who were also ambitious and eager for societal change was key. Why young? “Young people are more open change,” and an organization going through rapid growth will need to change and adapt accordingly. These new people were then included in helping to develop the newly expanded organization’s culture – which, although put them at odds with longer-serving employees, placed the organization on the stronger footing to meet its strategic goals. Attract Millennials Young people (a.k.a. Millennials, born approximately between the nearly 1980s and the early 2000s) are commonly thought of to be seeking purpose, highly values-driven, eager for social change and justice, an embracing of innovation, inclusivity and diversity. This should make them a perfect fit for the philanthropic sector. And they can be – but they can also be demanding.  Talk your talk, walk your walk and embrace diversity Many Fellows in Salzburg remarked that Millennials frequently put pressure on their employers to include them in decision-making, preferring horizontal to hierarchical structures, and for them to “walk their walk,” said one participant. If your organization’s programs espouse values such as diversity, inclusivity and transparency, you must be willing to ensure your organization, work culture and employees also live up to these values. Diversity in the workplace brings diversity of experiences and ideas – hugely important if we’re to meet the world’s challenges. Have courage We live in challenging times – from political polarization and unrest to persistent social inequality and climate change – and philanthropy has an important role to play in helping the world address these challenges. To do that, philanthropy needs to be bold – both in our program delivery and in hiring the people to deliver those programs. Is philanthropy a sector, a field, an industry or a movement? If we’re to be a movement – encouraging collaboration across organizations and interest groups – then we not only need leaders to start the movement, but also brave first followers who can then encourage more followers to help build momentum and drive us forward. The Salzburg Global program Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy is part of Salzburg Global’s longstanding series Optimizing Institutional Philanthropy. It is being held in partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Zeshan Foundation. More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSphil.
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Andrés Thompson - “I think I’ve played a role in advancing philanthropy in Latin America"
Andrés Thompson
Andrés Thompson - “I think I’ve played a role in advancing philanthropy in Latin America"
Mirva Villa 
Activist, thinker, teacher, dispruter, maybe even an influencer – during his career in the philanthropic sector, spanning over four decades, Andrés Thompson has played many roles. Starting at the age of 17 as an activist, Thompson’s lifelong passion on improving the life of people around him has showed him the world of big foundations and grassroots movements. “I think I’ve played a role in advancing philanthropy in Latin America,” Thompson says modestly, and that includes both his professional and personal commitments to the social issues in the area. One of his proudest moments includes encouraging a group of young people to put pressure on their local government in Brazil. Thompson is the keynote speaker for the Salzburg Global Seminar session on Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy, but it’s not his first time in Salzburg. He has shared his expertise as a resource specialist for several other Salzburg Global Seminar sessions, but his own journey with the organization began over twenty years ago as a participant. On the appeal of the sessions, Thompson says: “You don’t have to play a role here. You have to reflect, think and share: that’s the essence. It’s not a conference – it’s a session, a conversation over beers.” Many things might have changed since the first time Thompson came to Schloss Leopoldskron, but the spirit has remained the same: “The heart of Salzburg Seminar is the same one.”  In fact, it was Session 304 - Non-Profit, NGO Sector: Individuals, Organizations, Democratic Societies - in 1993 that gave Thompson a new direction for his work in philanthropy. Previously, he hadn’t considered his work in philanthropy as a “career”. At the Salzburg Seminar (as the organization was then known), he met representatives of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and caught their interest with his new, disruptive ideas.  “The fact that they invited me to join the Kellogg Foundation, to learn about how a big foundation works and have the opportunity to have the money be on this side of the table… and invest that money for things I considered important – it was a great opportunity,” he says. In addition to his work for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Thompson has worked for the non-profit streetfootballworld, and until July 2017 he held the position of the executive coordinator of the Philanthropy Network for Social Justice in Brazil. Thompson continues his lifelong commitment to philanthropy – “love of humankind” – through his commitments to community projects in Latin America. Almost 25 years on since his first “disruptive” appearance at Salzburg Global Seminar, Session 581 will be a chance for Thompson to explore some further new ideas he has for philanthropy. “I would like to provoke people to think outside the box. In particular, what talent management means for the future of philanthropy. It’s not just about the process of hiring, retaining and firing people, but also about the skills that philanthropy needs, and the kind of future that we’re envisioning for philanthropy. “How can you think about talent management in a different way that is not about administrating or managing people, but helping people potentialize what they are?”  The philanthropic sector will need new skills if it wishes to adapt to the modern world, and Thompson hopes that the session will bring about fresh concepts and ideas. “We are all philanthropists and we all have the capacity to give, in many different ways… Love of human kind is what mobilizes people to do philanthropy.” The Salzburg Global program Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy is part of Salzburg Global’s longstanding series Optimizing Institutional Philanthropy. It is being held in partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Zeshan Foundation. More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SGSphil.
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Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Aceel Kibbi 
More than 80 students have come together as part of a three-week program to create a series of interactive exercises to educate others about global populism and extremism.Participants at this year’s Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change – entitled Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism – included students from Argentina, Austria, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Egypt, Finland, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Singapore, Slovakia, Syria, the UK, the United States, and Venezuela. Together they produced projects for an online DIY playbook: reaction.community.The online publication aims to identify how populism and extremism operates and affects people of different ages, backgrounds and ethnicities around the world. Students were organized into groups where they brainstormed, conducted research, and identified case studies related to populism and extremism. The ideas were then transformed into “playable problems.”Some of the themes explored in this year’s publication are children’s rights, climate change, reporting on extremism, the protection of journalists, the power of photo manipulation, the history and future of populism, violence against women, and freedom of information. The projects aim to facilitate dialogue and promote engagement through a product-based approach. They also invite the audience to develop a sense of solidarity and harness the right tools to stand in the face of oppression in all of its forms. Multimedia elements including videos, infographics, music playlists, interactive maps, text-based games, e-zines, comics, and data visualizations make up a number of the projects. Paul Mihailidis, program director of the Salzburg Academy and associate professor at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “The 83 students, 13 faculty and 15 visiting experts came together to create a meaningful civic media intervention that provides creative media solutions for responding to harmful populist rhetoric. Their work emerged out of a commitment to themselves, and each other, to be open, honest, and creative, and open to new ideas. Only then can they create creative media that is by them, for their peers, and focused on social impact at local and global levels.”Students’ ideas were inspired by conversations which took place throughout the Academy. Throughout the three weeks, students explored how media are framed by design choices, algorithmic bias, data manipulation, and commoditized content. To expand their international outlook on media and politics, they took part in plenary sessions, workshops, reading groups and hands-on exercises that challenged their creativity and transformed their thoughts into action. Topics covered included critical media making, the intersection of civic imagination and civic media, bridging cultural divides, challenging social gaps, journalism ethics and media literacy. Guest speakers at this year’s Academy included US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy and acclaimed journalist Robin Wright, a contributing writer for The New Yorker.This year’s students, who hailed from five different continents, put their differences aside to discuss one of the world’s most pressing problems. Not only did the Salzburg Academy serve as a safe space for healthy debate and dialogue, it also acted as a “brave space” – where participants reaped the benefits of challenging their perspectives and beliefs.In among the discussions and work, students were taken on cultural and poignant trips into the Alps and to the Mauthausen Memorial Site. Students also took part in a “Seeing Media” image contest, which provided a mosaic of visual art which shows how the Academy visualized global issues today.Connor Bean from Bournemouth University, UK, said: “Seeing how people from different parts of the world can come together and allow their perceptions to collide rather than clash has been the highlight of my time at the Salzburg Academy. The motivation and drive in certain people inspired me to make a change in my community and allowed me to have a whole new view on the world.”Rachel Hanebutt, a graduate student at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “Making connections on multiple continents, I left the Salzburg Academy feeling re-energized and ready to use my media and communication skills to make positive change in not only my community, but in the world. Before Salzburg, I didn’t realize how truly powerful media can be in shaping societies and changing perspectives; whether it is populism or climate change, I now know that I want to be a part in creating more just and equitable political systems, through media. More than anything, this Academy allowed me the time and space to focus in on what is truly important to me, which inadvertently helped me to more deeply understand I want to accomplish in the short term, as well as in my long term goals.”The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change was launched by the international non-profit organization, Salzburg Global Seminar in 2007 in partnership with leading universities on five continents. Over its 11 years, more than 700 alumni have taken part in the three-week program at its home, the palace Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria. The Academy has taken a pioneering lead in media education, tackling issues of global concern with a focus on media literacy and civic engagement. Academy alumni have been inspired to become change-makers and leaders, taking pro-active positions in education, media, technology and politics. Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running multi-year program, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/sac11.
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Seven Insights for Seven Decades
Seven Insights for Seven Decades
Louise Hallman 
Salzburg Global Seminar is enjoying its 70th birthday this summer. Today we boast a Fellowship of more than 30,000 academics, public servants, cultural innovators and social change-makers from 170 countries on six continents and a mission to “challenge current and future leaders to solves issues of global concern.” Launched in the summer of 1947, the then-called Salzburg Seminar in American Civilization brought 97 students and young graduates from 18 countries – many of which had recently been at war with each other – together for six weeks at the palace of Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria with leading academics from Harvard University, to examine America, its culture, politics and history – and heal war-time wounds. Today Salzburg Global Seminar, as we are now known, convenes sessions on topics as diverse as cultural innovation and financial regulation, health care reform and environmental sustainability, LGBT rights and technological disruption, bringing in people from students to senior professionals from all over the world. So how did a six-week summer academy for American and European students turn into a fully-fledged, international institution? We offer seven insights for our seven decades. 1. We had a plan In the summer of 1947, for the second time in just thirty years, Europe was recovering from a devastating war. Economic rebuilding was desperately needed, but three young visionaries believed that intellectual renewal was also vital. Those three Harvard men – Austrian graduate student Clemens Heller and Americans, college senior Richard “Dick” Campbell and young English instructor Scott Elledge – had an audacious plan. In 1947, the US government had announced the European Recovery Program, a.k.a. the Marshall Plan, to rebuild Europe economically. Theirs was a plan to rebuild Europe intellectually – a “Marshall Plan for the Mind.” Originally conceived as a one-off summer program, the founders designed the “Salzburg Seminar in American Civilization” to be an opportunity for a divided Europe “to see who one was, what one believed in, what others believed in and to create a basis for future collaboration.” Those first 97 Fellows (as the organization’s alumni are known) were advanced students who were teaching, had entered public life, or were intending to do so, and selected “on the basis of past scholarly achievement, with no regard to political, religious or racial considerations.” They spent six weeks sleeping, eating and studying together at Schloss Leopoldskron, eventually overcoming their war-time divisions, forming life-long bonds, and returning to their home countries and institutions with new ideas. Today’s Salzburg Global Fellows share that same commitment to serving the common good and bridging geographical, cultural and sectoral divides. 2. We started with one focus The original focus of Salzburg Global Seminar was American studies – but why study this in the heart of Europe? In 1947, Europe was still very much baring the scars of war. America, conversely, was thriving in its post-war industrial boom and taking an increasingly prominent place in the world – politically, economically and culturally – as the former colonial powers of Europe faded. Wanting to bring together bright young minds who had been enemies a mere two years earlier, the founders built on this growing European fascination with America and offered American studies as a neutral topic for the former adversaries to debate and dissect. Fellows examined a vast array of topics through the lens of American studies, including sociology, literature, the arts, politics, labor relations, economics, and law and legal institutions. In these early years, the Seminar’s home of Schloss Leopoldskron boasted the largest American studies library collection in Europe. American studies still features on the annual program of sessions at Salzburg Global Seminar; this year 40 Fellows from more than 25 countries are expected to come to Salzburg for a four-day discussion on Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration. 3. We broadened thematically While originally focused on American studies, in the 1960s the Seminar instead adopted a “common problems” approach. Rather than only examining “the city upon the hill”, Fellows came together “to exchange experiences, to explore differences, to seek out consistent – though rarely identical – solutions for problems that plague and puzzle men on both sides of the Atlantic,” as Salzburg Seminar President Paul Herzog explained in 1966. Long-studied subjects such as literature, politics and education began to lose their American focus. More non-American experts were introduced to the faculty, bringing new perspectives. And innovative sessions such as “The Social Impact of the New Technology” and “Planning and Development of the Urban Community” were held. In the following decades, Fellows and faculty also tackled new topics including international trade, health and health care, civil society and gender issues. Many of these issues continue to be examined by Salzburg Global Fellows in sessions at Schloss Leopoldskron, as well as topics such as human rights, financial regulation, climate change, and regional cooperation. 4. We diversified geographically The early years’ Fellows and faculty almost exclusively came from Western Europe and America respectively, but with Austria seen as a crossroads between Eastern and Western Europe, the Salzburg Seminar provided a natural place to bridge Cold War divides. Before the age of online applications, session recruitment was done largely face-to-face through connections at leading universities, government ministries and embassies. Thanks to funding from large private foundations, in the 1960s the Seminar started to expand geographically with Fellows starting to come from “behind the Iron Curtain”. The 1970s saw the first Fellows come from the Middle East as the organization believed that the region could benefit from the same neutral meeting place as former European enemies had in 1947, and thus launched an extensive outreach program, specifically to Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Jordan, Egypt, Palestine and Israel. By the mid-1980s, Palestinian and Israeli Fellows were attending sessions together. As a Jordanian Fellow wrote in 1979, “If the world recognized the extent of affection and understanding that can be generated by human interaction, it would denounce and abandon forever wars and hatred. The Salzburg Seminar is a forum whereby such a realization can be easily obtained.” Similar outreach efforts were made into Asia and Africa in later decades, recognizing that these regions’ emerging economies could learn from the similar experiences of Eastern European countries, post-Communism. Salzburg Global Seminar’s sessions today include Fellows from every (inhabited) continent, with dedicated scholarships offered to ensure that participation is as diverse as possible. 5. We expanded our business model The Salzburg Seminar in American Studies was incorporated as a non-profit in Massachusetts in 1950. In 1963, because of this non-profit status, the Seminar declined a $10,000 offer from Twentieth Century Fox to use Schloss Leopoldskron as a filming location. Little did they know that the film – The Sound of Music – would go on to win five Oscars and become a global sensation. The German publishing company, Bertelsmann, then-owners of the neighboring Meierhof building, took the offer instead, with set designers building replicas of Schloss Leopoldskron’s famous seahorse statues a little further along the lake. Instead of Hollywood royalties, support from private individuals has long been of central importance to Salzburg Global Seminar, dating from the initial funding contributed by students at Harvard University. Later, private philanthropists and large foundations such as the Ford, McKnight, Mellon and Nippon Foundations also contributed greatly to help bring more Fellows from further afield. Financial support also has come from both the US and Austrian governments, as well as other government ministries and embassies across the world. Many Salzburg Global Seminar multi-year series are run in partnership with leading international institutions, such as the Mayo Clinic, Educational Testing Services, and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Funding for corporate-focused series such as the Forum on Finance in the Changing World comes from sponsorship consortia that include leading financial services companies, law firms, regulators, and consultancies. Philanthropic support from organizations and individuals for Salzburg Global’s sessions is today boosted by the highly successful Hotel Schloss Leopoldskron – home to Salzburg Global’s core programs and major convocations, but also a destination venue and award-winning hotel sought out by individual guests, external clients and wedding parties alike. 6. We went truly global Schloss Leopoldskron has been the home of Salzburg Global Seminar since the beginning. The organization received the keys to the Schloss following a serendipitous meeting between co-founder Clemens Heller and Helene Thimig on the New York subway. Thimig, the widow of the Schloss’s pre-war owner, Max Reinhardt, was so impressed by Heller’s passion she agreed to loan him the palace for the first session in 1947. After years of protracted negotiations, the Schloss was sold by Thimig to the City of Salzburg, which in turn sold it to the Seminar in 1959 for $92,350 (equivalent to $1m in 2017). The Seminar’s property was added to with the purchase of the neighboring Meierhof building in 1973. To reflect its increasingly global role and the interconnectedness of the world’s challenges, the Salzburg Seminar changed its name in 2006 to Salzburg Global Seminar. While the majority of Salzburg Global’s programs continue to be held at its home of Schloss Leopoldskron, today its reach is felt across the world. What happens in Salzburg has always mattered because of the insights and ideas the experience kindles in our Fellows and for what they make happen later on the ground. The going out of the gates of Schloss Leopoldskron is more important than the coming in. Alumni reunions and Fellowship events have long been held by the organization, but now programs such as the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) seek to engage creative change-makers and turbo-charge their vision, talent and energy at the community level. Beyond an annual session held at Schloss Leopoldskron, the YCI Fellows collaborate in their city “hubs,” of which there are now 19 on six continents. This community-based approach, wherein Fellows establish local networks and implement projects at city or regional level, is now being expanded into other Salzburg Global Seminar programs. 7. We continue to create lasting change Famed anthropologist Margaret Mead was a co-chair of the first ever session of Salzburg Global Seminar in 1947. Her glowing review of the first summer’s program helped ensure the organization’s support from Harvard University and secure its future. She later coined the phrase: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” This sentiment was embedded in Salzburg Global Seminar’s ethos from its beginning. Our world now faces a multitude of challenges that both reach globally and impact locally: from climate change and disruptive technological innovations, to democratic disengagement, rising political extremism and financial crises. To effect positive transformation, the world needs responsible, proactive and innovative global leaders, but also “thoughtful, committed citizens” at all levels of public life and private institutions. Today, Salzburg Global Seminar bridges divides between countries as well as among generations, social backgrounds, and sectors. It encourages leaders to accept personal responsibility for finding solutions and opens doors to collaborative thinking and action. In our volatile, interconnected world, what Salzburg Global Seminar offers is more important than ever. Its relevance to global problem-solving and development of tomorrow’s leaders, and its growing base of individual and institutional supporters, ensures its prominence as a place where “thoughtful, committed citizens” can continue to shape a better world. To read more about our 70 years of history and see how we’re celebrating, click here: http://70.salzburgglobal.org 
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Report now online - Global Challenges, Regional Responses: How Can We Avoid Fragmentation in the Financial System?
Report now online - Global Challenges, Regional Responses: How Can We Avoid Fragmentation in the Financial System?
Aceel Kibbi 
The report of the Salzburg Global session Global Challenges, Regional Responses: How Can We Avoid Fragmentation in the Financial System? is now available to read, download and share. The 2017 session of the Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World brought together  57 financial leaders from 19 countries across different sectors and regions to discuss emerging risks to the financial system and potential solutions; to review obstacles to global coordination and cooperation in the light of increasing fragmentation; to assess progress in implementing the regulatory reform agenda against the backdrop of ongoing realignment in the global economy; and to outline priority steps to strengthen the global financial system. The report, written by Silke Finken, Professor at the International School of Management in Munich, Germany, provides an executive summary of the discussions from the intensive two-day program. Also included is a list of all participants in attendance, the opening speech of the Session Co-Chair Ranjit Ajit Singh, Executive Chairman, Securities Commission Malaysia, and the remarks of Jerome Powell, Member of the Board of Governors, US Federal Reserve System.   
Download the report as a PDF The Salzburg Global session Global Challenges, Regional Responses: How Can We Avoid Fragmentation in the Financial System? is part of Salzburg Global’s long-running Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World. More information can be found here: SalzburgGlobal.org/go/580
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