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Salzburg Global Explores How Radical Technology-Driven Changes are Impacting Financial Markets and Economies
Salzburg Global Explores How Radical Technology-Driven Changes are Impacting Financial Markets and Economies
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Salzburg Global Seminar helped cap off the Securities Commission Malaysia’s (SC Malaysia) latest World Capital Markets Symposium with a candid conversation on how technology is changing the financial services industry. The program, which took place immediately after this year’s World Capital Markets Symposium, was convened by Salzburg Global and the SC Malaysia at the Hotel Mandarin Oriental in Kuala Lumpur. Guest speakers included Benjamin Glahn, vice president at Salzburg Global; Masamichi Kono, deputy secretary-general at the OECD; Douglas Flint, former chairman of HSBC and a member of the Salzburg Global Forum on Finance Advisory Committee; Junko Nakagawa, executive vice president, executive managing director and chief risk officer at Nomura Asset Management; and David Wright, chair of EUROFI, a partner at Flint-Global, former secretary general of IOSCO, and a member of the Salzburg Global Forum on Finance Advisory Committee. Around 40 securities regulators, investors, bankers, and market practitioners engaged in the program and were welcomed by Ranjit Ajit Singh, chairman of the SC Malaysia. Following Singh’s remarks, Glahn, Kono, Flint, Nakagawa, and Wright engaged in discussion and debate about the topic of the 2018 Salzburg Global Forum on Finance in a Changing World, The Promise and Perils of Technology: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime, and FinTech. The annual Forum, which is off-the-record, takes place at Schloss Leopoldskron, in Salzburg, Austria each June. Public and private sector thought leaders are invited to take part in the two-day gathering, which focuses on issues critical to the future of financial markets and global economic growth and stability, and aims to stimulate important conversations on major trends unfolding across today’s financial landscape, including their implications and the responses they necessitate. The 2018 Forum will assess how radical technology-driven changes may impact societies, economics and financial markets around the world, what this means for policy, regulation, and practitioners in the short and longer term, and how technology can be utilized positively. Speaking after the discussion, Benjamin Glahn said, “This was a highly engaging panel and debate, and I would like to extend our sincere thanks to the Securities Commission Malaysia and Ranjit Ajit Singh for co-hosting this panel at the conclusion of a very successful World Capital Markets Symposium. I would also like to express our gratitude to each of our panelists who shared their time and expertise following the conclusion of the World Capital Markets Symposium. “Artificial intelligence, big data, cryptocurrencies, fintech, and cybercrime heavily featured in this year’s World Capital Markets symposium, and in the discussion afterward there was an interest to engage in this area further. It’s critical for us to understand the implications and responses to the changes taking place in global financial markets, and everyone agreed that the 2018 Forum on Finance in a Changing World will be a perfect place to continue these discussions in June.”
View full set on Flickr The Salzburg Global Seminar session, The Promise and Perils of Technology: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybercrime, and FinTech, will take place at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria, between June 24 and June 26, 2018. For registration information, please click here.
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Katrina Scotto di Carlo - Serving People and Profit at the Local Level
Katrina Scotto di Carlo - Serving People and Profit at the Local Level
Oscar Tollast 
During the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance – The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit? – participants were asked to consider what attributes make a director “courageous.” Katrina Scotto di Carlo, co-founder of Placemaker, a tech platform for independent businesses, says she finds this question “surprisingly difficult” to answer. Fittingly, Scotto di Carlo considered this question, and others posed to her while sitting in Max Reinhardt’s former office at Schloss Leopoldskron. Reinhardt was a director of a different kind, but one who achieved widespread recognition as a major theater figure of the 20th Century. Scotto di Carlo says the director, in a boardroom sense, also has to help hold many of the pieces together – not of a play, but of a business. “I really think we’re stepping into some uncertain times and some major instability globally. It’s a time when people will have to stand up from all sectors and be courageous,” she says. “I do believe corporations have a really important role to play, and the question is whether they’ll play that role.” Scotto di Carlo, who considered herself somewhat of an outsider at the session, says, “I find that my role in nearly every business meeting is the same here as it is everywhere else, which I didn’t expect. That role is often to be the really weird thinker. I think that the way I come at problems is just really different. As a kid, I would get penalized for it because a lot of teachers thought I was joking. Nowadays, it is seen as helpful, but my mind is somewhat overly creative. In a business setting, it poses interesting questions.” Beyond defining what it means to be “courageous,” participants at the third session of the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance also explored the second half of the session title: “Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet and Profit?” Much of the focus of the three-day discussion was on the multinational/planet level. But for Scotto di Carlo, this question is just as important at the local/community level. Scotto di Carlo played an instrumental role in her local community in Portland, Oregon, USA, as a member of the City of Portland’s Socially Responsible Investments Committee. The efforts by her and others led to Portland City Council divesting from all corporate securities in April 2017. Looking back at why this decision was made, she says: “The city looked at just like the huge commotion that was coming out of this and they said, ‘You know what? This isn’t why we were elected. We were elected to deal with the homeless population. We were elected to deal with the housing situation. We weren’t elected to spend hours and hours and hours on this investment piece, so we’re just going to divest.’” Each year, the council will review the investment policy and decide whether it should be changed. Scotto di Carlo says, “The biggest fear I have is that that’s not the solution to divesting. That means we only have US Treasuries to invest in, which with Trump is like an unknown. The solution would be that we look at a municipal bank like the Bank of North Dakota or something like this... The City of Portland is not putting anywhere near the amount of resources needed to create that solution currently. When April comes, it’s going to be: we killed this vehicle, we didn’t build another one.” Scotto di Carlo believes one of the problems with municipal governments is what they choose to measure as investment. She adds: “To me, a really interesting challenge would be how we measure the overall investment and using investment in the broadest definition possible to understand what it means to invest in community, what municipal government’s role is, and then how that investment compares to Wall Street.” WATCH: Placemaker co-founder Katrina Scotto di Carlo explains the City of Portland Council's decision to divest of all corporate securities The Socially Responsible Investment Committee featured six members representing different domains. Scotto di Carlo was selected to capitalize on her expertise of independent businesses. Placemaker, which was established by Scotto di Carlo and her husband in Michael in 2010, was design to help support independent businesses in Portland. Scotto di Carlo describes it as a “loyalty program to the community, not just an individual business.” Users of the platform can earn and spend points anywhere in their town. Information is stored on their Placemaker card or mobile app. Scotto di Carlo says, “It makes it so that the experience of shopping and eating local is one experience that you share in the community rather than you just going to separate businesses. You feel like you’re going into a solid community where every business is working together.” The platform was launched as an experiment. Di Carlo concedes she didn’t realize how much work it would be, but other communities have since come on board with networks popping up in Victoria, BC, Canada, and Western Massachusetts and Monadnock, NH, USA. Placemaker seeks community partners such as business associations, municipal governments, and economic development people to get networks off the ground. These partners license Placemaker and distribute it to their independent businesses. Scotto di Carlo says, “A customer on average, if they engage at a Placemaker business, will go to nine other businesses on the network. That’s the sort of return we’re seeing on the data.” Studies show that local businesses recirculate a greater share of every dollar in their local economy than national chains. One such study, conducted by Civic Economics in Monadnock showed that independent retailers saw a local recirculation of revenue rate of 62 percent, versus 13 percent by national chains. Commenting on money staying local, Scotto di Carlo says, “That ability for one customer’s experience in an independent business to create community wealth is real, and it’s perhaps one of the most approachable ways that an individual citizen can create community wealth. It’s just shopping, eating local, and providing money for the people that live there – their neighbors.” Scotto di Carlo attended The Salzburg Global program The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?, which is part of the multi-year series, the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance. The session is being supported by Shearman & Sterling LLP, BNY Mellon, UBS, Barclays, CLP Group, Goldman Sachs, and Teledyne Technologies. More information on the session can be found here.
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Report now online Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Report now online Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years
Louise Hallman 
Since 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has challenged current and future leaders to shape a better world. For seventy years, our Fellows have tackled issues of global concern including education, health, environment, economics, governance, peace-building, the rule of law and protection of human rights.  Since 2013, the advancement of LGBT human rights has joined that list of issues as we seek to shape a better world for everyone – including people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Founded five years ago, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was formed to establish a truly global space to reflect upon and advance LGBT human rights discussions around the world.  Today, the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is an international network that connects over 150 Fellows in 70 countries across six continents, spanning multiple sectors, generations, cultures and sexual orientations and gender identities. This new, 200-page publication, Building a Global Community - Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: The First Five Years, chronicles the first five years of the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum: the Fellows’ stories that they’ve shared, the wide-ranging issues we’ve addressed, and the impact the Forum has had on individuals, institutions and ideas advancing LGBT human rights around the world. The report was generously supported by the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth.  “Fundamental human rights concern us all. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum brings together queer and straight, representing gender in many expressions, in short: people with overlapping, changing identities. Whether homo-, bi- or heterosexual, cis-, inter- or transgender, our diverse backgrounds and lives are connected by our shared interest to advance LGBT equality globally.” — Dr. Klaus Mueller, Founder and Chair, Salzburg Global LGBT Forum “Throughout Salzburg Global’s history, the rule of law and protection of human rights have played a central role in our programming and impact – as critical elements for personal dignity and wellbeing, equality and social cohesion, successful economies and effective international relations. With this track record, the decision to create the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum was a natural and logical, yet bold, step.” — Clare Shine, Vice President and Chief Program Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “I am extremely proud of how the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum has advanced human rights... Public understanding and public policy have advanced considerably, but the challenges across the world remain great. The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum is a place where they can be addressed.” — Stephen L. Salyer, President and Chief Executive Officer, Salzburg Global Seminar “For our ministry, it has been very important to support the Salzburg Global LGBT Forum financially… For us, it is important to make visible these different situations as they exist in Europe and in other parts of the world, and this includes discussing the problems too. We learn from the LGBT Forum how discussions in Germany influence other countries, and how their discussions in other countries influence us in Germany.” — Ralf Kleindiek, German State Secretary for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth Download the report as a PDF
* LGBT: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender. We are using this term as it is widely recognized in many parts of the world, but we would not wish it to be read as in any way exclusive of other cultures, groups or terms, either historical or contemporary.
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A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
A Message from Our Vice President and Chief Program Officer
Clare Shine 
As 2018 gets underway, I would like to express my sincere gratitude for your continued engagement with Salzburg Global Seminar. In reflection of a landmark year celebrating Salzburg Global Seminar’s 70th anniversary, I wanted to look back on the journey traveled, new projects and horizons. Our 2017 theme of “Courage” resonated throughout this turbulent year. The 1947 vision of Salzburg Global’s founders – a “Marshall Plan of the Mind” to revive dialogue and heal rifts across Europe - felt fresh as ever. Cracks widened in societies and institutions across the world, compounded by a mix of insecurity, disillusionment, and isolationism. Yet the world should be in a better position than ever to tackle common challenges. There is an open marketplace for ideas, innovation, and invention, and opportunities to engage and collaborate are growing fast. In Salzburg, we are privileged to meet individuals from all walks of life who have the courage to tell truth to power, confront vested interests, express artistic voice and freedom, build coalitions for change, and see through tough choices. In divided societies, people need courage to stay true to their beliefs. Leaders need courage to curb their exercise of power. Together, we need courage to rekindle our collective imagination to rebuild society from the bottom up and the top down.Three strategies guide our own work for this purpose.1. Given Salzburg Global’s roots in conflict transformation, our programs seek to bridge divides: Our American Studies series – a discipline born at Schloss Leopoldskron – focused on Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration, including the roots of economic and racial division;The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change had its highest-ever participation on Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism and published an interactive playbook “Against Populism”;Our Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention series is now applying tools developed in previous years to promote pluralism and tolerance and address issues of radicalization and violent extremism. Pilot projects to test these approaches are under way in five countries (Pakistan, Rwanda, South Africa, Morocco, and Egypt) with the potential to expand to other countries;The Salzburg Global LGBT Forum marked its fifth anniversary with a major report assessing the influence and personal impact of a cross-sector network that now spans more than 70 countries and has inspired new partnerships and cultural initiatives. 2. Salzburg Global Seminar aims to inspire new thinking and action on critical issues to transform systems, connecting local innovators and global resources: Our high-level leadership programs address fundamental components of dynamic and inclusive societies. We now have three annual series - Forum on Finance in a Changing World, Salzburg Global Corporate Governance Forum, and the Public Sector Strategy Network – and have begun a new collaboration with major foundations on Talent Management for Effective Global Philanthropy. We have expanded our work on Health and Health Care Innovation with ambitious initiatives, including the five-year Sciana Health Leaders Network which marks a groundbreaking crossborder partnership with The Health Foundation (UK), Bosch Stiftung (Germany) and Careum Stiftung (Switzerland), and a major partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation aimed at building a shared culture of health.Education for Tomorrow’s World is going global! As an outcome of our 2015 and 2016 work on innovation for social and emotional learning, we are convening meetings over 15 months in Latin America, the Middle East and Gulf, and North America. These will inform a synthesis session in Salzburg in December 2018 to frame lessons learned for decision-makers in the education sector and other key stakeholders. 3. Salzburg Global seeks to expand collaboration by fostering lasting networks and partnerships: The Young Cultural Innovators Forum, created in 2014, now has 18 city/country hubs across the world, and held its first US inter-city meeting in Detroit;We’re expanding alliances in Asia with long-standing and new partners. The Asia We Want: Building Community through Regional Cooperation is laying foundations for a bottom-up innovation network for A Clean and Green Asia. November saw our first-ever program with the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups and the Hong Kong Jockey Club on Leadership for Inclusive Futures in Hong Kong, focused on 30 rising leaders across the public, private and civil society sectors.The Salzburg Statement on The Child in the City: Health Parks and Play (Parks for the Planet Forum) was showcased at the World Congress on Public Health in Australia and will feature in webinars for US city leaders, working with the National League of Cities and the Children in Nature Network. After six years living in Schloss Leopoldskron and meeting the most diverse and talented people imaginable, I often hear myself describe Salzburg Global Seminar as “deeply human.” 2017 brought many reminders of the special bonds forged during our lifetime and the enduring need to advance trust and openness around the key issues facing today’s world.  Thank you again for your commitment and recognition of Salzburg Global’s importance in your professional and personal development. We hope you will consider joining other Fellows who have already made a donation to Salzburg Global this year. Please click here to learn more. With very best wishes from everyone at Salzburg Global Seminar, and we hope to welcome you back to Schloss Leopoldskron in the near future.
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Report now online - The Courageous Director - Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?
Report now online - The Courageous Director - Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?
Salzburg Global Seminar 
Within the last year, Volkswagen and several of its executives and employees have pled guilty to criminal charges stemming from a scheme to cheat environmental standards; Wells Fargo Bank received a $100 million fine for inducing its employees to secretly and illegally open unauthorized accounts; and Google grappled with how to respond to a leaked internal memo regarding diversity in the workforce that the public perceived as demonstrating male chauvinistic bias. All three corporations faced resounding criticism from shareholders, public and press alike.   However, also within the last year, Kenneth Frazier, CEO of multi-billion-dollar pharmaceutical company Merck was hailed by as “courageous”, “brave” and even “heroic” when he resigned from US President Donald J. Trump’s American Manufacturing Council in August 2017 and publicly declared that his reason for doing so was in protest to Trump’s response to the racially driven events in Charlottesville, VA, days before. In today’s world, “courageous directors” have unprecedented opportunities to serve as global influencers. Even as private sector leaders achieve fame by engaging socially and championing brands that claim to improve quality of life, consumers, investors and employees increasingly demand that corporations act in ways beneficial to society. Looking forward, boards of directors will need to remain ahead of rapidly-evolving trends and address deceptively simple questions. What does the company seek to achieve, and where does it see its place in society? Shaping a better world - and corporate sectorSalzburg Global Seminar’s mission is to challenge current and future leaders to shape a better world. Founded in 2015, the Salzburg Global Forum on Corporate Governance seeks to deliver on that mission in the corporate sector. The third session of the Forum, The Courageous Director: Can Corporations Better Serve People, Planet, and Profit?, held October 2017, explored the role of the corporation as a good citizen, while assessing techniques to keep boards of directors alert, active, and effective in meeting their fiduciary duties in the current and future landscapes. It explored how directors might emerge as global thought leaders, to ensure multinational corporations can succeed both in achieving profit and in satisfying conflicting demands of the jurisdictions and societies in which they operate. This new report from Salzburg Global Seminar highlights the significant outcomes from the discussions at the two-day high-level meeting, including breakout groups that analyzed the scandals affecting Volkswagen, Wells Fargo, and Google and offered key recommendations for the three corporations.  The report also includes interviews from many corporate sector leaders, offering insights on what it takes to be a “courageous director”.  As Salzburg Global Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine notes: “Today’s corporations are under ever closer scrutiny. Like the rest of society, their operations and culture will have to change radically as the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’ gathers pace. Attitudes to power, progress and value are already in flux. Against this backdrop, courage in the boardroom will matter more than ever before.” Download the report as a PDF
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Report now online - Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration
Report now online - Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration
Salzburg Global Seminar 
In September 2017, 57 academics, professionals, practitioners, observers, and students of American Studies from 25 countries, convened at Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg, Austria for the session Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration. As this weekend marks the one year anniversary of Donald J. Trump's inauguration as president of the United States on January 20, 2017, it is a timely occasion for the publication of the report from the 15th symposium of the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association (SSASA). Since its founding in 1947, Salzburg Global Seminar has been examining, debating and dissecting America and its culture and institutions. Drawing on the 70 years of cross-border exchange that began at Schloss Leopoldskron in the aftermath of war, the multi-disciplinary four-day program examined what the “American Dream” means in today’s world and assessed progress in the United States toward fulfilling that potential.  Fairness and justice, immigration issues, incarceration practices, demographic changes, implications and challenges of new policies, and the fulfillment of domestic and foreign expectations were all key elements of focus for the session. The ultimate question for scrutiny and discussion was “How does the apparent reality of life and justice in America today reflect on the historic ‘American Dream’ and the ‘Promise of America,’ globally and in the United States since the founding of the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies in 1947?” This report offers summaries of each of the day’s thematic discussions and a list of resources provided by the participants, as well as interviews with some faculty members and speakers: Elaine T. May: Despite being preoccupied with safety, Americans have made themselves less secureLecia Brooks: Dedicated to ending injustice in AmericaLinell Letendre: Justice requires a culture of leadership, professionalism and respectDreamscape: Exploring race and justice in AmericaAsif Efrat: The new US administration has shown less interest in international cooperationNancy Gertner: “Lawyers should effect social change”Chris Lehmann: American justice is still a model for the world – but a flawed model  
Download the report as a PDF To request a print copy, please email press[at]salzburgglobal.org
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Lecia Brooks – Dedicated to Ending Injustice in America
Lecia Brooks speaking at the 15th symposium of the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association
Lecia Brooks – Dedicated to Ending Injustice in America
Oscar Tollast 
The Southern Poverty Law Center, based in Montgomery, Alabama, is committed to fighting hate, teaching tolerance, and seeking justice. Lecia Brooks, the Center’s outreach director, frequently gives presentations around the United States to put this message across to others. As a faculty member of the 15th symposium of the Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association (SSASA), Brooks wanted to put another thought in her audience’s minds. “What I wanted to convey to the participants in the seminar was that these issues that they do such a good job in chronicling for academic purposes, and they spend their time researching, have real-life consequences; that they’re representative of people’s real lives; and that the threat to civil rights and civil liberties that we’re seeing thus far under the Trump administration are affecting people already. I wanted it to be more than an intellectual discourse, but I sought to put a face to some of the story, the pictures we were painting,” she says. A few weeks before the symposium in Salzburg in September 2017, events unfolded in Charlottesville, Virginia that grabbed the world’s attention. Hundreds of white nationalists and supremacists descended on the town for the Unite the Right rally: a far-right rally organized to oppose the removal of a statue of Civil War general, Robert E. Lee. The night before the rally, about 250 people took part in a torchlight procession through the University of Virginia campus, shouting phrases such as “You will not replace us!” and “Blood and soil.” The group clashed with counter-protesters and left following the arrival of police. On the day of the rally, the violence continued. In the early hours of the afternoon, one person was killed and others were injured after a car went into a group of counter-protesters. A helicopter monitoring the clashes also crashed that day, killing the two Virginia State Patrol troopers who were on board. Brooks, who also serves as director of the Civil Rights Memorial Center, chose to share images from the torchlight procession in one of her presentations. She says, “It was just so incredible, and it is just frightening that it happened in the United States and right in the open on a university campus. First and foremost, I wanted to document that it happened, remind people that it happened, and remind people that it could happen in their university as well.” The Southern Poverty Law Center’s Teaching Tolerance project has led to the creation of anti-bias resources such as documentaries, lesson plans, and curricula, which are distributed to educators free-of-charge across the country. Brooks says the Center hopes to educate young people about the threat from the far right and “talk more about our aspirations to create diverse and inclusive communities and to make clear that those diverse communities are for everyone, including white males who are feeling marginalized at this time, [which] makes them particularly vulnerable to messages from white supremacists.” Brooks wanted to attend the 15th SSASA symposium – Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration – to have a conversation about justice, civil rights, and the issues surrounding them with a global community. She says, “I thought it would be really important, and it has been.” On the first morning of the symposium, participants woke up to remarks from US President Donald J. Trump made during a rally in Alabama. He criticized National Football League (NFL) owners for not punishing players who protested, who he accused of disrespecting the American flag. In a series of tweets posted the following day, he said, “If a player wants the privilege of making millions of dollars in the NFL, or other leagues, he or she should not be allowed to disrespect our Great American Flag (or Country) and should stand for the National Anthem. If not, YOU’RE FIRED. Find something else to do!” His remarks are thought to be in reference to the actions of players such as Colin Kaepernick, who first chose to sit during the anthem in August 2016. Kaepernick sat down during the anthem to protest the oppression of people of color in the US and issues with police brutality. Following a conversation with Nate Boyer, a former NFL player and US army veteran, Kaepernick chose to kneel, not sit, during the anthem from that point onward to show more respect for the armed forces. In response to Trump’s remarks, a movement sparked on social media with people tweeting a photo of themselves kneeling using the hashtags #TakeAKnee and #TakeTheKnee. In the NFL games that followed, several teams linked arms while other teams chose to stay in the locker room during the national anthem. More players were also seen to be kneeling. Commenting on the origin of the “Take the Knee” movement, Brooks says, “I think that it is up to us as individuals to talk about what the movement [and] what this protest is about. The narrative, unfortunately, has been switched by the president and other people. They’re trying to frame it as a protest that is disrespecting the United States flag or disrespecting the anthem, and thus the military and [what] all of America stands for when in actuality it’s a protest. “It’s a way of protest that was used during the Civil Rights movement with Dr [Martin Luther] King [Jr.] and others on numerous occasions…. That’s what the Take the Knee protest is about, protesting injustice, in particular, racial injustice. It has nothing to do with the flag.  “People who have participated in the protests are veterans [and] from all walks of people. What people can do is correct the narrative. Be sure to correct people when they mistakenly think it’s about something else. Talk to people about it and decide how they can support anyone – in this case NFL players – in exercising their First Amendment right to protest.” Brooks, who grew up in Oakland, California, first joined the Southern Poverty Law Center in 2004 as director of Mix It Up at Lunch Day, a Teaching Tolerance program which aimed to help break down racial, cultural and social barriers in schools. Before this, she worked for 12 years in several roles for the National Conference for Community and Justice in its Los Angeles office. She says, “I grew up very much aware of the racial oppression of the United States and fortunately found a way to channel that, to help advance equality and equity for African-Americans. That has, over the course of my life, exposed me to the inequities that people suffer because of who they are. So, that’s just really important to me in my life. It’s my life. It’s my work. It’s what I’m dedicated to: trying to end injustice or call out injustice.” Lecia Brooks was a participant of the Salzburg Global program Life and Justice in America: Implications of the New Administration, which is part of Salzburg Global’s multi-year series Salzburg Seminar American Studies Association (SSASA). More information on the session can be found here. You can follow all of the discussions on Twitter by following the hashtag #SSASA.
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