Home » Topics » Faces of Leadership
Faces of Leadership
Kimberly Mann – “It’s key to present information to people in a way that allows them to understand the lessons that are to be learned from this tragedy”
Kimberly Mann – “It’s key to present information to people in a way that allows them to understand the lessons that are to be learned from this tragedy”
Louise Hallman and Tomas De La Rosa 
It happened in Europe over 70 years ago, but teaching about and learning from the Holocaust is still vital across the world today, says Kimberly Mann, Salzburg Global Fellow and chief of the Education Outreach Section in the United Nations’ Department of Public Information. Speaking at the session, Learning from the Past: Sharing Experiences across Borders to Combat Extremism, Mann discussed the importance of Holocaust Education: “I think that when we look at Holocaust Education, we have to focus on two things: education and remembrance. It’s key to present this history to young people in a way that they can understand the lessons that are to be learned from this tragedy,” Mann says. In her role with the UN, Mann devised the strategy and outreach program to be used by all 63 field offices of the UN around the world, which each has a mandate to observe the International Holocaust Remembrance Day on January 27 (the anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp). In 2005, the first year of the outreach program, 10 Holocaust education and remembrance activities were held in 10 countries. By 2017, this had grown to 150 events and activities in 50 countries. “To me [that growth] says a lot,” says Mann. “To me it says that the United Nations has taken this subject very seriously and we have been very determined to encourage Holocaust education in countries around the world, in countries that are at risk and in countries that have had absolutely or very little connection to the Holocaust as it occurred at the time.” In April 2017, UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) published Education about the Holocaust and preventing genocide: A policy guide. As Mann explains, the guide “defines what it is about the Holocaust that is universal; why it’s important for educators around the world to introduce education about the Holocaust in their classrooms; the relationship that it has not only with the preventing of genocide but [also] international law; and the role of the international community has in helping to prevent such tragedies from occurring again.” The document, which was contributed to by 10 Salzburg Global Fellows, makes the link between Holocaust education and global citizenship education and the role that all individuals have to help promote peace and sustainable development. The Holocaust and the United Nations Outreach Programme contributed to the document's guidelines. There are challenges in this approach. Mann attended an earlier session in the Salzburg Global Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention Program where she says there were many intellectual debates: “Do we teach about the Holocaust in order to protect human rights? Or do we look at human rights and then consider the Holocaust? There are some great sensitivities.” Mann believes that “the Holocaust is a very important subject in and of itself.” “You don’t teach about the Holocaust to learn about other genocides; you teach about the Holocaust to understand how the Holocaust came about – the specific history, the impact that it had on the Jewish people, and what that meant to the rest of the world.” “Comparative genocide [studies are] important but you can’t compare the suffering of the victims. There is no hierarchy of suffering,” Mann explains. “But you can look at certain warning signs. You can be more aware and take action to prevent these things from happening by looking at case histories like the Holocaust, and what happened in Rwanda or other countries.” For Mann, Holocaust education has an important role in teaching societies about what happens when there is discrimination, hatred and bigotry, and a lack of respect for minorities and diversity, as well as how communities – local, national and international – respond to such atrocities. She highlights the importance of learning how the Holocaust was perpetrated and by whom: “It wasn’t just the Nazis, it was the German people and their collaborators.” Sharing personal experiences such as The Diary of Anne Frank has great value, says Mann, as they can help to make the atrocities feel more “real”: “It’s so important that we continue to listen to the stories of survivors, that this history has been documented.” At a UN event in New York to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the publication of The Diary of Anne Frank, at which the accounts of Anne Frank and other young victims of genocidal violence were presented to an audience of than 500 13 to 18 year olds, Mann remarks that she was “very inspired by [their] reaction.” “The reaction from the young people was to ask: ‘Why? Why do we see people who are different to us as being less than us? Why do we think that people who are different than us don’t deserve to have same treatment, the same quality of life, the same standards of living and protections under the law as we do? Why?!’ …I really think that what I see [now] versus when I was younger in school is that there is a lot of critical thinking that is happening now.” “There is a lot of work to be done but I think the first step is for young people to analyze the information that is being presented to them and then question the assumptions that they have already made themselves or the so-called ‘truths’ that have been presented to them.”    Ultimately, Holocaust education is not only about learning about and from the past. Mann hopes that programs like as hers will “motivate [young people] to take some sort of positive action to defend human rights.” The session, Learning from the Past: Sharing Experiences across Borders to Combat Extremism is part of the multi-year series Holocaust Education and Genocide Prevention (HEGP) Program, which is held partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and this year is funded by the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Zukunftsfonds der Republik Österreich. Additional support comes from Mr. Ronald Abramson; the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research, and Economy; the Robert Bosch Stiftung; the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation; the HDH Wills 1965 Charitable Trust; the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung; and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. More information can be found on the session here, and you can follow along via the hashtag #SGShol on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram
READ MORE...
“Americans have lost their bedrock of democracy” warns former newspaper executive in Cutler Lecture
Alberto Ibargüen, President, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, delivers the seventh Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law
“Americans have lost their bedrock of democracy” warns former newspaper executive in Cutler Lecture
Sarah Sexton 
Two weeks after Facebook, Google, and Twitter executives testified before US Congress on how Russia used social media to meddle in the 2016 presidential election, Alberto Ibargüen called on the tech titans to acknowledge their role as “publishers” and take responsibility for the authenticity of the content they disseminate.   Speaking on November 14 at the Newseum in Washington, DC, the former newspaper executive and current president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation said, “With the disaggregation of news sources and the rise of technology companies as leading publishers, Americans have lost their bedrock of democracy, which is a shared baseline of facts.”  Ibargüen was joined by Charlie Savage of The New York Times for the Seventh Lloyd N. Cutler Lecture on the Rule of Law: “Trust, Media and Democracy in the Digital Age” (full text). The lecture series was established by Salzburg Global Seminar in 2009 to honor the life and work of Lloyd N. Cutler, former White House Counsel to Presidents Carter and Clinton and long-time Chairman of Salzburg Global’s Board of Directors. Ibargüen is a former publisher of The Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald. During his tenure, The Miami Herald won three Pulitzer Prizes and El Nuevo Herald won Spain’s Ortega y Gasset Prize for excellence in Spanish language journalism. While technology companies never intended to shoulder responsibility for reporting news, Ibargüen said, Pew Research Center found that in 2017 two-thirds of adults in the US get their news from social media. Many of these tech companies shirk classification as media companies and disavow responsibility for authenticity. But Ibargüen warned that misinformation and “fake news” would prove bad for business if the public loses trust in what they read on Facebook and other social media platforms. Ibargüen and Savage discussed several possible solutions for determining the truth of online content, from Facebook’s efforts to curb “fake news” using a network of fact-checking partners to The Trust Project’s work with newsrooms and technology companies to help algorithms differentiate between news content and fakery.   Ibargüen recounted that 10 years earlier, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, approached the Knight Foundation for funds to work on technology that would determine the truth or falsity of online content. “It didn’t work. The technology wasn’t there,” Ibargüen said of those early efforts, “but I think that’s the future.”  Savage said that while technological advancements and artificial intelligence may contribute to the solution, these solutions would raise critical questions around ethics and governance. The public would need to know who programmed the algorithms – and who financed them, Savage said.  Ibargüen and Savage also shared observations about the changing understanding of what free speech and press mean to Americans. A substantial majority of college students believe “free speech” means censoring speech that would cause psychological harm or exclusion of people or groups, Ibargüen said.  “The increased value of inclusion and protection from this sort of harm is intensified by the common use of social media, with its reinforcement of filter bubbles, of like-minded thinkers, and the ability to block anyone with whom you disagree,” Ibargüen said. “And anonymity, hate speech, and bullying all promote the sort of thinking that values protection over exposure.” Ibargüen noted that the present upheaval around communication technology is only the beginning. “We’re very much in the early days of a new world,” Ibargüen said. “After Gutenberg, society adapted to embrace his disruption and thrived as never before.  Here's hoping history repeats itself.”
View full set on Flickr All photos can be republished with the inclusion of the credit: Salzburg Global Seminar/Stephanie Natoli This lecture was delivered under the auspices of the Lloyd N. Cutler Center for the Rule of Law. To learn more about Lloyd N. Cutler and the center, please visit: cutler.salzburgglobal.org Press inquiries can be directed to Thomas Biebl, Director of Marketing & Communications: tbiebl@salzburgglobal.org The full text of the lecture can be read here Download the transcript as a PDF
READ MORE...
Fellows Begin Building a Community for the Asia They Want
Fellows of the inaugural session of the new series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation
Fellows Begin Building a Community for the Asia They Want
Tomas De La Rosa 
The first session of new multi-year series The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation ended in decisive manner with representatives from 14 countries committing themselves to continue working for a greener and more sustainable Asia. Throughout the four days of the session, A Clean and Green Asia, 30 of the region’s rising leaders in environmental development, green technology, and sustainability policy discussed how to ensure a low-carbon and more sustainable future, which would harmonizes with both nature and the fast-growing urban development the region has experienced in the last 20 years. As part of the session’s final plenary discussion, participants shared how the session has provided them with the tools to face some of the challenges they face at work on a daily basis. One participant said the session had allowed them to be more mindful of the variety of ways in which communities are affected by similar environmental issues. Another said they were going back to work with a renewed sense of commitment to engage with more people with differing points of view. Participants also expressed hope that the network established in Salzburg will keep them connected, with a reunion planned in six months in order to share the various practices that have enabled their respective projects and organizations to be successful. Through this, they hope to establish common goals and frameworks that allowed them to remain on the same page. During the session, the participants took part in skills-building workshops focused on working with policy and decision-makers, how to promote regional collaboration, entrepreneurial thinking, and public engagement. Through these workshops, participants were given tools to become effective agents of change in their respective fields and countries. The four workshops addressed different environmental issues that affect local communities across Asia, and how private and public sectors can collaborate to develop country partnerships in the region. Discussion topics included how to achieve low carbon societies, how small-sized climate projects can gain access to proper financing, how communities can play a more impactful role in ensuring waste management is done responsibly, and how regional collaboration is essential to solve the urgent issue of widespread air pollution. Toward the session’s conclusion, and as part of the efforts to incentivize collaboration, many made open invitations for fellow participants to come visit communities in different countries in Asia that are affected by some of the issues discussed in the session. These visits would allow them to have firsthand experience of these issues, as well as gain new a perspective on the various effects these have across the Asia region. Session co-facilitator Niall O’Connor described the four-day session as a first step for the subject and “a platform to establish relationships.” For him, the fact that four days did not allow for enough in-depth discussion was an advantage for the long-term value of the multi-year program as it encourages participants to remain connected in order to foster cooperation in Asia. The Asia We Want: Building Community Through Regional Cooperation I - A Clean and Green Asia is the first session of a new multi-year series held in partnership with the Japan Foundation. 
READ MORE...
Salzburg Global Fellow Bright Simons Awarded 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize
Salzburg Global Fellow Bright Simons Awarded 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize
Tomás De la Rosa 
Salzburg Global Fellow Bright Simons has been named as one of four winners of the 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize. The award, also known as the Jan Eliasson Prize, is given annually by the Tällberg Foundation to outstanding leaders regardless of country and discipline, whose work is applicable at a global scale, innovative, courageous and rooted in universal values. Simons, president of mPedigree Network, is a Ghana-based technology innovator, development activist, and social entrepreneur. He attended Salzburg Global Seminar in 2011 for Session 481 - Health and Healthcare Series III, Innovating for Value in Health Care Delivery: Better Cross-Border Learning, Smarter Adaptation and Adoption. With mPedigree Network, Simons pioneered a system that enables consumers to instantly authenticate the safety of pharmaceuticals at the point of purchase by sending a free text message via their cell phone. Simons thinks of himself as part innovator, part entrepreneur and mPedigree as part IT enterprise, part social activist organization. Following his Salzburg experience and the global connections it afforded, Simons and mPedigree have since expanded their focus from Africa to Asia. The three other winners of the 2017 Tällberg Global Leadership Prize are Instituto Elos co-founder Rodrigo Rubido Alonso, International Refugee Assistance Project co-founder Rebecca Heller, and Fiorenzo Omenetto, who is the Frank C. Doble Professor of Engineering and a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts University. Alan Stoga, chairman of the Tällberg Foundation, said, "These four amazing leaders are global in their reach, tireless in their efforts, innovative in their approaches, and operate in concert with universal values. They prove that great leaders are rising to the challenges of our times. Our goal in honoring them is not only to draw attention to their work, but also to provoke a conversation about the kinds of leaders needed today.” All four winners will take part in a public discussion at Columbia University on November 28 as part of the Foundation’s Global Leaders Forum. They will be honored at the Paley Center for Media on November 29. WATCH: Salzburg Global Fellow Profile - Bright Simons
READ MORE...
Samantha Gilbert - “Organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people - at all levels”
Samantha Gilbert opens the Salzburg Global Seminar session Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Samantha Gilbert - “Organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people - at all levels”
Mirva Villa 
With hundreds of staff in dozens of offices around the world, managing all their staff and ensuring they hire the most enthusiastic, engaged and efficient employees is important to the Ford Foundation. At the conclusion of the recent Salzburg Global Seminar session, Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy, Samantha Gilbert, vice president for talent and human resources at the Ford Foundation, answered questions from Salzburg Global Seminar’s communications intern, Mirva Villa.  Salzburg Global Seminar’s Mirva Villa: What drew you personally to work in philanthropy?  Samantha Gilbert: I started my career fresh out of university as a social worker and over time moved into human resources management and leadership roles, the first ten years or so working in the government and not-for-profit sectors. I then worked for a decade in a global leadership role in a for-profit international knowledge-based business – a professional services arts business – which taught me a great deal and fulfilled my desire to work internationally and in a dynamic environment. Over time I realized that I needed to be doing my work back in a mission-driven environment – that’s where my values come through strongly, as I experienced earlier in my career. I was eager to take all the rich learning I gained from the private sector and contribute my experience and skills in an environment that was aiming to make a positive impact in the world. Philanthropy allowed me to continue to work internationally, fulfilling my interests in diverse cultures and experiences, and matching my deep-rooted values about work that enables the well-being of people. With your work in talent and human resources at the Ford Foundation, you clearly believe in the importance of the staff development. Why do you believe this is so important? I truly believe that organizations are only effective with highly talented and engaged people. At all levels. And I believe all individuals carry unique talents, and when nurtured in the workplace, great outcomes occur. At all levels. Organizational development is all about people development – creating a work environment where people feel inspired to do their best work. This is why I believe human resources functions have a critical role in organizational development – to understand the unique aspects of the organization’s culture, nurture the best of it, and put into place the support, systems, policies and practices that enable employees to give their best. That’s a “win” for the organization and a “win” for employees because they learn, grow and develop a sense of pride, purpose and confidence in the contributions they make. What are the biggest challenges the philanthropy sector faces in acquiring talent?  The world offers a rich diversity of people and abilities and it will take all of them to solve the problems of today’s complex world. Sometimes I think we do not look broadly enough for talented people to work within our organizations. We are often too risk-averse to consider someone from another sector. We are often not strong enough in our onboarding practices to enable diverse talent to effectively acclimate in our world of philanthropy. We are strong on knowledge-mentorship as manager but not as strong on career coach as manager. These are some good skills we could learn from the private sector. What did you hope to gain by attending this session? What will you go back with?  I created this session in many ways over four years ago at a first of its kind forum at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center for learning. This is the second follow-up, but with a larger number of philanthropic organizations joining this time, and with broader co-sponsorship. I hoped that we would have a rich discussion about the landscape of our field of mission-driven work, and what it means for our talent needs and practices. I hoped to build a network of global leaders who think about our work through the lens of people, and therefore share and exchange ideas about how to make our sector stronger and more impactful. I believe we have all walked away with some new insights and understanding, and a commitment and bond with each other, and I can say I have also walked away with some new tangible ideas. How was this session different to the one held in Bellaggio 2013? It was not different in spirit and goals, but this time it was larger in size (an additional ten organizations) and therefore more diverse, which brought an even greater richness and opportunity for learning. It also benefited significantly from the programming and facilitation support from Salzburg Global Seminar. Thanks to Salzburg Global we moved a few notches up in content design and delivery. Other than that….it rained on Lake Como when we were there in 2013, and it rained in Salzburg this week, and both lakes and the rain offered a special quiet for reflection and learning. What were the reasons for the Ford Foundation for joining in partnership with Salzburg Global to create this session? What are the benefits of events like this?  The Ford Foundation’s President, Darren Walker, my boss, believes deeply in continuous learning and the value of collaboration and network building to achieving impact. He leads in a people-focused way and Ford has a long history in supporting institutions, individuals and ideas. Our co-sponsors – Carnegie Corporation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the ZeShan Foundation – share these values. So together we knew that Salzburg Global would be the perfect partner to carry forward this seminar given their similar ideals and rich history of supporting these dialogues and developments. What change do you wish to see in the field of philanthropy?  I hope we will continue to be brave and innovative. Samantha Gilbert was a participant of the session, Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. You can read more about the session on the website: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/581
READ MORE...
Wangsheng Li - “One of the most distinct assets of philanthropic institutions is its people”
Wangsheng Li speaking at the Salzburg Global Seminar session Driving Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy
Wangsheng Li - “One of the most distinct assets of philanthropic institutions is its people”
Mirva Villa 
The constantly evolving world of philanthropy offers exciting opportunities for open-minded workers globally. A rising player in this field is China, where the modern philanthropic movement is still taking shape. As the philanthropic sector develops, talent management becomes increasingly important, emphasizes Wangsheng Li, a participant of the recent Salzburg Global Seminar session Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy. His diverse background, working in charitable organizations in Asia and the US, has given him a unique viewpoint to the developments in the philanthropic sector globally. Li is currently the president of ZeShan Foundation, which supported the latest Salzburg Global session on philanthropy. The advancement of global philanthropy and supporting diverse participation is important to the family foundation. “One of the most distinct assets of philanthropic institutions is its people. Talent management fits well with that line of thinking,” Li says, “Personally, it’s always a very inspiring and a worthwhile effort in terms of learning from your peers and an opportunity to have some time to reflect and think, and hopefully to be inspired – even challenged – in a sense.” Philanthropy in China Philanthropy and charitable giving in China has always existed in one form or another – from tightly-knit communities helping each other in their daily lives to leaders of the past preparing for the tough times by stocking up food supplies, like grain, and medicine. “In classic Chinese literature, you can find how local governments and local philanthropists would prepare themselves a year or longer ahead in anticipation of, say, floods, famine, etc. “Local doctors would be asked to stock up herbal medicine in case of an epidemic or digestive diseases caused by unclear water. That tradition has always been, and not only in China,” Li explains. However, the modern, institutionalized form of philanthropy is still taking its shape.  “Institutionalized philanthropy is a relative new phenomenon in comparison with the US,” Li explains, “Donors want to take their work to the next level, and there is an increasing recognition that institutionalized giving is the future of philanthropy. Institutionalization also means bringing on board professionals, so that gave rise to this kind of professionalization of grant-making. Now where do you get people? It was – and still is – a relatively new phenomenon, so where is your pipeline?” Currently a large portion of the people working in the field of philanthropy in China come from a background of social work training, instead of having experience in public policymaking or public administration. This is the case in many other countries in Asia and Latin America, Li says: “They’re trained as social workers, but they have a pretty sound understanding of the social issues and the community’s needs, and policy issues.” The challenge now facing the Chinese philanthropy sector is how to diversify their workforce, and more importantly, prepare them for their work in this evolving industry. “One [challenge] is how to encourage more young people or professionals of diverse backgrounds to go into the philanthropy field, and two is really looking at how to prepare them to go into this field. So it’s a pipeline issue.” The future of philanthropy So what lies in the future for philanthropy in China? Li expects to see the philanthropic sector move away from the traditional ways, and become more of a hybrid: “Social entrepreneurship has already become a very important part of contemporary philanthropy. The donors are younger, and have become increasingly hands-on. That poses also a challenge, even a conflict of interest.”. He also expects to see charitable giving no longer be perceived as the privilege of the “super rich.” “It also has become part of the social movement, you could say, of the development of civil society. Ordinary citizens can also be donors.” Wangsheng Li was a participant at Session 581 - Driving the Change: Global Talent Management for Effective Philanthropy, which is part of Salzburg Global's multi-year initiative on philanthropy and social investment. Read more about the session here.
READ MORE...
Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Salzburg Academy students develop DIY playbook for building a better world
Aceel Kibbi 
More than 80 students have come together as part of a three-week program to create a series of interactive exercises to educate others about global populism and extremism.Participants at this year’s Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change – entitled Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism – included students from Argentina, Austria, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Egypt, Finland, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Singapore, Slovakia, Syria, the UK, the United States, and Venezuela. Together they produced projects for an online DIY playbook: reaction.community.The online publication aims to identify how populism and extremism operates and affects people of different ages, backgrounds and ethnicities around the world. Students were organized into groups where they brainstormed, conducted research, and identified case studies related to populism and extremism. The ideas were then transformed into “playable problems.”Some of the themes explored in this year’s publication are children’s rights, climate change, reporting on extremism, the protection of journalists, the power of photo manipulation, the history and future of populism, violence against women, and freedom of information. The projects aim to facilitate dialogue and promote engagement through a product-based approach. They also invite the audience to develop a sense of solidarity and harness the right tools to stand in the face of oppression in all of its forms. Multimedia elements including videos, infographics, music playlists, interactive maps, text-based games, e-zines, comics, and data visualizations make up a number of the projects. Paul Mihailidis, program director of the Salzburg Academy and associate professor at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “The 83 students, 13 faculty and 15 visiting experts came together to create a meaningful civic media intervention that provides creative media solutions for responding to harmful populist rhetoric. Their work emerged out of a commitment to themselves, and each other, to be open, honest, and creative, and open to new ideas. Only then can they create creative media that is by them, for their peers, and focused on social impact at local and global levels.”Students’ ideas were inspired by conversations which took place throughout the Academy. Throughout the three weeks, students explored how media are framed by design choices, algorithmic bias, data manipulation, and commoditized content. To expand their international outlook on media and politics, they took part in plenary sessions, workshops, reading groups and hands-on exercises that challenged their creativity and transformed their thoughts into action. Topics covered included critical media making, the intersection of civic imagination and civic media, bridging cultural divides, challenging social gaps, journalism ethics and media literacy. Guest speakers at this year’s Academy included US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy and acclaimed journalist Robin Wright, a contributing writer for The New Yorker.This year’s students, who hailed from five different continents, put their differences aside to discuss one of the world’s most pressing problems. Not only did the Salzburg Academy serve as a safe space for healthy debate and dialogue, it also acted as a “brave space” – where participants reaped the benefits of challenging their perspectives and beliefs.In among the discussions and work, students were taken on cultural and poignant trips into the Alps and to the Mauthausen Memorial Site. Students also took part in a “Seeing Media” image contest, which provided a mosaic of visual art which shows how the Academy visualized global issues today.Connor Bean from Bournemouth University, UK, said: “Seeing how people from different parts of the world can come together and allow their perceptions to collide rather than clash has been the highlight of my time at the Salzburg Academy. The motivation and drive in certain people inspired me to make a change in my community and allowed me to have a whole new view on the world.”Rachel Hanebutt, a graduate student at Emerson College, Boston, USA, said: “Making connections on multiple continents, I left the Salzburg Academy feeling re-energized and ready to use my media and communication skills to make positive change in not only my community, but in the world. Before Salzburg, I didn’t realize how truly powerful media can be in shaping societies and changing perspectives; whether it is populism or climate change, I now know that I want to be a part in creating more just and equitable political systems, through media. More than anything, this Academy allowed me the time and space to focus in on what is truly important to me, which inadvertently helped me to more deeply understand I want to accomplish in the short term, as well as in my long term goals.”The Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change was launched by the international non-profit organization, Salzburg Global Seminar in 2007 in partnership with leading universities on five continents. Over its 11 years, more than 700 alumni have taken part in the three-week program at its home, the palace Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria. The Academy has taken a pioneering lead in media education, tackling issues of global concern with a focus on media literacy and civic engagement. Academy alumni have been inspired to become change-makers and leaders, taking pro-active positions in education, media, technology and politics. Voices Against Extremism: Media Responses to Global Populism is part of Salzburg Global Seminar’s long-running multi-year program, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. More information on the session can be found here: www.SalzburgGlobal.org/go/sac11.
READ MORE...
Displaying results 1 to 7 out of 325
<< First < Previous 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28 29-35 36-42 43-49 Next > Last >>